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TOP 100 TOOLS FOR LEARNING 2007



WHAT TO USE, WHY TO USE IT, AND WHERE TO FIND IT



TPCK



Home



Technology, Thinking and Learn
ing





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me to

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clicking
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dit

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Please feel free to add, alter or delete any
content. The idea is to create a document
that can form the basis of a shared
understanding

and allow Brigidine
Learning Technologies to have a
greater

impact in the classroom.

You
r thoughts are valued and your ideas
are needed. Ultimately this document will
be used to create a policy document that
will be presented to the College
Executive.










Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies

http://www.c4lpt.co.uk/recommended/toolbox.html

The

Learning Toolbox
categories the
TOP 100 TOOLS FOR LEARNING

(selected by
109 LEARNING
PROFESSIONALS
) by type of tool



The Learning Toolbox consists of two parts:

1
-

Personal Tools:

tools to access and view content as well as communicate with others (for your own personal
learning/working)

2
-

Producer
Tools
: tools to develop and deliver content and other learning solutions (for yourself and others)

The
Recommendations

are the highest ranked tools in The Top 100 Tools list in each category.


Other
suggestions

are other tools that appear in the Top 100 To
ols and Extra 50 Tools list in the same category.



See also



REVIEWS

of Top 10/100 Tools activity



ANALYSIS OF TOP 100 TOOLS LIST

-

our pre
liminary analysis of the list




GUIDE TO 100 TOP TOOLS

-

an introduction to the learning categories and how the tools fit in
-

links
to relevant pages appear in the Category columns below.




10 M
OST VISITED TOOLS PAGES

-

what tools are people finding interesting




TOP 100 TOOLS: SUMMARY INFORMATION AS A FREE PDF
-

your own
personal copy


Personal Tools


Category

Recommendation

Other suggestions

Web browser

and extensions
[
Guide
]

Firefox

Internet Explorer


|


Flock


|


Safari

-

Zotero

|
CoComment

|
Firebug

|
ScribeFire

|
delicious Bookmarks

RSS reader
[
Guide
]

Google Reader

Bloglines


|


NetNewsWire

|
FeedRaider

Email
[
Guide
]

Gmail

Outlook

(£) |
Thunderbird


|


Yahoo Mail

|
Apple Mail

|

Eudora

|
Outlook
Express

Personal home/start page
[
Guide
]

iGoogle

Netvibes

|
Pageflakes


Social bookmarking
[
Guide
]

del.icio.us

diigo


|


Furl

Podcast player
[
Guide
]

iTunes

-

PDF reader
[
Guide
]

Adobe Reader

-

Social networks
[
Guide
]

Facebook

LinkedIn

|
Eduspaces

|

twitter

|
Explode

Instant messenger
[
Guide
]

Skype

Adium

|
Google Talk

|
MSN/Windows Messenger

|
iChat

|
Pidgin

|
Meebo

|
twitter


(Re)search tools
[
Guide
]

Google Search

Wikipedia

|
Google Scholar

|
Amazon

|
Dogpile

|
Quintura

|
Technorati

|
Zotero

Online productivity tools
[
Guide
]

Google
Calendar

Google Maps

|
Google Notebook

|
Google Alerts

|
Mozy

Desktop productivity tools


[
Guide
]

Google
Desktop

Copernic Desktop Search

|

X1

(£)
|
Google Earth

|
Parallels

(£)


|

Quicksilver

(£)

Mobile phone tools


[
Guide
]

Meebo

|
twitter

|
Jaiku

iPod tools

iTunes


Producer Tools

Category

Recommendation

Other suggestions

Documents,
Spreadsheet

(& Database)
Tools
[
Guide
]

Word

(£)

Google Docs & Spreadsheets

|
OpenOffice


|
Zoho

|
Excel

(£) |
Access

(£) |
EndNote

Presentation
Tools


[
Guide
]

PowerPoint

(£)

Keynot
e

(£)

|
OpenOffice


|
Zoho

|
Slideshare

Narrated
pr
esentation
Tools


[
Guide
]

Articulate

Presenter

(£)

Adobe Presenter

(£)

|

Slideshare

|
VoiceThread

|
PhotoStory

PDF Conversion
Tools


[
Guide
]

Acrobat Professional

(£)

CutePDF Writer

|
OpenOffice

Blogging
Tools


[
Guide
]

