UNIVERSITY OF BRADFORD School of Engineering Design and Technology Programme/course title:

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BEng Elec Eng 2011
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12


UNIVERSITY OF BRADFORD

School of Engineering Design and Technology

Programme/course title:

Awarding and teaching institution:

University of Bradford

Final award:

B
Eng

[Framework for Higher Education Qualifications level
H
]

Programme title:

Electrical
and Electronic Engineering

Electronic, Telecommunications and Internet Engineering

Programme
accredited

by:

The Institution of Engineering and Technology

(IET)

Duration:

3 years full time; 4 years sandwich

UCAS code:

EEE
-

H606 (full time); H604 (sandwi
ch)

ETIE
-

H695 (full time); H690 (sandwich)

Subject benchmark statement:

Engineering

Date produced:

5 March 2002

Last updated :

24 June 2011


Introduction

E
ngineering is fundamental to

economic and social prosperity
, applying scientific principles
creatively,
to solve practical problems. A

profession
that

serves the needs of humanity, it develops and manages
our environment in an ethical and sustainable manner, and improves our way of life
. Your studies at
Bradford will be a foundation for life, aim
ed at developing an appreciation of engineering principles
and technical competence in their application using a wide range of personal and professional skills.
Our commitment to this integration is such that we strongly encourage you to undertake industri
al
placement as an integral part of your degree studies. Upon graduation
,

you will have the capacity for
professional growth to continue the path to Chartered Engineer (CEng) status.
Both BEng degrees
are accredited as providing fully the educational requi
rements for incorporated engineer and partly,
those for chartered membership of the Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET). For chartered
status the educational requirements are achieved by a period of approximately 1 year’s further
learning; this c
ould

be, for example, one of our accredited MSc courses. T
he ability of an engineer to
think clearly and logically is widely appreciated by many other professions
so

your studies
could also
serve as

a stepping
-
stone to an alternative career in
financial se
rvices
, teaching, law
,

etc


a real
foundation for life and for a lifetime of learning.


The School places emphasis on both teaching and research. Electr
ical and electronic

engineering is
the practical
and creative
application of electrical science and tec
hnology to the solution of

problems,
the design, development and improvement of products and processes

in industry, commerce and
soc
iety.

This exciting and rapidly
developing field will continue to
drive

the technological revolution of
the 21st century. Fr
om a heart mon
itor to a power station; from
satellite system
s

to the semiconductor
chips

and applications

in your
mobile
, electrical and electronic engineers provide the products, skills,
services and above all, ingenuity,
upon which modern life depends.


Both BEng courses have common early years with the equivalent MEng degree courses. However,
the MEng students are required to achieve more demanding progression requirements at each stage.
They also have an additional year of study. If your performance on
the BEng courses matches the
MEng progression requirement then there is the option of transferring from the BEng programme to
the MEng programme at the end of each stage. The two BEng courses described here have a
common structure and a common first year.
They differ mainly in the range of modules offered in later
years and in the target employment areas of graduates. The differences are described below:


BEng Elec Eng 2011
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Electrical and Electronic Engineering (EEE)


This course is
a general electrical and electronic engine
ering degree targeted at students who are
aiming for a career in a broad range of industries and government service. It can lead to successful
careers
in
electrical supply and distribution, electrical and
electronics manufacturing, electronic
product desig
n,

robotics,
communications
and IT
industries. It is a challenging course requiring
creative and innovative skills.
T
he course content includes
digital and analogue
electronics,
power
electronics,
electronics materials, telecommunications and computing. Our course emphasises
practical skills in designing, making and testing, with
a substantial group project

in year 2 and an
individual project in your third year of study.


In this course, you have a
choice in specialisation
,

which includes options from real
-
time systems,
digital signal processing,
sustainable
energy systems, satellite communications and
telecommunications networks, radio frequency and microwave design, digital and mobile
communication
s, quality eng
ineering and power electronics.


Electronic, Telecommunications and Internet Engineering (ETIE)


Electronic engineering has undergone a technological explosion in the last
few decades
. The
evolution of computers
, networks

and digital systems
(particularly microprocessors) has already
affected the working lives of most people. The revolution in global mass communications is beginning
to have an even more far
-
reaching impact on their daily lives, and this will increase
through the 21
st

century.
For engineers with ingenious and inquisitive minds and the right combination of skills,
opportunities for fascinating and lucrative careers throughout the world are extensive and growing
rapidly.


