PR-04.16 Establishment of the M.S. in Biotechnology - University of ...

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Request for a New Unit of Instruction



BACKGROUND


1. Name of Institution:

University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford


2. Title of Proposed Program:

M.S. in Biotechnology

3. Contact Person:


Dr. Charles Evans

3.1 Telephone:

(217) 333
-
3079

3.
2 E
-
mail:

cevans4@uillinois.edu

3.3 Fax:

(217) 244
-
5763


4. Level of Proposed Unit:

Master’s


5. CIP Code:


6. Proposed Date for Enrollment of First Class:

Fall 2004


7. Location Offered:

On
-
Campus at the Univ. of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford



INTRODUCTION

Biotechnology, in its most basic sense, is the use of biological processes and technology to
solve problems or make useful products. This is not a new concept. People have been
breeding plants and animals for food and clothing for thousands o
f years. However, over the
past 40 years our knowledge of biology has allowed us to start using the building blocks of
life,
cells
, to solve problems and make products. Thus, the Biotechnology Industry
Organization (www.bio.org) currently defines biotechno
logy as “
the use of cellular and
molecular processes to solve problems or make products.”

The solutions and products
produced by the biotechnology industry find many different applications, ranging from
healthcare to consumer products to industrial applic
ations.

The biotechnology industry has shown consistent growth throughout the last decade.
Biotechnology company revenues increased from $8.1 billion in 1992 to over $28 billion in
2001 (Ernst & Young, LLP). According to the most recent biotechnology indus
try report by
Ernst & Young, “The best days of the industry are ahead, not behind” and “…the biotech
sector’s fundamentals are solid.” Thus, the biotechnology industry is expected to continue
growing in 2004 and beyond. The biotechnology industry employed
more that 191,000
people in 2001, which is more than all the people employed by the toy and sporting goods
industries. In Illinois alone, market research by Dunn & Bradstreet reports over 500
companies in biotechnology
-
related fields, employing over 20,000

people.





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2

Despite the size and projected continued growth of the biotechnology industry, there are
currently very few educational institutions offering advanced degrees in biotechnology in
Illinois. Roosevelt University in Chicago offers a Master’s in Biot
echnology & Chemical
Science. The emphasis of their program is on organic and physical chemistry. Northwestern
University offers an M.B.A. in Biotechnology in their Kellogg School of Management.
However, that program does not train students to work as scie
ntists in the industry. There is
therefore an unmet need for well
-
trained scientists to work in the expanding biotechnology
industry.

The University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford (UICOM
-
R) is well
-
qualified to
serve the educational and traini
ng needs of the biotechnology industry in the local and
regional area (i.e., from Chicago to Madison, Wisconsin). UICOM
-
R currently offers MS
programs in Nursing, Public Health and Social Work. In addition, the Department of
Biomedical Sciences has scienti
sts actively involved in research, representing a broad
spectrum of fields of expertise. Teaching laboratories and laboratory equipment are available
for this program, and this department has close ties with Pierce Biotechnology, Inc.

One particular stren
gth of the proposed program is the connection to the College of
Medicine. This connection will be leveraged in order to offer a specialization in Medical
Biotechnology

focusing on the medical and clinical applications of biotechnology. This
emphasis is pa
rticularly attractive to biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies involved
in producing healthcare
-
related products. The specialization in Medical Biotechnology makes
this program unique in the Midwest.

There is considerable local and regional support fo
r this program. A survey of over 200 local
college and university science students revealed that 65% of the students would be interested
in such a program offered at UICOM
-
R. In addition, biotechnology companies in the area are
enthusiastic about this Mast
er’s program, and are willing to lend their support to the program
(see letters of support in the Appendix). Finally, a recent report conducted by the Rockford
Area Council of 100 concluded that “The Rockford area contains many of the essential
elements fo
r innovation [in biotechnology]” and that there is a need for action. One important
component of the analysis by the Council of 100 was the proposed UICOM
-
R Biotechnology
Master’s program.



MISSION, OBJECTIVES
AND PRIORITIES

8. Mission

8.1 Specific Objec
tives and Measurable Contributions to the University’s Mission

The objectives of the proposed program are as follows.



To educate and train individuals for mid
-
level to high
-
level jobs in the biotechnology
industry.



To provide the regional biotechnology ind
ustry with highly skilled professionals to
serve as research scientists and administrators.





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3



To develop a state
-
of
-
the
-
art curriculum focused on the scientific techniques and
disciplines used by the biotechnology industry.



To provide students with the oppor
tunity to specialize in medical and clinical aspects
of biotechnology.



To stimulate educational and research partnerships between the University of Illinois
and local biotechnology companies.



