Church Website User Manual

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St Andrew’s
,

Marks Tey

Church Website
User Manual



A step by step guide to using your new
Drupal 7
church
website



Richard Morgan, 2011




St Andrew’s, Marks Tey :

Church Website User Manual

©
Richard Morgan, 2011

ISBN 978
-
1
-
4709
-
4031
-
7


Contact

To contact Richard, use:

Revd Richard Morgan

revrichardmorgan@googlemail.com

www.revrichardmorgan.org


or at:

www.good
-
samaritan.org


For information about Drupal:

www.drupal.org

and especially:

www.drupal.org/documentation


Acknowledgements

This document is inspired by the Drupal 6 end user manual template at:
http://drupal.org/node/936846

by Andrew
Tuline.

Visual Quickstart Guides from Peachpit Press are great publications and provide the blueprint for the
page layout of this document. This publication is in no way meant to be comparing itself to that series in
any other way than taking inspiration f
or the page design.

This document

has been printed by
www.lulu.com

[unless you are reading an electronic copy]. This offers
reasonably priced printing which makes distributing a 100 page document a much better experience

in
printed manual form than a collection of loose leafs stuck into a binder. More copies can be ordered from
www.lulu.com

by searching by author and title.


Copyright

This document

has been created for the users of the
St Andrew’s Marks Tey church website at
www.marksteychurch.org.uk
. It

is © Richard Morgan, 2011 and
is relea
sed under the Creative Commons
Attribution
-
Share
Alike
l
icensing
[you can do what you like with it,
but
do

re
-
distribute similarly freely]
as found
at:

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by
-
sa/3.0/





‘Whatever you do, whether in word or deed, do
it all in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ, giving
thanks to God the Father through him.’

Colossians 3:17, NIV



i

Table of Contents


Introduction:

Introduction

1

Why a Church Website?

2

Content Types

4

People, comments &
tags

5

How Drupal builds a page

6

Administration pages

7


Chapter One:

Users

9

R
egistering for a User Account

10

User Account options

11

Managing Users

12

User Roles

14


Chapter Two:

Creating a Basic Page

17

Create

a basic page

18

Menu Settings

19

Revision
s


20

URLs

21

Scheduling

22

Publishing Options

23


Chapter Three:

Managing the Main Menu

25

Re
-
ordering the menu

26

Editing menu items

28


Chapter Four:

Articles (Blog posts)

31

Create an Article

32

Tags

34

Image

36

Summary

38

Text Formats

40

Comments

41

Authoring Information

42

Publishing Options

43


Chapter Five:

Events

45

Create an Event

46

Date

47


ii

Image &
Description

48

Options

49


Chapter Six:

Sermons

51

Create a Sermon

52

Event Description

53

Uploading Audio

54

Files to Download

56

Speaker and Series

57

Bible Reference

58

Sermon Description

59


Chapter Seven:

Rotating Images

61

Create a Rotating Image

62

The Image

63

Linking to Content

64

Text Overlay

65

Managing Rotating Images

66


Chapter
Eight
:

The Text Editor

69

Styles

70

Other Formatting

71

Links

72

Media, Tables & Special Characters

76

Pasting Content

77

Teaser Breaks

78

Other options

79


Chapter Nine:

Media

81

In
sertin
g

Media

82

Images

83

Video

88

Files

89

Audio

90







iii


Chapter
Ten
:

Managing Content

93

Editing Content

94

Finding Content

95

Filtering by Status and Type

96

Bulk Operations

97

Searching for Content

98


Chapter
Eleven
:

Term Descriptions

101

Where you see Term Descriptions

102

Editing the Descriptions

103

Description URLs

104


Chapter Twelve:

Blocks

107

What is a block?

108

How bl
ocks are displayed

109

Understanding the Context

112

Editing blocks

114

Adding a new block

115


Chapter Thirteen:

Views

117

What is a view?

118

View Titles

120

Number of View Items

121


Chapter Fourteen:

Backing Up

123

Why Back Up?

124

How to back up

125

How to restore from a backup

126

Why and how to test a backup

127


Chapter Fifteen:

Emails

129

Site email when people register

130

Setting up email addresses

131

A new email address

132

A new email forward

133




iv


Appendix One:

Modules

137

Modules



Core a
nd Contributed

137

Core Modules in Use

138

Contributed Modules in Use

138

Libraries

142

Upgrading Modules

142

Upgrading Drupal core

143


Appendix Two:

Theme

145

Theme settings

145

Logo and favicon

145

How a theme is structured

146

Page Template

147

Styling

(css files

and images
)

147

Custom code (template.php)

147


Appendix Three:

Hosting

149

Hosting and Domain Name Hosting

149

cPanel

150

Cron Jobs

150

Subdomains

150

Addon Domains

150

FTP

151


Appendix Four:

A clean installation

153

Why install a clean
website?

153

How?

153


Appendix Five:

Drupal
Resources

155

Online

Resources

155

Books

156


Appendix Six:

Images for the Web

159

Image
size and compression settings

159

Image editors

160

Using Layers

160

Good sources of Images

160







v


Appendix Seven:

Audio f
or the Web

163

Audio file size

163

Audacity

163

Settings for sermon
audio

164


Appendix Eight:

Writing for the Web

167

Page length

167

Writing style

167


Appendix Nine:

Feeding Facebook

169

Setting up TwitterFeed

169


Appendix Ten:

Training Users

171

Exercise Sheets

171




1

Introduction
In
This Chapter

Why a Church Website
?

2

Content Types

4

People, comments & tags

5

How Drupal
builds a page

6

Administration pages

7


This manual introduces you to using your
new church website.
You will learn how to
create and manage the content that makes
up the site. Each chapter will take you
through the basics of the various tasks
involved in

this role.

This introductory chapter will introduce
you to some of the
principles

involved
in

managing

the
web
site.
You
will

find
understanding
some of these basic
concepts

hel
pful in learning the specific
tasks you will be responsible for.


i

Introduction

2



Why a Church
Website?

Before you start adding content to a
church website, it’s worth taking a
moment

to think of who

it is there for

and
what it ought to achieve
. There are two
broad categories of
visitors to

your website


those who ar
e members of the church
already

and those who are not members.
Their needs are different, but a website
that is catering well for existing church
members will
also
communicate to
someone checking out the church online
that the communi
ty is thriving and active.
Conversely, a website that

is making the
effort to communicate information about
the church clearly and effectively to non
-
members will avoid pitfalls like
advertising: ‘next Alpha course starts on
Tuesday’ without explaining what an
‘Alpha Course’ actually is. This means that
it w
ill also be communicating well with
members.

There are
at least the following reasons
why people will visit your website:



People visiting a church for the first
time visit its website first. They need
to know where you are and what time
to turn up. They wi
ll want to get some
kind of impression about what the
worship service will be like and what
kind of community of people you are.
They may well be interested in what
the
church provide
s

for their children.



Some people will visit the website
looking for spec
ific information. Can I
get married here? What is the Rector’s
phone number / email?
How do I
arrange for my child
to be
baptised?
I’ve seen the national Alpha
advertising; are you running a course

here
?



Church members will want to listen to
a sermon agai
n, or ca
tch up on one
they have missed.



Members will want to check up on
information that they have forgotten
(What were the dates of the holiday bible
club?).



Members will visit if they’ve been told
that there is information there that
they are interested

in.
[‘I’ve posted my
notes from the annual general meeting
online…’
, ‘There’s a new newsletter from
Nepal online…’
]

(These are some of the reasons. It would be a
good exercise to get out a piece of paper and
write out a list of other reasons people might
be
visiting.)

