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7 Δεκ 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 8 μήνες)

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Vakgroep

Informatietechnologie



Vakgro
ep Informatietechnologie


Onderzoeksgroep
IBCN

Gaston Crommenlaan 8
,

bus 201,

B
-

90
5
0 Gent

www.intec.UGent.be




1

Business Intelligence 2.0

1.1

Introduction and context

Industrial companies and governmental
agencies

employ business processes to
support their da
ily

operations. In order to
survive the ever growing fierce competition

and
expand

their market share,
appropriat
e

measures

are required

at the right
time
.
Every piece of information
,

technology

or practice

that
supports

the management or
steering committee in improving
the performance of their organization

is commonly
referred to

as business intelligence.

Until rece
ntly, it was only deemed important to observe the impact of decisions after
they had
already
been taken. Nowadays,
people are

beginning to appreciate the
real value o
f a pro
-
active approach: formulating and executing a response while the
corresponding even
t is busy or even before it actually happens.
Another conclusion
is that previously, the development of similar tools was
merely a privilege for large
commercial vendors
, but the
open source community gets more and more involved
.

The ability to interact wi
th business intelligence anytime and everywhere is a crucial
desideratum for concerned stakeholders. Henceforth, the stress in this project lies
on the construction of a real
-
time mobile frontend or gateway to backend platforms.

1.2

Goals

We will start from

an

existing initiative in the open source world: Pentaho. How does
it live, breathe and eat? Simultaneously, state
-
of
-
the
-
art research is conducted to
learn more about real
-
time decision making through mobile interaction. The final
deliverable c
omes in the s
hape

of an architecture merging the best of both worlds.

1.3

Requirements



We would like to offer multi
-
channel exposure, towards different kinds of
mobile devices.



Clients are entitled to receive accurate and timely responses.



An intuitive configuration and us
age are highly important.

1.4

References



Business Intelligence:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_intelligence



Pentaho:
http://www.pentaho.com/

1.5

Conta
ct

Davyd.Matthys@UGent.be


2
/
9


Vakgroep Informatietechnologie


Onderzoeksgroep
IBCN

Gaston Crommenlaan 8,
bus 201,
B
-

905
0 Gent

www.intec.UGent.be



2

Continuous
I
ntegration
E
nvironment

2.1

Introduction and context


T
he complexity of software development projects is commonly managed by the
principle of “divide and conquer”


a large chu
nk of work is split up into smaller
pieces that are easier to handle

individually
.

However,
the
undertaking

of welding
those components back together into a sound unified whole is
by no means a trivial
task!
In the past, integration was
invariably
postpone
d until the very last stage, only
to discover

that it lasted longer than the construction of the actual parts.

Continu
ou
s integration speaks for itself
: integration activities are conducted
right
from the start of the actual project and are carried on duri
ng the entire lifecycle
of
the resulting products. The net result i
s that you are able to deliver
working
software
whenever a client asks for a demonstration or status report.

In terms of software
architecture, we hence achieve “build
-
ability” as a quality

attribute
, creating a factory
with product lines assembling applications and components instead of e.g. cars.

Nowadays, this approach is gaining more and more momentum in the industry as
well as the academic world. Henceforth, a broad range of commercial
and open
source tools governing bug tracking, build scheduling, workflow management etc.
are
at our disposal
. Our biggest frustration at this moment is that similar initiatives
nearly always fail to address the entire problem


they focus on
a single or

li
mited
number of aspects. On top of that,
they were seldom built to interact with related
frameworks, and little room is left for personalization and customization.

2.2

Goals

We depart from
existing research performed by a summer internship student. We
will car
ry out a thorough state of the art analysis
to investigate and compare current
CI
tools and
applications

and select best of breed features.
Our
core

assignment is
to draw up an architecture for a highly generic CI platform
.

2.3

Requirements



The platform can be

tailored to a maximum extent
: generality is key
.




The platform accommodates every aspect of CI: bug tracking, connection
with version control etc.



The platform should of
fer intuitive configuration and usage.

2.4

References



Fowler

: http://martinfowler.com/art
icles/continuousIntegration.html

2.5

Contact

Davy
d
.
Matthys
@UGent.be

3
/
9


Vakgroep Informatietechnologie


Onderzoeksgroep
IBCN

Gaston Crommenlaan 8,
bus 201,
B
-

905
0 Gent

www.intec.UGent.be



3

Mobile Extensions to Content Management Systems

3.1

Introduction and context

The mobile internet is on the rise! With the emergence of new technologies like
UMTS, EDGE and HSDPA surfing while on
the move becomes faster and more
seamless. New phones with bigger screens make surfing a more enjoyable
experience. U
nfortunately

watching a website optimized for a desktop user on a
mobile phone is still no picnic.

