1) List of social networking websites

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SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

1

1) List of social networking websites

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to:
navigation
,
search

This is a
list of

major active
social networking

websites
; for defunct social networking Web sites see
List of defunct
social networking websites

P
lease note the list is not exhaustive
, and is limited to
some

notable, well known sites.

Name


Description/Focus


Registered
users


Re
gistration


Global
Alexa
[1]

Page
ranking


Adult
FriendFinder

Adults
--

for finding friends or love partners.

230,000
[2]

Open

42
[3]

Advogato

Free

and
open source software

developers

13,575
[4]

Open

118,513
[5]

Amie Street

Music


Open

29,808
[6]

ANobii

Books


Open

14,345
[7]

aSmallWorld

European
jet set

and social elite

270,000
[8]

Invite
-
only

9,306
[9]

At
hlinks

Running, Swimming, Cycling, Mountain Biking,
Triathlon, and Adventure Racing

54,270
[10]

Open

94,171
[11]

Avatars United

Online games.


Open


Badoo

General, Popular in Europe

13,000,000
[12]

Open to

people 18 and
older

213
[13]

Bahu

General, Popular in
France, Belgium and Europe

1,000,000
[14]

Open to people 13 and
older

2,946
[15]

Bebo

General, Popular in the US, UK, Ireland, NZ and
the Pacific Islands

40,000,000
[16]

Open to people 13 and
older

108
[17]

Biip

Norwegian Community.


Requires Norwegian
phone number.


BlackPlanet

African
-
Americans

20,000,000
[18]

Open

901
[19]

Boomj.com

Boomers and Generation Jones


Open to age 30 and up

15,318
[20]

Broadcaster.com

Video sharing and w
ebcam chat

322,715
[21]

Open


Buzznet

Music and p
op
-
culture

10,000,000
[22]

Open

498
[23]

CafeMom

Mothers

1,250,000
[24]

Open to moms and
moms
-
to
-
be

3,090
[25]

Cake Financial

Investing


Open


Capazoo

General (blogs, photos, music, videos)


Open


Care2

Green

living and social activism

9,961,947
[26]

Open


Classmates.com

School, college, work and the military

50,000,000
[27]

Open

923
[28]

Cloob

General. Popular in Iran.


Open


College Tonight

College students.


requires an e
-
mail


SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

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address with an ".edu"
ending

CouchSurfing

CouchSurfing is a worldw
ide network for
making connections between travelers and the
local communities they visit.

871,049
[29]

Open


DeviantART

Art community

9,040,962
[30]

Open

119
[31]

DontStayIn

Clubbing (primarily UK)


Open


Elftown

Community and wiki around
Fantasy

and
sci
-
fi
.

185,000
[32]

Open, approval needed


Eons.com

For
baby boomers


Open to people 13 and
older

13,675
[33]

Espinthebottle

Teen networking site offering photos, games,
and relationships


Open to people 13 and
older


Experience
Project

Life experiences


Open


Facebook

General.

140,000,000
[34]

Open to people 13 and
older.

5
[35]

Faceparty

General. Popular UK.

200,000
[36]

Invitation only to
people 18 and older.

2,481
[37]

Fetlife

People who are into BDSM

32,500
[38]

Open to people "of
[legal] age to see adult
content"

54,198
[39]

Flixster

Movies

63,000,000
[40]

Open to people 13 and
older

309
[41]

F
otolog

Photoblogging. Popular in South America and
Spain.

20,000,000
[42]

Open

57
[43]

Friends Reunited

UK based. School, college, work, sport and

streets

19,000,000
[44]

Open

8,052
[45]

Friendster

General. Popular in Southeast Asian countries
such as Thailand, Philippines, Indonesia and
Singapore. Not p
opular in North America and
Europe.

90,000,000
[46]

Open to people 16 and
older.

35
[47]

Frühstückstreff

General


Open


Fubar

dating, an "online bar" for 18 and older

1,200,000
[48]

Open

2,609
[49]

Gaia Online

Anime

and games


Open to people 13 and
older


Gather

Article, picture, and video sharing, as well as
group discussions

465,000
[50]

Open


Geni.com

Families, genealogy

15,000,000
[51]

Open


Goodreads

Library cataloging, book lovers


Open

5,305
[52]

Gossipreport.com

Anonymous gossip


Open to people 16
and
older


Grono.net

Poland


Invite
-
only


GamerDNA

Online games


Open


Habbo

Ge
neral. Over 31 communities worldwide.
Chat
Room

and
user profiles
.

117,000,000
[53]
[54]
[55]

Open to people 13 and
older

4,050
[56]


SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

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hi5

General. Popular in Angola, Portugal, Cyprus,
Romania, Thailand, Central Africa and Latin
America.

80,000,000
[57]

Open to people 13 and
older

16
[58]

Horseland

5 million users who join from all over the world
with a shared love and interest in horses.

5,000,000
[59]

Open to people 13 and
older

43,409
[60]

Hospitality Club

Hospitality

328,629
[61]

Open


Hyves

Most popular
Dutch

social network, espec
ially
for students

8,000,000
[62]

Open

216
[63]

imeem

Music, Video, Photos, Blogs

24,000,000
[64]

Open

140
[65]

IRC
-
Galleria

Finland

505,000
[66]

Open to Finnish
speaking people 12 and

older


Italki

Learning languages, and helping others to learn

350,000

Open


itsmy

Mobile community worl
dwide, blogging,
friends, personal TV
-
shows

2,500,000.
[67]



iWiW

Hungary

1,700,000
[68]

Invite
-
only


Jaiku

General. Owned by
Google
.


You must request an
invitation into the beta
-
test


Jammer Direct

Creative resource website


Open to the Gener
al
Public


kaioo

General, nonprofit

30,000
[69]



kaixin

General. In Simplified Chinese; caters for
mainland China users


Open to the General
Public


Last.fm

Music

21,000,000
[70]

Open to people 13 and
older

262
[71]

LibraryThing

Book lovers

400,000
[72]

Open to people 13 and
older


lifeknot

Shared interests
, hobbies


Open to people 18 and
older.


LinkedIn

Business

30,000,000
[73]

Open

211
[74]

LiveJournal

Blogging

17,564,977
[75]

Open (
OpenID
)

56
[76]

Livemocha

Languages. Used to learn and help others learn
languages.

1,000,000
[77]

Open

5
,505
[78]

LunarStorm

Sweden


Open


MEETin

General


Open


Meetup.com

General. Used to plan offline meeting
s for
people interested in various activities.


Open to people 18 and
older.


MiGente.com

Latinos

2,800,000
[79]

Open

5,266
[80]

Mixi

Japan

20,936,509
[81]

Invite
-
only

64
[82]

mobikade

mobile community, UK only


Open to peo
ple 18 and
older


MocoSpace

mobile community, worldwide

3,000,000
[83]

Open to people 14 and
older



SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

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MOG

Music


Open to people 14 and
older


Multiply

"Real world" relationships

10,000,000
[84]

Open to

people 13 and
older

150
[85]

Muxlim

Muslim portal
site

50,000
[86]

Open to people 13 and
older

94,338
[87]

MyChurch

Christian Churches

144,295
[88]

Open

33,621
[89]

MyHeritage

family
-
oriented social network service


Open


MySpace

General. Popular in the United Stat
es, Canada
and Europe.