WordPress

Blogger


|
TypePad


) |

MovableType

(£) |
Edublogs

|
b2evolution
|
ScribeFire

|


ecto

|
FeedBlitz

|
CoComment


|
MyBlogLog

|
StatCounter

Podcasting
Tools

[
Guide
]

Audacity

Gabcast

|
Skype

|
Odeo

Wiki
Tools


[
Guide
]

Wikispaces

MediaWiki


|


PB Wiki


|
Jotspot

|


Ti
ddlywiki

|
Confluence

Mindmapping
Tools


[
Guide
]

MindManag
er

(£)

FreeMind


|


Cmap

|
Inspiration

(£) |

MindMeister

(£) |
Bubbl.us

Web Authoring
Dreamweaver

(£)

Google Page Creator

|
Flash

(£) |
Frontpage

Tools

[
Guide
]

Firebug

|


Web Developer

|
StatCounter

HTML/Text
editors


[
Guide
]

HTML
-
Kit


|
Notepad


|
Notepad++

|
TextPad

|
Vim

Graphics, image
and photo
editing
tools
[
Guide
]

GIMP

Gliffy


|
Picasa

|
Photoshop

(£)


|
Fireworks

(£) |
OmniGraffle

(£)

|


Paint Shop Pro

(£)


Courses and
tutorial (rapid e
-
learning)
Tools


[
Guide
]

Articulate Rapid

E
-
Learning Studio

(£)

Adobe Presenter

(£) |
eXe

|
CourseLab

Interactivity,
quiz and testing
Tools
[
Guide
]

Articulate Engage/
Quizmaker

(£)

Flash

(£)

Course
management
systems
[
Guide
]

Moodle

Blackboard

|
DrupalEd

Tools for courses
by Email
[
Guide
]

Gmail

Outlook

(£) |
Thunderbird


|


Apple Mail

|


Yahoo Mail


|
Eudora

Screen capture
and
screencasting
Tools
[
Guide
]

Captivate

(£)

S
nagIt

(£) |
Camtasia

(£) |
iShowU

(£) |
Gadwin
PrintScreen

Live

E
-
Learning
/ Web Meeting
Tools
[
Guide
]


Elluminate

(£)

Yugma

|

Adobe Connect Professional

(£) |
iVocalize

|
Skype

Social

networking
Tools
[
Guide
]

Ning

Elgg

Content
management
Systems


[
Guide
]

Drupal

b2evolution

Group space
Tools

[
Guide
]


Yahoo Groups

Google Groups

Virtual world
Tools


[
Guide
]

Second Life

-

File
hosting/sharing
sites


[
Guide
]

flickr


|


YouTube


|


Slideshare


|


Scribd


|


TeacherTube

|
Odeo


|
eSnips



T
echnology, Thinking & Learning

The following principles are considered necessary whether
technology is included
within the learning process or not
:



Teachers understand the importance of positive student
-
teacher relationships to support
learning.



Teache
rs believe that all students can enhance their learning through the development of
thinking skills.



Teachers understand the thinking demands and learning expectations of their own learning
areas.



Teachers accept responsibility for teaching knowledge a
bout thinking and learning in their
own learning areas.




Teachers believe students need to be highly flexible and skilled learners, capable of
learning new roles and solving complex problems.



Teachers believe learning is an active, individual process o
f building meaning.



Teachers understand the importance of student involvement in decision
-
making about
what and how they learn and students taking responsibility for their learning.



Teachers have a good knowledge of individual students and their appro
aches to learning.



Teachers use a common framework for assessing higher order thinking skills.



Teachers develop rich assessment tasks and authentic assessment criteria.



Teachers provide students with opportunity to evaluate their learning through m
eta
-
cognitive strategies.



Student self
-
assessments are included on written reports.



Teachers provide students with challenging tasks that stimulate, encourage and support
thinking.



Teachers model thinking and learning strategies they want their stu
dents to develop.



Teachers explicitly teach cognitive and meta
-
cognitive strategies and embed them in their
own learning areas.



Teachers are equipped with a range of teaching practices and strategies that cater for the
diverse range of students.



Le
arning takes place in a cooperative environment.



Teachers ensure students have sufficient time to think, reflect and engage in sustained
discussion deliberation and enquiry.