This course has been designed to provide these skills.
Alth
ough it still provides a strong foundation in
all aspects of electronics, it
is
particularly focussed on employment in the area of telecommunication
and internet engineering. It is
structured to allow new developments to be introduced, as they bec
ome
valua
ble career attributes.


A core of electronics modules provide
s

a basic understanding of electronic systems. You then build
up a portfolio of computer programming, software engineering, telecommunications, control, and
systems engineering topics necessary f
or an understanding of modern complex
networks and
real
-
time systems. You become as expert in your understanding of
programmable devices

and com
puter

networks

as in the more traditional areas of electrical engineering. Many graduates from this course
find
careers in
the

communications industry, which is increasingly dominated by
software

systems
and
techniques.


Programme Aims

Both

programme
s are

intended to:



To help graduates to develop the engineering, design, management and personal skills
required to be
come
professional Electrical/ Electronic Engineers and in doing so, also equip
them for careers in other professions.



To
partially satisfy
the educational requirements (in compliance with UK
-
SPEC) to permit
progression to Chartered Membership of the IET an
d registration with ECUK as a chartered
engineer.

In addition the BEng
Electrical and Electronic Engineering

is intended to:



To provide a basis for a successful professional career in any area of electrical or electronic
engineering
.

In addition the BEng
E
lectronic, Telecommunications and Internet
Engineering is

intended to:



To provide a basis for a successful professional career in the area of electronic engineering,
telecommunications and internet engineering.

BEng Elec Eng 2011
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Programme Learning Outcomes

When you have com
pleted the programme, you will
develop the following
:


Knowledge and Understanding



Demonstrate a knowledge and
u
nderstanding of fundamental concepts, principles and
underpinn
ing theories in the electrical/electronics/
telecommunications field.



Demonstrate k
nowledge of fundamental and advanced principles and practice of engineering
design and manufacture.



Demonstrate experience of

business and management practices for engineering

and the

roles and responsibili
ties of professional engineers.



Demonstrate knowle
dge of specific skills in the use of computers in creation, innovation,
design, and rapid prototyping; generic and specialised numerical methods for modelling and
analysing engineering problems relevant to your chosen specialism.



Demonstrate
an understandi
ng of the implications of engineering design and manufacturing
for sustainability.

Intellectual Abilities



Apply engineering principles and inter
-
personal skills to the critical analysis of problems in
order to create innovative solutions to non
-
routine
problems.



Identify an area for further detailed investigation, design and experimental programme, utilise
research skills to critically evaluate and interpret newly developed data.



Integrate engineering understanding and apply insight to the solution of
real problems.

Practical Skills



Select and apply appropriate principles of data collection and manipulation methods to
support problem solving.



Demonstrate use of practical electronic skills in design and PCB manufacture, testing and
fault diagnosis
.



Demon
strate use of advanced skills of critical analysis, synthesis and evaluation to support
design
.



Demonstrate ability to balance sometimes conflicting, ambiguous and/or incomplete aspects
encountered in creative problem solving.

General Transferable Skills



W
ork in groups in order to meet shared objectives
.



Communicate effectively using a
wide range of
techniques
.



Demonstrate use of problem solving strategies to develop, monitor and update a plan of both
technical and personnel contributions to meeting organis
ational needs.



A fundamental awareness of ethical issues particularly as this relates to engineering.

Curriculum

The map of the curriculum that you will study is detailed
below

showing core (C) and optional (O)
modules. Each year, or stage, of a
BEng

cours
e comprises
two

semesters with 60 credits being
studied in each semester. For 10 credit modules, all of the teaching and assessment is undertaken in
the same semester. Some of the 20 credit modules have teaching and assessment that occurs in both
semesters
.

BEng Elec Eng 2011
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As can be seen from the tables, the first year of both programmes is common to both course it is also
common with the MEng courses of the same name. In subsequent stages, the courses diverge in
terms of both core and optional modules available for the tw
o courses.

We strongly encourage you to undertake a year of industrial placement between stages 2 and 3. The
School has many contacts with relevant organisations and arranges for interviews with those in which
you have an interest. It is then your task to
impress them sufficiently to gain an offer of employment.
The work undertaken during the placement is monitored by the University and counts towards the
industrial training requirements of
chartered membership of
the IET.