To benefit the Rockford community by helping to stimulate the gr
owth of the local
biotechnology industry.


The specific contributions that this program will make to the university’s goals,
objectives and priorities are as follows.



Serving a distinct student population

The MS in Biotechnology program is designed to me
et the needs of a specific
population of students; working professionals with a bachelors degree in a science
-
related field. The program is designed with a part
-
time curriculum, with classes
meeting in the evenings or on weekends. This makes the program id
eally suited for
students already employed full time. One targeted population are current employees
of biotech companies who would like to obtain the MS degree to help them advance
in their careers. The program is also well
-
suited for students who are empl
oyed in any
field but who would like to move into the biotechnology field, allowing them to
continue working in their current field while learning the field of biotechnology.



Occupational and student demand for the program

As mentioned in the introduction,

the field of biotechnology has shown rapid growth
over the past ten years, and is expected to continue growing in 2004 and beyond.
Biotechnology company representatives have expressed their enthusiasm for this
proposed MS program and have indicated that i
t will fill a need they have for well
-
trained scientists (see letters of support in the Appendix). In addition, there is
considerable student interest in this program, as determined by a recent survey
conducted by our department. In order to increase stude
nt demand for the program we
will produce printed materials (brochures, fliers, etc.) that will be mailed to regional
colleges and universities, and to biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies. We
will also develop a web site that will contain the same i
nformation, plus additional
resources of interest to students.



Collaboration with other programs at the institution

This program collaborates with other programs at this site in two ways. The first is
the tie to the College of Medicine which enables us to
offer the specialization in
Medical Biotechnology. Thus, several of the clinical faculty will participate in
teaching the biotechnology students. In addition, students will be exposed to some of
the clinical trials being conducted in the College of Medicin
e. The second form of




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4

collaboration is through the Biostatistics 1 course, which is a part of the Public Health
Master’s program here at the college.



Meeting the needs of business, employers, or society

The program’s curriculum has been designed to meet th
e needs of the local and
regional biotechnology industry. This was accomplished through meetings with
scientists at both large and small biotechnology companies in the region (e.g., Pierce
Biotechnology, Inc., Genencor International, Inc., and Baxter Healt
hcare Corp.). As a
result of these meetings, substantive improvements were made to the program’s
curriculum. The scientists that were consulted are very supportive of the program (see
letters of support in the Appendix), and three of them now serve on the
MS in
Biotechnology Advisory Board (discussed later in the application, on page
17
).

In addition, the program was designed with working professionals in mind so that
they can continue to be productive at their jobs while earning
their MS degree. These
efforts have resulted in a program that provides both flexibility and the rare
opportunity to be trained in medical biotechnology.



Increasing the number of graduates in a high demand field of study

As the biotechnology industry grows

in 2004 and beyond, there will be an increasing
need for scientists trained to work in biotechnology. In particular, the students in this
program have the option of specializing in Medical Biotechnology, in which they
learn about the clinical and medical
aspects of biotechnology. This type of training
equips the scientist to better meet the challenges and opportunities in the rapidly
growing area of biotechnology pharmaceutical products, which are going into clinical
trials in ever increasing numbers (see
letter of support by Dr. Thomas Sutliff, in the
Appendix).

8.2 How the Program will Meet Regional and State Needs

The proposed MS program in biotechnology will help address important regional and
statewide goals and priorities. Specifically, this program w
ill help meet two goals of
The
Illinois Commitment
. This program will help meet the first goal, namely, that “Higher
education will help Illinois business and industry sustain strong economic growth.” This
program has been designed specifically to meet the

needs of both students and industry,
thereby fostering the growth of the biotech industry in Illinois. This type of program can
also be used as an incentive to attract more biotechnology companies to Illinois.
Moreover, the program can help draw the atten
tion of the biotechnology industry to
Illinois, thereby enhancing national awareness of our presence in the field.

This program will also help meet the fourth goal of the
Illinois Commitment
, which is
“Illinois will increase the number and diversity of ci
tizens completing training and
education programs”. This program provides an opportunity for people in Rockford who
are already in the biotechnology industry to complete a graduate degree, thereby
enhancing their ability to advance in the work place. Moreo
ver, this program can enable
workers from slow
-
growth industries (such as manufacturing) to re
-
train and enter into
the biotechnology industry.





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5

8.3 Similar Programs in the State

There are currently three other Master of Science in Biotechnology programs in

the state
of Illinois. Northwestern University in Chicago offers an M.B.A. degree specializing in
biotechnology in their Kellogg School of Management. This program focuses on the
business and management aspects of the biotechnology industry and does not t
rain
students to be scientists. Our program does not compete with the Northwestern program,
and should therefore have no direct impact on it.

