COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING M.TECH (NETWORKING) (NON-CBCS)

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1

COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING


M.TECH (
NETWORKING
)


(NON
-
CBCS)










REGULATIONS,

CURRICULUM AND SYLLABUS


(With effect from the Academic
Year 2011



12)










PONDICHERRY UNIVERSITY

PUDUCHERRY


605 014.


2

PONDICHERRY UNIVERSITY

PUDUCHERRY
-

605 0
14.

REGULATIONS FOR POST GRADUATE (M.Tech.) PROGRAMMES IN THE DISCIPLINE
OF
COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

(
NON
-
CBCS
)

(WITH EFFECT FROM JULY 2011)

M.Tech (
NETWORKING
)

1.0

ELIGIBILITY

Candidates for admission to the first semester of four semester M.Tech (
Net
working
) should
have passed B.E / B.Tech
.

in Computer Science and Engineering

/ Information Technology

/
Electronic & Communication Engineering

or M.C.A through

regular course of study from an
AICTE approved institution or an examination of any University
or authority accepted by the
Pondicherry University as equivalent thereto, with at least 55% marks in the degree examination
or equivalent CGPA.

Note:

1.

Candidates belonging to
SC/ST who have a mere pass in the qualifying examination are
eligible.

2.

There is n
o age limit for M.Tech. programmes.


2.0

ADMISSION




The admission policy for various M.Tech. programmes shall be decided by the respective
institutes offering M.Tech. programmes subject to conforming to the relevant regulations of the
Pondicherry Universit
y.

3.0


STRUCTURE OF M.Tech. PROGRAMME


3.1

General

3.1.1.

The M.Tech. Programmes are of semester pattern with 16 weeks of instruction in
a semester.

3.1.2

The programme of instruction for each stream of
specialization

will consist
of:

(i)

Core courses (Compulso
ry)

(ii)

Electives

(iii)
Laboratory

(iv)

Seminar

(v)

Project work


3.1.3 The M.Tech. Programmes are of 4 semester duration.


3

3.1.4. Credits will be assigned to the courses based on the following general pattern:

(i)

One credit for each lecture period

(ii)

One credit for each tuto
rial period

(iii)
Two credits for practical course


(iv)

Two credits for seminar

(v)

Twenty three credits for Project work divided
into 9

credits for
Phase
-
I and 14 credits for Phase


II.

(vi)

One teaching period shall be of 60 minutes duration including 10
minutes for dis
cussion and movement.


3.1.5

Regulations, curriculum and syllabus of the M.Tech. programme shall have the
approval of Board of Studies and other Boards/ Committees/ Councils, prescribed by the
Pondicherry University. The curriculum should be so drawn up

that the minimum number
of credits and other requirements for the successful completion of the programme will be
as given in Table


1.

Table 1: Minimum credits and other requirements


Sl.No


Description

Requirements

M.Tech

(Full
-
Time)

1

Number

of Semesters

4

2

Min. number of credits of
the programme

72

3

Max. number of credits of
the programme

75

4

Min. Cumulative Grade
Point Average for pass

5

5

Min. successful credits
needed for registering in the
next semester

Sem. I: 10

Sem. II: 2
5


Sem. III: 40

6

Min. period of completion
of programme (consecutive
semesters)


4


4

7

Max. period of completion
of programme(consecutive
semesters)


8

8

Number of core and elective
courses

13

9

Seminar

1

10

Laboratory

1

11

Project work (semester
s)

2


3.1.6 A core course is a course that a student admitted to the M.Tech. programme must
successfully complete to receive the degree. A student shall register for all the core
courses listed in the curriculum.

3.1.7

Elective courses are required to be

chosen from the courses offered by the
department(s) in that particular semester from among the approved courses. A core
course of one department may be chosen as an elective by a student from other
department.

3.1.8

Each student is required to make a se
minar presentation on any chosen topic
connected with the field of
specialization
. Preparation and presentation of a seminar is
intended to investigate an in
-
depth review of literature, prepare a critical review and
develop confidence to present the materi
al by the student. The seminar shall be evaluated
by a Department Committee constituted for this purpose, based on a report submitted by
the candidate and a viva
-
voce conducted at the end of the semester.

3.1.9

Project work is envisaged to train a student

to analyze independently any problem
posed to him/her. The work may be analytical, experimental, design or a combination of
both. The project report is expected to exhibit clarity of thought and expression. The
evaluation of project work will be a continu
ous internal assessment based on two
reviews, an internal viva
-
voce and an external viva
-
voce examination.

3.1.10

The medium of instruction, examination, seminar, directed study and project work
will be in English.





5


4.0 REQUIREMENTS

TO APPEAR FOR UNI
VERSITY EXAMINATION

4.1

A candidate shall be permitted to appear for university examinations at the end of
any
semester only if he / she secures not less than 75% overall attendance arrived at by
taking into
account the total number of periods in all subje
cts put together offered by the
institution
for the semester under consideration.

Candidates who secure overall
attendance greater than 60% and less than 75% have to pay a condonation fee as
prescribed by the

University along with a medical certificate obt
ained from a medical
officer not below the rank of Assistant Director to become eligible to appear for the
examinations.

4.2

A candidate to secure eligibility towards continuing the Programme, he/she must
have earned the minimum number of credits at the en
d of each semester as given in Table


1. If he /she
fail

to satisfy this criterion in any semester, he/she shall be placed on
scholastic probation in the succeeding semester.

4.3

His / Her conduct shall be satisfactory as certified by the Head of the in
stitution.


5.0

EVALUATION


5.1

Evaluation of theory courses shall be based on 40% continuous internal
assessment and 60% University examination. Evaluation of laboratory course shall be
based on 50% internal assessment and 50% University examination. In each

course, there
shall be a 3 hour University examination.

5.2

The seminar will be evaluated internally for 100 marks. The total marks for the
project work for M.Tech. programmes will be 300 marks for phase
-
I and 400 marks for
phase
-
II. The allotment of mar
ks for external valuation and internal valuation shall be as
detailed below:

Seminar

(Internal

valuation only)

:

100 Marks

First review



30 marks

Second review



30 marks

Report and Viva voce



40 marks


Total

100 marks



6


Project work


(Phase


I)
: 300 Marks

Internal valuation




Guide


50 marks


First Evaluation



50 marks


Second Evaluation



50 marks



Total

150 marks

External valuation




Evaluation (External Examiner
Only)



50 marks


Viva voce (50 for Ext.+ 50 for
Int.)



100 marks



Total

150 marks



Project work


(Phase


II):
400 Marks


Internal valuation




Guide


100 marks


First Evaluation



50 marks


Second Evaluation



50 marks



Total

200 marks

External valuation




Evaluation (E
xternal Examiner
Only)



50 marks


Viva voce (75 for Ext. + 75 for
Int.)


150 marks



Total

200 marks


7



Internal valuation should be done by a committee comprising of not less than 3
faculty members appointed by the Head of the Department and approv
ed by the Head of
the Institution.

5.3

The end
-
semester examination shall be conducted by the Pondicherry University
for all the courses offered by the department. A model question paper, as approved by the
Chairperson, BOS (ECE), Pondicherry University,

for each course offered under the
curriculum should be submitted to the University. The University examination shall cover
the entire syllabus of the course.

5.4

The University shall adopt the double valuation procedure for evaluating the end
-
semester ex
aminations, grading and publication of the results. Each answer script shall be
evaluated by two experts. If the difference between the total marks awarded by the two
examiners is not more than 15% of end
-
semester examination maximum marks, then the
averag
e of the total marks awarded by the two examiners will be reckoned as the mark
secured by the candidate; otherwise, a third examiner is to be invited to evaluate the
answer scripts and his/her assessment shall be declared final.

5.5

Continuous assessment

of students for theory courses shall be based on two tests
(15 marks each) and one assignment (10 marks). A laboratory course carries an internal
assessment mark of 50 distributed as follows:
(i) Regular laboratory exercises and
records


20 marks (ii) I
nternal laboratory test


20 marks and (iii) Internal viva
-
voce


10
marks.

5.6

All eligible students shall appear for the University examination.


6.0 Grading



6.1 The assessment of a course will be done on absolute marks basis. However, for the
purpose
of reporting the performance of a candidate, letter grades, each carrying
stipulated points, will be awarded as per the range of total marks (out of 100) obtained by
the candidate, as detailed below in Table


2.

TABLE 2: Letter Grade and the Corresponding

Grade Point

Range of Total
Marks

Letter
Grade

Grade
Points

Description

90 to 100

S

10

EXCELLENT

80 to 89

A

9

VERY GOOD


8

70 to 79

B

8

GOOD

60 to 69

C

7

ABOVE AVERAGE

55 to 59

D

6

AVERAGE

50 to 54

E

5

SATISFACTORY

0 to 49

F

0

FAILURE

Incomplete

FA

-

FAILURE DUE TO LACK OF
ATTENDANCE/ FAILURE BY
ABSENCE


6.2 A student is deemed to have completed a course successfully and earned the
appropriate credit if and only if, he /she receives a grade of E and above. The student
should obtain 40% of marks in

the University examination in a subject to earn a
successful grade.

6.3

A candidate who has been declared “Failed” in a course may reappear for that
subject during the subsequent semesters and secure a pass. However, there is a provision
for revaluatio
n of failed or passed subjects provided he/she fulfills the following norms
for revaluation.

(i)

Applications for revaluation should be filed within 4 weeks from the date of
declaration of results or 15 days from the date of receipt of marks card whichever is
earlier.

(ii)

The candidate should have attended all the
university examinations.

(iii)

The candidate should not have
failed in more than two papers in the current
university examination.

(iv)

The request for revaluation must be made in the format prescribed and duly
reco
mmended by the Head of the Institution along with the revaluation fee
prescribed by the University.

(v)

Revaluation is not permitted for practical courses, seminar and project work.