Your role will be to make sure that the
needs of these different types of visitor are
well catered for.



First of all, the church website must be
a good brochure for the church. Think
about the content you write and the
images you post careful
ly


does the
impression they create accurately and
effectively describe the church?



You should anticipate the kind of
information that people may be
looking for

and make sure that you
provide it clearly and make it easy to
find.



Events, news and sermons s
hould be
posted regularly and kept up to date.

Content Management

To meet the needs of the various visitors to
your website, you will need to post various
different types of content and make sure
they are kept up to date. The content
needs to be displayed
in the right place
Introduction

3


and
removed when it is no longer relevant
(it looks bad when you visit
a church website
that

is still advertising its Christmas services at
the beginning of January).

The task of managing this content is made
much easier by a ‘content ma
nagement
system’.
A well
-
known example of a system
that manages content is Facebook. You
type in a message, add a link or upload a
photo and Facebook takes care of the rest.
It chooses where and how (and to whom)
those items are displayed.
The system that
manages the church website (called
‘Drupal’)
is a bit like
this



you add the
content and Drupal will take care of how
and where it appears on the website. If you
can add and delete posts and images from
a Facebook page you will be able to use
your new chu
rch website.

What is
Drupal
?

Your
website is powered by a ‘content
ma
nagement system’ called Drupal.

Drupal
powers literally millions of
websites
.

Among countless others, it is the
system

used to power the websites of
Amnesty International and the White
House. Many churches use Drupal


in the
UK a
few

examples would be Holy Trinity
Brompton Church
in London
(
www.htb.org.uk
),

Woodlands Church in
Bristol (
www.woodlandschur
ch.net
) and St
Paul’s

Church, Salisbury
(
www.stpaulssalisbury.org
).

If you look at those websites you will see
that Drupal is
completely

customisable.
It’s
customised with templates that define the
appearance of the pages
, and modules

that

add different functionality
(like that rotating
banner image on the front page).

No two
Drupal websites need look or feel like one
another.

Your website has been customised for you.
Its appearance and functionality

were
decided in the process of creating
a theme
(a set of templates)

choosing mo
dules (a
set of functionality) and configuring the
various available options.

As you use the website, you are responsible
for creating and updating the content.
Drupal will ta
ke care of how that is laid out
in a page and make a lot of decisions about
what is presented and where. If you create
an article it will display it at the top of the
list of articles as the most recent one; if
you add a sermon it will show that by date
or
der; if you create an event Drupal will
automatically stop displaying it once the
event has happened.


Introduction

4



Content Types

When you add content to the site, you
have to choose a type of content to add
.
There are five choices
:



Basic Page

P
ages of information about the
church.
These

should go in the ‘About’
section of the website. Don’t use basic
pages for news or for listing events


there are different content types for
that.



Article

This is for news items or ‘blog’ entries
[from ‘web log’
].
All ‘Articles’ will be
displayed in the ‘
Blog’ section by date
published. The most recent will be also
be shown on the front page.



Event

Events coming up.
These are displayed
in the ‘Events’ section in date order

and disappear once the event has
happene
d.

The next events that are
happening are also displayed on the
front page.



Rotating Image

The front page has a rotating image
banner at the top. This creates some
visual interest, and is a great place to
put a few slides which will advertise
the church ef
fectively, as well as
promote anything about to happen.



Sermon

Details
of sermons which you can
attach audio and text files to.

These
can be sorted by preacher or by
Sermon Series.


Figure i.1

The ‘add content’ screen in Drupal
. You
simply click on the
content type that you want to
add.


Figure i.2
The front page of the website is compiled
from the most relevant content of each type. The
welcome text is in the ‘Basic Page’ type; there is a
‘Rotating Banner’ top right; underneath this items
are the most

relevant ‘Articles’, ‘Events’ and ‘Sermon’
content. Note, especially with sermons that you don’t
have to separately enter ‘Sermons coming up’ from
‘Most recent sermons’


Drupal knows what the date
is today and can intelligently display both these
things
from one set of data.



Introduction

5


People, comments & tags

Drupal stores the content that you enter in
a database.
As well as storing the piece of
content, it
also remembers

the person who
created the content, comments made
about the content and tags
that

label and
h
elp to categorise the content.

People

& roles

Every piece of content has an author. In
order to create content you must be
registered

and ‘logged on’ to the website
and have been given a role which allows
you to publish content.

Once a user has
r
egistered
and been authorised they can
comment on existing
articles
. In order to
create content themselves they must be
given the role of an ‘editor’. To be able to
allocate user roles, or to carry out a
number of other function
s

you must have
the role of ‘administr
ator’.

Comments

Every piece of content can, in principle,
have comments attached to it. In reality
this is switched off for everything apart
from articles. To prevent spam on the site
every person who
wishes

to comment
must be registered
.

E
very registratio
n
must
be

approved by an administrator. It’s
also possible to set the permissions so that
every comment must be approved befo
re it
is visible on the website;

but if the
comments are restricted to registered
users it is unlikely that you will want to
exerci
se that degree of censorship. Editors
and administrators can in any event
remove other people’s comments if
something was posted that was
inappropriate.

Tags

Drupal provides a rich system for
categorisin
g your content. If you ‘tag’ an

article with
a

word of phrase
(‘children’ for
example),

then that tag appears beneath the
article. Clicking on the tag will bring up a
list of all articles that share that tag. You
can see that you will want to keep tags
fairly general in scope so that they can be
of us
e
d to tag several articles

(how many
articles will you really publish which will all be
tagged ‘New Wine Summer

2011’? On the other
hand the tag ‘New Wine’ might apply to
a
number of

articles).

This classification system (or ‘taxonomy’)
is broader than jus
t tags for articles.
Several ‘vocabularies’ have been set up just
for the Sermons content type


to tag
sermons according to Speaker and Series,
and also by type of event
(i.e. Communion,
All Age Worship, Service of the Word).

This
makes it easy for the we
bsite visitor to
quickly find a list of all sermons by a
particular preacher, or all the sermons in
a
particular series.



Introduction

6



How Drupal builds a page

Drupa
l builds all of its pages from a single

page template
that

defines the layout of
every page on the site
. This page template
consists of

a number of regions where
content can
be shown



a header
,
the main
content area, a sidebar,
a banner area &

three panels (only used on the front page)
and a footer with two regions (on the left
and right).

Regions, Content

and Blocks

The main content of each page is displayed
in the main content region in the middle of
the page. This will either be a single ‘node’
[an event, sermon, page or article] or a list
of ‘nodes’


for example, the list on the
main ‘blog’ page.

The w
ebpage address
(or
‘url’)

defines what is displayed in this main
content region.

The other regions of the page
can contain
a variety of different ‘blocks’ of content.
These ‘blocks’ are displayed according to
context. The basic sections of the site
(home p
age, about, blog, events and
sermons) are each a different context.
Drupal knows what the context is and
displays relevant blocks accordingly.

For
example, the ‘services coming up’ block
displays in the sermons context and the
events context, but not in th
e blog context.

You won’t usually need to think about
what content goes in the blocks


Drupal
organise
s

this for you. Your task is to
supply

the site
with

the right content.
Drupal take
s

care of how it is displayed.