Stage 1

Module
Code

Module Title

Credits

Level

Study
Period

EEE

ETIE

ENG1073L

Engineering Analysis (Electrical)

10+10

1

1,

2

C

C

ENG106
5
L

Robotics

10+10

1

1,

2

C

C

ENG1067L

Fundamentals of
Telecommunications

10+10

1

1,

2

C

C

ENG1056M

Engineering Computation

10

1

1

C

C

ENG1033M

Introductory Mechatronics

10

1

1

C

C

ENG1037M

Digital Electronics Fundamentals

10

1

1

C

C

ENG1010M

Circuits and Systems

10

1

2

C

C

ENG1008M

Professional Skills

10

1

2

C

C

ENG1030M

Electronics Applications Project

10

1

2

C

C

Stage 2

Module
Code

Module
Title

Credits

Level

Study
Period

EEE

ETIE

CY0205M

Sensors and Actuators

10

2

1

C

O

ENG2043M

Power Electronics and Machines

10

2

1

C

O

ENG2088M

Further Engineering Analysis
(Electrical)

10

2

1

C

C

ENG2018M

Digital Electronics Design

10

2

1

C

C

ENG2052M

Technology Operations
Management

10

2

1

C

C

ENG2020M

Mobile Communications Systems

10

2

1

C

C

ENG2084M

Internet Engineering

10

2

1


C

ENG2037D

Group Design Project

20

2

2

C

C

ENG2021M

Transmission Principles

10

2

2

C

C

ENG2013M

Financial
Management

10

2

2

C

C

ENG2045M

Analogue Electronics

10

2

2

C

C

ENG2016M

Introductory Control

10

2

2

O

O

ENG2019M

Embedded Systems

10

2

2

O

O

BEng Elec Eng 2011
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Stage 3

Module
Code

Module Title

Credits

Level

Study
Period

EEE

ETIE

ENG3042J

Project

10+20

3

1, 2

C

C

ENG3036L

RF and Microwave Circuit Design

10+10

3

1
, 2

O

O

ENG30
xxM

Advanced Embedded Systems Design

10

3

1

O

O

ENG3023M

Antennas and Mobile
-
propagation

10

3

1

O

C

ENG3009M

Project Management

10

3

1

O

O

ENG4007M

Digital Signal Processing

10

M

1

O

O

ENG3022M

Power Devices and Applications

10

3

1

C

O

ENG3067M

Signals & Systems Theory

10

3

1

C

C

ENG3048M

Six Sigma for Business
Excellence

10

3

1

O

O

ENG3026M

Advanced Mobile & Satellite
Communications

10

3

2

O

C

ENG30
xxM

Advanced Embedded Systems

Applications

10

3

1

O

O

ENG4064M

Sustainable Energy

10

M

2

O

O

ENG3051M

Digital Design Using HDL

10

3

2

O

O

ENG3019M

Advanced Control

10

3

2

O

O

ENG3084M

Robotics Systems

10

3

2

O

O

ENG3049M

Reliability Engineering

10

3

2

O

O

ENG3011M

Corporate Strategy and
Engineering
Management

10

3

2

O

O

C
-

Core; O
-

Option

The curriculum may change, subject to the University's course approval, monitoring and review
procedures.

Teaching and Assessment Strategies

The teaching and learning strategy
takes into consideration the learning outcomes, progression
through the levels of study, the nature of the subject and the student intake, and the need for you to
take greater responsibility for your own learning as you progress through the course. The str
ategies
and methods are

as follows.



The teaching a
nd learning methods in the courses are designed
to engage you in developing your
knowledge and understanding of the course
. They

include formal
lectures (including those from
v
isiting
l
ecturers), case
studies, tutorial exercises, practical demonstrations, directed learning and
individual work. The method of assessment is by written examination and both analytic
al and
experimental coursework.



The methods implemented
to

develop your intellectual skills i
nclude
:

engaging with you during
tutorial exercises
;

case studies
;

practical demonstration
;

and supervised research or project work.
Embedded in many modules at all levels is material to develop your skills and understanding of
sustainable development and
the importance of an ethical approach to engineering. Y
ou will also
learn the skills associated with designing and exec
uting your own research project in a number of
modules, but particularly in stage 3 individual

Project.



The methods implemented
to

develop your practical skills includ
e demonstrations and practical
BEng Elec Eng 2011
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classes
linked with the taught modules. You will also design and operate equipment and/or
procedures and use instruments
for
me
asurement and

control under supervision during your
project w
ork. The methods
used to assess

practical skills
will also provide

feedback on laboratory
work l
inked with the taught modules.
In addition, a large part of the mark
for

the
Stage 3
Project
Report will be attributed to e
xperimental
m
ethod and the
p
resentati
on &
d
iscussion of
r
esults.



