Michael J

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7 Οκτ 2013 (πριν από 4 χρόνια και 8 μέρες)

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Michael J. Bouey Jr.

October 05
, 2007

Physics 1
3
1

Instructor: Dr.
Lee


Partners:

John Russell

Adam Fronczyk











Lab report #
4

DC Circuits Report for Experiments
4
-
6





























Introduction:


Th
e
s
e labs are designed to investigate
the variables that contribute to the to the operation
of electrical current.

Procedures:


My group

divided up the tasks for this lab. One person was reading the instructions and
recording data, another was setting up the resistors and experiments on the e
xperiment board,
and then the last person
taking reading off the mulimeter.

Results:


Over all the experiment
s

went rather well.
The largest difficult we seemed to have was
getting consistent reading from the mulimeter


Data
:
















Discus
sion (Ex4):

Q: How does the % error compare to the coded tolerance for your resistors?

A: The tolerance for your resistors was ±5% and actual was 1.81% which was within the
tolerance.

Q:

What is the rule apparent rule for combining equal resistance in seri
es circuits? In parallel
circuits?

A: The apparent rule seems to be circuits in series add in resistance. See Figure 4.1 under Data
section. Some examples are R
12

are approximately the sum of two 324Ω resistors, and R
123

are
approximately the sum of three 324Ω resistors. The apparent rule seems to be circuits in parallel
change with respect to the additive inverse rule. See Figure 4.2 under Data section. Some
exa
mples are R
12

are approximately the
product of the two resistors over the
sum of
same two

324Ω resistors, and R
123

are approximately the product of the three resistors over the sum of
additive inverse sum of the same three 324Ω resistors.

Q: What is the ru
le apparent rule for combining unequal resistance in series circuits? In parallel
circuits?

A: The apparent rule seems to be circuits in series add in resistance. See Figure 4.4 under Data
section. Some examples are R
12

are approximately the sum of two
different resistors, and R
123

are approximately the sum of three different resistors. The apparent rule seems to be circuits in
parallel change with respect to the additive inverse rule. See Figure 4.5 under Data section.
Some examples are R
12

are approx
imately the product of the two different resistors over the sum
of the two different resistors, and R
123

are approximately the product of the three different
resistors over the sum of additive inverse sum of the three different resistors.

Q: What is the ru
le apparent rule for total resistance in series circuits? In parallel circuits?

A: Resistors in series are added, resistors in parallel are combined using the additive inverse
property, and when used in combination parallel circuit are converted into sin
gle circuits so that
they

me be add into the other

cir
cuits in series to eventually come to a total resistance. See
Figure 4.3 & 4.6 under Data section.

Discussion (Ex
5
):

Q: What is the pattern for how voltage gets distributed in a series
circuit
of equal

resistance? In a
series circuit
of unequal resistance?

A: The patterned that evolved was that voltage is equal no matter what the resistance. I am not
sure about the accuracy data collected here. My group started having issues with our mulimeter.
The d
ata reflected that voltage was the same everywhere.

See Figure 5.1
-

5.6 under Data
section.

Q: What is the pattern for how voltage gets distributed in a parallel circuit of equal resistance? In
a parallel circuit of unequal resistance?

A: The patterned t
hat evolved was that voltage is equal no matter what the resistance. I am not
sure about the accuracy data collected here. My group started having issues with our mulimeter.
The data reflected that voltage was the same everywhere. See Figure 5.1
-

5.6
under Data
section.

Q: What is the pattern for how voltage gets distributed in combinations of series and parallel
circuits of equal resistance?

A: The patterned that evolved was that voltage is equal no matter what the resistance. I am not
sure about the

accuracy data collected here. My group started having issues with our mulimeter.
The data reflected that voltage was the same everywhere. See Figure 5.1
-

5.6 under Data
section.

Discussion (Ex6):

Q: What is the pattern for current in series circuits?

A: They appear to be increase
across each resistor in magnitude equal of the resistor.

See Figure
6.3 & 6.4 under Data section.

Q: What is the pattern for current in parallel circuits?

A: They appear to be increase across each resistor in magnitude eq
ual to the products and sum
of the additive inverses of the resistor in parallel.

See Figure 6.3 & 6.4 under Data section.


Conclusion:


In conclusion
my group

able
as able
to
ascertain

a lot of i
nformation about how resistance,
voltage, and current in circuits that are combine with similar or different resistors combined in
parallel or series. We did have a problem with the mulimeter as far as finding voltage is
concerned. We informed Dr. Lee of

our problems and he told us to just move on. Over all I feel
that this was a productive lab and very interesting to see how electricity travels and reacts in
certain materials.