Figure i.3

The

home page consists of a header
(where the logo and the main navigation is), a main
content region (on the front page just the small space
with the welcome text) and a number of r
egions
holding various blocks of

content. The banner region
holds the banner
image block, the three panel regions
hold blocks displaying recent blog items, events
coming up and information about sermons. Notice
how in the third panel region there are two separate
blocks


the ‘Next Service’ block and the ‘Most Recent
Sermon’ block.

At the bottom of the page (not visible
in this illustration
)

is the footer and the blocks of
content that belong there.


Figure i.4

The ‘Popular Tags’ and ‘Recent Article’
blocks are shown in the Sidebar region of the list of
articles page and every ind
ividual article page in the
Blog context.


Introduction

7



Figure i.5

Admin pages
are
display
ed

as an overlay
on top of the website.

Notice the two menu bars at
the very top of the page that appear when you are
logged in as an administrator or editor.



Figure i.6

Co
ntent can be edited simply by clicking
on the ‘Edit’ link that appears once you are logged in.
The editing is

then

done in an overlaid window like
the one above.


Figure i.7

Blocks

of content, and content items in
lists can be edited by hovering over the gear icon and
choosing ‘Edit’.

The number of different things that
you are able to edit this way will depend on the role
you have been given and the editing permissions
allocated to

that role
.

Administration Pages

Once you are logged in you will be able to
access various administration pages. These
contain forms that allow you to add and
manage content, comments, use
rs and
taxonomy
(classification / tags)
. If you have
administrator
privileges you will also be
able to configure many different options
on the site, such as which blocks appear
where, or what options appear on the rich
text editor for editing text content.

If you do have the administrator privileges
that allow you to alte
r much of the
functionality of the site can I strongly
suggest that you exercise caution before
changing something that you then cannot
remember how to change back.

The admin pages usually display as an
overlay on top of the website. You can
access them from the menu that appears at
the top of the website when you are logged
in with the right permissions. The content
editing pages
can also be accessed from the
content itself


either as a tab above the
content, or by hovering over the ‘gear’
icon which appears when you hover over a
piece of content.

9

Users

In This Chapter

R
egistering for a User
Account

10

User Account options

11

Managing Users

12

User Roles

14

Before you can edit the website you need
to be registered and have the necessary
permission to create and manage content.
This chapter will talk you through that
process and also explain a
bout the
different roles and permissions that users
of the website can have.

If you have administrator privileges you
will also be able to approve registrations
and assign roles and permissions to users.
Skip this
part of the chapter

if you know
that you w
ill only be using the ‘editor’ role
on the website.


1

Chapter One

10



Registering for a User
Account

To register for an account:

1.

Click the login link
(at the bottom
centre of the footer).

2.

Choose the ‘Create new account’ tab.

3.

Choose a Username and an email
and
submit the fo
rm
(press the ‘Create new
account’ button)
.

4.

Check your email


if the site is set up
to require an administrator to approve
every account it will let you know this;
ask someone who has administrator
privileges to get on and authorise your
account.

5.

Once
your account is approved, you
receive an email with a log in link.
Once you access this link you must set
a password for your account.



Tips



Your user name will be the name that
is displayed underneath articles that
you post. You are strongly advised to
use

your real name
(Firstname
Lastname)
as your username.



If you forget your password, you can
get the system to email you another
one to the email address you gave.

(The ‘request new password’ tab on the log
in page.
)



Figure 1.1
The

‘Log In’ link is at the bottom of the
footer in the center.


Figure 1.2
You arrive at the ‘Log In’ page for an
existing account. If you don’t have an account, you
need to select the ‘Create new account; tab at the top
left.


Figure 1.3
Your Username i
s going to appear
underneath any articles that you post. Please choose
a sensible username (real names are best).



Users

11



Figure 1.4
Once you are logged in there is a new
menu at the top right of the header


which allows
you access to your account settings a
nd to logging
out.


Figure 1.5

Once you have editor or administrator
privileges you also see a top black

admin

toolbar
(and a grey shortcut toolbar beneath it). The link to
your account (and the log out link) are also here.


Figure 1.6
Your account pa
ge has two tabs


‘View’
which you arrive at, and the ‘Edit’ tab
.


Figure 1.7
The edit tab brings up an overlaid form
where you can change your details.
User Account Options

Everyone can edit their own user account,
and administrators can edit any accoun
t.

The most important account option is
for
users
to keep their email addresses up to
date.

To change email or password:

1.

Choose the link from the top right of
the main administration toolbar
which says: ‘Hello
{your name}
’.

2.

Choose the edit tab.

3.

Change
your password and email
address as required.

4.

Submit the form.

(Press the ‘Save’ button
at the bottom.)



Tips



From this point on the manual
assumes that you have at least the
‘editor’ role on the site. If not, you
won’t see the top administration
menu
bar
s

o
n the website. Get someone to
authorise you as an editor or an
administrator.



It’s possible to have the site display a
user picture next to each article or
comment. You upload these here.



Leave the administrative overlay and
locale settings where they are.



Note that the ‘view’ and ‘edit’ tabs
look different in the administrative
overlay from the normal web view.
They are the same links though.


Chapter One

12



Managing Users

If you have the ‘administrator’ role you
will be able to enable (or block) user
accounts and give u
sers ‘editor’ or
‘adminstrator’ roles.

To
edit

a user
’s account
:

1.

Choose ‘people’ from the top admin
bar


or from the ‘shortcut’ bar
beneath it
(they are the same link).

2.

Choose ‘edit’ for the person that you
want to manage.



Tips



You can also authorise and
assign
roles to users directly from the list
page by ticking the users you want to
manage and using the ‘Update
Options’ drop down.



You can create a user here using the ‘+
Add User’ button at the top of the
page. You can then create an account
for a new u
ser and ask the system
will

send them an email with their details.

You can get straight to a user with
a url
(‘Uniform Resource Locator’ i.e. the address of
the webpage)
in the form ‘users/
{username}

where
{username}

is the name of the user in
lowercase w
ith spaces replaced by the ‘
-

character. To get straight to the edit page,
add ‘/edit’. So to get to the edit page
for
Joe Bloggs
, type the url ‘
users/
joe
-
bloggs
/edit
’ into the address bar.

Figure 1.8
The administration and editing options
are accessib
le from the top black toolbar. The more
commonly used options are also all in the grey
shortcut bar beneath it. ‘People’ brings up a list of
people.


Figure 1.9

The ‘People’ administration page
(displayed as an overlay on top of the website).


Figure
1.10
The far right column present an ‘edit’
link for each user. Here you can set the role for each
user.


Figure 1.11
If you check some of the users (here
‘Revd Richard Morgan’) you can perform any of the
available ‘Update Options on all the accounts th
at
you have checked.


Users

13



Figure 1.12

The user edit page. Beneath the
username and password details are ‘Status’ and
‘Roles’ options.


Figure 1.13
If the user has not been authorised
‘Status’ will be ‘Blocked’.
It won’t matter which roles
have been alloca
ted


the user will not be able to log
in.

If the website is set to require an
administrator to approve new user
accounts,
an administrator

will need to
approve each account that someone signs
up for.

The website will send an email to
the email address th
at is set up for the
website
[at: ‘admin/config/system/site
-
information’]

to let you know that a user has
signed up and would like to be authorised.

To authorise an account:

1.

Go to the edit page of the person you
want ot authorise.

2.

Under ‘Status’ select ‘Ac
tive’ rather
than ‘Blocked’

3.

Save
(at the bottom of the page)
.