Consistent processes for developing students thinking and learning skills are

embedded in
all learning areas.



Teachers develop comprehensive knowledge of their students learning needs in their own
learning areas.



Teachers establish flexible student groupings to maximise learning.



Teachers provide targeted support to identifi
ed students and utilise individual learning
plans



Teachers develop students thinking skills to support literacy.



Teachers ensure students make connections between their school work and their own lives.



Teachers plan and implement consistent learning
opportunities.



Regular communication is established between teachers and parents about students'
thinking and learning skills.



Overall, fifty years of educational research indicates that media and technology are
effective in schools as phenomena to lea
rn both from and with. Historically the learning
from or tutorial approaches have received the most attention and funding, but the with or
cognitive tool approaches are the focus of more interest and investment than ever before.
Media and technology have m
any other advantages in terms of repeatability,
transportability and increased equity of access. In addition longitudinal studies show that
pedagogical innovations and positive learning results do eventually emerge from the
infusion of media and technology

Into schools, but the process takes longer than most people imagine.



Large investments in time and support for teachers are especially critical if the adoption of
constructivist pedagogies accompany the infusion of media and technology. This is critica
l
given that it is pedagogy that is most influential on learning, not media or technology.
Media and technology, however, are integral to the implementation of innovative
pedagogies.



The purpose of research is to improve, not to prove. In the final analy
sis, given the
esoteric and complex nature of human learning, the most we maybe able to hope for with
respect to media and technology in education is creative application and informed practice.


Last modified at 9/07/2007 3:33 PM


by
Graham Hughes




Thoughts on a Technology St
rategy

By and large, the aim is to

encourage classroom teachers

to use

various technologies

that

support the
learning of all students within and across curriculum areas. Technology is not a cure
-
all, and sometimes
the
best teaching tool is not
a technology tool.

Technology benefits skilled teachers and engaged students but does not by itself create
e
ither. As with any teaching tool, technology must be understood within the broad context
of curriculum and pedagogy. At the same time, technology tools come with their own
particular challenges and benefits. We work toward a vision in which all teachers us
e
technology fluently and seamlessly to support student
-
focused learning rather than
teacher
-
driven instruction. At present,

for many reasons,

teacher use is typically neither
fluent nor seamless.




The bottom line is that many teachers find it difficult
to
integrate technology

because it
usually means changing the way they teach. Once teachers realize the potential for
improving learning through the effective use of technology, and as

they strive to become
competent or even proficient technology users they begin to change the way they teach.





Staff Development Objectives



A

technology plan must support the provision of staff development opportunities throughout the year.





Each o
f the following

instructional technology objectives is associated with specific objectives for the
Teaching Staff of Brigidine College. These are:



1.









To extend and expand the learning materials beyond those resources available within the
classro
om
.













Teachers need to have a
basic competence of computer operations

and know how to

research and
evaluate the

accuracy, relevance, appropriateness, comprehensiveness
, and

bias of electronic
information resources to be used by

students. They need to know
how

and

where

to find subject
matter which

enhances the curriculum
. A survey of

teacher

competency

will be needed to
assist in planning of workshops
.

.

2.


To provide a constructivist learning envir
onment that engages

students in substantive, real
-
world
problems
.




Research has shown that learning is a dynamic pro
cess constructed by the learner
who
brings prior

knowledge skills, and understanding in formulating new meaning to

her results
in

active l
earning.
Active

learning takes place in a constructivist classroom where knowledge
is not passively received, but

actively constructed by learners. Technology is an ideal
catalyst to make this happen because it

engages

the student in the learning process. The
constructivist model of teaching will

require change
s

in classroom dynamics, and teachers
will need guidance in

making this happen.



3.





To provid
e a learning environment that supports the strengths and needs of diverse individuals
.

Teachers will be given assistance in developing programmes that allow for differential achievement of outcomes.
Whilst acknowledging that individual programmes are not w
arranted or desirable it is essential that a variety of
learning styles are accessible so that student engagement is maximised. Professional development must focus on
providing guidance for facilitating differentiation.



4.





To prepare

students for a m
odern world of employment or higher education








In order to teach students the
technology tools

that they will need in their adult lives,


teachers mu
st be proficient users themselves. The training program should focus on use


of appropriate standard

software applications and
tools

to perform common
real
-
world



tasks.



5.



To offer

students learning opportunities independent of time and location.







