Guide to Executive Management

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Guide to Executive Management


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Big Brothers Big Sisters



Guide to Executive Management


This guide contains leadership tools and guidelines to help the Board manage, develop and
retain top leadership. Each section of the guide corresponds to one of four tools: Chief
Executive Job De
scription, Performance Objectives, Performance Evaluation Process, and
Compensation Guidelines and Market Survey Results.



I.

Establishing the Roles and Responsibilities of the Chief Executive


In this section, a job description including a comprehensive set

of core responsibilities
and qualifications important to the role of a Chief Executive in a Big Brothers Big Sisters
agency is provided. There are seven main categories to this job description: Strategy &
Planning, Board Development, Staff Leadership & De
velopment, Fund Development,
Volunteer Development and Partnerships, Program Management, and Finance and
Infrastructure. The Board should use the job description as a vehicle to communicate the
responsibilities and challenges of the role during leadership
transition. The Chief
Executive, once in the role, will use the job description as a guide to provide clarity and
focus regarding his or her responsibilities as leader of the organization.




Big Brothers Big Sisters of
(Agency Name)

Chief Executive Job
Description Template


The Big Brothers Big Sisters mission is to help children reach their potential through
professionally supported, one
-
to
-
one relationships with measurable impact.


The Position


The Chief Executive
will lead the development and attainm
ent of Big Brothers Big Sisters of
(Agency Name)

strategic goals.
He or she is appointed by and responsible to the Board of
Directors of Big Brothers Big Sisters of
(Agency Name).




Responsibilities


Strategy & Planning



Develop and drive the strategy
of the organization within the broad context of the local
and national landscape, taking a leadership role in driving a collaborative process with
the Board and staff that would result in the development of a strategic plan and 12
-
month
operational plan an
d budget.



Use performance measurement to guide strategic and operational decision
-
making.



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Board Development



Cultivate a strong Board of Directors willing to lead and contribute to the development of
prospects and cultivation of major donors.



Partner
with, and engage, the Board of Directors to leverage and secure resources,
contribute expertise and advice on short and long term strategic goals.



Build a diverse and inclusive Board of Directors that is representative of the community.



Ensure open communi
cation with the Board of Directors about the measurement of
performance against stated objectives.


Staff Leadership and Development



Lead, motivate and develop the staff
so that they are passionate about what Big Brothers
Big Sisters of
(Agency Name)
has
achieved and are committed to working effectively
toward continual improvement.



Ensure the organization has the caliber of staff with skills appropriate to meet the needs
of the position with the ability to positively impact agency objectives.



Ensure an

effective performance management system for all employees that includes
annual objective setting and evaluation.



Ensure a comprehensive recruitment and retention strategy to support Big Brothers Big
Sisters’ commitment to build a sustainable organizatio
n.


Fund Development



Ensure a strategic and comprehensive fund development plan that identifies prospects
and donors and enhances the short and long term diversified funding base for the agency.



Ensure establishment of a diverse donor base of individual, c
orporate, foundation, and
public segments.



Personally build loyal and long term relationships with key donor segments based on
mission, cultivation and stewardship, program outcomes and sound fiscal management.


Volunteer Development & Partnerships



Ens
ure comprehensive marketing strategies to attract, engage and mobilize significant
numbers of volunteer mentors reflecting the full diversity of the agency’s community.



Raise the public profile of Big Brothers Big Sisters of
(Agency Name)
by serving as the

spokesperson and advocate for the agency, as well as a visible, visionary and influential
leader in the community.



Ensure meaningful and effective partnerships with key public and private sector entities
to reinforce the Big Brothers Big Sisters brand an
d its impact in the community.



Develop meaningful and effective relationships with the media including press, television
and radio leading to strong support.


Program Management



Ensure programmatic excellence is achieved by establishing operational benc
hmarks,
setting timelines, and obtaining the resources needed to achieve strategic goals.



Actively participate in nationwide initiatives, programmatic innovations,

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best practices and quality standards; adapt these standards to create maximum

impact within the local agency’s environment.



Hold Big Brothers Big Sisters of
(Agency Name)

accountable to agency and national
standards for service delivery with a priority on child safety.



Promote the identification of continuous improvement in se
rvice delivery as the
champion for innovative solutions.