253,145,404
[90]

Open to ages 14 and
up.

6
[71]

myYearbook

General

5,100,000
[91]

Open to age 13 and up
& Grades 9 and up

894
[92]

Nasza
-
klasa.pl

School, college and friends. Popular in Poland.

11,000,000
[93]

Open


Netlog

General. Popular in Europe and Québec
province. Formerly known as Facebox and
Redbox.

36,000,000
[94]


[95]

Open to people 13 and
older

98
[96]

Nettby

Norwegian Community.


Open


Nexopia

Canada

1,400,000
[97]

Open to people 14 and
older

4,362
[98]

Ning

Users create their own social websites and social
networks


Open

566

Odnoklassniki.ru

General. Popular in Russia and former Soviet
republics

22,000,000

Open

42
[99]

OkCupid

Social networking and dating


Open to people 18 and
older


Orkut

Owned by Google. Popular in Brazil, Paraguay,
India, Pakistan and Estonia.

67,000,000
[100]

Open to people 18

and
older, (
Google

login)

11
[101]

OneWorldTV

Not for Profit

Video sharing and social
networking aimed at people interested in social
issues, developmen
t, environment, etc.


Open


OUTeverywhere

Gay
/
LGBTQ

Community


Open


Passportstamp

Travel


Open


Pingsta

Collaborative platform for the world's
Internetwork

Exper
ts


Invite
-
only, only
Internet Experts


Plaxo

Aggregator

15,000,000
[102]

Open


Playahead

Swedish, Danish,Norwegian teenagers


Open


Playboy U

Online college community


Open to college
students with .edu e
-
mail address


Plurk

Micro
-
blogg
ing, RSS, updates


Open

27,061
[103]

ProfileHeaven

British teens


Open to people 13 and
older


quarterlife

A social network for artists,

filmmakers,
musicians, and creative people


Open to people 14 and
older



SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

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Ravelry

Knitting and crochet

80,000
[104]

Invite
-
only

while in
beta


Reunion.com

Locating friends and family, keeping in touch

51,000,000
[105]

Open

2,311
[106]

ResearchGATE

Socia
l network for scientific researchers

22,000

Open


Ryze

Business

500,000
[107]

Open


scispace.net

Collaborative network site for scientists


By invitation, but can
reque
st an invitation


Shelfari

Books


Open


Skyrock

Social Network in French
-
speakin
g world

22,000,000
[108]

Open

41
[109]

Sonico.com

General. Popular in Latin America and Spanish
and Portuguese speaking regions.

17
,000,000
[110]
[111]

Open to people 13 and
older.

297
[112]

So
undpedia

Music


Open

154,672
[113]

Spoke

Business
networking


Open

5,568
[114]

Stickam

Live video

streaming and chat.

2,000,000
[115]

Open


Student.com

International teens and colleges


Open


StudiVZ

University students, mostly in the German
-
speaking countries

8,000,000
[116]

Open


Tagged.com

General

30,000,000
[117]

Open

236
[118]

Taltopia

Online artistic community


Open


TravBuddy.com

Travel


Open


Travellerspoint

Travel


Open


tribe.net

General


Open

3,517
[119]

Trombi.com

French subsidiary of Classmates.com

4,400,000
[120]



Tuenti.com

General. Very Popular in Spain


Invite
-
only

587
[121]

Twitter

Micro
-
blogging, RSS, updates

2,200,000
[122]

Open

1,970
[
123]

V Kontakte

Russian social network.

20,000,000
[124]

Open

27
[125]

Vampi
refreaks

Gothic and industrial subculture

1,725,604
[126]

Open to users 13 and
over


Vox

Blogging


Open


Wasabi

General


Open


WAYN

Travel and lifestyle

10,000,000
[127]

Open to people 18 and
older

823
[128]

WebBiographies

Genealogy

and
biography


Open


Windows Live
Spaces

Blogging (formerly MSN Spaces)

120,000,000
[129]

Open

4
[130]

Wis.dm

Questions and answers about anything and
everything

50,000
[131]

Open


Xanga

Blogs and "metro" areas

27,000,000
[132]

Open

230
[133]

XING

Business (primarily Europe (Germany) and
China)

6,000,000
[134]

Open

1,814
[135]

Xiaonei

Significant site in China

15,000,000
[136]

Open


Xt3

Catholic social networking, created after World
Youth Day 2008


Open



SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

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Yelp, Inc.

Local Business Review and Talk


Open


Youmeo

UK Social Network (focus on data portability)


Open













2) Social network service

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to:
navigation
,
search

Not to be confused with
social network
.

For a list of social networking websites, see
List of social networking websites
.

A
social network service

focuses on building
online

communities

of people who share interests and/or activities, or who
are interested in exploring the interests and activities of others. Most social network services are
web based

and p
rovide a
variety of ways for users to interact, such as
e
-
mail

and
instant messaging

services.

Social netw
orking has created new ways to communicate and share information. Social networking websites are being
used regularly by millions of people, and it now seems that social networking will be an enduring part of everyday life.
The main types of social network
ing services are those which contain directories of some categories (such as former
classmates), means to connect with friends (usually with self
-
description pages), and recommender systems linked to
trust. Popular methods now combine many of these, with
MySpace

and
Facebook

being the most widely used in North
America;
[1]

Nexopia

(mostly in
Canada
);
[2]

Bebo
,
[3]

Facebook,
Hi5
, MySpace,
Tagged
,
Xing
;
[4]

and
Skyrock

in parts of
Europe;
[5]

Orkut

and
Hi5

in
South America

an
d
Central America
;
[6]

and
Friendster
,
Orkut
,
Xiaonei

and
Cywor
ld

in Asia
and the Pacific Islands.

There have been some attempts to standardize these services to avoid the need to duplicate entries of friends and interests
(see the
FOAF

standard and the
Open Source Initiative
), but this has led to some concerns about privacy.


SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

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Contents

[
hide
]



1

History of social networking services




2

Research on the social impact of social networking software




3

Business applications




4

Medical applications




5

Social networks for social good




6

Pros of Social networking applications




7

Cons of Social Networking Applications




8

Typical structure of a social networking service


o

8.1

Basics


o

8.2

Social status


o

8.3

Additional features


o

8.4

Business model




9

Privacy


o

9.1

Notifications on social networking websites




10

Investigations




11

Potential for misuse




12

See also




13

References




14

Further reading


[
edit
]

History of social

networking services

The notion that individual computers linked electronically could form the basis of computer mediated social interaction
and networking was suggested early on
[7]
. There were many early efforts to support social networks via computer
-
mediated communication, including
Usenet
,
ARPANET
,
LISTSERV
, bulletin board services (
BBS
), and EIES: Murray
Turoff's s
erver
-
based Electronic Information Exchange Service (Turoff and Hiltz, 1978, 1993). The
Information Routing
Group

developed a schema about how the proto
-
I
nternet might support this.
[8]

Early social networking websites included
C
lassmates.com

(1995), focusing on ties with former school mates, and
SixDegrees.com

(1997), focusing on indirect ties. User profiles could be created, messages sent to users h
eld on a
“friends list” and other members could be sought out who had similar interests to yours in their profiles.
[9]

Whilst these
features had existed
in some form before SixDegrees.com came about, this would be the first time these functions were
available in one package. Despite these new developments (that would later catch on and become immensely popular),
the website simply wasn’t profitable and eve
ntually shut down.
[10]

It was even described by the website’s owner as
"simply ahead of its time."
[11]

Two different models of social networking that came about in 1999 were trust
-
based,
developed by
Epinions.com
, and friendship
-
based, such as those developed by Jonathan Bishop and used on some
regional UK sites between 1999 and 2001.
[12]

Innovations included not only showing
who is "friends" with whom, but
giving users more control over content and connectivity. Between 2002 and 2004, three social networking sites emerged
as the most popular form of these sites in the world, causing such sites to become part of mainstream user
s globally. First
there was
Friendster

(which Google tried to acquire in 2003), then,
MySpace
, and finally,
Bebo
. By 2005,
MySpace
,
emergent as the biggest of them all, was reportedly getting more page views than
Google
. 2004 saw the emergence of

SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

8

Facebook
, a competitor, also rapidly growing in size.
[13]

In 2006, Facebook opened up to the non US college community,
and together with allowing externally
-
developed add
-
on applications, and some applications enabled the graphing of a
user's own social network
-

thus linking

social networks and social networking, became the largest and fastest growing
site in the world, not limited by particular geographical followings.
[14]

Social networking began to flourish as a component of business internet strategy at around March 2005 when
Yahoo

launched
Yahoo! 360°
. In July 2005
News Corporation

bought MySpace, followed by
ITV

(UK) buying
Friends
Reunited

in December 2005.
[15]
[16]

Various social networking sites have sprung up catering to different languages and
countries. It is estimated that combined there are now over 200 social networking sites using these existing

and emerging
social networking models,
[17]

without counting the niche social networks (also referred to as
vertical social networks
)
made possible by services such as
Ning

and
KickApps
.
[18]

[
edit
]

Research on the social impact of social networking software

An increasing number of academic commentators are becoming interested in studying Facebook and other social
networking tools. Social science researchers have begun
to investigate what the impact of this might be on society.
Typical articles have investigated issues such as



Identity
[19]




Privacy
[20]




E
-
learning
[21]




Social capital
[22]




Teenage use
[23]


A special issue of the Journal for Computer
-
Mediated

Communications was dedicated to studies of social network sites.
Included in this issue is an introduction to social network sites.
[24]

A 2008 book pu
blished by
Forrester Research
, Inc. titled
Groundswell

builds on a 2006 Forrester Report about

social
computing and coins the term groundswell to mean "a spontaneous movement of people using online tools to connect,
take charge of their own experience, and get what they need
-
information, support, ideas, products, and bargaining power
-
-
from each oth
er."

[
edit
]

Business applications

Social networks connect people at low cost; this can be beneficial for
entrepreneurs

and
small businesses

looking to
expand their contact base. These networks often act as a cust
omer relationship management tool for companies selling
products and services. Companies can also use social networks for advertising in the form of banners and text ads. Since
businesses operate globally, social networks can make it easier to keep in touc
h with contacts around the world.

One example of social networking being used for business purposes is
LinkedIn
.com, which aims to interconnect
professionals. It claims to have more than 2
0 million registered users from 150 different industries.

Professional networking sites function as online meeting places for business and industry professionals. Other sites are
bringing this model for niche business professional networking.


SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

9

Virtual commu
nities for business allow individuals to be accessible. People establish their real identity in a verifiable
place. These individuals then interact with each other or within groups that share common business interests and goals.
They can also post their ow
n user generated content in the form of blogs, pictures, slide shows and videos. Like a social
network, the consumer essentially becomes the publisher.

A professional network is used for the business to business marketplace. These networks improve the abil
ity for people to
advance professionally, by finding, connecting and networking with others. Business professionals can share experiences
with others who have a need to learn from similar experiences.

The traditional way to interact is face
-
to
-
face. Intera
ctive technology makes it possible for people to network with their
peers from anywhere, at anytime in an online environment. Professional network services attract, aggregate and assemble
large business
-
focused audiences by creating informative and interac
tive meeting places.

[
edit
]

Medical applications

Social networks are beginning to be adopted by healthcare profes
sionals as a means to manage institutional knowledge,
disseminate peer to peer knowledge and to highlight individual physicians and institutions. The advantage of using a
dedicated medical social networking site is that all the members are screened against

the state licensing board list of
practitioners.
[25]

The role of social networks is especially of interest to pharmaceutical companies who spend appro
ximately "32 percent
of their marketing dollars" attempting to influence the opinion leaders of social networks.
[26]

A new trend is emerging with socia
l networks created to help its members with various physical and mental ailments. For
people suffering from life altering diseases,
PatientsLikeMe

offers its members the chance

to connect with others dealing
with similar issues and research patient data related to their condition. For alcoholics and addicts,
SoberCircle

gives
people in recovery the ability to communicate with one another and strengthen their recovery through the encouragement
of others who can relate to their situation.
Daily strength

is also a website that offers support groups for a wide array of
topics and conditions, including the support topics offered by
PatientsLikeMe

and

SoberCircle
.

[
edit
]

Social networks for social good

Several websites are beginning to tap into the power of the social networking model for
social good
.

Such models may be
highly successful for connecting otherwise fragmented industries and small organizations without the resources to reach a
broader audience with interested and passionate users. Users benefit by interacting with a like minded community a
nd
finding a channel for their energy and giving.
[27]

Examples include
SixDegrees.org
,
TakingITGlobal

and
Network for
Good
. The
charity badge

is often used within the above context.

[
edit
]

Pros of Social networking applications

-

CMC can have a positive effect on student/teacher communication which can lead to positive student outcomes. The
use of emoticons enables the relati
onship between teachers and students to become more personal.
[28]

-

Business decision makers are now preferring communication channels that are two
-
wa
y dialogs, channels that resemble
social networking applications. This is a great way for businesses to advertise their product. It is also a way that has
proved to be more effective than the previous “word of mouth” influence.
[29]


SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

10

-

Social networking allows us to identify and connect with friends and strangers while on the go. Such computer
mediated communication also allows us to reconnect with friends

from the past whom we may have lost contact with.
[30]

-

LinkedIn is a sns (social networking site) particularly used by jobseekers. It is a tool used

to link users to people they
may have worked with in the past through various jobs or institutions. Users also have the opportunity to link to certain
companies they aspire to work with.
[31]

[
edit
]

Cons of Social Networking Applications

On the
contrary, all networking applications used in the professional environment are not beneficial or successful. Some
prospects experience trouble while trying to build their networks, thus they may produce ineffective work.
[32]

Employees
are now more likely than before to carry inappropriate conversations at work. Communicating with such technologies
creates a relaxed feeling in a professional environment.