6.4

The internal assessment marks secured by a student in a theory course shal
l be
considered only during the first appearance. For the subsequent attempts, the marks
secured by the student in the University
examination shall be scaled up to the total marks.
Further, the marks secured by the student in the University examination in
the latest

9

attempt shall alone remain valid in total suppression of the University examination marks
secured by the student in earlier attempts.



7.0

DECLARATION OF RESULTS, RANK AND ISSUE OF GRADE CARD

7.1

The results will be declared and the grade cards wil
l be issued to the students after
completing the valuation process.

7.2

The grade cards will contain the following details:

(i)

The college in which the candidate is studying/has studied.

(ii)

The list of courses enrolled during the semester and the grades scored.

(iii)

The

Grade Point Average (GPA) for the semester and the Cumulative Grade
Point Average (CGPA) of all enrolled subjects from first semester onwards.

7.3

GPA is the ratio of the sum of the products of the number of credits ( C ) of courses
registered and the corresp
onding grades points ( GP ) scored in those courses, taken
for
all the courses and the sum of number of credits of all the courses


GPA = (Sum of
(C ×
GP)/ Sum of
C)

The sum will cover all the courses the student has taken in that semester,
incl
uding those in which he/she has secured F.

7.4 CGPA will be calculated in a similar manner, considering all the courses enrolled
from first semester. FA grades are to be excluded for calculating GPA and CGPA. If a
student has passed in a course after fail
ing in earlier attempts,

the grade secured by the
student in the successful attempt only will be taken into account for computing CGPA.


7.5


To convert CGPA into percentage marks, the following formula shall be used:


% Mark = (CGPA
-

0.
5
) × 10


7.6

A candidate who satisfies the course requirements for all semesters and passes all
the examinations prescribed for all the four semesters within a maximum period of 10
semesters reckoned from the commencement of the first semester to which th
e candidate
was admitted, shall be declared to have qualified for the award of degree.


7.7 A candidate who qualifies for the award of the degree shall be declared to have
passed the examination in
FIRST CLASS
with
DISTINCTION

upon fulfilling the
followi
ng requirements:


10

(i)

Should have passed all the subjects pertaining to semesters 1 to 4 in
his/her first appearance in 4 consecutive semesters starting from first
semester to which the candidate was admitted.

(ii)

Should not have been prevented from writing ex
aminations due to lack of
attendance.

(iii)

Should have secured a CGPA of 8.50 and above for the semesters 1 to 4.


7.8

A candidate who qualifies for the award of the degree by passing all the subjects
relating to semesters 1 to 4 within a maximum period of 6 co
nsecutive semesters after
his/her commencement of study in the first semester and in addition secures CGPA not
less than 6.5 shall be declared to have passed the examination in
FIRST CLASS
.

7.9

All other candidates who qualify for the award of degree shall

be declared to have
passed the examination in
SECOND CLASS
.

7.10

A student with CGPA less than 5.0 is not eligible for the award of degree.


7.11

For the award of University rank and gold medal, the
CGPA secured from 1
st

to
4
th

semester should be considered and it
is mandatory
that the candidate should have
passed all the subjects from 1
st

to 4
th

semester in the first appearance

and he/she should not
have been prevented from writing the examination due to lack of attendance and should
not have withdrawn from writing

the University examinations.


8.0

PROVISION FOR WITHDRAWAL

A candidate may, for valid reasons, and on the recommendation of the Head of the
Institution
be granted permission by the University to withdraw from writing the entire
semester
examination as one uni
t. The withdrawal application shall be valid only if it is made earlier than
the commencement of the last theory examination pertaining to that semester. Withdrawal shall
be permitted only once during the entire programme. Other conditions being satisfacto
ry,
candidates who withdraw are also eligible to be awarded DISTINCTION whereas they are not
eligible to be awarded a rank/gold medal.



9.0
DISCONTINUATION FROM THE PROGRAMME

I
f a candidate wishes to temporarily discontinue the
programme

for valid reas
ons, he/she
shall
apply through the Head of the Institution in advance and obtain a written order from the
University permitting discontinuance. A candidate after temporary discontinuance may rejoin the
programme only at the commencement of the semester at

which he/she discontinued, provided
he/she pays the prescribed fees to the University. The total period of completion of the
programme reckoned from the commencement of the first semester to which the candidate was
admitte
d shall not in any case exceed 4

years, including the period of discontinuance.


11

10.0
REVISION OF REGULATIONS AND CURRICULUM

The University may from time to time revise, amend or change the regulations of
curriculum and syllabus as and when requirement
for the same arises.



11.0

POWER TO MODIF
Y


11
.1

Notwithstanding anything contained in the foregoing, the Pondicherry University
shall have the power to issue directions/ orders to remove any difficulty.


11
.2

Nothing in the foregoing may be construed as limiting the power of the
Pondicherry U
niversity to amend, modify or repeal any or all of the above.



*******


12

M.TECH
(
NETWORKING
)


NON
-
CBCS

CURRICULUM AND SCHEME OF EXAMINATION

(Total number of credits required for the completion of the programme: 72)

SEMESTER


I

Sl.
No.

Code

Subject

Hour
s / Week

Credits

Evaluation (marks)

L

T

P

Internal

External

Total

1.

CS

9
5
1

Advanced Data
Structures and
Algorithms

3

1

0

4

40

60

100

2.

CS

95
2

High Performance
Networks


3

1

0

4

40

60

100

3.

CS

95
3

Network Components
& Design


3

1

0

4

40

60

100

4
.



Elective


I

3

0

0

3

40

60

100

5.



Elective


II

3

0

0

3

40

60

100

6.


Elective


III

3

0

0

3

40

60

100

7.

CS

95
8

Seminar

-

-

3

2

100

-

100

L

23

340

360

700


SEMESTER


II

Sl.
No.

Code

Subject

Hours / Week

Credits

Evaluation (marks)

L

T

P

Internal

External

Total

1.

CS

95
4

Computer Network
Protocols

3

1

0

4

40

60

100

2.

CS

95
5

Network Security

3

1

0

4

40

60

100

3.

CS

95
6

Wireless
Communication
3

1

0

4

40

60

100


13

Networks

4.


Elective




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SEMESTER


III

Sl.
No.

Code

Subject

Hours / Week

Credits

Evaluation (marks)

L

T

P

Internal

External

Total

1.

CS

9
5
9

Project Phase
-
I

-

-

16

9

150

150

300

2.


Elective


VII

3

0

0

3

40

60

100

T

12

190

210

400


SEMESTER


IV


Sl.
No.

Code

Subject

Hours / Week

Credits

Evaluation (marks)

L

T

P

Internal

External

Total

1.

CS

96
0

Project Phase II

-

-

24

14

200

200

400

L

14

200

200

400







14

LIST OF ELECTIVE SUBJECTS

SL.NO.

Code

SUBJECT

1

CS

97
1

Internet and Web Technologies

2

CS

97
2

Design of Distributed Systems

3

CS
97
3

Pervasive And Ubiquitous Computing

4

CS 97
4

Sensor Networks

5

CS 97
5

Optical Networks

6

CS 97
6

E
-
Commerce Tech
nologies

7

CS 97
7

Semantic Web

8

CS 97
8

Storage Area Networks

9

CS 97
9

Cryptographic Techniques

1
0

CS 9
8
0

Real Time System

1
1

CS 98
1

Design of
Embedded Systems

1
2

CS 98
2

Performance Evaluation Of Computer Systems And Networks

1
3

CS 98
3

High Perform
ance Computing

1
4

CS 98
4

Grid Computing

1
5

CS 98
5

Cloud Computing

1
6

CS 98
6

Neural Networks

1
7

CS 98
7

Network Management

18

CS 9
8
8

Software Architecture

19

CS 98
9

Distributed System Architecture

20

CS 99
0

Heterogeneous Parallel Computing


15


CS 951

ADVANCED DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS


UNIT I

Problem solving techniques


Space and Time complexity of algorithms

-

2 Growth of
Functions, Asymptotic notation, Standard notations and common functions, Summations
Summation formulas and properties, Bound
ing summations, Recurrences
-

substitution method

-

iteration method

-

The master method Sorting


heap sort
-
quick sort
-
randomized quick sort

-

bucket sort
-
merge sort
-
radix sort
-
lower bound on sorting
-
performance of sorting algorithms

-
applications of sorti
ng Search


binary and Fibonacci search
-
applications .


UNIT II

Linear data structures
-
array of structures
-
stack
-
queue
-
priority queues, pointers and linked
allocation Linked list


singly, doubly, circular
-

polynomial addition
-
sparse matrices

-
equivalenc
e relations

-

garbage collection and compaction


UNIT III

Non linear data structures


Trees
-

Binary Search Tree, terminology

-

representation


insertion



deletion

-

querying

Graphs


terminology

-

representation
-
traversals
-
spanning trees

-

shortest p
ath
-
topological sort


UNIT IV

Red black trees, AVL
trees,

B


trees


building


operations

-

analysis


UNIT V

Hashing
-

Basic Ideas

-

Hash Function

-

Linear Probing

-

Quadratic Probing

-

Separate Chaining
Hashing

-

Hash Tables versus Binary Search Tre
es

-

Hashing Application


REFERENCE
S

1.
Jean Paul
Tremblay and Paul G.Sorenson
,


An introduction to data structures with
applications

, Tata McGraw hill,

2nd edition,

2001

2. Thomas H. Cormen, Stein Clifford, Charles E. Leiserson
, Robert L. Rivest
,“
Intr
oduction to
Algorithms



3. Mark Allen Allen Weiss, Florida International
University,

Data

Structures and Problem
Solving Using Java

:
International Edition, 3/E,

Florida International
University, Publisher
:
Addison

-
Wesley, Copyright: 2006

4. S.Saxena,
Splay
Trees,

Handbook

of Data Structure and Application

, Chapman & Hall/CRC
2004.