Roosevelt University in Chicago and Schaumburg offers an MS in ‘Biotechnology &
Chemical Science’ that has a stro
ng emphasis on chemistry. The Roosevelt program does
not offer courses related to medical biotechnology, and does not provide industry
internships for their students. The Roosevelt program and our program are therefore
complementary because each focuses on

different aspects of biotechnology. We
anticipate that there will be some impact of our program on the Roosevelt program. In
particular, students that have an interest in medical biotechnology or who would like to
gain valuable industry experience during
their training are more likely to choose our
program over the Roosevelt program. However, those with a strong interest in chemistry
will be more likely to choose the Roosevelt program.

Illinois State University in Normal, IL offers an MS in Biotechnology.
Their program
focuses on basic biology and has no courses related to medical biotechnology. In
addition, their program does not provide industry internships for students. Because
Illinois State University is approximately 120 miles away from our campus (an
d 130
miles from Chicago), we do not anticipate that our program will have a significant impact
on the Illinois State University program.

The program being proposed here fills a unique need in the field

that of training
scientists that have expertise in b
oth the science of biotechnology and the medical and
clinical aspects of biotechnology. This training in medical biotechnology cannot be
obtained from any other master’s program in the state of Illinois.

8.4 Estimated Future Employment Opportunities for Gr
aduates

The biotechnology industry has been one of the fastest growing sectors of the U.S.
economy. Despite recent downturns throughout the economy, current forecasts project a
yearly

growth rate of approximately 11% in biotechnology product sales (see tab
le on the
next page). This will likely lead to robust growth in the biotechnology job market over
the next decade.

The Illinois Department of Employment Security has made projections of job growth for
2000

2010 (data can be found at http://lmi.ides.state.i
l.us/projections/employproj.htm).
They do not list biotechnology as a separate industry, but they do list projected job
growth for specific occupations, such as biological scientists. The number of jobs for
biological scientists is expected to grow by 25.8
% in Illinois between 2000

2010. That
corresponds to an average of 97 new jobs per year. The number of jobs for
all

life
scientists is expected to grow by 16% from 2000

2010. That corresponds to an average
of 230 new jobs per year in that time frame. Thus,

the need for well
-
trained scientists will
grow over the next 7

10 years and beyond. The proposed MS in Biotechnology program
is designed to make the students highly competitive in this growing job market (see




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6

letters of support in the Appendix). Thus, gra
duates from this program are expected to
have a high success rate at securing employment.


U.S. Biotechnology Product Sales Forecast

(millions of dollars)


Base Year

Forcast Years

‘03

‘13

Key Sectors

2003

2008

2013

Growth (%)

Human Therapeutics

17,000

30
,000

50,000

11

Human Diagnostics

3,130

4,600

6,100

7

Agriculture

1,600

3,200

5,900

14

Specialties

845

1,600

2,900

13

Non
-
Medical Diag.

425

700

1,100

10

Total

23,000

40,000

66,000

11

Source: Consulting Resources Corporation, Lexington, MA.

9. Program
Description

9.1 Narrative description of Program

The Master of Science Program in Biotechnology trains students in the major techniques
and disciplines in biotechnology, including: recombinant DNA and genomics, protein
production and proteomics, federal re
gulatory issues, biological systems and physiology.
In addition, students will receive hands
-
on experience with many of the laboratory
techniques used in the biotechnology industry. One unique aspect of this program is the
ability to specialize in
Medical
Biotechnology
, where students are trained in the clinical
aspects and considerations of biotechnology. The majority of the classes will be offered
in the evenings or weekends, thereby allowing students to earn their MS degree while
still working full or pa
rt time.


Program Admission Requirements

Applicants to the Biotechnology Master’s Program must meet the following admissions
requirements:

Baccalaureate Field:
A baccalaureate or its equivalent in a science
-
related field from an
accredited college or unive
rsity.

Transcripts and Grade Point Average:

Transcripts are required from all institutions
where the applicant earned the last 60 semester (90 quarter) hours of credit toward the
baccalaureate degree, and from all institutions where postbaccalaureate work

has
been done. At least 3.00 grade point average (A=4.00) for the final 60 semester (90
quarter) hours of undergraduate study. The cumulative grade point average of all
postbaccalaureate work will also be taken into consideration.





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7

Tests Required:

Applica
nts must take the GRE and earn a score of 1000 (combined
verbal and quantitative). Exceptions to the GRE requirement are made on a case
-
by
-
case basis. Applicants whose native language is not English must take the Test of
English as a Foreign Language (TOEF
L), and earn a minimum score of 550 (paper
-
based) or 213 (computer
-
based).