Tips



If you want to allow users to register
without requiring approval you can
change this option at the url:
‘admin/config/people/accounts’

or by
choosing ‘Configuration’ from the
admin bar, th
en ‘Account Settings’ in
the ‘People’ section. This is also where
you change the text of the emails that
get sent when users register or apply
for a new password.



Make sure that the email at
‘admin/config/system/site
-
information’
[or: choose ‘
Configuration

, then ‘Site
information’ from the ‘System’ section]

belongs to someone who is generally
available and
willing

to respond to
administration requests for the site.


Chapter One

14



User Roles

Every visitor to the website
is allocated a
role (or roles). Before a user logs
in they
are given the role ‘anonymous’. Once they
have logged in they are given the role
‘authenticated’ and any other roles that
they have been allocated.

The Drupal permissions system allocates
permissi
ons for each role, which define

what each role is ab
le to do. The church
website has been set up with the following
roles:



The
anonymous

visitor can view all of
the available content.



The
authenticated

user can comment
on blog articles and change their own
email and password



The
editor

can create, edit and delete
all of the content on the site. That’s a
pretty powerful role. They can’t
manage users or edit blocks (the
regions of the page other than the
main content region).



The
administrator

can do everything
that the editor can and al
so is able to
manage users and edit blocks. They
can also change virtually every aspect
of the site configuration.

You need to decide who should be editors
and administrators. One way to distribute
these roles would be to make everyone
who has been on a fu
ll day’s training an
administrator, and everyone else you’d like
to manage content on the website an
editor.

Figure 1.14

The Admin and shortcut toolbars for
an editor. Editors will not be able to edit user or
configure any of the options on the website.

They
have very wide ranging permissions for editing
content. The ‘authenticated’ user doesn’t have
either

of these toolbars at all


but they will be able to
comment on articles.


Figure 1.15
The Admin toolbar for an
administrator has
a lot

more options



allowing any
aspect of the site whatsoever to be configured. While
it is worth making sure that anyone who is given the
‘administrator’ role is properly trained and reliable
(they can really mess things up); it is also worth
noting that while editors
ha
ve

many fewer
permissions they can still delete eve
ry piece of
content on the site

should they press a few wrong
buttons. The real advantage of restricting people to
the ‘editor’ role is that you don’t overwhelm them
with options.



Users

15



Figure
1.16
Assigning people roles is as easy as
putting a check in front of the role in the list. The
‘authenticated user’ role can not be unchecked. If you
want to remove the ability of someone to comment on
the site, don’t try to remove this role


simply mark
them

‘Blocked’ in the status section.


Figure 1.17
The ‘Permissions’ tab of the People
page. Permissions are not granted to individuals but
to roles. If you want to let one or two individuals
have slightly more permissions that a standard
editor, you need to

create a new role (in the roles sub
menu item) and then assign the permissions to that
role, and that role to the people you want to
give

the
permissions

to
.

To allocate roles:

1.

Go to the edit page of the person you
want to allocate a role to.

2.

Under ‘Role
s’ tick the role you want to
allocate.

3.

Save the change
(bottom of the page)
.



Tips



Administrators don’t also need the
editor role, because they already have
all the editor permissions allocated to
them. However, if you set up more
roles with finer
-
grained p
ermissions
you can give people a mixture of
permissions by allocating them a
mixture of roles
(for instance ‘blogger’
and ‘sermon uploader’ could be new roles
which would only permit those specific
tasks)
.



The
permissions tab of the ‘People’
page is where you set which
permissions each role
has

and

create
new roles. The

permissions
for ‘editor’
and ‘administrator’
have been set
when the site was set up and should
not need to be changed. If you wanted
to create a

new role, (say people who
can upload audio, but are not allowed
to edit content) then create it here,
and under the permissions tab add
only the permissions that role needs.

17

Creating a Basic Page

In This
Chapter

Create a basic page

18

Menu Settings

19

Revisions

20

URL
s

21

Scheduling

22

Publishing Options

23


The bulk of this manual will talk you
through creating various types of content.
Each content type is created and edited in
much the same way
, so fut
ure chapters
will build on
the basic knowledge
presented in this chapter
.

We’re going to learn
how to create a very
basic page. We’ll also
allocate it a menu
item which will link to it

and place it in the
‘About’ section of the website
.

We’ll learn how to
re
-
order the

menu
items in the next chapter.

Creating pages with richer content
(
links,
headings, lists, bold, italic etc…)

will be
explained in Chapter 8 (‘The Text Editor’).
Inserting Images, Video and other media
into the text is explained in Chapter Ni
ne
(‘Media’). If you can’t wait, do skip ahead
once you have read this chapter to learn
about this functionality. Otherwise we will
go through the different content types one
at a time before covering the
text editor
options.


2

Chapter Two

18



Create a basic page

Creating
content couldn’t be simpler. All
content
must have

a title, but that’s all. To
create our first page
we’ll
do

just that


create
a page with only a title.

To create a page:

1.

Choose ‘Add content’ from the
shortcut bar.
[Or, you can choose
‘Content’ from the
main admin bar, and
then ‘
+
Add Content’

from the top of that
page.]

2.

Choose ‘Basic page’

3.

Type a title (say ‘Trial Page’) into the
title field.

4.

Save

That’s all there is to it. You
now
see the
new page (with just a title), and an address
has been create
d

for it
(in the address bar,
something like: ‘sitename/about/trial
-
page’
)
.

We

want
to have
more content that just
a
title

on the page, so next we’ll edit it.

To edit a page:

1.

Choose the edit tab.

2.

Make some changes.
(i.e. enter some
content in the ‘Body’ fie
ld)

3.

Save

To delete a page:

Choose delete at the bottom of the edit
page.

Figure 2.1
The ‘Add content’ page from where you
choose which type of content you would like to add.
This chapter takes you through creating a ‘Basic
page’


the first of these opt
ions.


Figure 2.2
Once you are logged in with the right
permissions each main piece of comment will have
‘View’ and ‘Edit’ tabs above it. Choose ‘Edit’ to edit
any piece on content on the site.



Creating a Basic Page

19



Figure 2.3
At

the bottom of the content editing
page are a section of horizontal tabs which control a
variety of options. The first of these is ‘Menu
settings’. Once ‘Provide a menu link’ is check
ed
, the
rest of the options slide down.

Menu Settings

The page you have
just created has a URL
(address)
.
This means that you can now
view it from anywhere in the world that is
attached to the internet just by typing that
URL into a web browser.

It’s a bit useless
on

the website, though,
unless it appears
as a link somewhere


so
we’re going to give it a menu link. Basic
pages should be used for the ‘About’
section of the website, so for this example
we’ll put it there.

To add a menu link:

1.

Edit the page

2.

Under
neath

the
body field is the
‘Menu settings’ option. Check the
‘Provide
a menu link box’ and more
options appear.

3.

Alter the title if required
(the text
displayed as the menu link)
and add a
description if you would like to.

4.

The ‘Parent item’ is the most
important field here


choose ‘About’

5.

Save

You might now like to click on
the ‘About’
section of the website to see your new
menu item in the sidebar.



Tips



You can safely ignore the ‘weight’
option


it’s easier and more reliable
to order the menu items in the way
you’ll learn in the next chapter.


Chapter Two

20



Revisions

If you update a page

you may want to keep
track of
the old version of the page

so that
you can keep a record of changes and
revert to the old version at a later point if
required.

To create a revision of the page:

1.

In the edit page, choose ‘Revision
information’.

2.

Check ‘Create

new revision’

3.