Some messages that should be relayed in person are being sent
through the computer; the nature of the message and the audience should dictate the medium used to transmit the
message.
[33]

The ability to network with 100 people will not improve our communication skills when in contact with
them.
[34]

[
edit
]

Typical structure of a social networking service

[
edit
]

Basics

In general, social networking services allow users to create a profile for themselves, and can be broken down into two
broad categories: inter
nal social networking (ISN)
[35]

and external social networking (ESN)
[36]

sites, such as
Orkut
,
MySpace
,
Face
book

and
Bebo
. Both types can increase the feeling of community among people. An ISN is a
closed/private community that consists of a group of people within a company, association, society, educa
tion provider
and organization or even an "invite only" group created by a user in an ESN. An ESN is open/public and available to all
web users to communicate and are designed to attract advertisers. ESN's can be smaller specialised communities (i.e.
linke
d by a single common interest eg TheSocialGolfer, ACountryLife.Com, Great Cooks Community) or they can be
large generic social networking sites (eg MySpace, Facebook etc).

However, whether specialised or generic there is commonality across the general appr
oach of social networking sites.
Users can upload a picture of themselves, create their 'profile' and can often be "friends" with other users. In most social
networking services, both users must confirm that they are friends before they are linked. For exa
mple, if
Alice

lists Bob
as a friend, then Bob would have to approve Alice's friend request before they are listed as friends. Some social
networking sites have a "favorites" fea
ture that does not need approval from the other user. Social networks usually have
privacy controls that allows the user to choose who can view their profile or contact them, etc.

Some social networking sites are created for the benifits of others, such as

parents social networking site "
Gurgle
". This
website

is for parents to talk about
pregnancy
,
birth

and bringing up children.

Several social networks in Asian markets such as India, China, Japan and Korea have reached not only a high usage but
also
a high level of profitability. Services such as QQ (China), Mixi (Japan), Cyworld (Korea) or the mobile
-
focused
service Mobile Game Town by the company DeNA in Japan (which has over 10 million users) are all profitable, setting
them apart from their wester
n counterparts.
[37]

[
edit
]

Social status


SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

11

The social status of an individual is revealed on social networks. Sociologist Erving Goffman refers to the “Interaction
Order” which he claims is the “part of the social life where face
-
to
-
face and spoken interactions occur” (Rh
iengold: 2002,
P171). He believes that the way people represent themselves provides other users information about them they want
others to believe, while concealing the rest. Goffman believes that people also give off “information leaking true but
uncontro
lled information along with their more deliberate performances” (Rheingold: 2002, P171). Through social
networks people are now able to completely control the information provided about themselves through the photos they
include, the information provided,
whether it be true or false and the friends they make. People are therefore now able to
control their personal information and their desired social status.

[
edit
]

Additional features

Some social networks have additional features, such as the ability to create groups that share common interests or
affiliations, upload or stream live videos, and hold discussions in for
ums.
Geosocial networking

co
-
opts internet mapping
services to organize user participation around geographic features and their attributes.

There is also a trend fo
r more
interoperability between social networks

led by technologies such as
OpenID

and
OpenSocial
.

Lately, mobile social networking has become popular. In most mobile communities, mobile phone users can now create
their own profiles, make friends, participate in chat room
s, create chat rooms, hold private conversations, share photos
and videos, and share blogs by using their mobile phone. Mobile phone users are basically open to every option that
someone sitting on the computer has. Some companies provide wireless services

which allow their customers to build
their own mobile community and brand it, but one of the most popular wireless services for social networking in North
America is Facebook Mobile. Other companies provide new innovative features which extend the social
networking
experience into the real world.

[
edit
]

Business model

Few social networks currently charge money for member
ship. In part, this may be because social networking is a
relatively new service, and the value of using them has not been firmly established in customers' minds.
[
citation needed
]

Companies such as
MySpace

and
Facebook

sell
online advertising

on their site. Hence, they are seeking large
memberships, and charging for membership would be counterproductive.
[38]

Some believe that the deeper information
that the sites have on each user will allow much better targeted advertising than any other site can currently provide.
[39]

Social networks operate under an autonomous business model, in which a social network's members serve dual roles as
both the suppliers and the consumers of content. This is in contrast to a traditional business model, wh
ere the suppliers
and consumers are distinct agents. Revenue is typically gained in the autonomous business model via advertisements, but
subscription
-
based revenue is possible when membership and content levels are sufficiently high.
[40]

[
edit
]

Privacy

On large social networ
king services, there have been growing concerns about users giving out too much personal
information and the threat of sexual predators. Users of these services need to be aware of
data theft

or
viruses
. However,
large services, such as MySpace, often work with law enforcement to try to prevent such incidents.


SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

12

In addition, there is a percei
ved privacy threat in relation to placing too much personal information in the hands of large
corporations or governmental bodies, allowing a profile to be produced on an individual's behavior on which decisions,
detrimental to an individual, may be taken.

Furthermore, there is an issue over the control of data

information having been altered or removed by the user may in
fact be retained and/or passed to 3rd parties. This danger was highlighted when the controversial social networking site
Quechup

harvested e
-
mail addresses from users' e
-
mail accounts for use in a
spamming

operation.
[41]

In medical and scientific research, asking subjects for information about their behaviors is normally strictly scrutinized
by
institutional review boards
, for example, to ensure that adolescents and their parents have
informed consent
. It is not
clear

whether the same rules apply to researchers who collect data from social networking sites. These sites often contain
a great deal of data that is hard to obtain via traditional means. Even though the data are public, republishing it in a
research paper mi
ght be considered
invasion of privacy
.
[42]

[
edit
]

Notifications on social networking websites

There has been a trend for social networking sites to se
nd out only 'positive' notifications to users. For example sites such
as Bebo, Facebook, and Myspace will not send notifications to users when they are removed from a person's friends list.
Similarly Bebo will send out a notification if a user is moved to
the top of another user's friends list but no notification is
sent if they are moved down the list.

This allows users to purge undesirables from their list extremely easily and often without confrontation since a user will
rarely notice if one person disap
pears from their friends list. It also enforces the general positive atmosphere of the
website without drawing attention to unpleasant happenings such as friends falling out, rejection and failed relationships.

[
edit
]

Investigations

Main article:
Use of social network websites in investigations

Social network services are increasingly being used in legal and criminal investigations. Information posted on sites such
as MySpace and Facebook has been used by police, probation, and

university officials to prosecute users of said sites. In
some situations, content posted on MySpace has been used in court.
[43]

Facebook is increasin
gly being used by school administrations and law enforcement agencies as a source of evidence
against student users. The site, the number one online destination for college students, allows users to create profile pages

with personal details. These pages c
an be viewed by other registered users from the same school which often include
resident assistants and campus police who have signed
-
up for the service.
[44]

[
edit
]

Potential for misuse

The relative freedom afforded by social networking services has caused concer
n regarding the potential of its misuse by
individual patrons. In October 2006, a fake
Myspace

profile created in the name of Josh Evans by Lori Janine Drew led
to the suicide of
Megan Meier
.
[45]

The event incited global concern regarding the us
e of social networking services for
bullying purposes.