Ensure the development of all financial, facilities and operational plans including
insurance; oversee implementation of budgets, monitor progress/changes related to
budgets.



G
uide the developme
nt of the organization’s financial and technological systems to
support, measure and communicate outcomes on quantitative and qualitative performance
indicators.


Qualifications




Bachelor’s degree from an accredited four
-
year institution required.



Proven
track record of effectively leading innovative change and scaling a high
-
growth
performance driven organization. At least XXX years of demonstrated success in board
development, staff leadership, fundraising, partnership development and financial
managemen
t.



Inclusive leadership style that endorses delegation and collaboration with clear decision
-
making authority.



Strong and effective oral and written communication skills.



Personal qualities that include integrity,

commitment to the Big Brothers Big Sis
ters
mission, and the ability to articulate an inspiring and motivating vision.



Entrepreneurial; can point to tangible examples of having shaped and driven the
processes and structures needed for an organization to get to the next stage of growth.



Nonpro
fit/general management experience preferred or having sat on a nonprofit board.

Has set strategic objectives, work
-
planned and coached a team to achieve goals, while
providing clear, performance
-
related people management
.



Strong fund development, marketin
g, and public relations experience to successfully
engage
external stakeholders including funders, corporate partners, policy makers and
communities.



Proven track record of successfully managing and growing a geographically dispersed
multi
-
site organizatio
n.



Continued driver of the organization’s culture with an eye toward the evolving
organization and the inherent changes in culture that accompanies growth.



We recognize that each agency is unique because of variables such as local community needs,
revenu
e, number of matches, and staff size. Therefore, this template provides a basis from
which each agency can tailor the job description. It is important to note, that agency staff and
board leaders involved in this design of the template concurred that the
seven identified core
responsibilities are relevant to the position regardless of the nuances of each agency.

Finance and Infrastructure

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We recommend asking the following questions to determine how to tailor this job
description template to fit your agency:


1.

What are the most signi
ficant challenges that the agency will face in the next three to
five years?

2.

What will the Chief Executive need to do to meet these challenges?

3.

To prioritize how the seven main categories of the job description template are most
relevant to your agency, im
agine you have one hundred percentage points and you
need to divide the major categories of responsibilities of the Chief Executive among
those one hundred points


what point values would you give to each?

a.

For example: 20% to Strategy & Planning; 20% t
o Board Development; 15% to
Staff Leadership & Development; 20% to Fund Development; 10% to Volunteer
Development and Partnerships, 10% to Program Management, 5% Finance and
Infrastructure.

4.

Then within each category, which activities are relevant? How

would you prioritize
relevant activities and are there others you would add?

5.

Are there nuances particular to your community or your organization for which you
will want to account?

6.

Are there additional qualifications you require given the needs of your ag
ency, your
growth plans or given the current and future staff configuration?





II.

Establishing Measurable Performance Objectives


In this section, Chief Executive performance objectives in agency core performance areas
are identified. Setting perfo
rmance objectives should be a high priority for the Board and
Chief Executive. Objectives should tie directly to the agency strategic plan and help set
direction, establish priorities, and clarify expectations. We encourage open dialogue
between the Board

and Chief Executive in establishing measurable objectives and
discussing outcomes
.
At a minimum,

measurable

objectives specific to the nuances of
the local agency should be established in each of the four core performance areas:




Match Growth:

Number of c
hildren served



Revenue Growth:

Increase in revenue



Productivity:

Cost per match



Quality:

Match length, match retention,


POE (Program Outcome Evaluation)


Additional performance areas key to sustained growth, such as
surplus and building
cash reserves,

org
anizational and people

developmen
t, and other
strategic priorities

for the agency might also be included. We recommend the
best practice

of establishing
SMART objectives

focusing

on measurable results
and
formally reviewed annually
:



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S


-

S
pecific:

Cl
early states a single well
-
defined result to be achieved.



M

-

M
easurable:

Observable and can be measured quantitatively or qualitatively.




A

-

A
ligned:

Linked to agency strategic goals



R
:

-

R
ealistic:

Can be achieved yet challenging



T

-

T
ime
-
bound:

There is a date by which the objective will be achieved


Even though Judy Vredenburgh’s role as President & CEO of BBBSA differs from the
Chief Executive role in a local agency, we thought it helpful to provide you with the 2005
performance

objectives she developed with her board:



1.