Save

You are now working on a revision of the
webpage, and there is a new tab marked
‘revisions’.
You can only ever edit the
current revision, but you can view the old
revisions by clicking on the revision
date

in the list on the revisions t
ab.

To revert to a previous revision:

1.

Choose the ‘Revisions’ tab

2.

Click ‘revert’ for the revision you want
to go back to.



Tips



‘revert’ actually creates a new revision
that is a copy of the revision you are
going back to.

You don’t need to worry
about losin
g the original once you
start making changes to it.


Figure 2.4

The next tab down is the ‘Revision
information’ tab. To create a new revision just check
the check box here before hitting ‘Save’ at the bottom
of the page.


Figure 2.5
Once

a revision has been created, a new
tab appears



‘Revisions’.


Figure 2.6
The

revisions tab lists the revisions and
gives you the option to revert to a previous version.
When you revert to a previous version, what you
actually do is create a brand new revision that is a
clone of the one you are ‘reverting’ to. This means
that once
you create a revision you retain a
permanent record of the previous revisions unless
you choose to delete them.



Creating a Basic Page

21



Figure 2.7
The next tab


‘URL path settings’. The
module ‘p
athauto’ will create automatic URL
s for
you. When ‘Automatic alias’ is checked,

the URL alias
field is greyed out. To override the automatic alias
just uncheck ‘Automatic alias’ and you will be able to
enter whatever you like the ‘URL alias’ field.

URL
s

Good URLs
look good in the address bar
and

are also helpful for advertising
info
rmation on the site.
[For instance, in a
parish

noticesheet: ‘Go to
ww
w.marksteychurch.org.uk/alpha for more
information’
.
]

They can also help locate the
user within the site
[i.e. all sermons have the
address /sermons/{title}].

Drupal will create a sensib
le URL for you.
The page you just created was given the
URL: ‘about/{page
-
title}’. Often that will do
just fine. Sometimes, however, you will
want to override what Drupal chooses (for
instance to have ‘/alpha’ rather than
‘about/alpha’.

To override the def
ault URL:

1.

Edit the Page

2.

Choose URL path settings

3.

Uncheck ‘Automatic alias’

4.

Fill in the URL alias you want

5.

Save



Tips



If you use short URLs be very careful
not to use something that is already in
use.



The URL you enter is always an ‘alias’.
The real URLs in
Drupal a
re something
more like ‘?q=node/
134’.
The systems
translates your ‘alias’ into something
Drupal can understand behind the
scenes.


Chapter Two

22



Scheduling

By default pages are published as soon as
you hit save and they remain published
until you change that.

Sometimes you might want to delay a
page’s publication, or have it automatically
unpublished.
You

use the scheduling
options to do this.

To schedule (un)publishing:

1.

Edit the page

2.

Choose ‘Scheduling options’

3.

Set the date and time for publishing or
unpublish
ing (or both). You must fill
in both the date and the time in the
format described on the form.

Use a
time of 00:00:00 if you want it to start
at the beginning of the day

4.

Save



Tips



You can also schedule rotating banner
images. This is especially useful if
you
use those for promoting events.

The site updates itself by running an
updating script periodically (called ‘cron’)
.
The (un)publishing will not occur at the
exact time you schedule it, but at the first
time cron is run after the time you specify.

(Cron

has been set up for you to run once an
hour


see appendix 3 for more details.)

Figure 2.8
The ‘Scheduling options’ tab. (We will
consider the ‘Comment settings’ tab in chapter 4


on
Articles). You can set a time to publish and/or a time
to unpublish.


Figure 2.9
In the ‘Content’ page (admin bar at the
top


or ‘Find Content’ in the shortcut bar) there is a
tab for ‘Scheduled’ items. This will show you a list of
content which has been scheduled and its publish
and unpublish dates.



Creating a Basic Page

23



Figure 2.10
The last available tab is ‘Publishing
options’. Pages are published by default. If you
uncheck ‘published’ then you will need to be logged
in to see the page, and it will no longer appear in the
menu, if you have set a menu item.


‘Promoted to front page’
and ‘Sticky at top of lists’
will have no effect on basic pages.

Publishing options

As well as scheduling a page to (un)publish
automatically, you can (un)publish it
manually using the ‘Publishing options’
section.

Unpublishing a page will also remove any

menu links from the menu
(they will
automatically reappear when you re
-
publish
the page).

To unpublish a page:

1.

Edit the page and choose ‘Publishing
options’.

2.

Uncheck ‘Published’

3.

Save



Tips



This is a good way to
work on

drafts of
a page before
publishing
it

on the
website. Other editors who are logged
in will be able to visit the URL of the
page you have created but it will not
be visible in the menu, or at all to non
logged in visitors.



If you want to circulate a draft to
people without a log on, you can
si
mply leave the page published, but
uncheck the menu link option in Menu
settings. A non logged in visitor can
see the page, but there is no link to it
from the website.



The ‘Promoted to front pa
ge’ and
‘Sticky at top of lists’ options have no
effect on Basic Pages.

25

Managing

the Main
Menu
In This Chapter

Re
-
ordering the menu

26

Editing menu items

28

The top level

items of the main menu are
the section headings: ‘About
’, ‘Blog’,
‘Events’, ‘Sermons’. The ‘Home’ page is
reached by clicking on the logo. You can
also
switch the ‘Home’ page menu item
back on so that the sections

read ‘Home’,
‘About’…

In the
‘A
bout


sect
ion there is also a menu
block
on the left which

shows menu items
beneath

the ‘About’ section heading. If
these second level menu items have items
beneath them, they have a little arrow to
the left of the menu item

to indicate that
the menu item has sub
-
it
ems.

They can
either be expanded by default, or will
expand when that menu item is chosen.

The currently active menu item i
n the
menu block is underlined
to indicate
where the user is within the section.

You can re
-
arrange the menu items
however you like,
and use the same menu
editing page to edit the individual menu
items

(for convenience
-

rather than editing
them from within the page that they belong to
).


3

Chapter Three

26



Re
-
ordering the menu

We learned how to create menu items
within the form for creating and editing
p
ages.

What if you want to re
-
arrange the order
in which these menu links are shown?

To re
-
order items in the menu:

1.

Click on ‘Manage main menu in the
shortcuts menu bar.

2.

Drag

the menu item you want to
move. Drop it in

the place in the menu
you’d like it mov
ed to.

3.

Save



Tips



You can also access this admin page
from the contextual link when you
hover over the menu block. Choose
‘list links’ not ‘edit menu’.



Different levels of the menu are show
by indentation. If you drag ‘About’
(which has many sub items) you
drag
all the sub
-
items with it. Play around
with dragging menu items, bu
t
remember not to press ‘save’
(
you can
get back to where you star
ted just by
reloading the page)
.



You can also drag menu items left and
right to change the level at which the
item app
ears in the menu. Again, this
is best discovered by playing with it.
Make sure not to save your changes!


Figure 3.1
The ‘Main menu’

admin

page that you
get to from the ‘Manage main menu’ link. To drag
menu items up and down, click and drag on the littl
e
cross shaped icon to the left of the menu item names.
Remember that once you have rearranged them you
must press ‘Save’ at the bottom of the form.


Figure 3.2
When

you hover over the sidebar menu
a little gear icon appears


this is the ‘contextual link’
icon. Click on the gear and the contextual links
appear in a drop down (as in this image). Choose ‘List
links’ to rearrange the menu items. The item ‘Edit
menu’ wil
l allow you to change the menu’s name


which is not what you want to do.