In July 2008, a Briton,
Grant Raphael
, was ordered to pay a total of GBP £22,000 (about USD $44,000) for libel and
breach o
f privacy. Raphael had posted a fake page on
Facebook

purporting to be that of a former schoolfriend Matthew

SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

13

Firsht, with whom Raphael had fallen out in 2000. The page falsely claimed that

Firsht was homosexual and that he was
dishonest.

At the same, genuine use of social networking services has been treated with suspicion on the ground of the services'
misuse. In September 2008, the profile of Australian Facebook user Elmo Keep was banned
by the site's administrators
on the grounds that it violated the site's terms of use. Keep is one of several users of Facebook who were banned from the
site on the presumption that their names aren't real, as they bear resemblance the names of characters l
ike Sesame Street's
Elmo.
[46]

The misuse of social networking services has led many to cast doubt over whether any information on these
services can in

fact be regarded as true.

[
edit
]

See also



Comparison of social networking software




Distributed social network




List of social networking websites




Mobile social network




Online dating service




Professional network service




Social network




Social network aggregation




Social networking in the Philippines




Social software




Virtual community




Web 2.0




3) Comparison of social networking software

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to:
navigation
,
search


The
neutrality

of this article is
disputed
.

Please see the discussion on the
talk page
.
(A
ugust 2008)

Please do not remove this message until the
dispute is resolved.


This article or section
may contain improper references to
self
-
published sources
. Please help
improve it

by
removing references to
unreliable sources

where they are used inappropriately.
(August 2008)

[
edit
]

Social Network Engine Comparison

Social Network Engines

provide the basis for community driven content and social/business networking.


SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

14

Category

PeopleAggregator

ELGG

Mugshot

Drupal

Community
Server

Joomla!

PHPizabi

ODS

Last Access

2007
-
03
-
05

2007
-
03
-
05

2008
-
10
-
31

2008
-
11
-
02

2007
-
03
-
05

2007
-
03
-
05

2007
-
03
-
05

2008
-
03
-
06

License

Custom
[1]

[5]

Open source under the
GPL
2.0
[2]

[6]

GPL 2.0

GPL 2.0
[3]

[7]

Custom
Prohibited

GPL 2.0

Custom

Licensing Terms

(based on
GPL
2.0
)

Cost

Free (not free,
$270
0
-
$20,000)
[
clarification
needed
]

Free

Free

Free

Per License

Free

Free

Free

Source
Code

Yes

Freely available via stable
releases and development
SVN

SVN

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

ODS CVS

is part of the
Virtuoso
source tree

at SourceForge

Version

1.2pre6

0.9.2

N/A

5.12, 6.6

20611.96

1.5.6

0.848b C1
HFP1

5.0.5

Installation

Out of the box

Out of the box


Out of the
box


Out of the
box

Out of the
box

Out of the box in
Virtuoso Open
-
Source Edition

demo database

Codebase

PHP
,
MySQL

PHP
,
MySQL
/
PostgreSQL


PHP
,
MySQL

ASP.NET

2.0.

PHP
,
MySQL

PHP
,
MySQL

Virtuoso Universal Server
:
VSP
,
VSPX

SSO

support

Yahoo

Flickr

ID,
OpenID

,
VardSpace

(under dev)

LDAP

built in,
OpenID

by
plugin

No

Yes
-

OpenID
,
module

Yes

No


ODS
-
Framework
-

OpenID

and
Yadis

compliant

RSS

Blog

Blog/Files/Groups/users/tags

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes


content syndication sup
porting
RSS

1.0, RSS 2.0,
Atom
,
SIOC
,
OPML
,
OCS
, and others


SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

15

RSS

Reader/Aggregator

No

Yes

Simple
aggregator
from
many sites

Module

Yes

No


ODS
-
Feed
-
Manager
-

RSS

1.0,
RSS 2.0,
Atom
,
OPML
,
OCS

Feed
Aggregator

Access control

Group based

Yes, users and groups
(extensible via plugins)

Group
based

Yes

Yes

No


Yes, Users and Groups

Wiki

No

Plugin

No

Module

No

No

No

ODS
-
Wiki supports Atom
Publishing Protocol alongside
Twiki and Wikimedia markup

Forum

Yes

Yes, via plugin

No

Yes

Yes


Yes

Conversation/Discussion
Management that also provides
Conversation/Comment/Discussion
management services to all of the
ODS
-
* applications

Blog

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

ODS
-
We
blog supports all major
publishing protocols (
Atom
,
Moveable Type
,
Meta Weblog
, and
Blogger
) and includes automatic
generation of content syndication
gems that support
RSS

1.0, RSS
2.0,
Atom
,
SIOC
,
OPML
,
OCS
,
and others

Media sharing

"Image, Video,
Audio"

"Image, video, audio,
documents, any filetype,
automatic podcast support"


Module

Yes


Yes

ODS
-
Gallery
-

Photo & General
Image Sharing;
ODS
-
Briefcase
-

WebDAV based Unified Storage
Solution for any filetype also
incorporates automated metadata
extraction and management

Messaging

Yes

Yes

Yes

Module

Yes

Yes

Yes

ODS
-
Mail
-

Web based Email
Client


SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

16

Event
Calendar

Yes/Personal+Group

No


Module



Yes

ODS
-
Calendar
-

Calendar Manager

Social Grouping

Yes

Yes


Module



Yes
(commercial
module)

ODS
-
Community
-

Group
/Community Mode service
for all of the ODS
-
* applications

Tagging

Yes

Yes


Module



No

Yes (
SKOS
,
SCOT

and
MOAT
)

Connectivity

"
MySpace
,
Facebook
,
Google

Service,
YouTube
,
AIM
,
Flickr
"



Yes via
third party
integration
like
Octazen
scripts




Facebook
,
Flickr
,
Amazon
,
Ebay
,
Google
,
del.icio.us
, Web importer,
Mash
-
ups

Bookmark Sharing
/ Management


Yes, via plugin






ODS
-
Bookmark
-
Manager
-

Shared
Bookmark Ma
nager

Poll
Generation/Tally








ODS
-
Polls
-

Polls Manager

Contact
Management








ODS
-
Addressbook
-

Addressbook
Manager

Supports the
Semantic Web








Yes, and
Linked Data

Supports
DataPortability








Yes

Customizable

Under dev.

Extensible via plugins with a
flexib
le API; skinnable;
available in many languages


Module




Open Source, Skinnable, and more


SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

17

Comment

Integration of many
services

"Clean, simple"

More like
RSS
aggrators

Equipped
with a
powerful
blend of
features,
Drupal
supports a
variety of
websites
rangi
ng
from
personal
weblogs to
large
community
-
driven
websites.


Content
management


All component applications fully
integrated, and all data accessible
by multiple means including
SPARQL
/
RDF
,
ODBC
,
JDBC
,
AD
O.NET
,
OLE DB
,
XMLA
, and
other protocols.

Category

PeopleAggregator

ELGG

Mugshot

Drupal

Community
Server

Joomla!