Other Documents:

Applicants must submit three letters of reference and a statement of
career goals.


Graduation Requirements

A total of 32 credit hours (including course work, inte
rnship and thesis credits) are
required to earn the Master of Science degree in Biotechnology. At least 9 credit hours
must be at the 500
-
level, excluding thesis work, BioT 598.


Curriculum Design

Students will consult with the graduate advisory committee

to decide on the sequence of
courses that best suits their background and career interests.


Core Courses.
These courses must be taken by all students.

a.

BioT 500. DNA & Proteins (3 credit hours)

b.

BioT 501. Cell Biology & Human Physiology (3 credit hours)

c.

BioT 502. Bioethics (2 credit hours)

d.

BioT 509. Seminar in Biotechnology (3 credit hours)

e.

BioT 510. Product Development: Concepts & Regulatory Issues (1 credit
hour)

f.

BioT 511. Techniques in Biotechnology (3 credit hours)


Elective Courses.
Students ma
y choose from these courses to complete the requirement
of 24 credit hours in course work.

Medical Biotechnology;

Students wishing to specialize in the Medical Biotechnology
track would take electives
g

i

below.

g.

BioT 520. Immunotechnology, Microbiology
and Cellular Therapy (3 credit
hours)

h.

BioT 521. Pharmacology, Toxicology & Clinical Trials (3 credit hours)

i.

Bsst 400. Biostatistics 1 (3 credit hours)

j.

BioT 530. Lab on Biotechnology Assays (1 credit hour)

k.

BioT 531. Biotechnology Engineering (2 credit
hours)





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8

l. BioT 598. Thesis Research work. (8 credit hours).

One semester will be spent
working at an internship in industry or in a laboratory at the College of Medicine at
Rockford. The graduate advisory committee will help the student in choosing an
ap
propriate industry partner or laboratory mentor. A scholarly thesis will be written by
the student on the lab work or internship work they have conducted. The thesis should be
of publication quality.

In order to earn the Master of Science degree in Biotec
hnology, the student must
successfully complete all course work and internship or lab work. In addition, the written
thesis and the oral presentation of the thesis must be approved by the graduate advisory
committee.


Course Descriptions

BioT 500. DNA &
Proteins (3 credit hours)

DNA structure and replication. Regulation of transcription. Translation and post
-
translational modifications. Genome structure. Genome organization. Viruses and
viral replication. Introduction to Bioinformatics and microarrays. P
rimary, secondary,
tertiary and quaternary protein structure. Enzyme mechanisms. Biochemical
pathways, and regulation of biochemical pathways.

BioT 501. Cell Biology & Human Physiology (3 credit hours)

Cellular organization and cell organelles. Lipid mem
branes. The cytoskeleton. Cell
-
extracellular matrix interactions. Growth factors. Cell signaling. Cell cycle control.
Review of major organs and physiological systems. Control of tissue oxygenation,
perfusion, and metabolism. Nutrition. Endocrine functions
. Neurochemistry.
Mechanical properties of muscle. Electrical phenomena in nerves and muscle.
Synaptic transmission. Sensory and motor neurophysiology. Higher brain functions.

BioT 502. Bioethics (2 credit hours)

Covering issues such as the use of human
stem cells and embryonic stem cells, ethical
issues on animal research, conflict of interest and misconduct in research and
business.

BioT 509. Seminar in Biotechnology (3 credit hours total)

Journal club
-
type format. Students present papers on topics di
rectly related to
biotechnology. Students will also gain experience in analyzing, graphing out and
presenting data. Aimed at getting students to learn communication skills, and to
analyze and present research papers and data in an organized and logical man
ner.

BioT 510. Product Development: Concepts & Regulatory Issues (1 credit hour)

Product development life cycles. Product commercialization. Intellectual property,
patenting, new drug applications (NDAs). Regulatory affairs issues, such as GLP
(good lab
oratory practice) and GMP (good manufacturing practice), documentation,
validation, FDA inspections, etc.





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9

BioT 511. Techniques in Biotechnology (3 credit hour)

Laboratory course covering many of the techniques used in the biotech industry
today, includin
g antibody work, cell culture, recombinant DNA, protein production
and engineering, cloning (molecular, cellular, animal).

BioT 520. Immunotechnology, Microbiology and Cell Culture Techniques (3 credit
hours)

Antibody production principles and techniques.

Humanization of antibodies. Clinical
testing and uses of antibodies. Culturing of immortalized and primary cells. Isolation
of cells from tissues. Protein production in mammalian cell systems. Fermentation,
bioremediation, secondary metabolism. Bioterrori
sm control and containment and
eradication strategies.