Accomplish 10% growth in revenue and children served nationwide;

2.

Achieve BBBSA revenue of $24 million and assure spending within board approved
expense budget, minus grants to agencies;

3.

Add four new Directors to

the Board and ensure each committee is led well with clear
objectives;

4.

Accomplish by
-
laws changes and new organization linkages, including the
Nationwide Leadership Council, endorsed by the organization;

5.

Model and communicate at least monthly to organizat
ion roles and responsibilities of
professional leaders as compared with roles and responsibilities of board leaders; and

6.

Conduct a combined total of 150 visits to potential/current major prospects of all
stripes (corporate/foundation/individual).





III.

Develop the Agency Compensation Philosophy



A well thought out and executed compensation philosophy, reflecting agency strategy,
culture and critical issues pertaining to compensation should be developed and approved
by the Chief Executive and Board.
We
recommend local agencies tailor their
compensation philosophy to that provided below:



Big Brothers Big Sisters Executive Compensation Philosophy Template


BBBS executive compensation program reflects our commitment to attract and
retain talented and dive
rse executives in a competitive non
-
profit environment. We
recognize the strong relationship between executive performance, organization
development and sustainability. We additionally recognize the impact of the
agency’s local market on executive compensa
tion practices. Our compensation
philosophy supports our mission, values and strategy and encourages open
communication between the Chief Executive and his or her Board Chair in matters
involving performance, development and compensation. Listed below are
the four
key points of the compensation philosophy template.

1.

Compensation practices will attract, retain and motivate qualified, talented, and
diverse employees who will use his or her abilities to meet present and future agency
needs.

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2.

Executive compensati
on reviews will occur annually and
be based on Chief
Executive performance against objectives and responsibilities and overall agency
performance. In addition, benchmarked peer performance in core agency
performance areas may be considered.

3.

We will
compet
itively compensate strong performers at the top quintile of the
non
-
profit

social services market and as appropriate to business and economic
conditions, agency size and geography, length of service/experience. We recognize
internal equity and financial co
nstraints may justify market deviation.

4.

The compensation structure will reflect a mix of base salary and benefits and may
include pay for performance programs such as bonuses or incentive pay.





IV.

Establishing Performance Management Practices.


In th
is section, the Performance Evaluation Process (PEP) is a sequentially outlined
evaluation tool provided for the Board’s use. The performance evaluation process is a
year
-
round cycle of activities that provide structured opportunities for
measuring
result
s
,
providing feedback, planning for

executive career development

and
determining compensation. The current Board Chair, immediate past chair or
committee designee,

is responsible for facilitating the performance evaluation process.


There are some very
specific
best practices

that address Chief Executive performance
evaluation, as follows:



Formal board review of Chief Executive performance should occur annually;



The Chief Executive should have a role in establishing and evaluating his or her
performance

objectives;



Performance should be evaluated following the review of annual agency performance
data;



A performance review should always precede any discussion of Chief Executive
compensation; and



Chief Executive compensation should be linked to agency perf
ormance.


Executing the Performance Evaluation Process (PEP)


Step 1:
Selecting the Executive Performance Evaluation and Compensation
Structure That Fits the Agency

Boardsource,
the premier resource for building nonprofit boards, recommends
one of the fo
llowing agency compensation structures. Regardless of the structure
selected, it is recommended that the full board be advised of Chief Executive
performance and compensation adjustments.



Large boards

should delegate oversight to a committee or task force
.



Mid size boards

may choose to assign oversight to the board’s executive
committee.



Smaller boards

may handle compensation oversight as a full board.

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Step 2
:

Prepare for the Formal Evaluation

Relevant materials such as the Chief Executive job desc
ription, agency
performance data and executive self
-
evaluation, if available from the previous
year should be compiled.



Step 3: Implement the Performance Evaluation Process (PEP)

Using
Section 1, “Performance On Objectives”
of the
performance template
,
The Board should rate performance against each objective. Agency performance
data will provide the factual basis for this section of the

evaluation.