5. Ellis Horowitz and sartaj sahni


Fundamentals of Data Structures

,

Galgotia Booksource
,
1995


6.

Robert Kruse C.L.Tondo and Bruce Leung,


Data Stru
ctures and Program de
sign in C

,

Pearson Education Asia
,
second edition
,

2001





16

CS 952

HIGH PERFORMANCE NETWORKS


UNIT

I


Introduction to computer networks
-

Review of OSI/ISO model


Introduction to high speed
networks
-

High speed LANs


Fast Ethernet
-

Switched Fast Ethern
et
-

Gigabit Ethernet


ISDN, FDDI, Frame relay
-

operations and layers.



UNIT

II


Introduction to SONET


SONET/SDH Layers


SONET Frame Structure



Sonet Physical
Layer. Introduction ATM


Cell format and Switching Principles


Protocol Architecture


Service categories.


TCP/IP protocol Suite


IP Packet Header


TCP packet header


User
services


Protocol Operation


Connection Establishment


UDP.



UNIT

III


Congestion control in Data Networks and Internets


Effects of Congestion


Congestion

Co
ntrol
in Packet Switched Networks. Frame relay Congestion Control


Traffic rate Management


Congestion Avoidance. ATM Traffic and Congestion Control


Attributes


Traffic Management
Framework


Traffic Control


ABR Traffic Management. TCP Traffic Contr
ol


Flow Control


TCP Congestion Control


Timer Management


Window Management.



UNIT

IV

Introduction to Quality of Service
-

Integrated Services


Differentiated Services


Protocols for
QoS support
-

Resource Reservation (RSVP)


Multiprotocol Labe
l Switching (MPLS)


Real
-
Time Transport Protocol (RTP).



UNIT

V


Introduction to Optical networks


Wavelength division multiplexing (WDM)


Introduction to
broadcast
-
and
-
select networks
-

Switch architectures
-

channel accessing


Wavelength routed
net
works


Switch architectures
-

Routing and wavelength assignment


virtual topology design


IP over SONET over ATM over WDM


IP over ATM over WDM


IP over WDM.



REFERENCE
S

1.

William Stallings,

High
-
Speed Networks and Internets

, Pearson Education, 2
nd

E
dition,
2002.

2.

Fred Halsall,

Multimedia Communications: Applications, Protocols, and Standards

,

Pearson Educat
ion Asia, 2001.

3.

Rajiv Ramaswami and Kumar N. Sivarajan,

Optical Networks: A Practical Perspective

,
Morgan Kaufmann (Elsevier Indian Edition),

2nd

Edition, 2004.


4.

C. Siva Ram Murthy and Mohan Gurusamy,

WDM Optical Networks: Concepts, Design
and
Algorithms

, PHI, 2002.

5.

Laon
-
Garcia and Widjaja,

Communication Networks: Fundamental Concepts and key
Architectures

,

Tata McGrawHill, 2000.

6.

Behrouz

A. Forouzan,

Data Communications and Networking

,

Tata McGraw

-

Hill,

2
nd

edition, 2000.



17

CS 95
3

NETWORK COMPONENTS AND DESIGN


UNIT I

Network Components and
Topologies:

Basic Networking Components: Cables, Network

adapter
cards, Hubs, Switching Hub
s. Network Interface, Link Interconnect and Switch.

Network
Topologies, Network
Hardware
Components
, MAC Addresses, Access Methods,

Ethernet and IEEE
802.3, Token Ring and IEEE 802.5,
FDDI


UNIT

II

Network installation and upgrades, Connectors, Components,

Structured Wiring Systems,

Wiring
Techniques
, Crimping Cables, Cabling Diagram, Wiring for a UTP Patch Cable,

Wiring for a Cross
-
over Cable, Network Adapter Cards, Network Card Drivers
,

Configuring network services.


UNIT III

Network
Design:

Major challe
nges in network design, centralized network design, distributed

network design, Technical consideration of networking design and planning, Similarities and

comparisons between LAN and WAN design, Performance analysis.


UNIT IV

LAN and WAN network design :
Management overview of LAN design and planning,

Information
source for baseline LAN models, LAN planning and design tools, Management

overview of WAN
network design, Technical overview of WAN network design, Major

features and functions of
automated design

tools.


UNIT V

Troubleshooting : Troubleshooting equipment, Terminators,

Loopback test, Crossover cable
,

Volt

-
Ohm meters, Tone generators and probe, Cable Testers and Certifiers
,

Time

-

Domain

Reflectometer
(TDR), Product Indicators
, Test Frame and Packe
t Generators, Network

Mo
nitors, Protocol
Analyzer, SNM
,

Troubleshooting Networks
, Troubleshooting Cabling,

Troubleshooting
Infrastructure,
Troubleshooting Name Resolution
, Establishing a Se
ssion
,

Troubleshooting services,
S
ervice Packs and Driver Updates,
Performance Monitor
,

Network Monitor.


REFERENCE
S

1.Teresa C.Mann
-
Rubinson, Kornel Terplan,

Network Design Management and

Technical
Perspectives

,
Auerbach Publications
,
Second Edition,

200
4

2.
James .D.McCabe,
Network analysis architecture and design, Published 2003

3.
Bruce Hallberg,

Networking for Beginners, Forth edition, 2004

4.
Gurdeep

S. Hura, Mukesh Singhal
,


Data and computer
communications:

Networking and
Internetworking








18

CS 95
4

COMPUTER NETWORK PROTOCOLS


UNIT I

Network Communication Architecture and Protocols:

OSI Network Architecture
-

TCP/IP
Architecture
-

IBM SNA Architecture
-

TCP/IP Protocols
-

Application Layer Protocols
-

Bootstrap Protocol
-

Data Link Switc
hing Client Access Protocol
-

DHCP

-

DNS Protocol


Protocols for User Information, FTP, HTTP, S
-
HTTP, Internet Message Access, Internet Relay
Chat, Extensible Messaging,
TFTP
, NAT, URL, Remote Directory Access,
LWDA
, S
-
MIME,
Network News Transfer, Network

Time, POP and POP3, rlogin, Remote Monitoring, Service
Location, Terminal Emulation by TELNET, SMTP, SNMP and System log


UNIT II

Layered Protocols:

Presentation Layered Protocols : Light weight Presentation Protocol
-

Session
Layer Protocols:
RPC

-

Tran
sport Layer Protocols: ITOT , RDP, RUDP, TALI, TCP, UDP,
Compressed TCP Pro
tocol
-

Network Layer Protocols
: Routing Protocols such as
BGP
,
EGP
,
ICMP & ICMPv6
-

IPv4 and IPv6
-

Router Discovery Protocol
-

Mobility Support Protocol
-

ARP

-

Next Hop Resoluti
on Protocol
-

OSPF

-

RIP

-

Resource reservation Protocol
-

Virtual
Router Redundancy Protocol
-

Multicasting Protocol types


RARP.


UNIT III

Network Security and VOIP Protocols:

AAA Protocols
-

Kerberos: Network Authentication
Protocol
-

Remote Authent
ication Dial in User Service
-

Secure Shell Protocol
-

Tunneling
Protocol types
-

Secured Routing Protocol types


VOIP Signaling Protocols such as H.323,
H.225.0, H.235, H.245, H.248


Network Based Call Signaling Protocol such as RTSP, SAP,
SDP, SIP, SCC
P
-

Multipoint Data Conferencing Protocols
.


UNIT IV

LAN, WAN and Broadband Access Protocols:

ATM Protocols
-

ATM Signaling for B
-
ISDN,
SONET
-

BISDN

-

DSL

-

PPP Protocols
-

Frame Relay
-

Ethernet Protocols
-

Virtual LAN
Protocols
-

Wireless LAN Proto
cols
-

Metropolitan Area Protocols
.


UNIT V

ISO and Propriety Protocols:

ISO Protocols in 7 Layers
-

Cisco Protocols
-

Novell NetWare
Protocols
-

Apple Computer Protocols
-

Microsoft Protocols
-

Xerox Internet Datagram Protocol
-

Toshiba Flow Attribute No
tification Protocol.


REFERENCE
S

1.

Javvin,

and Jielin Dong,

“Network Protocols Handbook”, Javvin Technologies, Inc.
4
th

Edition
, 2007.

2.

Eric Hall, “
Internet Core Protocols: The Definitive Guide
Help for Network
Administrators”,
O'Reilly Media, February 2000

3.

D
ouglas E. Comer, “Internetworking with TCP/IP”, Prentice Hall,
5
th

Ed
.
, 2005.

4.

James K. kurose and Keith W.Ross, “
Computer Networking: A Top
-
Down Approach
”,
5th Edition
, Pearson Education Inc., 2009
.

5.

E.D. Tylore, “Networking Handbook”, Tata McGraw Hill, 200
0.


6.

Barry Nance, Network Programming In C
, Prentice Hall, 2001



19

CS 95
5

NETWORK SECURITY


UNIT I

Introduction to Security in Networks
-

Elements of Security
-

Precepts of Security
-

Threat
-

Sniffing
-

External Threat
-

Types of External Threats
-

Denial of

Service Attack
-

Kinds of

security breaches
-

Virus
-

Worms
-
Trojans
-

Threats & Countermeasures
-

Trends in

Security Plan of attack
-

Points of
vulnerability
-

Security Objectives and Services.

IT

II

Cryptography

-

Basic encryption and decryption Encrypt
ion techniques Characteristics of good
encryption

systems Secret key cryptography International Data Encryption Algorithm Advanced

Encryption Standard Elliptic Curve Cryptography
-

Hash and MAC algorithms
-

Public Key

encryptions Introduction to number the
ory
-

RSA algorithm Diffie
-
Hellman Key

Exchange
algorithm.