BioT 521. Pharmacology, Toxicology & Clinical Trials (3 credit hours)

Basic pharmacology; pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, drug
-
receptor
interactions, distribution
-
metabolism
-
excretion. Basic toxi
cology; drug reactions,
antidotes, etc. Drug development cycle (Preclinical work, Phase I, II, III clinical
testing, introduction to market, post market surveillance). Issues in design, conduct
and evaluation of clinical trials. IRB issues. Examples of suc
cesses and failures in
clinical trials. Examples of trials currently on
-
going at the College.

Bsst 400. Biostatistics 1 (3 credit hours)

[Public Health program]

Descriptive statistics, basic probability concepts, one
-

and two
-
sample statistical
inferenc
e, analysis of variance and simple linear regression. Introduction to a
statistical computer package such as Minitab, SAS or SPSS.

BioT 530. Lab on Biotechnology Assays (1 credit hour)

A large segment of the biotech industry is involved in developing and

marketing
assays. This laboratory course will familiarize the student with the principles involved
in assay development. The different methodologies used in commercial assays will be
analyzed, strengths and weaknesses of each method will be discussed. Stu
dent will
gain hands
-
on experience with assays from several different companies.

BioT 531. Biotechnology Engineering (2 credit hours)

Engineering aspects of biotechnology, such as eukaryotic and prokaryotic expression
systems. Large scale cell culture. I
ndustrial scale bioprocessing culminating in the
finished form of the product. Methodologies, types of production equipment, steps
along the process. Process sensing and control. Harvesting, separation and
purification. Sterilization, aseptic processing, f
illing and finishing steps. QA/QC. The
course will include field visits to processing facilities at Biotech companies.

9.2 Student Learning Objectives

The program’s learning objectives are to teach students advanced concepts in the
theoretical constructs i
n biology, and to give them a working knowledge of the major
techniques used in the biotechnology industry. This will be accomplished through lecture




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10

and laboratory courses, and through direct research work in either industry or an
academic laboratory.

The

specific knowledge a student must master is listed below:



Concepts of molecular biology (gene structure, transcription, and translation).



Concepts of biochemistry (protein structure and function and regulation of
biochemical pathways)



Cell biology concep
ts (organelles, cell cycle control, cell communication, etc.)



Basics of human physiology



Analysis, interpretation and presentation of scientific data



Ethical issues in biotechnology



Major R&D techniques used in biotechnology, such as recombinant DNA, antib
ody
technologies, protein expression, etc.



Product development life cycles



Federal regulatory issues affecting the biotechnology industry, such as GLP, GMP,
documentation, etc.


In addition, students taking the Medical Biotechnology specialization must mas
ter the
following knowledge:



Antibody production and use in clinical settings



Pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, drug
-
receptor interactions



Toxicology, drug reactions



Drug development cycle



Design, conduct and evaluation of clinical trials



Basic concepts
in probability, and statistical analysis of biological or clinical trial data


With the knowledge and training described above, graduates from this program can work
as research scientists with jobs having titles such as Biologist II and III, Research
Assoc
iate II and III, Associate Scientist II and III, or Cell Biologist. They can also work
as data analysts in positions such as Biostatistician or Clinical Data Analyst. They can
also work in quality control (e.g., as a Quality Control Associate).

9.3 Strateg
ies to Promote Student Learning

The following strategies will be incorporated into the program in order to encourage
student learning:





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11



Ensuring that students understand the purposes of the program.

New students will participate in an Orientation Session at

the start of each Fall
semester. This orientation session will inform the students about the goals of the
program, will give an overview of the core and elective courses, and will discuss the
option of specializing in Medical Biotechnology. The students w
ill also be told what
is expected of them in terms of grades, participation in departmental seminars, and
participation in Research Day (an annual event at the College of Medicine
--
Rockford
where students and faculty present posters on their research).



Mea
suring student learning and academic performance as students move through the
program.

Student learning and academic performance will be monitored by keeping track of
each student’s grades in the core and elective courses, by annual graduate advisory
commi
ttee reviews with the student, by collecting reports and feedback from
internship mentors, and by assessing the quality of the student’s written thesis and
oral presentation of the thesis.



Communicating evaluation results to students promptly and providing

effective
feedback on performance.

Students will receive course grades at the end of each semester. In addition, the
students will meet annually with the graduate advisory committee to discuss grades
and their overall progress in the program.



Familiarizin
g students with the norms and practices of the discipline or profession.