Section 2, “Performance On Responsibilities”

provides the Board with the
opportunity to comment and rate performance on each of the seven executive
responsibilities. This section, coupled with outcomes against objectives, provides
a framewo
rk for the discussion of Chief Executive performance and
development.


Once sections
1

and
2

have been completed, it is recommended that the board
review results, discuss key findings, and reach agreement on the overall annual
performance rating and key me
ssages to deliver to the Chief Executive. The
following questions can serve as a guide to this discussion. The Board should
obtain separate input from the Chief Executive on these same three performance
questions.




What were the

most significant achieveme
nts of the Chief Executive

over
the past year?



How did the Chief Executive

resolve the specific challenges faced by the
agency?



What are the Chief Executive

competency strengths and competency
development areas?


BBBS Executive Competencies were determine
d from the 2004 BBBS Leadership
Competency Survey
,
in which critical leadership competencies were identified and
prioritized by BBBS agency leaders, Board Chairs and key national staff. These
competencies are listed below. Board Chairs and Chief Executives

are asked to use these
competencies to assess leadership strengths and development needs:

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Strategic Management

The ability to create a compelling vision of the future and recognize its implication for strategy and
tactics of the organization. The abili
ty to effectively allocate/utilize resources to ensure the
accomplishment of organizational vision and objectives.

Driving, planning, execution, delegation and strategic thinking are included.

Communication

The ability to express oneself well in speech
and in writing even when relating complex information.
The ability to promote a free flow of information through the organization. The ability to listen
actively and present information effectively.

Oral Communication, presentation skills, active listening

written communication and fostering open
dialogue are included.

Ethics

The ability to understand and exercise honesty, integrity, responsibility, trust, respect and responsible
citizenship in all aspects of personal and professional life. The ability an
d willingness to set an
example for the organization when dealing with employment practices, records and information,
communicating with internal and external parties, potential conflicts of interest, the handling of
organizational assets. The ability to s
afeguard the public’s trust in the organization.

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Leadership

The abili
ty to lead others effectively by promoting teamwork within the organization. The ability to
empower employees to believe in the organization’s mission and accomplish goals and objectives
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d敶敬ep楮g 瑡汥nt

慲攠楮c汵d敤.

Entrepreneurial Orientation

The ability to look for and seize opportunities that further the impact of the organization and instill a
sense of urgency around seizing these opportunities. The ability to set standards for the team to follow
and create an environment focused on performance management. The ability to initiate and manage
change needed to support new strategic directions.

Drive to achieve results and leading change and innovation are included.

Thinking/Cognitive Skills

The abil
ity to effectively gather and analyze information needed to solve problems and make effective
decisions. The ability to think critically when analyzing information. The ability to use
strategic/conceptual thinking to understand situations, create a vision,

and anticipate both long and
short term consequences of decisions.

Visionary thinking, problem solving/decision making, and critical thinking are included.

Interpersonal Skills

The ability to forge strong, ongoing relationships with the board, customers
, and other key
stakeholders. The ability to establish rapport and relate to others. The ability to persuade others and
gain their support. The ability to utilize political savvy when necessary. The ability to provide a high
standard for integrity and comp
assion within the organization.

Building and sustaining relationships, influencing and negotiating, compassion, and political savvy are
included.

Job and Sector Specific Competencies

Industry specific areas of knowledge or personal traits that are requir
ed for successful job
performance.

Fund raising, passion for the mission, financial acumen, subject area knowledge and technology
management are included.

Self
-
Management

The ability to remain open to new points of view and to change or adapt based on si
tuational
parameters. The ability to continually update organization related knowledge/skills and to
recognize/address the need for self
-
development.

Adaptability/flexibility and self
-
development are included.

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Any adjustments to compensation should be d
etermined at this time using the information
in
Step 4

below.
The compensation guidelines and market survey results should be
applied in a manner that links salary adjustments to Chief Executive performance.
This linkage between performance and salary pro
vides a solid rationale for
compensation and maintains the integrity of Chief Executive compensation
practices.


The board member responsible for the performance assessment, along with other board
members as appropriate, should meet with the Chief Execut
ive to discuss the results
against objectives, deliver the agreed upon message from the board, discuss major
strengths and development areas, overall performance rating and compensation for the
following year.