On the other hand Content Management Sys
tems (CMS’s) like Drupal, Joomla!, …
are on the rise. These systems are so popular because of their extensibility. A core
system that contains user and menu management, logging, … can be extended by
using additional ‘modules’. The layout of the sites is de
termined by a ‘theme’. A lot
of modules and themes can be found publicly because of the large community
support.

Now it would be nice if mobile extensions to these platforms could be provided. This
way a site could be created only once and it could be disp
layed on every device
without extra overhead.

3.2

Goals

First a state of the art study should be carried out so possible existing solutions for
mobile surfing can be explored. Using the gathered information an architecture for
such an extension should be devel
oped.

Cooperation with existing solutions for mobile adaptation should be looked at.

3.3

Requirements



It should be kept in mind that the architecture is being developed for open
source software (community development).



It has to be plugged in to several existi
ng platforms, so a uniform extendable
interface should be provided.

3.4

Contact

dieter.blomme@intec.ugent.be

4
/
9


Vakgroep Informatietechnologie


Onderzoeksgroep
IBCN

Gaston Crommenlaan 8,
bus 201,
B
-

905
0 Gent

www.intec.UGent.be



4

Multi
-
touch Interfaces

4.1

Introduction and context

Single touch interfaces, such as the track pad, have been available for a long time.
With the launch o
f the iPhone, multi
-
touch interfaces were introduced to the public
at large. Following the success of its interface design desktop developers could not
stay behind. There are several products available such as Microsoft’s Windows
Surface or the HP Multitou
ch desktop products, there are several prototypes being
presented at conferences and even more futuristic designs are envisioned.

All these products try to offer a non intrusive, as natural as possible interface and
therefore they try to mimic some of the

physical properties of digital items which
represent natural objects, e.g. they give a “back” side of a picture, where you can
write on. In this spirit, the interface should interact on a natural way with other
devices, e.g. it should detect a user’s lapt
op and offer an interface for it, or it could
interface with a MP3
-
player, the HiFi installation, etc …

4.2

Goals

Our goal is to create a platform where devices can automatically connect with a
multi
-
touch interface. For example when we connect our HiFi instal
lation and iPod,
the multi
-
touch interface shows a virtual piano, which gets played back by the HiFi
installation and recorded to the iPod.

4.3

Requirements



The platform must automatically detect devices through different
technologies, e.g. Bluetooth, UPnP, bo
njour, camera detection, …



The platform extends the connected device’
s interface on a natural way
(a
utomatically installs the correct software)
.

4.4

References



Adobe :
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UcK
qyn
-
gUbY



Windows Surface :
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rP5y7yp06n0



Windows Surface Parody :
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZrr7AZ9nCY

4.5

Contact


Nico.Goeminne@UGent.be






5
/
9


Vakgroep Informatietechnologie


Onderzoeksgroep
IBCN

Gaston Crommenlaan 8,
bus 201,
B
-

905
0 Gent

www.intec.UGent.be



5

Multi Channel Advertising Platform

5.1

Introduction and context

Recently new technologies, such as podcasting, blogging, social networks, online
adds, mobile advertising and many more opened up a fresh range of advertising

channels. Together with the old school channels such as TV, radio, printed adds
and billboards marketing agencies have numerous opportunities to reach the
consumer. Marketing campaigns are now more and more focused to a specific
target audience (or even t
o a specific user).

These agencies will try to maximize the return on investment for their own
customers (the companies), therefore they need to solve a complex puzzle; Do we
advertise a product (e.g. iPhone, iPod) or do we advertise a brand and life styl
e
(Apple) or an event (Rock We
r
chter); what is the target audience (kids, youngsters,
adults, business people, personal add) and through what channel do we reach them
(blogs, press releases, radio spots); do we schedule adds during prime time and for
what
period do they run. Can we asses if an ongoing campaign is successful and
can we intervene during its course?

Once all those questions are answered, the campaign plan and schedule is laid out
and the content is created the campaign can be launched (semi au
tomated) through
the different distribution enablers.