The methods implemented in developing
a

students’ transferable skills are implicit in the
programme. The University of Bradford is well known for attracting students from a wide variety of
background, experiences and countries.

This and the learning facilities available to all students
provide the conditions for students to develop and manage their
own
learning. The University of
Bradford
maxim
, Making Knowledge Work, is imbedded in the philosophy of this course,
particularly i
n the area of Engineering, Design and Technology, which is well equipped with
practical and computational facilities. The methods of assessment of transferable skills are built
in
to

the structure of the examinations, case studies, laboratory demonstrations

and research or
project work.

Assessment Regulations

This Programme conforms to the standard University Assessment Regulations
,

which are available at
the following link:
http:
//www.brad.ac.uk/admin/acsec/QA_Hbk/Undergrad_Regs_.html


Thi
s
course is accredited by the IET
as
partially

satisfying the educational requirements of

C
Eng

status,

provided

that you
take supplementary assessment in no more than 20 credits in the final
stage. It is thus necessary to pass the final year project ENG3042J at the first attempt. It is also a
requirement that you complete both stages 2 and 3 of your course here at Bradford. Thus direct entry
students into stage 2 are eligible for an accredited

degree but direct entry students into stage 3 are
NOT. Failing to achieve an accredited degree does not preclude you from receiving a classified
degree from the University of Bradford it does however preclude you from automatic exemption from
the appropri
ate IET and ECUK chartered engineering educational requirements. An unaccredited
degree can be used as part of a portfolio of experience and education when applying for membership
via the non
-
standard route to IET chartered status; however, this generally
takes longer than
accredited route.

Admission Requirements

The University welcomes applications from all potential students regardless of their previous academic
experience; offers are made following detailed consideration of each individual application.
Most
important in the decision to offer a place is our assessment of a candidate’s potential to benefit from
their studies and of their ability to succeed on this particular programme. Entrance requirements for
each programme will vary but consideration o
f your application will be based on a combination of your
formal academic qualifications

and other relevant experience.

If you have prior certificated learning or professional experience which may be equivalent to parts of this
programme, the University ha
s procedures to evaluate this learning in order to provide you with
exemptions from specified modules contained within the curriculum. Please talk to us if you do not fit
the standard pattern of entry qualifications.

The University of Bradford has always
welcomed applications from disabled students, and these will be
considered on the same academic grounds as are applied to all applicants. If you have some form of
disability, you may wish to contact the programme leader before you apply.

A typical offer t
o someone seeking entry through the UCAS
scheme would be (UCAS points 240
) with
(Mathematics and Physics studied at A level). However, applications are welcome from mature
students (those over 21 years of age on entry) and candidates with non
-
standard qual
ifications or
who, lacking academic qualifications, have significant relevant experience. On completion of a UCAS
form, you will be invited to the School for an Open Day when you will have the opportunity to meet
staff, view the facilities and discuss "the

Bradford exp
erience" with current students.

The School actively promotes educational opportunities for ethnic minority, mature and alternatively
qualified students, as well as for school
-
leavers and traditionally qualified students.


BEng Elec Eng 2011
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English Language Requ
irements

All students must satisfy the English language requirements for admission as described in
http://www.brad.ac.uk/international/english
-
prepare.php
.

If your native language is
not English, you will
have to pass a test in English approved by the University before you can be admitted. The following
qualifications are acceptable as satisfying this requirement. Both are available internationally.



The International English Language
Testing Service (IELTS) administered by the British Council, is
the test preferred by the University. You will need to achieve an Overall Band of at least 6, with at
least 5 in each of the four sub
-
tests. Testing facilities are available at most British Co
uncil overseas
offices. When you take your test, you should ask for a copy of your Test Report Form to be sent to
the University.



The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) administered by the Educational Testing
Service, Princeton, New Jersey, 0854
0, USA. You will need to score at least 550 (220 on the
computer based test). If you take this test, you should enter the University’s code 0828, on your
answer sheet.

Learning Resources

The JB Priestley Library on the city campus and our specialist librar
ies in the School of Health and the
School of Management provide a wide range of printed and electronic resources to support your
studies. We offer quiet study space if you want to work on your own, and group study areas for the
times when you need to dis
cuss work with fellow students. Subject librarians for each School provide
training sessions and individual guidance in finding the information you need for your assignment, and
will help you organise your references properly.

Student PC clusters can be f
ound in all our libraries and elsewhere on the campus. Many of these are
open 24/7. You can also use the University's wireless network to access the internet from your own
laptop. Most of our online journals are available on the internet (both on and of
f campus), and you can
also access your University email account, personal information and cour
se
-
related materials this way.