Managing the Main Menu

27



Figure 3.3
You can see that ‘Bek’s Group’ and
‘Water’s group’ are indented from ‘Networks’ and
‘Children’s Church to indicate that these third level
menu items. They will not be

displayed by default,
unless ‘Networks’ is in the active menu trail (i.e.
either ‘Networks’ or one of its sub pages is the
current page).


Figure 3.4
You can see that when ‘Children’s
Church’ is the active item, the sub
-
items of
‘Networks’ are hidden. T
he little arrow to the left of
‘Networks’ now shows horizontally, indicating that
there are sub menu items, but that they are not
displayed.



‘Second level’ menu items are the ones
that appear in the ‘About’ Menu block.
‘Third level’ links appear as sub
-
links
(‘children’)
to these items, and are not
displayed by default unless their
parent item is selected. As long as the
user is in this parent’
s part of the
menu
(i.e. the parent is in the ‘active
-
trail’)

these sub links will show. You
can change this behaviour to show
them always expanded
(see the
following page).



‘Fourth level’ items are not displayed
at all. They will however place a page
with
in this section of the site and so
ensure that the menu is shown on the
left hand side, and their ‘parents’ in
the active trail will be expanded.



If you want a page to be in the ‘About’
section but not to show in the menu,
you should still put it in the me
nu, but
disable it
(see how on the following page)
.
If you don’t, ‘About’ won’t be in the
active trail and the menu block on the
left hand side will not be displayed.
[If
it’s naturally a 4
th

level link, there is no
need to disable it


the user won’t see
it in
any case.]



Second level links are only set up to be
displayed within the ‘About’ section.
To change this behaviour, you would
need to add the ‘menu
-
block’ block to
the sections in which you want to
display this block. This is a reasonably
advanced to
pic, and is covered briefly
in chapter 12.


Chapter Three

28



Editing menu items

From the same menu admin page, you can
also edit the individual menu links by
clicking on the edit link. This is mostly the
same as editing the menu item from the
content editing page, with the

exception
that you can also choose whether to ‘show
as expanded’. If you check this, the third
level ‘children’ items will always be shown
expanded.

To edit a menu item:

1.

Choose ‘Manage main menu’ from the
shortcut admin bar.

2.

Choose edit for the item you w
ant to
edit.

3.

Change the title

and description to
suit.

4.

Save



Tips



The title should be short but
descriptive.



The ‘description’ is text that will be
shown when the user hovers their
mouse over the menu item. Keep these
short, but use them to provide a littl
e
more information about where the
link will take the user.



You don’t need to enable and disable
menu items from this screen


you can
do it from the main menu admin
screen. Similarly, it’s much quicker to
change ‘parent item’ and ‘weight’ by
the drag and
drop method of the
previous page.


Figure 3.5
The ‘Edit menu link’ page. The options
are the same as with the Menu link tab in the content
editing page, except that you can choose ‘Show as
expanded’ to force sub items to be shown even when
their parent
is not in the active menu trail.



Managing the Main Menu

29



Figure 3.6
The easiest place to enable and disable
menu items is from the checkboxes on the main
menu page. Remember that once you have checked
or unchecked your options, these are not effective
until you press ‘Save’
at the bottom of the page.

When you disable a menu item, the menu
item will disappear. The page is still there,
though, and accessible to the user from the
address bar (by typing in the URL).

If you look on the main menu admin page,
the ‘Home’ link is disabled.
[The home page
is obviously still there though


and accessible
through clicking on the logo.]
Try enabling
this to see the effect on the main admin
menu.

To enable / disable menu items:

1.

Choose ‘manage main menu’

2.

Check or uncheck to item you want to
enable or disable.

3.

Save



Tips



You can also delete menu items from
this page. This will not delete the
content


just the menu link that
point
s

to it. You will usually want to
disable a link rat
her than delete it.



Links can be added from this screen
(the ‘+ Add link’ at the top
)
. You would
use this to add external links to the
menu. It is very strongly advised
not

to do this, as us
ers will expect links
within your menu system to take them
to pages within your site. Instead, if
you want to add links to other
websites, create a ‘links’ page, and list
them there.

31

Articles (Blog posts)

In This Chapter

Creat
e an Article

32

Tags

34

Image

36

Summary

38

Text Formats

40

Comments

41

Authoring Information

42

Publishing Options

43

A blog
(from ‘we
b log’
)

provides a stream of
posts listed in reverse date order of
publication. Your ‘wall’ on Facebook is just
this. In fact it is very easy to set up a
service to automatically ‘cross
-
post’ every
article posted on the church website to a
church facebook page
(s
ee Appendix 9


‘Feeding Facebook’)
.

If you’re going to have a ‘Blog’ section on
the website you
must

contribute ‘articles’
to it
regularly
.
[Otherwise


switch it off,
which is most easily accomplished by simply
disabling the ‘Blog’ menu link.]

Think abou
t
whether this is something you want to
commit to.

Don’t be distracted by the name ‘Article’
for this content type. You could post:



Just a link to something you read
online or a YouTube video you saw.



Upload a file and provide a link to it
-

i.e. minutes o
f a meeting.



News from mission
partners
.



A set of photos from an event.



A leading article from the parish
newsletter.



A good thought you had today.



Absolutely anything else you’d like to
that keeps people up to date.

4

Chapter Four

32



Create an Article

You create an articl
e just the same way as
a regular page.

To create an article:

1.

Choose ‘Add content’ and then
‘Article’

2.

Fill out the Create Article form

3.

Save

Articles are very like basic pages, but have
a couple of new fields


‘Tags’ and ‘Image’
and are displayed
in lists o
n the site rather
than requiring a menu to find the article.

Tags allow users to search for other
articles where the content is related. The

image
’ field

allows

a large image to be
shown at the top of an article, while a
smaller version of the same image
is
shown on the list of articles
(‘blog’)

page.

Articles are displayed in a list on the ‘Blog’
page, but the most recent articles are also
displayed on the home page. You can
control whether articles will sh
ow up on
the front page or not.

Articles are also

displayed with
information about their author and when
they were published.

The author name is
the website username for that author


which is why people should use their full
names when they create user accounts.

The rest of this chapter talks you throug
h
these options.

Figure 4.1
Articles are shown in a list on the ‘Blog’
p
age of the website. You get to the main article page
by clicking on the title. If the article is too long to be
shown in full in the list, there is also a ‘Read More’
link which tak
es you to the full article.


Figure 4.2
Clicking on a ‘tag’


either beneath an
article, or in the list of popular tags in the side bar
produces a page with a list of articles which share
that tag.



Articles (Blog posts)

33



Figure 4.3
In

list view, you can go straight to the
article editing page, by using the contextual link
(hover over the article and then click on the gear that
appears and choose ‘Edit’).


Figure 4.4
From the full article page, you choose
the ‘Edit’ tab just as you wo
uld

do

for basic pages.

Editing Articles

You edit (or delete) articles the same way
as pages; you can also get to their edit page
from the contextual links within a list of
articles.

The rest of the chapter will assume that
you are within the ‘create arti
cle’ or ‘edit
article’ form.

To edit articles (like pages):

1.

Find the article in the list on the ‘blog’
page.

2.

Click on the title of the article you
want to go to the main article page.

3.

Click on the ‘edit’ tab

To edit articles (quicker):

1.

Hover over the artic
le and click on the
contextual links gear widget.

2.