Students will learn about the norms and practices of the discipline or profession
primarily in two ways
--
in coursework and in the internship. Courses will focus on
real
-
world applica
tions of knowledge to the field of biotechnology. Many of the
lecturers and instructors in the courses will be from the biotechnology industry. Lab
courses will discuss how each of the techniques is used in the industry, along with
giving students hands
-
on

experience in working with the equipment and analyzing
data that is collected during the lab work. Finally, the most instructive aspect of the
program in this regard is likely to be the lab or industry internship, where students
will obtain first
-
hand exp
erience in working in the biotechnology industry, or in an
academic lab conducting experiments.



Promoting faculty/student and student/student contact.

Interactions between the faculty and students and between the students themselves
will be fostered throug
h several mechanisms, including discussions in the courses,
interactions in the Seminar in Biotechnology courses (where each student must
present in front of the class at least once each semester), through participation in
departmental seminars, and throug
h annual student reviews with the graduate
advisory committee. In addition, the students and faculty will participate in the annual
Research Day event highlighting research that is being conducted here at the College
of Medicine.





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12



Fostering active learning.

Students will be encouraged to participate actively in each course, and in the Seminar
in Biotechnology courses they will be required to make presentations in front of the
class, and to respond to presentations made by others. Lab courses are also a good
vehicle for promoting active learning. Active learning will also be fostered through
participation in the lab or industry internship.



Promoting faculty development of teaching.

Faculty will be encouraged to participate in UIC sponsored courses and seminars

on
teaching practices and the instructional uses of technology. In addition, student course
evaluations will encourage faculty to improve their effectiveness as instructors.

RESOURCES

10.






Table I

STUDENT ENROLLMENT PROJECTIONS FOR THE NEW PROGRAM


Bu
dget
Year

2
nd

Year

3
rd

Year

4
th

Year

5
th

Year

Number of Program Majors (Fall
Headcount)

4

15

24

24

24

Annual Full
-
Time Equivalent Majors

2

7.5

12

12

12

Annual Credit Hours in EXISTING
Courses
1


6

24

24

24

Annual Credit Hours in NEW
Courses
1

48

174

264

264

264

Annual Number of Degrees Awarded



4

12

12

1

Include credit hours generated by both majors and non
-
majors in courses offered by the
academic unit directly responsible for the proposed program.






Page
13

11.






Table II

TOTAL RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR T
HE NEW PROGRAM

(in Thousands)


Budget
Year

2
nd

Year

3
rd

Year

4
th

Year

5
th

Year

Total Resource Requirements

132.0

118.0

124.0

135.0

137.0

Resources Available from Federal
Sources
1

-

-

-

-

-

Resources Available from Other
Non
-
State Sources
1

50.0

25.0

-

-

-

Existing State Resources
2

-

93.0

124.0

135.0

137.0

State Resources Available through
Internal Reallocation
3

82.0

-

-

-

-

New State Resources (Line 1 minus
the sum of lines 2 through 5)
4

-

-

-

-

-

1

Numbers can be positive or zero only. These lines re
flect available funds, not
incremental dollars.

2

The amount of existing state resources in a given year is equal to the sum of the
previous year’s existing state resources (line 4) plus resources available through internal
reallocation (line 5) plus any n
ew state resources required (line 6). Existing state
resources allocated to the program in a given year (line 4) may exceed total requirements
needed to support the program in the following year. In this event, existing state
resources should be reduced by

showing a negative dollar amount on line 5 so that the
sum of lines 2 through 6 equals line 1.

3

Numbers can be either positive (allocated to the program) or negative (allocated away
from the program).

4

This number is the level of funding requested for t
he referenced year. Dollars reported
will be incremental.

12 Institutional Resources



Faculty qualifications, evaluation, and reward structure

Faculty members are selected by the highest standards of academic excellence along
with rigorous interviews by exi
sting faculty and department heads. Faculty promotion
will be expedited for those individuals that demonstrate accelerated progress in their
careers and excellence in their academic performance.





Page
14

The faculty members in the Department of Biomedical Sciences
that will be
participating in this program are listed below. In addition, we will recruit adjunct
faculty from industry to help teach some of the courses.

Biomedical Sciences Faculty

Name & Position

Degree

Institution

Area of Expertise

Caldwell, Jack

Assi
stant Professor

Ph.D.

Michigan State
University

Human physiology and endocrinology.
Director of Medical Student
Pharmacology course.

Chen, Aoshuang

Assistant Professor

Ph.D.

Univ. of
Cincinnati

Cell biology, cellular immunology, cell
signaling.

Hentall,
Ian

Associate Professor

Ph.D.

