LESSONS LEARNED IN THE PAST 11 YEARS OF IMPLEMENTING SHAREPOINT (AND COUNTING)

abashedwhimsicalSoftware and s/w Development

Nov 2, 2013 (3 years and 8 months ago)

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LESSONS LEARNED IN THE PAST
11 YEARS OF IMPLEMENTING
SHAREPOINT (AND COUNTING)

Ishai Sagi

Extelligent Design (www.exd.com.au)

WHO AM I?


Director and Solution Architect at Extelligent
Design (
www.exd.com.au
)


SharePoint MVP since 2007


Author of “SharePoint How To” 2007 and 2010
books


Co
-
Manage the Canberra User Group


Speaker: Australia, Singapore, Germany, Canada


Blog:
www.sharepoint
-
tips.com


Twitter: @
ishaisagi


What’s with the hair?


AGENDA


History of SharePoint (2001
-
2010)


What we learned in 2001


What we learned in 2003


What we learned in 2007


What we learned in 2010


Summary of Lessons Learnt


My View : Using SharePoint as an Organic,
Evolution
-
driven Information Management
System
-

Empower Your Users

SHAREPOINT 2001


IT BEGINS


SharePoint Team Services part of
office, not part of portal


Hierarchical Database (like the file
system)


100% dashboard, 0% collaboration


Introduction of Web Parts (renamed
from “nuggets” in outlook dashboard)

SHAREPOINT 2001


SOME ISSUES


No one knows how it should be used


theories abound


Disconnected from other Microsoft
products (no visual studio development,
no connection to CMS or STS) except for
office (WebDav)


Competed with Microsoft Content
Management Server


Not running .NET


SHAREPOINT 2001 STORY


IMPLEMENTING 1ST TIME


Implementing beta


Lesson learnt…

SHAREPOINT 2001 STORY


RECORD
MANAGEMENT


Developed late 2001


Bought by one client


Served to show how fragile the
foundation was


Highlighted issues with what
methodology should be used


use the
portal’s interface, or develop your own
and use the portal as database?

SHAREPOINT 2001 LESSONS LEARNT


People think of time saved to themselves, not to
the company


People are less likely to open their portal than
they are to open their emails.


Tasks management must be email integrated,
with workflows.


Document management system must be robust,

backup and restore must be granular.


Every client wants something different from the

same system


Some projects should not use SharePoint…


SHAREPOINT 2003


BECOMING
WORKABLE


SharePoint Team Services (renamed WSS)
as the basis


Visual Studio development


Web Parts are .NET, but not part of the
.NET framework.


No workflows yet (except 3rd party)


WSS brought a focus shift to team
collaboration


Introduction of user profiles

SHAREPOINT 2003


NOT THERE YET


Limited in big team collaboration
(taxonomies not scaling)


Permissions


lost the ability to deny
access. No document level permission.
Difference in how permissions worked in
SPS and WSS.


SPS have “Areas”


which were not 100%
WSS.


Still competing with CMS

SHAREPOINT 2003 PROJECT STORY


Building a migration application to
migrate 2001 to 2003

SHAREPOINT 2003


LESSONS
LEARNT


Upgrade and migrate are completely
different things


Analysis of how you should use the new
system is more important than analysis of
how your current system works


Installing latest patches onto SharePoint,
.NET and Windows can be critical.


SHAREPOINT 2007


SYNERGY!


One product to rule them all
-

everything
is standardized on WSS, replaces CMS.


Better taxonomy management (content
types and site columns)


Introduction of Business data catalogue


Introduction of Page Layouts and Master
Pages


Workflow development as part of the
Windows Workflow Foundation

SHAREPOINT 2007 EVEN BETTER


Support the .NET Web Parts


Federated Search (as part of a service
pack)


Item level security comes back


SharePoint Designer replaces
FrontPage and adds power user
workflow designer, editing content in a
client application.

SHAREPOINT 2007 PROJECT STORY


Building intranets for two government agencies


Analysing existing applications to be migrated
reveals interesting results


Training end users, developers and Infrastructure
experts at the beginning of project


Corporate Directory is the #1 requirement of any
intranet


Expectations of performance from the platform
sometimes exceed infrastructure capabilities


Used 3rd party applications to migrate, and to
enhance

SHAREPOINT 2007 LESSONS LEARNT


Implement disaster recovery strategy
before going live


You cannot have enough training


Geo location aware platform is missing


Active Directory needs cleaning, and
maintenance for a proper Corporate
Directory


SHAREPOINT 2010


“ENTERPRISE
-
Y”


Adds enterprise level taxonomy


Adds better integration with external
databases (as long as they are simple)


Adds better search (built in, and the
optional
FaST
)


Adds standard development tools
(Visual Studio 2010)

SHAREPOINT 2010 PROJECT STORY


Implementing SharePoint 2010 as an extranet for
a school


Training too late = requirements change too late


Agreement on project flexibility at beginning
assures success at the end


Using 3rd party applications to augment the out of
the box functionality


List project tasks into three categories:


Must


Should


Would

SHAREPOINT 2010 LESSONS LEARNT


SharePoint projects plays nice with
Agile


Start small, grow only as fast as you
can


Making life easier on end users is more
important than anything

SUMMARY OF LESSONS LEARNT


Implement backup and disaster recovery right after
installing


The importance of pre
-
training When implementing
SharePoint for the first time


Migrate, don’t Upgrade


Start with small objectives, plan for scalability and progress


Building Solutions In SharePoint or Purchasing 3rd party
Solutions


Use email integration as best you can (Colligo &
OnePlaceMail)


End users should always come first


train them and provide
them with easy tools and interfaces to ensure project
success



USING SHAREPOINT AS AN
“EVOLUTIONARY COLLABORATION
SYSTEM”


The legacy of Access
Databases


SharePoint Lists to the rescue


Survival of the fittest
application




See
http://www.informit.com/articles/article.a
spx?p=1355235


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