Staff are on hand during the daytime to help you if you get stuck, and there is a 24/7 IT helpline
available.

Student Support and
Guidance

Course Team

Support for you personally and in your course of study, will be provided both by the University and the
Course Team. You will be allocated a personal tutor who is someone with whom you will be able to talk
about any academic or person
al concerns. The School will ensure that there is someone available with
whom you feel comfortable to help and support you. You will be provided with a comprehensive series
of handbooks that you can consult on a range of learning issues and your course t
utors will be available
to consult on subject specific queries.

Students’ Union

We value the feedback provided by students and collaborate with the Students’ Union, through a
system of course representatives and formal staff student liaison committees, so
that any issues you
wish to raise are addres
sed rapidly.

The Students’ Union and the University of Bradford work in partnership to provide confidential
counselling and welfare services where you can get help with any aspect of your personal or academic
lif
e. Student Financial and Information Services (based in the Hub) will provide you with information
about a diverse range of issues such as council tax, personal safety and tourist information.
International Students can access a range of additional advic
e and support services through the
Student’
s Union.

Careers and Employability

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an
integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the
course from Career
Development Services including help to find part time work while studying, placements, vacation work
and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use
the extensive resources on the web s
ite
www.careers.brad.ac.uk
.

BEng Elec Eng 2011
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Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining
skills of job
-
hunting. In most of programmes
,

there is direct input by Caree
r Development Advisers into
the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops. These may take place as early as year 1, or
may be achieved through a customised Career and Personal Development module in year 2 or 3
,

which
is developed in close cooperat
ion with the academic department. An annual First Destination Survey
leads to compilation of a report on the outcomes of all programmes and to the development of an
annually updated Traffic Light Analysis of Employability
,

which is used as a performance in
dicator.

You will be allocated a personal tutor who is someone with whom you will be able to talk about any
academic or personal concerns. The School has a system of handbooks, year tutors and formal staff
-
student liaison committees so that issues are rap
idly dealt with. The University provides important
facilities such as extended access to Library and Computing facilities, counselling and welfare services,
careers advice and a Disabilities Office. The later routinely arranges dyslexia assessments and
a
ppropriate additional time allocation for sitting examinations.

The School has a Women’s Engineering Society named FAIRER (Females Actively Involved in
Rewarding Engineering Roles). It provides a social network support to all students in Engineering,
Desi
gn and Technology from foundation year to postgraduate.

Learner Development Unit (LDU)

The Learner Development Unit provides support in all aspects of academic, maths, numeracy and
interpersonal skills. A programme of interactive workshops is delivered dur
ing both semesters which
complement individual support available from Advisers and the wide range of interactive online
materials available from the LDU website.

Disability

Disabled students will find a supportive environment at Bradford where we are commi
tted to ensuring
that all aspects of student l
ife are accessible to everyone.

The Disability Service can help by providing
equipment and advice to help you get the most out of your time at Bradford and is a place where you
can discuss any concerns you may

have about adjustments that you may need, whether these relate to
study, p
ersonal care or other issues.

For more information contact the Disability Service by phoning:
01274 233739 or via email:
disabili
ties@bradford.ac.uk
.

University policies and initiatives

Ecoversity:

Ecoversity

is a strategic project of the University which aims to embed the principles of sustainable
development into our decision
-
making, learning and teaching, research activities campus operations
and lives of our staff and students. We do not claim to be a beac
on for sustainable development but we
aspire to become a leading University in this area. The facilities we create for teaching and learning,
including teaching spaces, laboratories, IT labs and social spaces, will increasingly reflect our
commitments to s
ustainable development. Staff and student participation in this initiative is crucial to its
success and its inclusion in the programme specification is a clear signal that it is at the forefront of our
thinking in programme development, delivery, monitori
ng and review. For more details see
www.bradford.ac.uk/ecoversity
.

Further Information:

For further information, please check the University prospectus or contact Admissions.

The Admissions Office

The Un
iversity of Bradford

Richmond Road

Bradford, BD7 1DP

UK

The Admissions Office

School of

Engineering, Design & Technology

The University of Bradford

Chesham Building

Richmond Road

Bradford, BD7 1DP
,
UK

+44 (0)1274 233054

http://www.brad.ac.uk/courses
/

+44 (0)1274 23
4567

http://www.eng.brad.ac.uk


The contents of this programme specification may change, subject to the University's
regulations and course approval, monitoring and review procedures.