UNIT III

Digital Signature And Authentication Protocols
-

Digital Signatures
-

Digital Signature standard
-

Digital Signature and Authentication

Protocols
-

Authentication Protocols
-

Elliptic Cur
ve
cryptography
-

Trusted intermediaries

Security handshake pitfalls


UNIT IV

Virtual Private Network (VPN): Evolution, Types, Architecture, Tunneling, Design Issues,

Implementation, Security Issues Firewall: Elements, Design Principles, Architecture,

Pack
et
Filtering, Bastion Host Trusted System
-

Intrusion Detection system (IDS):

Requirements,
Classification, Types, Honeypots.


UNIT V


Social Engineering Attacks
-

Physical Penetration Attacks
-

Insider Attacks
-

Using the BackTrack
Linux Distribution
-

U
sing Metasploit


Managing a Penetration Test Programming Survival Skills
-

Basic Linux Exploits
-

Advanced Linux Exploits
-
Shellcode Strategies
-
Writing Linux Shellcode
-

Windows Exploits
-

Understanding and Detecting Content
-
Type Attacks
-

Web Applicat
ion Security
Vulnerabilities
-

VoIP Attacks
-

SCADA Attacks



REFERENCE
S

1. William Stallings,

Cryptography and Network Security: Principles and Standards

,

Prentice Hall
India, 3rd Edition, 2003

2. Charlie Kaufman, Radia Perlman and Mike Speciner,

Netw
ork Security: Private

Communication
in a public world

, Prentice Hall India, 2nd Edition, 2002

3. Charles P. Pleeger,

Security in Computing

, Person Education Asia.

4.
William Stallings,

Network Security Essentials: Applications and standards

, Person

Ed
ucation Asia, 2000

5.

Allen Harper, Shon Harris, “Gray Hat Hacking,: The Ethical Hackers Handbook” , Tata Mcgraw
Hill Education Private Limited, 2011



20

CS 95
6

WIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS


UNIT I

Introduction to Wireless Networks
-

Wireless Network Topo
logies
-

Characteristics of the

Wireless
Medium GSM Cellular Network concept
-

Cellular transmission principles

Typical cell layout
Signals Transmission interference Cell splitting
-

TDMA technology

-

CDMA technology GPRS
-

Security in Wireless Networks.


UNIT

II

Wireless LAN standard
-

Evolution of IEEE 802.11
-

Introduction to IEEE 802.11 General

Description Medium Access Control (MAC) for the IEEE 802.11 WLANs Physical Layer

for IEEE
802.11 WLANs; Radio systems IR Systems Applications
-

RF Standards: DECT

Bluetooth WATM
Home RF HIPERLAN


UNIT III

Wireless LAN technology
-

Bluetooth Specifications
-

Bluetooth Architectures


Bluetooth

Protocols
-

Bluetooth Service Discovery
-

Bluetooth MAC
-

Bluetooth Packet Structure
-

Bluetooth Audio
-

Bluetooth Addressin
g
-

Bluetooth Limitations
-

Bluetooth Implementation.



UNIT IV

The WAP Forum
-

WAP Service Model
-

WAP Protocol Architecture
-

WAP Programming

Model
-

Cordless systems
-

Mobile IP
-

Mobile adhoc networks(MANET) Wireless

Routing Protocol
-

Cluster Switch G
ateway Routing (CSGR)
-

Ad Hoc On
-
Demand Distance

Vector Routing (AODV).
Dynamic Source Routing (DSR)
-

Zone Routing Protocol (ZRP)
-

Source Tree Adaptive Routing
(STAR).


UNIT V

Introduction to Satellite Communication Basic Transmission theory Satellite C
omponents

Communication subsystems
-

Satellite Link Design
-

Microwave Propagation on Satellite

-

Earth
Paths Satellite Services
-

INSAT, VSAT, Remote Sensing Mobile satellite Network

design Mobile
satellite services DTH


REFERENCE
S

1. William Stallings,

Wireless communications and Networks

, Pearson Education

Asia,
2
nd
Edition
,
2005.

2. Jochen Schiller,

Mobile Communications

, Addison

-

Wesley,

2
nd
Edition,
2000.

3. Theodoere S. Rappaport,

Wireless Communications: Principles and Practice

, Prentice Hall,
1996

4.Assuncion Santamaria, Francisco Lopez

-

Hernandez,

Wireless LAN Standards and

Applications

,

Artech House, 2001

5. Chai

-

Keong Toh,

AdHoc Mobile Wireless Networks: Protocols and Systems

, Addition

Wesley
,
2002
.

6. Dennis Roddy,

Satellite
Communi
cations

,
Mc Graw Hill International

Editions
,

Third Edition

2006





21

CS957 NETWORK PROTOCOL

LABORATORY


1.

Simulation of topology of network in wired and wireless network using network simulators

2.

Connecting computers in Local area network; Hardware and s
oftware firewall
programming/configuration

3.

Internet security policy implementation using software control access tool

4.

Configuration of network using popular protocols

5.

Socket programming for implementing the protocols

6.

Router programming

7.

Implementation
of proxy based security protocols in c or c++ with f
eatures

like confidentiality,
integrity and authentication.

8.

Performance evaluation of various cryptographic algorithms


9.

Program to build and use AVL tree and B Trees


10.

Experiments to trouble shoot the n
etwork using troubleshooting cables and devices


11.

Develop a Design for campus network and prepare bill of materials. Simulate the designed
campus network using simulators or network kit



22

CS 9
71

INTERNET AND
WEB TECHNOLOGIES


UNIT I

The internet Archite
cture

-

Introduction Evolution Components advantages


Web

platform
architecture web application architecture Classification of internet standards and

technologies.


UNIT

II

The C
lient

-

Introduction Browser dependent issues Client Caching
-

DOM basics Eve
nts

manipulation Object basics
-

Form and Data manipulation Advanced DOM techniques

Error
handling XML and client side scripting.


UNIT III

The Server

-

Introduction components
-

Request and responses
rendering

dynamic

contents
Manipulation of database fro
m server side scripting

-

caching in server side
-

performance measures
Authentication and security access controls in web servers.


UNIT IV

Web documents distribution and caching
-

caching the web data
-

Interactions with

enterprise
server,

application se
rver etc. Web
services:

architecture, design and

implementation
issues,

advantages and
applications of web services.


UNIT V


Web2.0

-

Introduction, Technology overview
-

Ajax Overview Rethinking the web

application Core
technology Security in AJAX case st
udy on AJAX frameworks and

libraries.


REFERENCE
S

1.
Guide to Web Application and Platform Architectures (Springer Professional Computing), 2004
.

2. Stefan Jablonski, Ilia Petrov, Christian Meiler, Udo Mayer, 2003

3. Professional JavaScript for Web develop
ers Nicholas
C Zakas

Web Server

Programming
Neil
Gray
, 2003

4.
Dave crane, Eric Pascarello and Darren James, “
Ajax in Action


2005










23

CS 97
2

DESIGN OF DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS


UNIT


I

Introduction


Examples of Distributed Systems


Resource Sharing an
d the Web


Challenges
-

System Models
-

Introduction


Architectural Models


Functional Models

-

Characterization of
Distributed Systems


Client
-
Server Communication


Distributed Objects and Remote
Invocation


Communication Between Distributed Objects



Remote Procedure Call


Events
and Notifications.


UNIT


II

Distributed Operating Systems
-

Introduction



Issues


Communication Primitives


Inherent
Limitations
-

Lamport’s Logical Clock; Vector Clock; Causal Ordering; Global State; Cuts;
Terminati
on Detection. Distributed Mutual Exclusion


Non
-
Token Based Algorithms


Lamport’s Algorithm
-

Token
-
Based Algorithms


Suzuki
-
Kasami’s Broadcast Algorithm


Distributed Deadlock Detection


Issues


Centralized Deadlock
-
Detection Algorithms
-

Distribute
d Deadlock
-
Detection Algorithms. Agreement Protocols


Classification
-

Solutions

Applications.


UNIT

III

Distributed Resource Management
-

Distributed File systems


Architecture


Mechanisms


Design Issues


Distributed Shared Memory


Architecture


Algorithm


Protocols
-

Design
Issues. Distributed Scheduling


Issues


Components


Algorithms.


UNIT

IV

Introduction to Distributed Algorithms, Kinds of Distributed Algorithm, Timing Models.
Synchronous Network Algorithms: Synchronous Network Model,

Leader Election in a
synchronous Ring, Algorithms in a General Synchronous Networks, Distributed Consensus with
Link Failures, Distributed Consensus with Process failures, More Consensus problems.


UNIT

V

Resource Security and Protection

-

Introduction


The Access Matrix Model


Implementation
of Access Matrix Model


Safety in the Access Matrix Model


Advanced Models of protection


Data Security.














REFERENCES

1.

George Coulouris, Jean Dellimore and Tim K
i
ndberg,

Distribu
ted Systems Concepts
and Design

, Pearson Education,
4
th

Edition, 2005

2.

Mukesh Singhal and N. G. Shivaratri,

Advanced Co
ncepts in Operating Systems

,

M
cGraw
-
Hill, 2001

3.

Joshy Joseph and Craig Fellenstein,

Grid Computing
”, IBM Press, 2004.

4.

Ajay D. Kshem
kalyani and Mukesh Singhal,

Distributed Computing


Principles,

Algorithms and Systems

, Cambridge University Press, 2008.

5.

Pradeep K. Sinha,

Distributed Operating Systems

, PHI, 2005.

6.

Nancy A. Lynch,

Distributed Algorithms

, Morgan Kaufmann Publishers,

2000.




24



CS 97
3

PERVASIVE AND UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING


UNIT I


Pervasive Computing Devices: Introduction to
Pervasive computing
-

hand held computers
-

Palm devices
-

note book computers
-

smart phones
-

smart cards
-

telematics.


UNIT II

Smart Identificat
ion and Application: Smart card hardware
-

smart card software
-

Communication with smart card
-

smart labels
-

tokens.