Massachusetts
Institute of
Technology

Human physiology and neurobiology.
Electrical brain signals and drug
actions in relation to analgesia and
anesthesia, and to epilepsy.

Kalyanasundaram,
Ramaswamy

Associate Professor

Ph.D
.

Univ. of
Calgary,
Canada

Microbiology, and molecular aspects of
cellular immune responses.

Morla, Alex

Assistant Professor

Ph.D.

Univ. of
California, San
Diego

Cell biology, cell signaling, vascular
biology. Cell
-
extracellular matrix
interactions.

Redd
y, Venkata

Assistant Professor

Ph.D.

Bangalore
University, India

Chemotherapy and drug development
against mycobacteria.

Yu, Fu
-
Li

Professor, Department
Head

Ph.D.

Univ. of
California, San
Francisco

Mechanisms of chemical and hormonal
carcinogenesis, nucl
eic acid
metabolism, RNA polymerase and
gene regulation in mammalian cells.

Zheng, Guoxing

Research Assistant
Professor

Ph.D.

Univ. of
Cincinnati

Cell biology, cellular immunology, cell
signaling.




Adequacy of library and related resources

MS in Biotechn
ology students have full access to the Crawford Medical Library, a
10,500 sq. ft. facility that houses over 28,000 bound volumes and 25 computers (plus
color printers and scanners).

All students will have access to the Electronic Journals Online, including

full
-
test
access to the biotechnology
-
related journals listed below. Note that although the
Crawford Medical Library does not currently subscribe to the print editions of any of
these journals, the most useful titles (e.g.,

Nature Biotechnology, Trends i
n
Biotechnology, Biotechnology Techniques
) will be purchased once the program starts
(funds for this are included in the projected budget). In addition, many of the journal
articles that will be used in coursework (e.g., in the Biotechnology Seminar cours
e)
will come from general scientific journals, such as
Nature

and
Science
.





Page
15

The biotechnology
-
related journals available online (full text) include the following
titles:



Applied biochemistry and biotechnology



Biotech software & Internet report



Biotechnology

and bioengineering



Biotechnology law report



Biotechnology letters



Biotechnology progress



Biotechnology techniques



Critical reviews in biotechnology



Current opinion in biotechnology



Journal of biotechnology



Molecular biotechnology



Nature biotechnology



Plan
t biotechnology



Reviews in molecular biotechnology



Trends in biotechnology



World journal of microbiology & biotechnology

The Crawford Medical Library houses numerous biotechnology
-
related books,
including the titles listed below. Note that all books that
will be used in courses will
be purchased and will be available to students in the library (the purchase of books is
accounted for in the projected budget).



Brown, Sheldon S.; Rowh, Mark (rev.).
Opportunities in biotechnology careers

(2001)



Chadwick, Ruth

(ed).
Concise encyclopedia of the ethics of new technologies
(2001)



McHughen, Alan.
Pandora’s picnic basket: the potential and hazards of
genetically modified foods

(2000)



Directory of biotechnology companies

(1999)



Raymond, Susan.
Life sciences and he
alth challenges

(1998)



Biodiversity, biotechnology, and sustainable development in health and
agriculture: emerging connections
(1996)



Rosenberg, Nathan, Gelijns, Annetine, Dawkins, Holly (eds.).
Sources in medical
technology: universities and industry.
Committee on Technological Innovations
in Medicine, Institute of Medicine (1995)





Page
16



Bulger, Ruth Ellen, Hetiman, Elizabeth, Reiser, Stanley Joel (eds.).
Ethical
dimensions of the biological sciences
(1993)



Ono, Dana (ed.).
Business of biotechnology: from th
e bench to the street
(1991)


The library and all labs and offices in the building are connected to the internet and
share online library resources with UIC, including access to online journals, scientific
databases, etc. Students also have access to bibli
ographic formatting software,
statistics software, and office software.



Adequacy of student support services, support staff, equipment, and other resources

Student support services, such as orientation, counseling and academic advising, will
be administere
d through this program. Each student will meet with the graduate
advisory committee at the start of the program, and at the start of each year, in order
to assess student progress, and to advise and mentor the student.

Excellent support is provided by the
Department of Biomedical Sciences staff (two
full time support personnel). Teaching equipment (computers, LCD projectors, etc.) is
readily available in the department and at the College of Medicine. A teaching
laboratory is available for the use of this pr
ogram, and the majority of the equipment
needed for the laboratory courses is also currently available.



Demonstration of teaching/scholarship effectiveness and course evaluation

Instructors and courses will be evaluated by standard student evaluation forms

that
have been used in courses at the College of Medicine
--
Rockford. The results of these
evaluations will be analyzed each semester by the program director and feedback will
be given to the instructors to help ensure high quality in the courses of the pr
ogram.