Choose ‘Edit’


Chapter Four

34



Tags

Tags are displayed under articles and if
you click on them they bring up a list of all
articles with that tag. The most popular
tags are also displayed in a block on the
right hand side
of the blog pages. By
tagging articles sensibly, you allow visitors
to quickly find related content.

You can have as many tags as you like
attached to one article and tags can be one
word (‘children’) or more (‘children’s
work

). You should aim to keep the
m short.

To use the tag field:

1.

Write the first two or three letters of
the tag you want to use in the tag
field.

2.

The autocomplete widget will look for
all tags containing those letters. Select
the tag you want from this list.

3.

If the tag you want to use
doesn’t exist
yet, autocomplete will not find it. Just
type the tag in. It will be available to
autocomplete the next time you want
it.



Tips

Keep tags general


the purpose is to
categorise lots of posts together, not to
describe the unique properties of o
ne post.
[‘2011 AGM minutes’ is very bad. ‘Minutes of
Meetings’ much better.]

Figure 4.5
In the ‘Tags’ field once I have typed the
‘we’ of ‘website

, the dropdown provides me with a
list of all tags including ‘we’. Selecting from this drop
down ensures
that you are choosing exactly the right
spelling.You can see that this is separate from the
‘children’s work’ tag because of the comma after
‘children’s work’. You can have as many tags as you
like for one article.



Articles (Blog posts)

35




Let the autocomplete widget do its
wor
k


don’t type

the tag unless you
have to
. The tags: ‘Children’s Work’,
‘children’s work’, ‘Childrens Work’ and
‘Chidren’s Work’ are all different


you
need them to be the same and the
autocomplete widget guarantees that
for you.



If you want to have sever
al tags you
separate them with a comma
(which
means that a comma can’t be part of a
tag)
. Once you’ve typed the comma,
the autocomplete widget works again
on whatever you type after the
comma.


Chapter Four

36



Image

The image field allows you to upload an
image to the art
icle. This will be displayed
as a large image in the middle of the page
underneath the title and before the main
body of the article. On the list pages, it will
be displayed on the left and in a much
smaller size.

You can insert images into the main body
of the article (we’ll learn about that in
chapter nine), but they won’t be resized
automatically by Drupal when it is
displaying a list view rather than the main
article. So it’s much better to use this
image field (at least for the main image
that accompa
nies the article).

Drupal is very adept at handling images.
You can upload an image of whatever size
you like and Drupal will resize it for you.

(There is more information about preparing
images in Appendix 6.)

The large image (for the
main article) will
b
e scaled down to a maximum of the full
width of the article column and a
maximum of
the same height.

It will usually look better to choose a wide
(landscape)

picture rather than a tall
(portrait)

one.

Figure 4.6
In the main article page, the image field

of the post fills the full width of the content column.


Figure 4.7
In the list view of articles, the same
image is shown, but much smaller, and floated to the
left hand side of the page, with text wrapping around
it.



Articles (Blog posts)

37



Figure 4.8

To use the image fi
eld first of all choose
a file. Once you have chosen the file from your file
system you must then press ‘Upload’.


Figure 4.9
Once the image is uploaded you will see
a thumbnail of it and have the opportunity to fill in
the ‘Alternative text’ which will
be used by screen
readers. Remember that even at this stage the image
is not yet attached to your article


you must still
press ‘save’ at the bottom of the edit page to save
your changes.

To use the image field:

1.

(
First find a decent image for your
article,
and get it onto your computer.
)

2.

In the ‘Image’ field, press ‘Choose File’.
This will bring up your own
computer’s dialog for opening a file.

3.

Find the image you want within your
computer’s file system and press
‘Open’ or double click, or do whateve
r
your computer requires for you to say
‘this one, please’.

4.

Back in the Article form, press
‘Upload’, and wait
. When it is
uploaded you will see a thumbnail
version of the image appear in the
form.

5.

A new text field


‘Alternate text’ has
appeared. Enter a
short description of
the image here.

6.

Save.



Tips



You
must

save the form. It’s easy to
think that once photo has successfully
uploaded you are done. You
have

uploaded the photo, but you’ve not
attached it to this particular article
until you press ‘Save’ at the bottom of
the form.



The image file must be either a .jpg, a
.png or a .gif. If you’re uploading a
photo it will almost

certainly be a .jpg
(or .jpeg).
There are other formats,
though, and if your file is in a different
format you will need to convert it
.


Chapter Four

38



Summary

If you look at the list of articles on the
‘Blog’ page you will see some of the article
(a ‘teaser’) but not the full text
(unless the
article
is very short)
.
You get to read the
whole article by clicking on the article
title, or on the ‘Read More’ link at the
bottom of the teaser.

The text for this ‘teaser’ for the article is
automatically created from the first few
sentences of your article. Yo
u can override
the default break

point
, though, and set
the ‘teaser break’ at the
exact
point you
choose. Do let the system create the teaser
for you, but if it gives you something
you’re not happy with then set this break
point manually.

The other thing
t
hat
you can do is to
override the teaser altogether and
write
your own

‘summary’

of the article
. When
people look at the list of articles, they only
see the ‘teaser’ and if the first few
sentences don’t work well as a ‘teaser’ for
the whole article, it may

be worth creating
a separate
‘summary’ to describe it.

The block on the home page is created
from the first 360 characters of your article
(trimmed to the nearest whole word).
There is nothing you can do to change this
behaviour

on a per article basis
.


Figure 4.10
The ‘Read more’ link indicates that in
the list view you have only been shown a ‘teaser’ for
the full article. By default this teaser is the first part
of the article, but you can set a different summary
altogether.



Articles (Blog posts)

39



Figure 4.11
In the to
olbar of the text editor there is
a little icon showing a dotted red line. This will insert
a ‘teaser break’ in the article


shown by the double
red lines in the body of the article. These double red
lines don’t show when you are viewing the post.


Figur
e 4.12

Next to the ‘Body’ field title is a link to
‘Edit summary’. Use this if you want the teaser text
to be entirely different from the body
text
of the
article.


Figure 4.13
Once you have clicked on ‘Edit
summary’ you will see a new text editor wind
ow
above the body window


this is the text that will
form your ‘teaser’ and be shown in the article list
view. If it is empty, the system reverts to using a
trimmed version of the body text (either automatic
or using the teaser break you have set).

To
set the teaser break point:

1.

In the main body of the article, place
the cursor at the point where you
want the break.

2.

Press the teaser break button in the
text editor toolbar (the icon with black
lines interrupted by a red dotted line).

To write your own ar
ticle
summary:

1.

In the body field, after the title, click
on ‘Edit Summary’. A whole new text
box appears.

2.

Type the summary in this box.



Tips



Most of the time the system will create
a perfectly acceptable ‘teaser view’ of
the article for you.



Don’t worry
about the rest of the text
editor options yet


we’ll cover these
in chapters 8 & 9.



From this point on, I’ve stopped telling
you that you must ‘Save’ the form as
the final instruction. You do still need
to press ‘Save’ for anything to be
saved.


Chapter Four

40



Text Form
ats

For the sake of completeness, we’re going
to cover all the options on the content
editing form.

After the ‘body’ field is the options to
switch to ‘plain text editor’


you could do
this if you only want to type plain text and
don’t want to see the ric
h text editor
options.

Beneath that is a ‘text format’ drop down


set by default to ‘Full HTML’.

Drupal runs filters on the content before
displaying it on a webpage. This is
especially important to prevent attacks on
the website. So it checks
(for instan
ce)

that
there isn’t any executable code in the
content before it sends it to the web
browser.