UNIT III

Embedded Control and Security: Smart Sensors
-

Actuators
-

smart clock
-

home networking
-

intelligent control
-

onboard comp
uting
-

In
-
vehicle networks
-

television applications
-

set
-
top
boxes
-

Game controls.



UNIT IV

Web Connectivity and Services: Programming in Java API
-

smart card programming
-

message
components
-

database components
-

programming in WAP
-

voice inter
face
-

web services
-

web connectivity
-

web gateway
-

transcoding
-

internet portals
-

device management
-

synchronisation.


UNIT V

Case Studies on Software for Pervasive Computing: Windows CE
-

Palm OS
-

Symbian OS.


REFERENCES

1. Uwe Hansmann, Lother M
erk, Martin S. Nicklous and Thomas Stober, “Pervasive
computing”, Springer,

2
nd

ed,
2003.


2.
Ramesh Singh, “Strategic Pervasive Computing Applications: Emerging Trends”, IGI Global,
2010.

3.
Frank Adelstein, Sandeep Gupta, Golden Richard III, Loren Schwi
ebert, “
Fundamentals of
Mobile and Pervasive Computing”,
Tata McGraw Hill, 2005.



25

CS 97
4

SENSOR NETWORKS


UNIT I

Sensor Networks: A Bridge to the Physical Word
-

Introduction to various sensors like Temperature

Humidity
Pressure Introduction to Sensor net
works motivation applications sensors

architectures and platforms for
Wireless sensor networks Sensor Node Architecture Sensor

Network Architecture Sample sensor networks
applications Design challenges Performance

metrics
.


UNIT II

Localization
a
nd Tracki
ng

-

A tracking scenario sensing model Collaborative localization Bayes state
estimation distributed

representation
tracking

multiple objects Ranging techniques Range based localization

algorithms location services
.


UNIT III

Data Storage and Manipulation
& Security

-

Data
-
centric Routing and Storage in Sensor Network
-

Compression Techniques for Wireless Sensor Networks
.
Security

-

Security for Wireless Sensor Networks

-

Key Distribution Techniques for Sensor Networks
-

Watermarking Techniques
.


UNIT IV

Net
working Sensors and Network Platforms

-

MAC for sensor networks Geographic Energy aware routing
Attribute based routing

Sensor node Hardware (Berkeley Motes) TinyOS nesC Tiny GALS NS 2 TOSSIM

PIECES.


UNIT V

Rfid Basics

-

Introduction transponder and reade
r architecture types of tags and readers frequencies of

operation selection criteria for RFID systems information processing in the transponder and reader

fundamental operating principles antennas for RFIDs.


REFERENCES

1.

Holger Karl and Andreas Willig, “Pro
tocols and architecture for Wireless Sensor Networks”
,

John Wiley & Sons ltd., 2005

2.

Mohammad Ilyas and Imad Mahgoab, “Handbook of Sensor Networks: Compact Wireless and
Wired Sensing Systems”, CRC Press, 2005

3.

F.Zhao and L.Guibas, “Wireless Sensor Networks”
, Morgan Kaufmann, San Francisco, 2004.










26

CS 97
5

OPTICAL NETWORKS


UNIT I

Introduction to optical networks Principles of optical transmission Evolution of optical

networks
Components and enabling technologies Wavelength division multiplexing

(WDM)

WDM network
architectures, broadcast



and

-

select networks, linear light

wave

networks, and wavelength routed
networks Issues in broadcast
-
and
-
select networks.


UNIT
-

II

Static traffic routing in wavelength routed networks Virtual topology design proble
m

formulation
and algorithms
-

design of multi
-
fiber networks Virtual topology reconfiguration

problem
formulation
-

reconfiguration due to traffic changes
-

reconfiguration for fault

restoration Network
provisioning.


UNIT III

Dynamic traffic routing in w
avelength routed networks
routing

and wavelength assignment

algorithms Centralized and distributed control Wavelength convertible networks

converter placement
and allocation problems.


UNIT IV

Wavelength rerouting algorithms Network survivability backup mu
ltiplexing, link based

restoration,
path based restoration Multicast traffic routing source rooted trees.


UNIT V

Next generation optical Internets burst switching packet switching (IP
-
over
-
WDM)

Photonic slot
routing Network control and management Access N
etworks PON, FTTC,

FTTH Recent advances
MPLS, MPLambdaS, optical virtual private networks.


REFERENCES

1. B. Mukherjee,

Optical Communication Networks

, McGrawHill, 1997.

2. Rajiv Ramaswami and Kumar N. Sivarajan,

Optical Networks: A Practical

Perspectiv
e

, Morgan
Kaufmann, USA,
2
nd
Edition,
2001.

3. C. Siva Ram Murthy and Mohan Gurusamy,

WDM Optical Networks: Concepts,

Design, and
Algorithms
”,

Prentice Hall, USA,

2002,









27

CS 97
6

E
-
COMMERCE TECHNOLOGIES


UNIT I

Introduction
-

Evolution
-

Technology o
verview
-

Needs for ecommerce
-

Internet as a

business
platform
-

The ecommerce infrastructure

-

value chains in electronic commerce.


UNIT

II

Business Models and e
Commerce:

Various business models
associated

with ecommerce

-

Advantages
-

Web based tools f
or electronic commerce
-

Web server requirements for

ecommerce

-
feature sets

-

web server software and tools for ecommerce.


UNIT III

Electronic payment
systems:

e
cash,

electronic wallets, smart cards etc

-

credit cards

payment
acceptance and
processing. E
-
commerce

strategies:

web auctions, virtual

communities, web portals
etc

Supply Chain Management and eCommerce: Introduction to SCM

-

ecommerce

implementation
with SCM.


UNIT IV

Security threats to e
commerce:

various security threats
-

implementing securit
y mechanisms

in
ecommerce
-

client security
-

server security
-

electronic transactions integrity

-

certification policies
and practices.


UNIT V

Legal and Ethical Issues in e
Commerce:

-

Global, Social, and Other Issues in eCommerce

Recent
Trends

-

case st
udies.


REFERENCES

1.
Gary Schneider, James T. Perry,


Electronic Commerce

,

2004.

2.
Warwick Ford, Michael S. Baum
,

Secure Electronic Commerce: Building the Infrastructure for
Digital Signatures

and Encryption


(2nd Edition), 2004.











28

CS 97
7

SEMAN
TIC WEB


UNIT I

Introduction: Semantic web and Knowledge Management
-

roles of ontologies

-

Architecture

for
semantic web

-

based Knowledge Management

-

Tools for semantic web
-
based Knowledge

Management
.


UNIT

II

Ontology Languages for the Semantic Web: In
troduction
-

OIL and DAML+OIL Semantic

web
pyramid of languages

-

design rationale for OIL

-

OIL language constructs

-

Different

syntactic
forms

-

language layering



semantics

-

From OIL to DAML+OIL
.


UNIT III

Ontology based Knowledge Management: Introduct
ion

-

Feasibility Study

-

Kick off phase

-

Refinement phase

-

Evaluation phase

-

Maintenance and Evolution phase

-

Related Work

Ontology
Management

-

Storing, Aligning and Maintaining ontologies: The Requirement for

Ontology
Management

-

Aligning Ontologie
s

-

Supporting ontology change

-

organizing

ontologies


UNIT IV

Resource Description Framework: what is RDF

-

distinction between RDF model and syntax

-

RDF
features

-

RDF and XML



non

-

contextual modeling data modeling using RDF schema

-

Need for
an RDF
S query language

Ontologies for semantic web: introduction

-

reading the web

-

information
extraction knowledge

generation from natural language documents.


UNIT V

Ontology based knowledge management

-

case studies
-

Semantic web tools


REFERENCES

1. J. Da
vies,

Towards the Semantic Web: Ontology
-
driven Knowledge

Management

,

John Wiley
& Sons Ltd., 2003

2. Tim Berners

-

Lee,

Spinning the Semantic Web: Bringing the World Wide Web to

Its Full
Potential


, The MIT Press; New Ed edition
-

March 1, 2005

3. She
lley Powers,

Practical RDF


O'Reilly Media, Inc.; 1st Edition
-

July 2003

4. John Davies,

Semantic Web Technologies: Trends and Research in
Ontology based

Systems
Wiley


July 11, 2006

5. Thomas B. Passin,

Explorer's Guide to the Semantic Web


Manning

Pu
blications

-

March 1,
2004.

6. Lee W. Lacy,

Owl: Representing Information Using the Web Ontology

Language


Trafford
Publishing
-

January 1, 2005.

