Kentucky Center for Performance Excellence Annual Conference ...

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6 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 11 μήνες)

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QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN
KENTUCKY

A Study of Quality Practices in Industry



Presentation at KYCPE Conference 2010


Copyright 2010, M. Reid

Background


In 2003, Davig et.al. survey


Identifying quality management practices used
by Kentucky manufacturers


Kentucky manufacturing firms had launched
many new quality programs but did not
embrace the core concepts of
TQM


minimal emphasis on employee training,
process measurement, the quality of customer
service or process control.


Motivated to determine “what has changed”
in the last 10 years

Background



Total Quality Management


Baldrige Quality Framework



Quality is Important to the Commonwealth


17
th

in the nation ranked by value of
manufacturing exports

Defining Quality


Evolved from


“Value” to


“Conformance to specification” to


“Conformance to requirements” to


Multi
-
dimensional complex term incorporating:


Performance, Conformance, Reliability,
Durability, Serviceability, Aesthetics, Special
Features and more.

Defining Total Quality Management


Began with Deming’s 14 parts


Evolved to include internal customers


Grew through a period of focus on prevention
of quality problems “0 Defects”


Baldrige Framework of 7 factors


To Integrated Philosophy and “Approach to
Managing” that is common today

Evolving Quality


Conformance to Specification

Quality


Identification of variability




Confromance to Requirements




Statistical Control




Dimensions of Quality









































Time





























































1930

1940

1950

1960

1970

1980



1990

2000

2010













TQM




TQM established




ISO 9000 Introduced




ISO Created


Internal Customers




Prevention "0" Defects











Awards


Deming Prize Created




European Quality Award


Baldrige Created

Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence Framework

1

Leadership

2

Strategic

Planning

5

Workforce

Focus

7

Results

3

Customer

Focus

6

Process
Management

4

Measurement, Analysis and Knowledge Management

Organizational Profile:

Environment, Relationships and Challenges

Methodology


Survey developed through an iterative
process prior to public release


Students


Faculty


Local business managers


Emailed to 1,683 businesses licensed in the
Commonwealth


2 Reminder emails sent at three week intervals


Randomly called 250 non
-
respondents to solicit
participation

Analysis


114 usable responses; 6.8% response rate


Non
-
response bias tested via early vs. late
comparison


no bias detected


Respondents were managers with various
levels of responsibility


Majority of respondents were manufacturing
firms


Auto manufacturing


Industrial equipment


Consumer packaged goods


Construction


Aerospace


Findings


Process Management dimension of TQM is
most utilized of the dimensions


Inspection the most utilized method


In Davig et al. process management was not a
significant performance dimension


70% of respondents have their processes
certified by an independent organization


In 2003 only 16% had considered getting ISO
certified

Findings
(Continued)


Upper management (35%) and first line
management (32%) were responsible for
quality


In Davig et al. 50% of respondents thought a
specialized department like quality control
should be responsible for quality.


65% of respondents report that employees
received 8 hours or more of quality training
per year


In 2003, of the 45% of employees that received
training, only 13% had 10 or more hours of
quality training.

Findings
(Continued)


68% of respondents prioritize quality over
quantity


In 2003 60% of respondents prioritize quantity
over quality


91% of respondents document quality
performance on at least a monthly basis, with
48% having a report available daily


In 2003 less than 50% documented quality
performance in important functional areas.

Findings


Companies are doing a lot more to monitor
and maintain quality


but customer
expectations have increased as well


A greater dependence on a company’s
supply chain to insure that quality
components are used


Not much change in the ~ 10 years between
the two studies


there is still lots of opportunity
for business to improve.


Conclusions


Significant increase in awareness and
attention given to process variables in
manufacturing


Leadership, Strategic Planning, Customer
Focus, Measurement analysis and Knowledge
Management, Workforce Focus and Results
factors of the Baldrige Framework are not
emphasized in the way these businesses
deliver products to their markets.


Respondents do consider their supply chain
important in their ability to deliver high quality