In order to guide students, educators need to identify

specific
technology applications and



resources

that maximize student learning, address learner needs, and affirm diversity. Teachers


need to become

adept at

creating units of study which involve independent student research from

home as well as in
the classroom.



6.




To support online collaboration among the

global community

of peers and experts.




In order to teach students how to
collaborate
, it is beneficial for teachers to engage in
collaborative

activi
ties

with their peers. Online internet projects foster collaboration among educators.

Technology workshops can help teachers find appropriate projects and guide teachers to become

collaborative project coordinators.


7.



To enable parents to become ac
tive participants in their daughter's education
.







In order to communicate electronically with parents, it is essential that staff members are familiar

and comfortable working with the tools that enable this to happen. It is also essential that teache
rs

use authentic forms of assessment and are able to report on student progress towards published

outcomes.


Last modified at 9/07/2007 3:05 PM


by
Graham Hughes




Adding Value with Technology

When designing programmes that will include the use of technology it is critical to consider
why before what. There are many reasons for using technology in a classroom
environm
ent but these are the "top ten" reasons for using technology to transform
learning:



Value adding with technology



Example of Technology



(
available on student and staff Tablet PCs)



1. Visual examples make some
concepts easier to grasp and then
allow

students more time to access
higher level skills.

Allows students to construct their own
understanding





2. Abstract concepts can be made
more concrete. Manipulation &
visualisation

of relationships between
variables makes understanding of
systems easier. Allow students to get
to higher level skills more quickly

Allows students to construct their

own understanding



Concept mapping


Fun with MindBook

Drawi
ng/design software


Fun with Construction

Java Applets

Shockwave video clips

SchoolKit modules

Learning Federation learning objects

The Internet
-

various







Spreadsheet charting tools


-

MS Excel

Graphing software


Fun with Construction

Graphing calculator


Microsoft Student 2007

Geometer’s Sketchpad

Learning Federation learning objects



3. Take low
-
level, repetitive labour out
of complex tasks, allowing focus on
higher level skills.

Allow students to construct their own
understanding



Word processing

Spreadsheets & Databases

Data loggers

4. Make drill & practice more
interesting



Testing software which provides immediate

Fee
dback


Scholaris, Heucampus

Spreadsheets



5. Increase the interest and relevance
of a topic



Video clips

Internet resources

Multimedia CD
-
ROMs

SchoolKit modules

Learning Federation resources



6. Improve preparation and
presentation of written report
s



Desktop publishing software

Microsoft Word 2007

Microsoft PowerPoint 2007

Leaning Essentials



7. Improve collaboration in group
work Allows students to construct
their own understanding and compare
with others



Webquests

Web
-
Page design

Microsoft O
neNote

SharePoint Portal Services

Microsoft Outlook



8. Improve technology literacy,
information literacy and visual literacy.
Illustrate, simulate and give practice
in skills and with tools



All software tools and communication and
presentation technol
ogies



9. Provide quick and easy access to

Information sources not available
locally Allows students to construct
their own understanding



Internet

Microsoft Outlook

Microsoft Student 2007 multimedia atlases and
encyclopaedias


Encarta

Instant Messag
ing software
-

Heucampus

10. To allow for differentiation within a
On
-
line courses; self
-
instructed modules

Value adding with technology



Example of Technology



(
available on student and staff Tablet PCs)



group. Tasks can be varied to suit
different levels. Allows students to
construct their own understanding



Teacher designed worksheets & extension

activities



There may be other reasons for using technology in the classroom, but if it is not one of
the above10, its value should be questioned.



It should be noted that this is about students using technology not teachers The use of a
data projector

and associated presentation software is akin to the use of transparencies
with an OHP. The essential ingredient is students learning, not teachers teaching. Evidence
suggests that a constructivist environment can be more easily created with the use of
tec
hnology rather than without. However, sometimes the direct instruction approach is
more useful and teachers are encouraged to vary their lessons as the curriculum demands.



Before deciding to use technology, decide on the reason and then select the most
a
ppropriate type of technology to suit the learning situation.

When designing a course of instruction or a sequence of lessons the 'rule of thumb' is 30
-

50% technology inclusion. Over 75% is probably too much and under 25% is too little.
However teacher, j
udgement based on the amount of value that can be added to the
learning process is a vital ingredient in the design process.