7.
Grigoris Antoniou, Frank van Harmelen,

A Semantic Web Primer
-
Cooperative

Information
Systems

,

The MIT Pr
ess

-

April 1, 2004





CS 97
8

STORAGE AREA NETWORKS



29

UNIT I

Basic Networking Concepts and Topologies: OSI Reference Model, Common Network

Devices,
Network Topologies, MAC Standards
-

Need for Storage Networks


Storage

Devices and
Techniques Evolution and

benefits of SANs SAN Components and Building

Blocks
Fiber

Channel
Basics:
Fiber

Channel Topologies,
Fiber

Channel Layers, Classes of

Service SAN Topologies


UNIT

II

SANs Fundamentals: SAN Operating Systems Software and Hardware Types of SAN

Technology:
Te
chnology and Configuration, High Scalability and Flexibility Standards

Storage Management
Challenges Networked Storage Implementation Challenges

Storage Subsystems for Video Services


UNIT III

Storage Networking Architecture Storage in Storage Networking:
Challenges, Cost,

Performance
Network in Storage Networking:
Fiber

Channel, Emerging SAN interconnect

Technologies Basic
Software Advanced Software Backup Software Implementation

Strategies


UNIT IV

Storage Network Management In

-

Band management Out



of

-

Band Management

-

SNMP

HTTP

-

TELNET Storage Network Management Issues Storage Resource Management

Storage Management
Storage, Systems, and Enterprise Management Integration


UNIT V

Designing and building a SAN

-

Design considerations Business requiremen
ts Physical

layout
Placement Storage pooling Data availability Connectivity scalability

migration manageability fault
tolerance and resilience
-

prevention of congestion

routability
-

backup and restoration
-

SAN
Security & iSCSI Technology Basic security

g
uidelines implementing SAN security Backup and
restoration iSCSI technology
-
Future of SANS


REFERENCES

1. Meeta Gupta,

Storage Area Network
Fundamentals

,

Cisco Press, 2002

2. John R. Vacca,

The Essential Guide to Storage Area
Networks

,

Prentice Hall,

2002

3. Richard Barker, Paul Massiglia,

Storage Area Network
Essentials

,

John Wiley

& Sons, Inc.,
2002

4. Tom Clark,

Designing Storage Area
Networks

,

Addison Wesley Pearson

Education (Second
Edition)

5. Alex Goldman,

Storage Area Networks
Fundamentals

,

Cisco Press 2002

6. Christopher Poelker,

Storage Area Networks for Dummies






30

CS 97
9

CRYPTOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUES


UNIT I

Introduction to Network Security OSI Security Architecture Security Attacks Intruders

Malicious
Software
-

Kinds of security breache
s Plan of attack
-

Points of vulnerability

Methods of defense
Control measures Effectiveness of controls
-

Security Objectives and

Services


UNIT

II

Classical Encryption techniques Symmetric Cipher Substitution Technique

Transposition Techniques
Steganogra
phy Block Ciphers and Data Encryption

Standards(DES)
-

Characteristics
-

Design
Principles Differential and Linear Cryptanalysis

-

Mode of Operation
-

Strength of DES
-

Multiple
encryption and Triple DES


Advanced

Encryption Standard


UNIT III

Introductio
n to number theory Public Key Cryptography Principles
-

RSA algorithm Key

Management
-

Diffie
-
Hellman Key Exchange algorithm
-

Elliptic Curve Cryptography

Message
Authentication and Hash Functions
-

Hash and MAC algorithms



UNIT IV

Digital Signatures
-

Di
gital Signature standard
-

Digital Signature and Authentication

Protocols
-

Authentication Applications Kerberos x.509 Elliptic Curve cryptography
-

Trusted intermediaries
Security handshake pitfalls IP Security Overview Architecture

Authentication Header
Key
Management
-

Web Security.


UNIT V

Security protocols Transport layer protocols Electronic mail security S/MIME security

protocol
Pretty Good Privacy Virtual Private Network (VPN) Tunneling Bastion Host

-

Firewalls design
principles Intrusion Detection

System
-

Trusted systems Electronic

payment protocols


REFERENCES

1. William Stallings,

Cryptography and Network Security: Principles and
Standards

,

Prentice Hall
India, 4rd Edition, 2006

2. Charlie Kaufman, Radia Perlman and Mike Speciner,

Network Sec
urity: Private

Communication
in a public world


, Prentice Hall India, 2nd Edition, 2002

3. Charles P. Pleeger,

Security in
Computing

,

Person Education Asia

4. William Stallings,

Network Security Essentials: Applications and
standards

,

Person

Education

Asia, 2000

5. Meeta Gupta,

Building a Virtual Private
Network

,

2003.





31

CS 9
80

REAL TIME SYSTEM



UNIT

I

Introduction

-

Concept of Real Time System, Issues in real time computing, Performance measures of

Real
Time System, Issues in Real Time Computing,

Performance measures of Real time Systems,

Real Time
Application.

Task Assignment and Scheduling

-

Different task model, Scheduling hierarchy, offline vs Online

Scheduling, Clock Drives.


UNIT

II

Model of Real Time System

-

Processor, resources, temporal
parameter, Periodic Task Model,

Sporadic Task
Model, Precedence Constraints and Data Dependencies, Scheduling hierarchy
.
Scheduling of Periodic Task

-

Assumptions, fixed versus dynamic priority algorithms, schedulability

test for fixed priority task with a
rbitrary
deadlines.


UNIT


III

Scheduling of
Aperiodic

and Sporadic Tasks

-

Assumptions and approaches, deferrable, sporadic

servers, slack
stealing in deadline driven and fixed priority systems. Two level schemes for integrated

scheduling,
Scheduling for

applications having flexible constrains.

Resources and Resource Access Control

-

Assumptions
on resources and their usage, resource

contention, resource access control (Priority Ceiling Protocol, Priority
Inheritance protocol, Slack

Based Priority Ceiling

Protocol, Preemption Ceiling Protocol).


UNIT
IV

Multi Processor Scheduling

-

Model of multi processor and distributed systems, scheduling

algorithms for end
to end periodic tasks in homogeneous/heterogeneous systems, Predictability and

validation of dyna
mic
multiprocessor system.


UNIT


V

Real time Communication

-

Model of real time Communication, Priority base service

for

switched network,
Weighted Round Robin Service,

Medium access Control Protocol, Real Time

Protocol.


REFERENCES

1. Jane .W. S. Liu
,


Real Time Systems
”,

Pearson Education.

2. Krishna .C.M
,


Real Time Systems
”,

Mc
-
Graw Hill Publication.








32

CS 9
81

DESIGN OF
EMBEDDED

SYSTEMS


UNIT I

Embedded Computing
-

Challenges of Embedded Systems


Embedded system design process.
Embedded process
ors


ARM processor


Architecture, ARM and Thumb Instruction sets


UNIT II

Embedded C Programming
-

C
-
looping structures


Register allocation


Function calls


Pointer aliasing


structure arrangement


bit fields


unaligned data and endianness


inlin
e
functions and inline assembly


portability issues.


UNIT III

Optimizing Assembly Code
-

Profiling and cycle counting


instruction scheduling


Register
allocation


conditional execution


looping constructs


bit manipulation


efficient switches


op
timized primitives.

UNIT IV

Processes and Operating systems
-

Multiple tasks and processes


Context switching


Scheduling policies


Interprocess communication mechanisms


Exception and interrupt
handling
-

Performance issues.


UNIT V

Embedded System
Development
-

Meeting real time constraints


Multi
-
state systems and
function sequences. Embedded software development tools


Emulators and debuggers. Design
methodologies


Case studies


Windows CE


Linux 2.6x and RTLinux


Coding and sending
applicat
ion layer byte stream on a TCP/IP network using RTOS Vxworks


Embedded system
for a smart card.


REFERENCES

1.

Andrew N Sloss, D. Symes and C. Wright, “ARM System Developers Guide”, Morgan
Kaufmann / Elsevier, 2006.

2.

Michael J. Pont, “Embedded C”, Pearson Ed
ucation, 2007.

3.

Wayne Wolf, “Computers as Component: Principles of Embedded Computer System
Design”, Morgan Kaufmann / Elsevier, 2
nd

Edition, 2008.

4.

Steve Heath, “Embedded System Design”, Elsevier, 2
nd

Edition, 2003.

5.

Raj Kamal, “Embedded Systems


Architectu
re, Programming and Design”, McGraw
-
Hill companies,
2
nd

Edition,
2008




33

CS 9
82

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF COMPUTER SYSTEMS AND
NETWORKS



UNIT

I

Introduction to performance evaluation
-

Metrics
-

Workload
-

Problem of workload characterization
-

Representat
iveness of a workload model
-

Test workloads
-

Workload model implementation techniques
-

Measurement
-

Hardware
-

software monitors.


UNIT

II

Queuing Network Modeling

-

Overview
-

Modeling cycle
-

Understanding the objectives of a study
-

Workload charact
erization


Sensitivity

analysis
-

Sources of insight
-

Fundamental laws
-

Queuing

network model inputs & outputs.


UNIT

III

Bounds o
n Performance

-

Asymptotic bounds
-

Using asymptotic bounds
-

Balanced system bounds
-

Models with one job class


Workload

representation
-

Solution techniques.


UNIT

IV

Memory

-

System with known average multiprogramming level
-

Memory constraints


Swapping

-

Paging
-

Disk I/O
-

Channel in NON
-

RPS I/O subsystems
-

Channel contention in RPS I/O subsystems
-
Additional path
elements
-

Multipathing
-

Other architectural characteristics
-

Processors.


UNIT

V

Parameterization

-

Existing systems
-

Evolving systems
-

Proposed systems
-

Simulation
-

Analysis of
Simulation Results
-

Simulation of General and extended
queuing

network
s
-

Response time distributions
-

Local area networks
-

Models
-

Link performance
-

Transaction response, Link throughput, Multiplexed
link Capacity
-

Ethernet, token ring performance analysis.


REFERENCES

1.
Edward D.Lazawska, John zahorjan, G
.Scott Graha
m, Kenneth C.Sevcik
,

Quantitative system
performance
-

Computer system analysis with queueing network mod
els

, Prentice Hall Inc
,1984.

2. Domenico Ferrari, Giuseppe Serazzi
,

Alexandro Zeijher,

Measurement & Tuning of Computer
Systems

-

Prentice Hall Inc
,1983.

3. Michael F.Mories and Paul F.Roth
,


Tools and techniques, Computer Performance Evaluation

, Van
Nostrand, New York, 1982.

4. John Freer R.,

Computer Communications and networks

, Affiliated East
-
West press Pvt, Ltd., 1990.





34

CS 983
HIGH PERFORM
ANCE COMPUTING


UNIT


I

Introduction
-

Historical progression leading to current state


types of parallism including temporal, data
and functional. Instructional level parallelism


pipelined processors


super scalar processors


VLIW
processors


mult
ithreaded processors


proposed future processors including trace, multiscalar and super
flow


case studies.


UNIT
II


Parallel Architectures
-

Classification


inter connection networks


vector computers


shared memory
parallel computers


cache coher
ence


distributed shared memory parallel computers


message passing
parallel computers


cluster of workstations.