Step 4:

Establishing Chief Executive Co
mpensation

BBBSA commissioned an external market compensation survey in 2005.

The
purpose of the survey was to determine competitive market compensation levels
for the

Chief Executive

and other

top

agency leadership positions,
to assess
the
external comp
etitiveness of agency pay

levels in relation to comparable
nonprofit social service organizations nationwide, and to
identify the
prevalence of benefits
. Executive bonus, incentive pay and other forms of
income added to base salary will affect base pay and

is beyond the scope this
guide.
Human Resources expertise and legal counsel should be sought for these
more complex compensation practices.

Current BBBS pay data was obtained
from the 2004 Agency Demographic Report (ADR).




Applying Compensation Mar
ket Data



The following leadership positions were included in this survey:


BBBS Agency Demographic Report
Position Title

Survey Position Titles


Executive Director CEO/President


Chief Executive Officer

Associate Executive Director/Vice
President of O
perations/COO

Chief Operating Officer*

Director of Programs/ Vice President of
Programs

Top Program Position

Director of Fund Development/Vice
President of Fund Development

Top Fund Development Position


* Revenue over $2,100,001



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The table below il
lustrates agency revenue buckets used in the survey:


BBBS Agency



Revenue Category

Number

of Agencies
Reporting

Percent
of Total
Agencies

Mean
Annual
Revenue

1.

Below $250,000*

152

45.5%

$130,000

2.

$250,000
-

$500,000

93

27.8%

$375,000

3.

$500,001
-

$1,100,000

58

17.3%

$750,000

4.

$1,100,001
-

$2,100,000

20

5.9%

$1,500,000

5.

$2,100,001
-

$5,000,000

12

3.6%

$3,700,000

6.

$5,000,000
-

$10,000,000**

0

0%

$0

Total

335

100.0%

$515,030



*

Although a large number of BBBS agencies fall on the low en
d of the $250,000
revenue category, there is a minimum pay level all small BBBS agencies must pay in
order to attract, retain and engage qualified talent with the prerequisite knowledge,
experience and competencies for the survey positions.

**

Agency ann
ual revenue above $5,000,000 was included in the survey to allow for
agency growth in the future but not used for comparative purposes as there is no
BBBS agency reporting revenue in that category.

Determining Competitive Pay Using the Compensation Survey
Results

The primary factors which influence pay for the executive position are
agency revenue

and
geographic location
. Therefore, each BBBS agency needs to assess their market
competitive compensation using the data provided in this report.


The table on

the next page provides market competitive pay for each survey position.
This information is grouped by revenue categories, includes the total number of survey
incumbents (incs.), and is listed by percentile.














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Summary Base Salary ($000)
Survey Position
# of Incs.
25th %ile
Mean
Median
75th %ile
Chief Executive Officer
116
$ 34.4
$ 45.4
$ 42.0
$ 54.4
Top Program Position
13
30.4
42.2
39.7
48.1
Top Fund Development Position
3
25.1
31.6
26.3
35.5
Summary Base Salary ($000)
Survey Position
# of Incs.
25th %ile
Mean
Median
75th %ile
Chief Executive Officer
184
$ 47.3
$ 59.6
$ 58.7
$ 69.4
Top Program Position
57
42.7
47.6
46.7
52.5
Top Fund Development Position
17
41.8
45.3
44.2
46.7
Summary Base Salary ($000)
Survey Position
# of Incs.
25th %ile
Mean
Median
75th %ile
Chief Executive Officer
249
$ 65.1
$ 81.9
$ 77.5
$ 90.3
Top Program Position
57
47.7
56.9
53.0
62.9
Top Fund Development Position
69
43.9
60.0
51.2
70.4
Summary Base Salary ($000)
Survey Position
# of Incs.
25th %ile
Mean
Median
75th %ile
Chief Executive Officer
136
$ 84.2
$ 104.8
$ 99.3
$ 119.4
Top Program Position
64
49.8
60.3
58.0
64.6
Top Fund Development Position
70
50.7
62.3
60.0
71.3
Summary Base Salary ($000)
Survey Position
# of Incs.
25th %ile
Mean
Median
75th %ile
Chief Executive Position
177
$98.8
$121.3
$113.5
$133.7
Chief Operating Officer
134
69.6
84.9
79.0
93.4
Top Program Position
109
54.0
63.9
60.7
70.6
Top Fund Development Position
113
57.7
72.7
69.7
82.6
Summary Base Salary ($000)
Survey Position
# of Incs.
25th %ile
Mean
Median
75th %ile
Chief Executive Position
114
$105.1
$132.6
$125.1
$147.7
Chief Operating Officer
96
73.7
90.9
86.3
103.6
Top Program Position
71
53.8
69.1
63.6
79.8
Top Fund Development Position
64
61.6
78.4
77.2
93.6
Category 1