This is generally a good idea.

Editors and Administrators can use ‘Full
HTML’, but people who are j
ust logged in
as ‘Authenticated’

can only use ‘Filtered
HTML’
(they won’t be able to post YouTube
videos for instance).

Text formats and their permissions are
fully
customisable

(‘Configuration’


then
‘Text Formats’ in the Content Authoring box)
but you should really forget all about them
now they are set and be gla
d of a certain
level of protection that is provided for you.

As part of this filtering it is useful to note
that any email addresses you publish on
the site are protected from being spammed
(see the description of the ‘SpamSpan’ module
in Appendix 1)
.

Fi
gure 4.14
Underneath the body field is an option
to choose ‘text format’. Leave the format set to
‘Full
HTML’. Text formats filter the text as it’s displayed to
the website visitor.



Articles (Blog posts)

41



Figure 4.15
Comments

are open by default on
articles. Once you mark them ‘closed’ people will be
able to see the existing comments, but not add any
more. If you were to choose ‘hidden’ then none of the
comments for the post would be visible.


Figure 4.16
In list view, the n
umber of comments
for a post is displayed underneath the post. If you
click on ‘2 comments’ it takes you straight to the
comments for the post.


Figure 4.17
Underneath the individual comments
are links to delete, edit or reply to the comment. This
is whe
re you would come to delete comments that
were inappropriate if that should prove necessary.

Comments

Logged in users can add comments to
articles. These display in a list after the
article. Every content type can allow
comments


only the ‘Article’ conte
nt type
is set to do so.

Also by default, every comment is
immediately published
(you can set the
system to require administrator approval of
every comment, but that seems a bit over
-
controlling)
.

You can choose to ‘close’ comments for a
particular article



either when you
publish it (so there will be no comments),
or after the comment thread has been
open for a couple of w
eeks or so and you
don’t want

any
further comments
.

To close comments on an article:

1.

Choose ‘Comment settings’ from the
tabs at the
bottom of the form
.

2.

Select the ‘Closed’ button.



Tips



If someone posts an inappropriate
comment, then you should remove it.
There’s a delete link immediately
under each comment.


Chapter Four

42



Authoring Information

Underneath the article title is the author
and date of p
ublication.

Usually this information will be right, but
if you have published an article on
someone else’s behalf you might want to
change the authorship to their name.

Similarly, the date of publication will
usually be right, but if you created the
articl
e on the website and worked on it for
a week or so
(while leaving it ‘unpublished’


so it wasn’t visible)

you might want to
update the publication date to the date
when you published it, rather than when
you first ‘created’ it.

To change author and public
ation
date:

1.

Choose the ‘Authoring information’
tab

2.

For the author, you must choose a user
who is registered on the site. Let the
autocomplete widget do its job


type
in a couple of letter
s

of the name and
let the widget find your author.

3.

For the date and
time field, you must
enter the date in exactly the format
described.



Tips



You only need to enter the date part of
the date and time
(but be careful with
the format)
.


Figure 4.18
The last of the horizontal tabs on the
content editing pages that we will
look at. The author
must already be a registered user on the website

so
the autocomplete widget will find the author you are
looking for. If you want to post an article by someone
who is not yet a user on the website create the user
first (‘+ Add user’ at
the top of the ‘People’ page
)
.



Articles (Blog posts)

43



Figure 4.19
The ‘From the Blog’ block on the front
page shows the most recent two articles which have
‘Promoted to front page’ checked under the
publishing options tab in their content editing page.
Articles are ‘pro
mote
d to front page’ by default

so
you will want to deliberately uncheck this option for
less important articles.

Publishing Options

Just
like you learned in chapter two

when
we created a basic page, you can publish
and unpublish an article using the
‘Publish
ing options’ tab. Articles are
published by default, but you might want
to uncheck ‘Published’ when you create an
article if you want to work on a draft
before letting it go ‘live’ on the site.

There are two other options that we didn’t
cover in chapter tw
o:

Promoted to front page

This is checked by default for articles. It
affects the behaviour of the front page.
The front page will trailer the most recent
two articles
which have ‘Promoted to front
page’ checked
. If you post an article that you
don’t want
advertised on the front page,
uncheck this option.

Sticky at top of lists

This is another flag that all content types
have. It is meant for
forums where you can
keep certain posts ‘stuck’ to
the top of a
list. It has no effect on any content type
within the church website.

45

Events

In This Chapter

Crea
te an Event

46

Date

47

Image &
Description

48

Options

49

What is coming up that you want people to
know about?



A trip to a conference like New Wine?



The beginning of a series of sermons?



A special
service (Harvest or
Remembrance,

Christmas or Easter?)



A concert or other special event?



An open meeting


or some parish
wide gathering?

Anything that has a date attach
ed to it, and
is coming up in the future can be entered
as an ‘event’.

Just as with articles, make sure that if you
use this section of the website, you keep it
well stocked with events.

On the other hand, don’t list
too

many
events. Save them for signific
ant items
that peo
ple will want to be reminded of

or
have bought to their attention. Listing
ev
ery Thursday evening housegroup
, or
every Sunday service will be too much.



5

Chapter Five

46



Create an Event

Events are displayed on the ‘Events’ page
in reverse date order
(i.e
. the next event
coming up is shown first)
. The three next
events are also shown on the front page.

To create an event:

1.

Choose ‘Add content’ from the
shortcut bar.

2.

Choose ‘Event’.

The event form should be very familiar by
now. It must have a title, and
there is a
body field and some options in tabs at the
bottom of the form. Like ‘Articles’ you can
add an image, which will be displayed both
in the list view and on the full page for the
Event. Like the Article ‘Image’ field Drupal
will take care of resizi
ng images to an
appropriate size. Once you’ve uploaded an
image make sure that it looks right both in
the list and the page view.

There are two new
options
:



Event Location



to describe where
the event will be.



EVENT DATE



to describe when the
event is happening.

Location is a simple text field. You do not
have to enter a location


in fact ask
yourself whether you really ne
ed to.

The
‘EVENT DATE’

field
set

i
s described on
the facing page.


Figure 5.1
Events are display
ed in a list by reverse
chronological order of the start date on the ‘Events’
page.


Figure 5.2
The next three events are also shown in
a block on the front page.



Events

47



Figure 5.3
The ‘EVENT DATE’ fieldset allows you to
have a start date, an optional end
date and
optionally remove the time field by marking an event
‘All Day’. For a multi day event, mark the event ‘all
day’ but choose different start and end days.


Figure 5.4
While the event dates are entered in
quite a non user friendly format in the eve
nt date
fields (see fig. 5.3), Drupal takes care of displaying
them in a much more user friendly fashion in the
event listing.

Date

Events will be displayed up until the ‘Start
date’ of the event. Once the event has
begun it will not be displayed in the l
ist of
events coming up.

You have two basic choices in the ‘EVENT
DATE’ fieldset:



The ‘All Day’ check box. Is the event
‘All Day’ or does it have a particular
start time? If you check ‘All Day’ it will
remove the time field(s) and a single
all day event wi
ll be displayed with
‘(all day)’ written after the date.

All
day is often better for multi
-
day
events
(like a holiday club


where you list
it as 10
th



14
th

July
)

with the times for
each day added to the description of
the event.



The ‘Show End Date’ check

box. If you
check this, new fields appear to show
the end date and ti
me. You will often
want to display a date like ‘7pm


9pm,
August 3