QUALITY ASSURANCE

13 Program/Student Learning Outcomes Assessment

13.1 Program’s Assessment Plan



Statement of program objectives and intended learning outcomes

The objectives of the proposed program are as follows.



To educate and train individuals f
or mid
-
level to high
-
level jobs in the
biotechnology industry.



To provide the regional biotechnology industry with highly skilled professionals
to serve as research scientists and administrators.



To develop a state
-
of
-
the
-
art curriculum focused on the scie
ntific techniques and
disciplines used by the biotechnology industry.



To provide students with the opportunity to specialize in medical and clinical
aspects of biotechnology.





Page
17



To stimulate educational and research partnerships between the University of
Illi
nois and local biotechnology companies.



To benefit the Rockford community by helping to stimulate the growth of the
local biotechnology industry.

The program’s intended learning outcomes are to teach students advanced concepts in
the basic theoretical con
structs in biology, and to give them a working knowledge of
the major techniques used in the biotechnology industry. In addition, students will
learn communication skills and gain experience interpreting and presenting scientific
data in front of an audien
ce. Students will also learn about the latest issues in
bioethics and in federal regulations as they relate to the biotechnology industry.
Students in the Medical Biotechnology track will learn about how drugs interact with
the body and the drug developmen
t process, including clinical trials and introduction
of the product to the market. The specific knowledge students must master is listed in
section 9.2 (page
9
).



End
-

or near
-
end
-
of
-
program assessment of student learning; I
nternship and
thesis/project

After completing all coursework, each student must complete a one
-
semester
internship in industry or in a lab at the College of Medicine
-
Rockford. Interns will be
supervised by a mentor at the site, and the mentor will provide
a written evaluation of
the student’s performance in the internship. A thesis will be written that will provide
evidence of the student’s grasp of the theoretical problems and practical solutions
addressed in the student’s internship work.



Feedback from ke
y stakeholders

Graduating students will participate in an exit interview to gain feedback on the
program. In addition, employers will be surveyed after one year and five years to
assess the job success of graduates.



Formal feedback/improvement mechanism

Th
e program will be reviewed annually at a one
-
day meeting of the MS in
Biotechnology Advisory Board. The Board is made up of representatives from the
College of Medicine at Rockford, UIC, and local and regional biotechnology
companies. The members of the Bo
ard are listed below:






Page
18

MS in Biotechnology Advisory Board

Name and Title

Affiliation

Asrar Malik, Ph.D.

Distinguished Professor and Head

UIC Dept. of Pharmacology

Donald Chambers, Ph.D.

Professor and Head

UIC Dept. of Biochemistry & Mol. Biol.

Bernard S
alafsky, Ph.D.

Professor and Regional Dean

UICOM
-
R

Fu
-
Li Yu, Ph.D.

Professor and Head

UICOM
-
R Dept. of Biomedical
Sciences

Peter Bell, Ph.D.

Senior Director, Res. & Dev.

Pierce Biotechnology, Inc.

Thomas Sutliff, Ph.D.

Senior Director, Research
-
Material
s

University Technology Liaison,

Technology Resources

Baxter International Corporation

David Amrani, Ph.D.

Senior Research Director

Exploratory Research, Tech. Resources

Baxter International Corporation


The Advisory Board will evaluate the various meas
ures of performance discussed
below (section 13.2). These evaluations will be analyzed to determine which areas of
the program are operating well and which areas need improvement. The
recommendations of the Advisory Board will be implemented in order to im
prove
curriculum, instruction and learning in the program.

The program will also undergo an IBHE
-
mandated review process every 8 years.

13.2 Measures to be used to Assess and Improve Student Learning, Curriculum, and
Instruction.

The following performance
measures will be used to assess the success of the program.



Student course evaluations



Student exit interviews (asking students to comment on their educational experience,
quality of mentoring, quality of facilities, and suggestions for program
improvement
s).



Percent of graduates employed in the field



Career advancement achieved by program graduates



Graduate and employer satisfaction with the program



Retention and graduation rates and time
-
to
-
degree completion



Percent of graduate students presenting or publ
ishing papers

The results of these measures will be evaluated by the Advisory Board on an annual
basis. These outcomes results, along with results from student learning measures
(previous section) will be analyzed to determine what changes should be implem
ented to
help improve the program.







Appendix


Letters of support from biotechnology industry representatives.


Letters attached:

1.

Peter Bell, Ph.D., Pierce Biotechnology, Inc.

2.

Thomas Sutliff, Ph.D., Baxter Healthcare Corp.

3.

David Miller, iBIO