Podcasts
RSS
Feeds
Blogs
Press
Releases
Mobile
Advertising
TV
Advertising
Radio
Advertising
Content
Youth
Elderly
Business
Brand
Recognition
Target audience
Product
Placement
Events
Campaign Types
Scheduling
Expenses
Management
Campaign
Management
Data Mining
Online
Advertising
Social
Networks
Consumer
driven content
Multi Channel
Advertising Platform
Enablers
6
/
9


Vakgroep Informatietechnologie


Onderzoeksgroep
IBCN

Gaston Crommenlaan 8,
bus 201,
B
-

905
0 Gent

www.intec.UGent.be



5.2

Goals

The goal is to create a (web based) platform where campaign managers can
manage or create new marketing campaigns. Based on the input parameters it
generates a overall marketing plan, it creates
a schedule for the content creators to
deliver their work, e.g. picks a date for the production house to finish the radio spot,
sends an email to the editor of a blog, … Secondly it creates a schedule for the
content to be released and decides through what

channel it will reach the targeted
audience best.

5.3

Requirements



The platform enables cooperation between content creators, campaign
managers and distribution channels.



The platform accommodates automated content distribution for certain
enablers.



The plat
form should offer an intuitive user interface.

5.4

Contact

Nico.Goeminne@UGent.be

7
/
9


Vakgroep Informatietechnologie


Onderzoeksgroep
IBCN

Gaston Crommenlaan 8,
bus 201,
B
-

905
0 Gent

www.intec.UGent.be



6

Personalized Composition of eShop Services using Semantics

6.1

Introduction and context

One of the hottest trends in Web 2.0 is the dev
elopment of mash
-
ups. The term
mash
-
up originated in the music world
--

a music mash
-
up is a remix of two or more
songs to create a new song. Similar to music mash
-
ups, a Web application mash
-
up
combines complementary functionality from multiple Web sites
or Web applications,
e.g., combining an eShop application with a shipping service so that you can
receive the specified goods without further user interaction.

6.2

Goals

The purpose of this assignment is the design of
the
eShop architecture. Based on a
user pr
ofile and semantic description of eShop services, the application should
enable an automatic personalized mash
-
up of the available eShop components.
Two views will be explored. The user should receive the latest updates including
products, new services, et
c when logging in, via e
-
mail, mobile messages
depending on his profile. On the other hand, based on few keywords, the
application should be able to compose the needed services for realizing a defined
goal (e.g. purchase of a specific book).



User request
User request
payment
e
-
buyer
e
-
shop
shipping
supplier
s

Web services

8
/
9


Vakgroep Informatietechnologie


Onderzoeksgroep
IBCN

Gaston Crommenlaan 8,
bus 201,
B
-

905
0 Gent

www.intec.UGent.be



6.3

Requirements



The platform should implement an
intuitive interface for plugging in new
eShop services.



The platform should dispose of a registry for the available eShop services
containing semantic metadata used for searching purposes.



Usi
ng semantics, the platform should be able to choose the most appropriate
service from a pool of similar services.



Using semantics, the platform should be able to compose several services
realizing a specified goal.



The platform should provide for the execu
tion of the composed services.

6.4

Contact

anna.hristoskova@intec.ugent.be

9
/
9


Vakgroep Informatietechnologie


Onderzoeksgroep
IBCN

Gaston Crommenlaan 8,
bus 201,
B
-

905
0 Gent

www.intec.UGent.be



7

Widget Engine for Mobile Devices

7.1

Introduction and context

Widgets have been around for some time on the regular PC platform and are now
also being developed for consumer electronics an
d mobile devices. Widgets mostly
use standard web technologies such as (X)HTML, XML,
J
ava
S
cript, etc, but are
often executed on a dedicated widget engine instead of in a web browser.

In this project, research will be done concerning the architectural requ
irements for a
widget engine, targeted at mobile devices. Important differences with regular
widget engines include:



Input/output and rendering has to be adapted to the specifics of the device.
A widget, rendered in some way, may look great and may be ea
sy to use on
one device, but may be next to useless on another.



Native functions of the device (e.g. phone book, SMS inbox, camera, …)
should be accessible through the widget engine.

The research can possibly include the study of the architecture of open s
ource
browsers (e.g. Google Chrome or Fennec (“mobile Firefox”)) and how they may be
used as a basis for a mobile widget engine.

7.2

Goals



Determine requirements for widget engines, specifically for ones targeted at
mobile devices



Design an architecture from s
cratch



Study existing widget engines architectures and see how they can be
adapted/extended for mobile use

7.3

Requirements



The engine should be portable to other platforms, without too much effort



Modifiability, extensibility



Smooth integration with the mobil
e platform

7.4

Contact

Raf.Hens@intec.UGent.be