Below $250,000
Category 2

$250,001 - $500,000
Category 3

$500,001 - $1,100,000
Category 4

$1,100,001 - $2,100,000
Category 5

$2,100,001 - $5,000,000
Category 6

$5,000,001 - $10,000,000


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To use this table, follow t
he four steps below:


1.

Identify agency revenue in one of the five (5) revenue categories;

2.

Locate the position title;

3.

Decide where your executive should fall based on the appropriate pay percentile
using the guidelines listed below;


25
th

percentile (devel
oping executive)
: the compensation amount above which 75%
of all reported data fall.

Mean (fully performing and experienced executive):
represents the average on all
reported data.


Median (fully performing and experienced executive):

the compensation am
ount
above which 50% of all data fall.

75
th

percentile (outstanding performance and exceptional experience):

the
compensation amount above which 25 % of all reported compensation data fall.


This range will present challenges for future salary growth poten
tial. Boardsource
recommends that targeting above the
75
th

percentile

be justified by the board and
based on situational specifics such as: need for specialized leadership skills in an
agency repositioning itself, ambitious growth plans, executive leaders
hip position in
the community or currently has an unusually skilled or experienced long serving and
performing Chief Executive. The IRS uses reasonableness standard in defining the
marketplace as the value that would ordinarily be paid for like services, b
y like
organizations, under like circumstance.

4.

Apply market adjustment factors based on geography using the table below. Identify
agency location in one of two national markets,
above or below.
(if an agency is not
listed on that appendix, then it falls in
to the national market.)




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BBBS Locations Above and Below National Labor Market





*Information is based on labor supply and demand. Additional adjustments may be made for market cost of living.
Reflects location with 25%
premium. Other NY locations 10%
-

15% premium. Other California locations 10%
-

20% premium.




Locations Above National Market

Chapter

City

State

BBBS of Anchorage, Inc

An
chorage

AK*

BBBS of Greater Los Angeles and the Inland Empire

Los Angeles

CA*

Catholic BBBS

Los Angeles

CA*

Jewish BBBBS Assn of Los Angeles County

Los Angeles

CA*

BBBS of the East Bay Inc

Oakland

CA

BBBS of the Greater Sacramento Area, Inc

Sacramento

CA

BB&S of San Diego County

San Diego

CA

BBBS of San Francisco & The Peninsula

San Francisco

CA*

BBBS of Santa Clara County, Inc

San Jose

CA

BBBS of Marin & Napa Counties

San Rafael

CA

BBBS of Santa Barbara County

Santa Barbara

C
A

BBBS of Santa Cruz County

Santa Cruz

CA

BBBS of Southeastern Connecticut

Groton

CT

BBBS of the National Capital Area

Washington

DC

BBBS of Honolulu, Inc

Honolulu

HI*

BBBS of Maul, Inc

Wailuku

HI*

Catholic Charities BBBS of Brooklyn & Quee
ns

Brooklyn

NY

One To One BBBS

Ithaca

NY

BBBS of Ulster County

Kingston

NY

BBBS of Long Island, Inc.

Levittown

NY

BBBS of Rockland County, Inc.

New City

NY

BBBS of New York City, Inc.