PHPizabi

ODS

Retrieved from "
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_social_networking_software
"

Categories
:
Software comparisons

|
Online social networking

Hidden categories:
NPOV disputes from August 2008

|
All NPOV disputes

|
Accuracy disputes from August 2008

|
Wikipedia articles needing clarification


4) Comparison of social ne
tworking software

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to:
navigation
,
search


The
neutrality

of this article is
disputed
.

Please see the discussion on the
talk page
.
(August 2008)

Please do not remove this message until the
d
ispute is resolved.


This article or section
may contain improper references to
self
-
published sources
. Please help
improve
it

by
removing references to
unreliable sources

where they are used inappropriately.
(August 2008)

[
edit
]

Social Network Engine Comparison

Social Network Engines

provide the basis

for community driven content and social/business networking.


SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

18

Category

PeopleAggregator

ELGG

Mugshot

Drupal

Community
Server

Joomla!

PHPizabi

ODS

Last Access

2007
-
03
-
05

2007
-
03
-
05

2008
-
10
-
31

2008
-
11
-
02

2007
-
03
-
05

2007
-
03
-
05

2007
-
03
-
05

2008
-
03
-
06

License

Custom
[1]

[5]

Open source under the
GPL
2.0
[2]

[6]

GPL 2.0

GPL 2.0
[3]

[7]

Custom
Prohibited

GPL 2.0

Custom

Licensing Terms

(based on
GPL
2.0
)

Cost

Free (not free,
$2700
-
$20,000)
[
clarification
needed
]

Free

Free

Free

Per License

Free

Free

Free

Source Code

Yes

Freely available via stable
releases and development
SVN

SVN

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

ODS CVS

is part of the
Virtuoso
source tree

at SourceForge

Version

1.2pre6

0.9.2

N/A

5.12, 6.6

20611.96

1.5.6

0.848b C1
HFP1

5.0.5

Installation

Out of the box

Out of the box


Out of the
box


Out of the
box

Out of the
box

Out of the box in
Virtuoso Open
-
Source Edition

demo database

Codebase

PHP
,
MySQL

PHP
,
MySQL
/
PostgreSQL


PHP
,
MySQL

ASP.NET

2.0.

PHP
,
MySQL

PHP
,
MySQL

Virtuoso Universal Server
:
VSP
,
VSPX

SSO

support

Yahoo

Flickr

ID,
OpenID

,
VardSpace

(under dev)

LDAP

built in,
OpenID

by
plugin

No

Yes
-

OpenID
,
module

Yes

No


ODS
-
Framework
-

OpenID

and
Yadis

compliant

RSS

Blog

Blog/Files/Groups/users/tags

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes


content syndication supporting
RSS

1.0, RSS 2.0,
Atom
,
SIOC
,
OPML
,
OCS
, and others


SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

19

RSS

Reader/
Aggregator

No

Yes

Simple
aggregator
from
many sites

Module

Yes

No


ODS
-
Feed
-
Manager
-

RSS

1.0,
RSS 2.0,
Atom
,
OPML
,
OCS

Feed
Aggregator

Access control

Group based

Yes, users and groups
(extensibl
e via plugins)

Group
based

Yes

Yes

No


Yes, Users and Groups

Wiki

No

Plugin

No

Module

No

No

No

ODS
-
Wiki supports Atom
Publishing Protocol alongside
Twiki and Wikimedia markup

Forum

Yes

Yes, via plugin

No

Yes

Yes


Yes

Conversation/Discussion
Management that also provides
Conversation/Comment/Discussion
management services to all of the
ODS
-
* applications

Blog

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

ODS
-
Weblog supports all major
publishing protocols (
Atom
,
Moveable Type
,
Meta Weblog
, and
Blogger
) and includes automatic
generation of content syndication
gems that support
RSS

1.0, RSS
2.0,
Atom
,
SIOC
,
OPML
,
OCS
,
and others

Media sharing

"Image, Video,
Audio"

"Image, video, audio,
documents, any filetype,
aut
omatic podcast support"


Module

Yes


Yes

ODS
-
Gallery
-

Photo & General
Image Sharing; ODS
-
Briefcase
-

WebDAV based Unified Storage
Solution for any filetype also
incorporates automated metadata
extraction and management

Messaging

Yes

Yes

Yes

Module

Yes

Yes

Yes

ODS
-
Mail
-

Web based Email
Client


SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

20

Event
Calendar

Yes/Personal+Group

No


Module



Yes

ODS
-
Calendar
-

Calendar Ma
nager

Social Grouping

Yes

Yes


Module



Yes
(commercial
module)

ODS
-
Community
-

Group/Community Mode service
for all of the ODS
-
* applications

Tagging

Yes

Yes


Module



No

Ye
s (
SKOS
,
SCOT

and
MOAT
)

Connec
tivity

"
MySpace
,
Facebook
,
Google

Service,
YouTube
,
AIM
,
Flickr
"



Yes via
third party
in
tegration
like
Octazen
scripts




Facebook
,
Flickr
,
Amazon
,
Ebay
,
Google
,
del.icio.us
, Web importer,
Mash
-
ups

Bookmar
k Sharing
/ Management


Yes, via plugin






ODS
-
Bookmark
-
Manager
-

Shared
Bookmark Manager

Poll
Generation/Tally








ODS
-
Polls
-

Polls Manager

Contact
Management








ODS
-
Addressbook
-

Addressbook
Manager

Supports the
Semantic Web








Yes, and
Linked Data

Supports
Dat
aPortability








Yes

Customizable

Under dev.

Extensible via plugins with a
flexible API; skinnable;
available in many languages


Module




Open Source, Skinnable, and more


SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

21

Comment

Integration of many
services

"Clean, simple"

More like
RSS
aggrators

E
quipped
with a
powerful
blend of
features,
Drupal
supports a
variety of
websites
ranging
from
personal
weblogs to
large
community
-
driven
websites.


Content
management


All component applications fully
integrated, and all data accessible
by multiple means i
ncluding
SPARQL
/
RDF
,
ODBC
,
JDBC
,
ADO.NET
,
OLE DB
,
XMLA
, and
other protocols.

Ca
tegory

PeopleAggregator

ELGG

Mugshot

Drupal

Community
Server

Joomla!

PHPizabi

ODS

Retrieved from "
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparis
on_of_social_networking_software
"

Categories
:
Software com
parisons

|
Online social networking

Hidden categories:
NPOV disputes from August 2008

|
All NPOV disputes

|
Accuracy disputes from August 2008

|
Wikipedia articles needing clarification



5) Distributed social network

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to:
navigation
,
search

A
distributed social network

traditionally refers to an
inte
rnet social network

that is decentralized and distributed across
different providers, with emphasis on
portability
a[›]

and
interoperability
. It contrasts with
social network aggregation

services, which are used to manage accounts and activities across multiple discrete social networks. Open standards such
as
OAuth

authorization,
OpenID

authentication
b[›]
,
XRD

metadata discov
ery, the
Portable Contacts

protocol,
OpenSocial

widget

APIs
,
microformats

like
XFN

and
hCard
, and
Atom

web feeds

increasingly referred to together as the Open
Stack

are often cited as enabling technologies for distributed social networking.
[1]

Projects developin
g open
-
source implementations of distributed social networking concepts include The DiSo Project,
[2]

NoseRub,
[3]

and the So(m)mer Address Book.
[4]


SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

22

A few social networking service providers ha
ve used the term more broadly to describe provider
-
specific services that are
distributable across different websites, typically through added widgets or
plug
-
ins
. Th
rough the add
-
ons, the social
network functionality is implemented on users' websites. Such social network services include YouChoose.net
[5]
c[›]

and
Redanyway.
[
6]

[
edit
]

Notes

^

a:

See
DataPortability

article.