UNIT


III

Parallel Algorithms
-

Models of parallel
computation

including PRAM, combinational circuits, inter
connection networks, BSP

-

Log P


design and analysis of algorithms for a vide variety of computational
problems.


UNIT


IV

Parallel Programming
-

Models including message passing


shared memory data parallel


message
passing libraries


including PVM and MPI


High performanc
e Fortran (HPF)


UNIT


V

Compiler Transformations And Performance Evaluation

-

Dependence analysis


loop transformations


transformations for parallel computers including data layouts, computational and communication
optimization.

Performance

Metrics


performance lows


scalability


performance measurement
.



REFERENCES

1.

Selim G
.Akl


The design and analysis of parallel algorithms
”,

Prentice Hall International Inc,
1989.

2.

Hwang K. Briggs F.A.

Computer Architecture and parallel processing


Mcgraw Hill


1985.

3.

Angel L.Decegama


The technology of parallel processing, parallel processing architecture and
VLSI Hardware
”,

Vol I


Prentice Hall Engle wood cliffs
New

Jersey 1989.

4.

Michael J.Quinn,

Parallel computer theory and practice


McGraw Hill 2
nd
Edition
1994.

5.

V.Rajaraman and C.Siva Ram Murthy,

Parallel computers architecture and programming

,
Prentice Hall of India, India 2000.

6.

C. Siva Ram Murthy, K.N. Balasubramanya Murthy and A.Srinivas

New Parallel Algorithms for
Direct Solution of Linear Equations
”,

John Wiley & Sons Inc, USA 2001.

7.

K. Hwang and Z.Xu,

Scalable Parallel Computing: Technology, Architecture and
Programming

, WCB/McGraw


Hill Inc., USA 1998.






35

CS 9
84

GRID COMPUTING


UNIT I

IT Infrastructure Evolution: Introduction
-

Microprocessor Te
chnology


Optical Networking
Technology


Storage Technology
-

Wireless Technology
-

Sensor Technology
-

Global Internet
Infrastructure
-

World Wide Web and Web Services
-

Open
-
Source Movement
-

Productivity
Paradox and Information Technology
-

Introducti
on
-

Productivity Paradox
-

Return on Technology
Investment


Multi
-

Story Bureaucracy
-

Business Value of Grid Computing
-
Introduction
-

Grid
Computing Business Value Analysis
-

Risk Analysis
-

Grid Marketplace


Grid Computing
Technology Overview.


UNIT II

The Open Grid Services Architecture: Introduction
-

An Analogy for OGSA
-

The Evolution to
OGSA
-

OGSA Overview
-

Building on the OGSA Platform
-

Implementing OGSA
-

Based Grids
-

Creating and Managing Grid Services
-

Tools and Toolkits
-
Support in UDDI
-

UDDI and OGSA
-

UDDI Extensions and Implementation
-

Uses
-

Quality of Service Management


UNIT III

Desktop Grids
-

The Desktop Grid Value Proposition
-

Desktop Grid Challenges
-

Desktop Grid
Technology
-

Key Elements to Evaluate
-

Desktop Grid Suitabil
ity
-

Key Areas for Exploration
-

The
Grid Server
-

Real
-

World Examples
-

Cluster Grids
-

Industry Examples
-

Cluster Grids
-

Data
Grids
-


Alternatives to Data Grids
-

Avaki Data Grid


UNIT IV

Software Applications
-

Introduction


Grid Computing: Di
scontinuous Innovation or Massive Yawn
-
The Needs of Grid Users


Grid Deployment Criteria
-

Methods of Grid Deployment
-

When to
Grid
-
Enable Software
-

Requirements for Grid
-
Enabling Software
-

Grid Programming Tools and
Expertise
-

Application Integratio
n
-

Introduction
-

Application Classification


Grid Requirements
-

Integrating Applications with Middleware Platforms


Conclusion.


UNIT V

Grid Enabling Network Services
-

Introduction
-

On Demand Optical Connection Services
-

Creating
Grid
-

Enabled Net
work Services
-

Montague River Grid
-

Montague River Domain
-

Sample API
-

Deployment Example: End


to
-

End Light Path Management


Conclusion Managing Grid
Environments


Service Level Management
-

Data Catalogs and Replica Management
-

Portals

.
Grid
Computing Toolkit: Globus GT3 Toolkit


Architecture
-

Programming Model
-

Sample
Implementation
-

Case Studies: Sun Grid Engine


National Grid Project


Garuda.


REFERENCES

1. Joshy Joseph and Craig Fellenstein,

Grid Computing

, Pearson Education, 2003.

2. Ian Foster and Carl Kesselman,

The Grid2: Blueprint for a New Computing Infrastructure

,
Morgan Kaufman, 2004.

3. Ahmar

Abbas,
:
Grid Computing: A Practical Guide to Technology and Application

, Charles
River Media, 2005.




36

CS 9
85

CLOUD COMPUTING


UNI
T I

Cloud Computing

-

Cloud Versus Grid
-

Cloud Application Architectures
-

Cloud Computing components
-

Cloud Infrastructure Models
-

An Overview of Amazon Web Services


UNIT II

Amazon Cloud Computing
-

Amazon S3
-

Amazon EC2
-

Before the Move into the Cl
oud

-

The Shift to a
Cloud Cost Model
-

Service Levels for Cloud Applications
-

Security


Disaster

Recovery


UNIT III

Ready for the Cloud
-

Web Application Design
-

Machine Image Design
-

Privacy Design

-

Database
Management


UNIT IV

Security
-

Data Secur
ity
-

Network Security
-

Host Security
-

Compromise Response


UNIT V

Disaster Recovery
-

Disaster Recovery Planning
-

Disasters in the Cloud
-

Disaster Management.

Scaling a
Cloud Infrastructure
-

Capacity Planning
-

Cloud Scale


REFERENCES

1.

Cloud Appli
cation Architectures: Building Applications and Infrastructure in the Cloud


(Theory in

Practice (O'Reilly))

b
y George Reese
.
















37


CS 9
86

NEURAL NETWORKS


U
NIT

I

Back Propagation

-

Introduction to Artificial Neural Systems

-

Perceptron Representa
tion
-
Linear separability
.

Learning Training algorithm
-

The back propagation network
-

The
generalized delta rule
Practical considerations

-

BPN applications.


U
NIT

II

Statistical methods

-

Hopfield nets Cauchy training Simulated annealing
-

The Boltzmann

machine. Associative memory
-

Bidirectional associative memory Applications.


U
NIT

III

Counter Propagation Network and Self Organizing Maps
-

CPN building blocks

-

CPN data
processing. SOM data processing Applications.


U
NIT

IV

Adaptive Resonance Theory a
nd Spatio Temporal Pattern Classification
-

ART network
description
-

ART1
-

ART2 Application. The formal avalanche Architecture of spatio temporal
network

-

The sequential competitive avalanche field Applications of STNs.


U
NIT

V

Neo Congnitron
,

Cognitron

Structure & training
-

The neocognitron architecture

-

Data
processing Performance Addition of lateral inhibition and feedback to the recognition. Optical
neural networks Holographic correlators.


REFERENCES

1. James Freeman A. and David Skapura M.,

Neur
al Networks Algorithms, Applications &
Programming Techniques
”,

Addison Wesley 1992.

2. Yegnanarayana B.,

Artificial Neural Networks

, Prentice Hall of India Private Ltd., New
Delhi 1999.






38

CS 9
87

NETWORK MANAGEMENT

UNIT I

Network Management goals, org
anization, and functions
-

Network monitoring


Network control
SNMPv1 Network management organization and communication function models
-

structure of
SNMP management information standards SNMPv2 system architecture protocol
-

protocol
specification
-

SNM
Pv3 architecture.


UNIT II

Remote Network monitoring
-
concepts
-

group management
-

RMON alarms and filters
-

packet
capture group
-

practical issues
-

RMON2 protocol
-

practical issues ATM network management
Telecommunication network management TMN concept
ual model architecture
-

Network
management applications.


UNIT III

Need for encryption Definitions
-

Encryption Techniques Simplified DES differential and linear
cryptanalysis Triple DES RC5


Public

-

Private Key (PPK) Cryptography
-

Hash and Mac
Algorit
hms
-

Digital certificates
-

Digital signatures and authentication protocols Cryptographic
Algorithms in SNMPv3.


UNIT IV

Intruders Viruses, Worms, and related threats
,

Firewalls
,

Design principles
,

Trusted systems
,

Web
security

requirements
,

Secure socke
ts
,

IP security
:

overview
,

IP security architecture
,

key
management
,

Security management
,

SNMP

-

based security. Internet security
:

Threats to privacy
,

Packet sniffing
,

Spoofing
,

Fraudulent information
,

collection
,

Fundamental elements of security
:

Securit
y assurance
,

concepts
,

Security technologies
,

Physical security
,

logical security
,

application
layer security
,

deterring

threats.


UNIT V

Security protocols Transport layer protocols SSL
-

Application layer protocols Email based



PGP

-

S/MIME security pro
tocols Electronic payment protocols SET Proxy payments Shopping experience
protocols Open trading protocols (OTP) Open buying on the Internet (OBI) Internet banking
protocols Open Financial exchange (OFX) Electronic bill presentation and payment (EBPP)
-

S
NMPv3 Security model and protocol.


REFERENCES

1. Juanita Ellis, Tim Speed, and William Crowal,

The Internet Security Guidebook: From Planning
to Development

, 2001.

2. Mani Subramanian,

Network management: Principles and Practice

, Addison Wesley, 2000.

3. Mark S. Merkow, Ken L. Wheeler, and James Breithaupt,

Building SEI Applications for Secure
Transactions

, 2000

4. Moshe Rozenblit,

Security for Telecommunications Network Management

, Prentice Hall India,
2000.

5. William Stallings,

Cryptography and

Network Security: Principles and Practice

, Prentice Hall,

2
nd
Edition,

2000.