When designing an assessment task, an assignment, a homework exercise or a single
lesson technology use is not always applicable
and in some cases is not desirable at all.
The use of technology for its own sake can be counter
-
productive.

Evidence seems to suggest that technology allows quicker access to higher level cognitive
skills such as evaluation, analysis and ref
How will
lectio
n and can assist with these skills
once the task has progressed to that point. This should be one of the most compelling
arguments for using technology in the classroom environment.

An understanding of the
relationships between technology, thinking and le
arning is critical to the design of learning
programmes especially when decisions are being made about the nature of the technology
that is to be included.



How will teachers become confident ICT integrators?


Effective teaching for all students will depe
nd on teachers becoming confident and capable
users of ICT

and understanding how to integrate ICT effectively into their teaching practice. Teachers
make key decisions about how to integrate ICT effectively into the classroom, in order to
achieve the desir
ed learning outcomes for students. They evaluate the appropriateness and
effectiveness of available technologies and digital resources and decide when and how to use
them with students.

“It is the teacher’s strategic use of instruction that makes the diffe
rence. The teacher is
continually making professional decisions, responding to instructional situations as a flexible
problem solver, and monitoring their students’ progress. Effective teachers don’t follow
predetermined programmes of … instruction. They a
lign the … activities with their students’
progressions.
[1]



Teachers can
transform their teaching role through the deliberate and considered use of ICT.
For example, teachers may delegate more responsibility to the students to self
-
regulate their
learning, and there are opportunities for students to collaborate effectively thro
ugh peer
learning and mentoring. However, it is the teacher’s strategic and deliberate planning of the
learning and use of ICT that will ensure the desired learning takes place.



Effective teachers can use e
-
learning to:




create new learning environments
based on a blended learning approach, which allows students
to




explore and experiment, think critically and work creatively, reflect and plan, use feedback and
self
-




assessment, and create new knowledge;



make teaching and learning more effective and effi
cient by using customised tools that aid
preparation, programming, assessment, and reporting;



customise learning experiences to recognise individual, cultural, and developmental differences;



enhance communication and collaboration to build partnerships bey
ond the classroom,



expanding the community of learners



enhancing the quality of learning;



create new education communities by increasing the modes of teaching and learning and the
range of people who can be involved.
[2]



To achieve this, teachers must be supported in developing and enhancing their own ICT knowledge and
skills,

through professional learning and consistent ongoing support.



DESIRABLE OUTCOME #1: Teachers have the confidence and capability to effectively
integrate e
-
learning into their professional practice
.



Actions



Work with faculties and individual teachers t
o include specific ICT literacy skills and pedagogies
in learning all programmes for 2008



Support professional development that is focused on information management,
information


literacy, and access.

We will have achieved this when an increasing number of

learning programmes include ICT literacy skills
and effective e
-
learning pedagogies.



DESIRABLE OUTCOME #2: All ICT professional development programmes in schools
focus on effective teaching, ICT literacy, and understanding the potential of ICT to
suppor
t learning across the curriculum
.



Action



Assist teachers to develop personal learning plans that highlight their immediate plans and needs
in the context of the College Strategy, their Faculty, and their classrooms. To begin in term
4

2007, and to identi
fy workshop topics for 2008, week 1.

We will have achieved this when > 80 percent of teachers have participated or are participating in a
personal ICT PD programme.



DESIRABLE OUTCOME #3: Teachers use online communities of practice to strengthen
collegia
l support, professional dialogue, and reflective practice.



Action



Support the exchange of knowledge and information between online communities of practice
through subject associations, and the ICT professional development community.

We will have achieved

this when:



the number of active online communities has increased;



the proportion of teachers engaged in online communities has increase



the number of active online communities has increased;



faculties have access to, and are using, a range of web
-
based to
ols to meet their
communication and publishing needs.

Curriculum Materials



Effective teaching for all students through e
-
learning must be supported by access to a wide range of
relevant, high
-
quality educational content. Furthermore, appropriate tools, s
uch as online learning
environments (OLEs) and learning management systems (LMSs), enable teachers and students to
access, manage, use, create, and distribute content easily and efficiently.