New York

NY*

Jewish BBBS

New York

NY

Total

23

Loc
ations Below National Market

Agency

City

State

BBBS of Greater Birmingham, Inc

Birmingham

AL

BBBS of Morgan County, Inc

Decatur

AL

BB/BS of the Shoals, Inc

Florence

AL

BBBS of Northeast Alabama

Gadsden

AL

BBBS of South Central Alabama

Mont
gomery

AL

BBBS of West Alabama

Tuscaloosa

AL

BBBS of North Central Arkansas, Inc

Conway

AR

BBBS of Northwest Arkansas

Springdata

AR

BBBS of Mid Florida

Gainesville

FL

BBBS of Martin County

Stuart

FL

BBBS of the Sun Coast, Inc

Venice

FL

BBBS of Coosa Valley

Calhourn

GA

BBBS of Columbus

Columbus

GA

BBBS of Northwest Georgia Mountains, Inc.

Dalton

GA

BBBS of the Oconee

Milledgeville

GA

BBBS of South Georgia

Tifton

GA

BBBS of Clinton

Clinton

IA

BBBS of Central Iowa, Inc.

C
live

IA

BBBS of the Quad Cities

Davenport

IA

BBBS of the Great River Area

Keokuk

IA

Guide to Executive Management


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BBBS Locations Below National Labor Market





Below National Market (Cont’d)

Agency

City

State

BBBS of Marshall County, Inc.

Marshalltown

IA

BBBS of Muscatine County

Muscatine

IA

BBBS of Northeast Iow
a

Waterloo

IA

BBBS of Southeast Idaho, Inc

Idaho Falls

ID

Mid
-
Illinois BBBS

Charleston

IL

BBBS of West Central Illinois

Jacksonville

IL

BBBS of Will and Grundy Counties

Joliet

IL

BBBS of Richland County

Olney

IL

Heart of Illinois BBBS

P
eoria

IL

BBBS of DuPage County

Wheaton

IL

BBBS of Bartholomew County, Inc.

Columbus

IN

BBBS of Fayette County

Connersville

IN

BBBS of Decatur County

Greensburg

IN

BBBS of Dubois County

Jasper

IN

BBBS of Cass County, Inc.

Logansport

IN

BBBS of Jefferson County

Madison

IN

BBBS of Delaware County

Muncie

IN

BBBS of Henry County, Inc.

New Castle

IN

BBBS of Southeast Indiana

Seymour

IN

BBBS of Vigo County, Inc.

Terre Haute

IN

Youth Service Bureau BBBS of Wabash County

Wabash

IN

BBBS of Finney County

Garden City

KS

BBBS of Salina, Inc.

Salina

KS

BB&BS of Topeka, Inc.

Topeka

KS

Kansas BBBS, Inc.

Wichita

KS

BBBS of the Southern Pennrile

Hopkinsville

KY

BBBS of Madisonville
-
Hopkins County, Inc.

Madisonville

KY

B
BBS of Pulaski County, Inc.

Somerset

KY

BBBS of Acadiana, Inc.

Lafayette

LA

BBBS of Southwest Louisiana
-
Lake Charles

Lake Charles

LA

BBBS of Caddo/Bossier

Shreveport

LA

BBBS of Northeast Louisiana

West Monroe

LA

BBBS of Steels County

Owaton
na

MN

BBBS of Central Minnesota

Saint Cloud

MN

BBBS of Boone County, Inc.

Columbia

MO

BBBS of Jasper & Newton Counties

Joplin

MO

BBBS of Mississippi

Jackson

MS

BBBS of Gallatin County

Bozeman

MT

BBBS of Butte
-
Silver Bow, Inc.

Butte

MT

B
BBS of Flathead County

Kalispell

MT

BBBS of Park County

Livingston

MT

BBBS of Missoula

Missoula

MT

BB&S of Lake County

Poison

MT

BBBS of the Central Piedmont

High Point

NC

BBBS of Southeastern North Carolina

New Bern

NC

BBBS of the Southe
rn Piedmont, Inc.

Statesville

NC

BBBS of Bismarck
-
Mandan

Bismarck

ND

BBBS of the Village Family Service Center

Fargo

ND

BBBS of Fremont

Fremont

NE

BBBS of Grand Island, Inc

Grand Island

NE

BBBS of the Norfolk Area, Inc.

Norfolk

NE

BBBS of

Otero County

Alamogordo

NM

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BBBS Locations Below National Labor Market



25% red
uction in market base salaries applies to small rural locations 10%
-

15% reduction in market base salaries
applies to medium size cities in this category.