6. William Stallings,

Network Security Essentials: Applications and Standards

, Pearson Education
Asia, 2001.

7. William Stallings,

SNMP, SNMPv2, SNMPv3, and RMON1 and 2

,Pers
on Education Asia,
3
rd
Edition,

1999.


39

CS 9
88

SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE


UNIT


I


Software Architecture
-

Bridging Software Requirement and Software Implementation

-
Architectural Styles

-

Quality Attributes
-
Guidelines for Software Architectural Design.
Softwar
e
Architecture Design Space

-

Types of Software Structures

-

Software Elements

-

Software
Connectors

-

An Agile Approach to Software Architecture Design.

Models for Software
Architecture

-

UML for Software Architecture
-
Architecture Views
-
Architectural Desc
ription
Languages (ADL).


UNIT


II

Object Oriented Paradigm

-

Introducing Object Oriented Paradigm

-

OO Analysis

-

OO Design

-

Design Principles.

Data Flow Architecture

-

Batch Sequential

-

Pipe & Filter Architecture



Process

-

Control Architecture.
Data

Centered Software
Architecture

-

Repository Architecture Style

-

Blackboard Architecture Style.


UNIT


III

Hierarchy Architecture
-

Main/Subroutine

-

Master/Slave

-

Layered
-
Virtual Machine. Implicit
Asynchronous Communication Software Architecture
-

Non
-
Buffered Event

-

Based Implicit
Invocations
-
Buffered Message

-

Based Software Architecture. Interaction Oriented Software
Architecture


Model



View

-

Controller (MVC)



Presentation



Abstraction

-

Control (PAC).


UNIT


IV

Distributed Architecture



Int
roduction

-

Client/Server

-

Multi
-
tiers

-

Broker Architectural Style



Service

-

Oriented Architecture (SOA).
Component
-
Based Software Architecture

-

Component
-
Principles of Component

-

Based Design.

Heterogeneous Architecture

-

Methodology of Architecture

Decision
-
Quality Attributes
-
Selection of Architectural Styles

-
Evaluation of Architecture Designs
-
Case Study: Online Computer Vendor.


UNIT


V

Architecture of Graphical User Interfaces

-

Evolution of User Interfaces

-

Look



and

-

Feel (Syntax) of User I
nterfaces

-

Usability (Semantics) of User Interfaces

-
Design Considerations of User Interfaces

-

Enabling Technology

-

Direct Manipulation

-
Evaluation of User Interfaces.

Product Line Architectures

-

Introduction and Motivation

-
Domain Engineering: Institu
tionalizing Software Reuse

-

Product Line Architectures (PLA)
-
A
Product Line Analysis Example.


REFERENCES


1.

Kai Qian, Xiang Fu, Lixin Tao, Chom
g

-

Wei Xu and
Jorge L. Diaz

-

Herrera,

Software
Architecture and Design Illuminated

, Jones & Bartlett Publishe
rs, 2010.

2.

Mary Shaw and

David Garlan,

Software Architecture: Perspectives on an emerging
discipline

, Prentice Hall of India, 2010.


40

CS 98
9

CLIENT SERVER ARCHITECTURE

UNIT
I

Introduction


Examples of Distributed Systems


Resource Sharing and the Web


Challenges
-

System Models
-

Introduction


Architectural Models


Functional Models
-

Characterization of
Distributed Systems


Client
-
Server Communication


Distributed Objects and Remote Invocation


Communication Between Distributed Objects


Remote Pro
cedure Call


Events and Notifications.

UNIT II

Client/Server System Architecture: Client/Server building blocks


Hardware, Software, Middleware


Types of Middleware


DDE, OLE, MOM, Transaction processing Monitors, ODBC


Need for
database connectivity


Design overview of ODBC


Architecture


Components


Applications


Driver Managers


Drivers


Data Sources


ODBC2.5 and ODBC 3.0


Operating System Services


Base Services


External Services


Service Scalability.


UNIT III

Client/Server Databases:

SQL database Servers


Server Architecture


Multithread Architecture


Hybrid Architecture


Stored procedures


Triggers


Rules of client/server transaction processing


Transaction Models


Chained and Nested transactions

Transaction Management Stand
ards


Distributed Database characteristics


Introduction to Data Warehousing and Data Mining.


UNIT V

Remote Method Invocation: RMI Interfaces and Classes


RMI Scenario


The JDBC Architecture


JDBC Interfaces


JDBC Scenario


Java Bean Component Mode
l


Overview


Comparison of
Middleware Technologies


UNIT
V

Introduction to Cloud Computing
-

The Evolution of Cloud Computing


Hardware Evolution


Internet Software Evolution


Server Virtualization
-

Web Services Deliver from the Cloud


Communication
-
as
-
a
-
Service


Infrastructure
-
as
-
a
-
Service


Monitoring
-
as
-
a
-
Service


Platform
-
as
-
a
-
Service


Software
-
as
-
a
-
Service


Building Cloud Network
-

Introduction to grid computing
-

peer
to networks


.










REFERENCES

1.

George Coulouris, Jean Dellimore and T
im KIndberg, “Distributed Systems Concepts and
Design”, Pearson Education, 4
th

Edition, 2005

2.

Robert Orafali, Dan Harkey and Jerri Edwards,

Essential Client/Server Survival Guide

, John
Wiley & Sons Inc.,1999

3.

John W. Rittinghouse and ames F. Ransome, “Cl
oud Computing Implementation, Management
and Security”, CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group, Boca Raton London New York. 2010

4.

Robert Orfali and Dan Harkey,

Client/Server Programming with JAVA and CORBA

, John
Wiley, Second edition.

5.

Dawna Travis Dewire,

Client
/Server Computing

, McGraw
-

Hill Computer Science Series.


41

CS 9
90

HETEROGENEOUS PARALLEL COMPUTING


UNIT I

Heterogeneous Architecture and Parallel Computing: Introduction to parallel programming,
Introduction to heterogeneous architecture
-

GPU in p
articular. Introduction to GPU computing,
Need for GPU, evolution of GPU pipeline and general purpose computation on GPU, GPU
architecture case studies: NVIDIA G80, GT200, Fermi,

AMD Radeon, AMD Fusion APU.




UNIT II

Execution Model: Features of CUDA and

OpenCL, Comparison of CUDA and OpenCL, Thread
organization, Kernel, error handling, and execution in CUDA and OpenCL.


UNIT III

Programming Model: CUDA Introduction, basics of CUDA C, Complete CUDA structure, basic
details of API and libraries
, OpenCL

ove
rview, OpenCL basic specification, OpenCL C
language,
Factorization
.


UNIT IV

Memory Model: Introduction to memory model and GPU interaction with CPU
, Memory

model
of CUDA and OpenCL, Memory hierarchy (local/register, shared and global) and optimizations,
memory optimized programming, coding tips.


UNIT V

Tools and programming: I
nstallation and compilation process, usage of tools, profilers and
debuggers. CUDA by Examples and OpenCL by Examples, Future Directions.





REFERENCES



1.

David B Kirk and Wen
-
Mei W
. Hwu, “Programming Massively Parallel Processors: A
Hands
-
on Approach”,
Morgan Kaufmann, 2010

2.

Jason Sanders and Edward Kandrot,



CUDA by Example: An Introduction to General
Purpose GPU Programming”,

Addison
-
Wesley Professional, 2010

3.

O
pen CL at Khronos:

h
ttp://www.khronos.org/developers/library/overview/opencl_overview.pdf

http://www.khronos.org/registry/cl/specs/opencl
-
1.0.48.pdf

4.

Timothy Mattson, Beverly A. Sanders, Berna L. Massingill, “
Patterns of Parallel
Programming”,
Addison
-
Wesley Professionals
, 200
5

5.


NVIDIA CUDA Programming Guide

V3.0,
Addison
-
Wesley Professionals

NVIDIA

6.


GPU Gems 3

, H. Nguyen (ed.), Addison Wesley, 2007

7.


GPU Gems 2

, M. Pharr (ed.), Addison Wesley, 2005

8.


NVIDIA and OpenCL:

http://www.nvidia.com/content/cudazone/download/OpenCL/N
VIDIA_OpenCL_Progra
mmingGuide.pdf



42

Infrastructure and Faculty requirements for M.Tech
.
(
NETWORKING
)


Faculty

student ratio:

1:12

(As per AICTE norms for intake of 18: 1 Professor,





1 Associate Professor
)

Class room Equipment:

Multimedia Projector, Bl
ack Board

Teacher qualification

Specialization:

M.Tech. in
Computer Science & Engineering

Class Room:




2
, with
the area

of 30

sq.m

Laboratory: 1

Resources

Batch size of 25 students

Computer System :
Server

2 No. (1 server Windows based
-
1 server
Linux Based)

Computer systems:
node

18 No connected in LAN

UPS

Minimum of 5 KVA

Printer

2 No.

User License required
for software
(proprietary)

Minimum 18 No.

Software

1.

Microsoft Server OS and Linux Server

2.

Proprietary/ open source clients

3.

Borland

C Compiler / Microsoft C compiler/ any open source C
compiler/ any Proprietary C compiler

4.

Java development Kit (Latest Version)

5.

Microsoft Visual Studio With .Net Framework

6.

DB2 Server / ORACLE server/ SQL Server/ Open source DBMS
server software

7.

Ne
twork simulators (open source / propoereitiry) and /Network Kits

8.

Router

9.

Programmable firewall

10.

Network Trouble shooting tools and Devices including
Troubleshooting equipment, Terminators, Loopback test, C
rossover
cable, Volt
-
Ohm meters, Tone generators and probe, Cable Testers
and Certifiers, Time
-

Domain Reflectometer (TDR), Product
Indicators, Test Frame and Packet Generators, Network Monitors,
Protocol Analyzer, SNM, Troubleshooting Networks,
Troubles
hooting Cabling, Troubleshooting Infrastructure,