^

b:

See also
foaf+ssl
, an authentication protocol using
FOAF

and
SSL
, noted by some as architecturally simpler than OpenID.

^

c:

According to YouChoose.net, co
-
foun
der Mike Dever coined "Distributed Social Network" in 2007,
[5]

though the generic term
was in use years before then.
[7]
[8]

[
edit
]

References


6)

Mobile social network

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to:
navigation
,
search


This article includes a
list of references

or
external links
, but
its sources remain unclear because it lacks
inline
citations
.

Please
improve

this article by introducing more precise citations
where appropriate
.
(November 2007)

Mobile
social networking

is social networking where one or more individuals of similar interests or commonalities,
conversing and c
onnecting with one another using the mobile phone. Much like web based social networking, mobile
social networking occurs in
virtual communities
. A current trend for
Internet social networking websites such as
MySpace
[1]

and
Facebook
[2]

is to turn mobile. There are two basic types of mobile social networks. The first is companies
that par
tner with wireless phone carriers to distribute their communities via the default start pages on mobile phone
browsers, an example is
JuiceCaster
. The second type is companies that d
o not have such carrier relationships (also
known as "off deck") and rely on other methods to attract users, for example
Mobimii
,
MocoSpace

and
Mobikade
.
Advances in software technology have facilitated the existence of these mobile virtual communities. Industry wireless
network technologies include
SMS
,
WAP
,
Java
,
BREW

and
i
-
mode
.

Japan, Korea and China have much higher usage of mobile social networks than Western co
untries
[3]
, generally thanks to
better mobile networks and data pricing (flat rate notably is widespread in Japan)
[4]
. Most of them are extensions of PC
-
based services, but others are pure mobile
-
focused offerings. Leaders in the space are Mixi (Japan, web+mobile), Mobile
Game Town (Japan, mobile),
Cyworld

(South Korea, web+mobile),
Tencent QQ

(China, web+mobile), TX.com.cn
(China, mobile). In Japan where 3G networks achi
eved over 80% user penetration, numerous other mobile SNS have
popped up.

With the current software that is available, interactions within mobile social networks are not limited to exchanging
simple text messages on a 1
-
to
-
1 basis (SMS) but are constantly
evolving towards the sophisticated interactions of
Internet virtual communities.


SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

23

Contents

[
hide
]



1

Mobile commun
ity




2

See also




3

References




4

External links


[
edit
]

Mobile community

In most mobi
le communities, mobile phone users can now create their own profiles, make friends, participate in chat
rooms, create chat rooms, hold private conversations, share photos and videos, share blogs by using their mobile phone.
Some companies provide wireless
services (for example, Sonopia) which allow their customers to build their own mobile
community and brand it. Other companies provide new innovative features which extend the social networking
experience into the real world.

Mobile communities are becoming

more and more popular among young Americans.
[5]

[
edit
]

See also



Social network service




Geos
ocial networking


[
edit
]

References

7)

Mobile social network

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to:
navigation
,
search


This article includes a
list of references

or
external links
, but
its sources remain unclear because it lacks
inlin
e
citations
.

Please
improve

this article by introducing more precise citations
where appropriate
.
(November 2007)

Mobile
social networking

is social networking where one or more indivi
duals of similar interests or commonalities,
conversing and connecting with one another using the mobile phone. Much like web based social networking, mobile
social networking occurs in
virtual communities
. A current trend for Internet social networking websites such as
MySpace
[1]

and
Facebook
[2]

is to turn mobile. There are two basic typ
es of mobile social networks. The first is companies
that partner with wireless phone carriers to distribute their communities via the default start pages on mobile phone
browsers, an example is
JuiceCaster
. The second type is companies that do not have such carrier relationships (also
known as "off deck") and rely on other methods to attract users, for example
Mobimii
,
MocoSpace

and
Mobikade
.

SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

24

Advances in software technology have facilitated the existence of these mobile virtual commu
nities. Industry wireless
network technologies include
SMS
,
WAP
,
Java
,
BREW

and
i
-
mode
.

Japan, Korea and China hav
e much higher usage of mobile social networks than Western countries
[3]
, generally thanks to
better mobile networks and data pricing (flat rate notably i
s widespread in Japan)
[4]
. Most of them are extensions of PC
-
based services, but others are pure mobile
-
focused offerings. Leaders in the space are Mixi (
Japan, web+mobile), Mobile
Game Town (Japan, mobile),
Cyworld

(South Korea, web+mobile),
Tencent QQ

(China, web+mobile
), TX.com.cn
(China, mobile). In Japan where 3G networks achieved over 80% user penetration, numerous other mobile SNS have
popped up.

With the current software that is available, interactions within mobile social networks are not limited to exchanging
sim
ple text messages on a 1
-
to
-
1 basis (SMS) but are constantly evolving towards the sophisticated interactions of
Internet virtual communities.

Contents

[
hide
]



1

Mobile community




2

See also




3

References




4

External links


[
edit
]

Mobile community

In most mobile communities, mobile phone users can now create their own profiles, make friends, participate in chat
rooms, create chat rooms, hold private conversations, share photos and videos, share blogs
by using their mobile phone.
Some companies provide wireless services (for example, Sonopia) which allow their customers to build their own mobile
community and brand it. Other companies provide new innovative features which extend the social networking
ex
perience into the real world.

Mobile communities are becoming more and more popular among young Americans.
[5]

[
edit
]

See also



Social network service




Geosocial networking


[
edit
]

References


8)

Professional network s
ervice


SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

25

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to:
navigation
,
search


This article
needs additional
citati
ons

for
verification
.

Please help
improve this article

by adding
reliable references
.
Unsourced material may be
challenged

and removed.
(January 2008)

A
professional network service

(or, in an
internet

context, simply
professional
network
) is a
virtual community

that it
is focused on
interactions and relation
ships of a business nature

instead of
social interactions
.

This type of professional network service enables business professionals to network and collaborate
by title, industry and
business interests so that they can discuss interests, stay informed and share knowledge.

Virtual communities allow individuals to be accessible. People establish their real identity in a verifiable place. These
individuals then inte
ract with each other or within groups that share common interests and goals. They can also post their
own user generated content in the form of blogs, pictures, slide shows and videos. Like a social network, the consumer
essentially becomes the publisher.

A professional network is used for the business to business marketplace. These networks improve the ability for people to
advance professionally. Business professionals can share experiences with others who have a need to learn from similar
experiences. Ad
ditionally, the ability to find, connect and network with other business professionals is one reason why
LinkedIn

has grown from less than 8,500 members in 2003 to over 18 million today.