Agency

City

State

BB&BS of San Juan County, Inc.

Farmington

NM

BB/BS of Las Cruces, Inc.

Las Cruces

NM

BB/BS of Las Vegas, Inc.

Las Vegas

NM

BBBS of Southeastern New Mexico

Rosw
ell

NM

BBBS of Nevada, Inc.

Las Vegas

NV

BB&S of Portage County, Inc.

Ravenna

OH

BBBS if Cleveland County, Inc

Norman

OK

BBBS of Pottawatomie, Seminole & Pontotoc Co. Inc.

Shawnee

OK

BBBS of Stillwater, Inc.

Stillwater

OK

BBBS of Central
Oregon

Bend

OR

BBBS Youth Program of the YMCA

Eugene

OR

BBBS of Centre County

State College

PA

BBBS of New Foundations Children & Family Svc, Inc.

Anderson

SC

Pee Dee Area BBBS Association

Florence

SC

BBBS of the Black Hills

Rapid City

S
D

BBBS of Sioux Falls

Sioux Falls

SD

BBBS of Clarksville

Clarksville

TN

BB/BS of Maury County

Columbia

TN

BBBS of the Greater Tri
-
Cities

Kingsport

TN

BBBS of Tennessee Valley, Inc.

Knoxsville

TN

BBBS of El Paso

El Paso

TX

BBBS of Lubbock
, Inc.

Lubbock

TX

BBBS of Northeast Texas, Inc.

Paris

TX

BBBS of Washington County, Inc.

Abingdon

VA

BBBS of Danville Area, Inc.

Danville

VA

BBBS of Harrisonburg
-
Rockingham County

Harrisonburg

VA

BBBS of Central Virginia, Inc

Lynchburg

VA

BBBS of Island County

Oak Harbor

WA

BBBS of the Fox Valley Region, Inc.

Appleton

WI

BBBS of Rock, Walworth & Jefferson Counties

Beloit

WI

BBBS of Fond du Lac County, Inc.

Fond du Lac

WI

BBBS of Ozaukee County, Inc.

Grafton

WI

BBBS of the Co
ulee Region

La Crosse

WI

BBB of Manitowoc County, Inc.

Manitowoc

WI

BBBS of Wood County

Marshfield

WI

BBBS of Green County, Inc.

Monroe

WI

BBBS of the Northwoods, Inc.

Phillips

WI

BBBS of Racine & Kenosha Counties, Inc.

Racine

WI

BB&BS of

Sheboygan County, Inc.

Sheboygan

WI

BBBS of Central Wisconsin, Inc

Stevens Point

WI

BBBS of Dodge County

Watertown

WI

BBBS of Northcentral Wisconsin

Wausau

WI

BBBS of Washington County, Inc.

West Bend

WI

BBBS of North Central West Virginia
, Inc.

Clarksburg

WV

BBBS of the Eastern Panhandle

Martinsburg

WV

BBBS of the Northern Panhandle

Wheeling

WV

Greater Wyoming BBBS

Laramie

WY

YMCA of Sweetwater County BBBS

Rock Springs

WY

BBBS of Northeast Wyoming, Inc.

Worland

WY

Tota
l

121


Below National Market (Cont’d)

Guide to Executive Management


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Competitive Benefits

In the case of employee benefits, BBBS agency practices generally seem consist
ent with
market norms. The market employee benefit cost projections will vary somewhat in
different geographic locations mainly due to healthcare usage (i.e., experience ratings) in
different locations. Most BBBS agencies (70%) provide their active, full
-
time employees
with medical benefits. Similar to typical market practices, almost all BBBS agencies
provide their employees with paid time off (i.e., paid vacation, sick leave, holidays and
personal days). Specific
broad
-
based employee benefits

for organi
zations with revenue
at or above $1,000,000 include: medical, dental, vision, life/AD&D insurance, sick
leave/short
-
term disability, long
-
term disability, retirement, paid time off and
professional development. An explanation of each of these benefits and

typical costs are
included in the BBBS Market Compensation Survey Report.

Obtaining Counsel

Agencies should acquire legal advice in structuring their compensation plan and decision
-
making process especially if specific compensation complexities exist or
if there is need
specific to your agency.