The effective use of well
-
designed digital content across a broad

range of learning activities has a positive
effect on student engagement and student learning outcomes. Digital content can be deployed relatively
quickly and can be readily revised in the light of new evidence. It can be a powerful mechanism to support
c
onsistency in core curriculum areas and improved teacher performance



DESIRABLE OUTCOME #4: Online learning environments are widely used to support
effective learning and teaching
.



Action



Work with all faculties to provide guidelines that will enable th
em to consider how an online
learning environment will

-

contribute to their teaching and learning.

-

work within the existing technical infrastructure and resources of the College

-

connect to other systems in the College and in other schools;



We will
have achieved this when an increasing number of faculties are using online learning
environments to contribute to teaching and learning.



DESIRABLE OUTCOME #5: High
-
quality digital content is easily accessible



Actions



Continue to assist the development

of digital content and a shared pool of effective research and
documentation through Scholaris and Microsoft Sharepoint Portal.



Develop and publish a policy framework, including the Digital Commons, for managing copyright
and digital rights (print and dig
ital media) for the College.



Work with the Scholaris, SchoolKit, Heulab Pty Ltd and other agencies to develop cost
-
effective
systems to find and access online resources.

We will have achieved this when:










there is an increase in the amount of high
-
quality digital content available and it is being
used more often

















and more effectively by all teachers








a policy framework for digital rights has been developed and is used to support e
-
learning








the College has access to and are using an increased number of quality online
resources through a variety











of

partner organisations

.

DESIRABLE OUTCOME #6: Teacher
-
developed digital content and resources are
available for use across the College
.



A
ction



Increase access to web
-
based and collaborative tools that support content development and
publishing by teachers. Provide samples and showcases to stimulate use.

We will have achieved this when there is an increase in the number and use of teach
er
-
for
-
teacher
developed learning objects, resources and information available for use from the Portal via Scholaris



DESIRABLE OUTCOME #7: There is an increased number of relevant and engaging
educational contexts provided through the medium of ICT.



Ac
tion



Increase the number of resources and web services that enable access to experiences and
understandings otherwise unavailable to students. Provide samples and showcases to stimulate
use.

We will have achieved this when an increased number of users are
accessing an increasing range of
online services and resources for students
.



DESIRABLE OUTCOME #8: The knowledge and availability of high
-
quality software for
learning is increased.



Action



Provide teachers with access to a bank of identified quality so
ftware, resources, and relevant
information on which to base decisions related to meeting student learning needs.

We will have achieved this when there is an increased awareness and use of quality software for learning
resources.






Community Involvement



Research shows that parents who are involved in their children’s learning, and encourage their children to
be the best they can be, make a real and positive difference to how their children learn. The influence and

involvement of parents in addition to
effective teachers, has a significant positive impact on how well
students achieve.

Parents are best able to help their children when they receive useful, focused, and timely information

and support from government agencies and schools. Schools need to wor
k with families, and their
communities to foster understanding of how to use ICT effectively in learning. ICT provides new
possibilities

for following students’ progress and engagement with teachers. ICT can strengthen communication with
families as well a
s being able to provide community access to ICT facilities.



DESIRABLE OUTCOME #9: There is increased community understanding of the
importance of ICT and information literacies


the 21
st

century skills that are important
for participation in a knowledg
e society.



Actions



Engage with College Development and Marketing on including information for parents about the
nature of 21
st

century skills and about how they can support their children’s learning through ICT.



Make clear the College view that students
need to have easy access to the College Portal from
home though an efficient internet service.



Encourage faculties to celebrate good practice and their success stories of ICT use with their
families and communities.

We will have achieved this when:





information for parents on supporting their children’s learning through ICT is regularly
included in College publications

all students are able to access their le
arning materials
equally well regardless of their location.

faculties are provided with models or examples of how to showcase their work and to celebrate
successes with parents.



DESIRABLE OUTCOME #10: There is increased community participation in school
ICT
activities and the use of ICT facilities.



Actions



Support and encourage the provision of community access to school ICT facilities and expertise.



Provide examples, strategies, and protocols for enabling online access by families to The College
Portal
, websites and other information.



Improve the quality of information available to


parents, families, and communities through ICT.

We will have achieved this when there is increased use of school ICT facilities by the wider community
and all families have
increased access to and use of web
-
based information.






[1]

NZ Minis
try of Education, 2003b, page 79

[2]

MCEETYA, 2005


Last modified at 5
/07/2007 2:52 PM


by
Graham Hughes