T
he traditional way to interact is face
-
to
-
face. Examples are a business lunch, a seminar or workshop, or at an industry
event such as a trade show or conference. Interactive technology makes it possible for people to network with their peers
from anywhere,

at anytime in an online environment.

Professional network services attract, aggregate and assemble large business
-
focused audiences by creating informative
and interactive meeting places.

[
edit
]

See also



ACTORSandCREW




LinkedIn




Sales community




ryze




XING




Plaxo




Yahoo! Kicksta
rt




Noodle_(Software)




VIADEO



Facebook

(primarily a social network service, but adding professional
network features).



Applebatch (private professional network for K
-
12th grade educators)


SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

26

[
edit
]

References

9)

Social

network aggregation

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to:
navigation
,
search


This article may require
cleanup

to meet Wikipedia'
s
quality standards
.

Please
improve this article

if you can.
(January 2008)


This article
needs additional
citations

for
verification
.

Please help
improve this article

by adding
reliable references
.
Unsourced material may be
challenged

and removed.
(January 2008)

Social network aggregation

is the process of collecting content fr
om multiple
social network services
, such as
MySpace

or
Facebook
. The task is often performed by a social network aggregator, which pulls together information into a single
location
[1]
, or helps a user consolidate multiple social networking profiles into one profile.
[2]

Various aggregation servi
ces
provide tools or
widgets

to allow users to consolidate messages, track friends, combine bookmarks, search across
multiple social networking sites, read rss feeds for multiple social netw
orks, see when their name is mentioned on various
sites, access their profiles from a single interface, provide "lifestreams", etc.
[
2]

Social network aggregation services attempt to organize or simplify a user's social networking experience
[3]
, although the
idea has been satirize
d by the concept of a "social network aggregator aggregator."
[4]

Contents

[
hide
]



1

Social network aggregators




2

Distributed social networking




3

Overlap between multiple social ne
twork services




4

See also




5

References




6

External links


[
edit
]

Social network aggregators


To meet Wikipedia's
quality standards

this sectio
n may need a rewrite, in part or in full.

Please discuss this issue on the
talk page
.

FriendFeed
,
Gathera
,
Youmeo
,
Spokeo

and
Secondbrain

are examples of social network aggregators. Social network
aggregation platforms like
Mybloglog
, a
Yahoo

property,
Plaxo
,
Jaiku

or others, allow members to share their other
social network activities like
Twitter
,
Youtube
,
Stumbleupon
,
Digg
, and other major platforms.


SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

27

One can also integrate their blog posts and comments in the aggregation platform. Everything is

shown in real time to
other members who subscribe to a particular community, which eliminates the need to jump from one
social media

network to another, trying to keep an eye on o
ne's interests.
[5]

The aggregation is done by an
API

application. For the API to be able t
o access a users actions from another platform,
the user will have to give permission to the social aggregation platform, by specifying user id and password of the social
media to be syndicated. This concept is similar to
open id
.
[6]

[
edit
]

Distributed social networking

Main article:
distributed social network

In March 2008,
The Economist

reported that
social network services

are only beginning the move away from
"walled
gardens" to more open architectures. Some sites are working together on a "data portability workgroup", while others are
focussing on a single sign
-
on system called
OpenID

to allow use
rs to log on across multiple sites. Historically the trend
from private services to more open ones can be seen across many internet services from email and instant messaging to
the move that early
online service providers

made to become websites.
[7]
. The
OpenSocial

initiative aims to bridge the
member overlap between various online social network services.
[8]

[
edit
]

Overlap between multiple social network services

Many users have

accounts on several different social networking sites.
[7]

In November 2007, Alex Patriquin of
Compete.com

reported on the member overlap between various online social network services:
[8]

Mem
bers of
Bebo




65% are MySpace members.



25% are Facebook members.



3% are Hi5 members.



2% are Friendster members.



1% are LinkedIn members.



1% are Ning members.



0% are Orkut members.



0% are Pl
axo members.

Members of
Facebook




64% are MySpace members.



9% are Plaxo members.



4% are Bebo members.



2% are Friendster members.



2% are Hi5 members.



2% are LinkedIn members.



1% are
Ning members.



1% are Orkut members.

Members of
Friendster


Members of
Hi5




69% are MySpace members.



24% are Facebook members.



7% are Bebo members.



4% are Friendster members.



2% are Orkut

members.



1% are LinkedIn members.



0% are Ning members.



0% are Plaxo members.

Members of
LinkedIn




42% are Facebook members.



32% are MySpace members.



8% are Friendster members.



8% a
re Ning members.



4% are Bebo members.



3% are Orkut members.



3% are Plaxo members.



2% are Hi5 members.

Members of
MySpace


Members of
Ning




44% are MySpace members.



35% are Facebook members
.



19% are LinkedIn members.



6% are Bebo members.



6% are Friendster members.



2% are Orkut members.



2% are Plaxo members.



1% are Hi5 members.

Members of
Orkut




29% are MySpace members.



26%

are Facebook members.



8% are LinkedIn members.



7% are Hi5 members.



4% are Friendster members.



3% are Bebo members.



2% are Ning members.



1% are Plaxo members.

Members of
Plaxo



SOCIAL NETWORKING CASE STUDY

28



49% are MySpace members.



23% are Facebook members.



6% are LinkedIn members.



5% are Bebo members.



4% are Hi5 members.



2
% are Ning members.



1% are Orkut members.



0% are Plaxo members.



20% are Facebook members.



3% are Bebo members.



1% are Friends
ter members.



1% are Hi5 members.



0% are LinkedIn members.



0% are Ning members.



0% are Orkut members.



0% are Plaxo members.



54% are Li
nkedIn members.



48% are Facebook members.



34% are MySpace members.



14% are Ning members.



8% are Friendster members.



5% are Bebo members.



4% are Orkut members.



2% are Hi5 members.

[
edit
]

See also



Social network service




Social network




Social media




List

of social networking websites




Web 2.0


[
edit
]

Refe
rences

10)

Social software

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to:
navigation
,
search


This article
may require
copy
-
editing

for grammar, style, cohes
ion, tone or spelling
. You can assist by
editing it

now. A how
-
to
guide

is available.

(April 2007)

This article is about computer software. For the Social Procedure field of research, see
Social Software
.

Social software

encompasses a range of software systems that allow users to interact and share data. This
computer
-
mediated communication

has become very popular with social sites like
MySpace

and
Facebook
, media sites like

Flickr

and
YouTube
, and commercial sites like
Amazon.c
om

and
eBay
. Many of these applications share characteristics like
open
APIs
, service oriented design, and the ability to upload data and

media. The terms
Web 2.0

and (for large
-
business
applications)
Enterprise 2.0

are also used to describe this style of software.

The more specific term
collabora
tive software

applies to cooperative information sharing systems, and is usually
narrowly applied to the software that enables collaborative work functions. Distinctions among usage of the terms
"social", "trusted", and "collaborative" are in the applicat
ions or uses, not the tools themselves, although there are some