PSG COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

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PSG COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY




Department of Production Engineering

(Autonomous College affiliated to Anna University
-
Coimbatore)

(ISO 9001 : 2000 Certified)

Coimbatore


641 004









Programme: ME




Specialisation:
VIRTUAL PROTOTYPING AND
DIGITAL MANUF
ACTURING





20
09

REGULATIONS

AND

SYLLABI






09
PM
01
GEOMETRIC MODELING AND COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN

3 0
2

4


COMPUTER GRAPHICS AND GRAPHICS SYSTEMS:
Origin, history, goals and applications. 3D graph essentials, 3D world,
Graphics API’s and software, grap
hics input and output devices, Raster
devices.






(6)


OUTPUT PRIMITIVES AND ATTRIBUTES:
DDA, Bresenham algorithm for straight lines, Midpoint algorithm for conics and curves,
Filled area


scan line, boundary and flood fil
l. Primitive attributes
.









(4)


TRANSFORMATIONS AND GRAPHICS PIPELINE:
Coordinate system, Graphics pipeline, Translation, scaling, rotation, reflection
and shear transformations. Combined, modeling and co
-
ordinate transformation.








(4)


VIEWING AND CLIPPING:
3D viewing pipeline, Co
-
ordinates and volume, Parallel and perspective projections, Projection and
view
-
port transformation, clipping. Camera, normalized view volume.







(4)


CURVES:

Lagrange, hermite and
spline interpolation, cubic, Bezier and b
-
spline curves, composite curves and geometric continuity,
non
-
linear splines, curve fairing, recursive subdivision of curves.








(
6
)


SURFACES
:

Implicit and quadric surfaces, surface of revo
lution, sweep, ruled, bilinear and coons surfaces. Bicubic patch. Bezier,
b
-
spline and cyclide surfaces. Surface fairing, recursive subdivision of surfaces.









(
5
)


SOLID MODELING:
Solid Modeling and their representation.





(6)


GRAPHICS
FILE
STANDARDS:

Data exchange format
, shake based format,

product based format
,

G
KS, PHIGS, IGES, PDES,
DXF
,

CGM, STL, VRML, XML
files
.










(
4
)


INTERACTIVE COMPUTER PR
OGRAMMING:
Introduction to elementary level


on screen menu


high level


database level


device level and object oriented programming.









(
3
)


Total 42

REFERENCES:


1.

Donald Hearn and Pauline Baker, “Computer Graphics C Version”, Pearso
n Education, 2004.

2.

Michael E Mortenson, “Geometric Modeling”, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., Second Edition, 2004.

3.

Radhakrishnan P.
,

Subramaniyan S.

and Raju V.
, “CAD/CAM/CIM”, New Age International (P) Ltd.,
2003
.

4.

David F Rogers and Alan Adams J, “Mathematica
l Elements in Computer Graphics”, Tata McGraw

H
ill, 2002
.

5.

Ibr
ahim Zeid, “CAD/CAM Theory and P
ractice”, Tata McGraw Hill, India 2002.

6.

James D Foley, Andries van Dam, Steven K Feiner and John F Hughes, “Computer Graphics Principles and Practice”,
Addison
-
Wes
ley Publishing Company, Second Edition in C,
2000
.

7.

Georg Glaeser and Hellmuth Stachel, “Open Geometry : Open GL+ Advanced Geometry”, Springer Verlag, 1999.

8.

Radhakrishnan P. and Kothandaraman C.P., “Computer Graphics and Design”, Dhanpat Rai and Sons, 1997
.

9.

Martti Mantyla, “An Introduction to Solid Modeling”, Springer Verlag, 1987.



09
PM
02
VIRTUAL REALITY

3
1

0
4


VIRTUAL REALITY AND VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS:

Computer Graphics, Real
-
time computer graphics, Flight simulation, Virtual
environments,
requirements

for VR,
benefits of Virtual reality
.










(3
)


HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF VR:
Scientific landmarks
.








(
3
)


3D COMPUTER GRAPHICS:
V
irtual world space, Positioning the virtual obs
erver,
P
erspective projection, Human vision, stereo
perspective projection, 3D clipping, Colour theory, Simple 3D modeling, Illumination models, Reflection models, Shading
algorithms, Radiosity models, Hidden
-
surface removal, Realism Stereographic images
.






(
5
)


GEOMETRIC MODELING:
Tessalating CAD data,

Importing from CAD Systems
, VR formats
.




(
4
)


GEOMETRICAL TRANSFORMATIONS:
Frames of reference, Modeling transformations, Instances, Picking,

Flying, Scali
ng the VE,
Collision detection











(
4
)


GENERIC VR SYSTEM:
The virtual environment,
the

computer environment, VR technology,

Modes of interaction, VR systems
.

(
4
)


ANIMATING THE VIRTUAL

ENVIRONMENT:
D
ynamics of numbers, animation of objects,
creation of intermediate shapes and
objects between two key images, morphing s
hape
s

and object
s,
Free
-
form deformation, Particle systems
, Different

levels of details
.

(
5
)


HUMAN FACTORS:
E
ye, e
ar, so
matic senses, Equilibrium
.













(3
)


VIRTUAL REALITY HARDWARE:
Sensor hardware, Head
-
coupled displays, Acoustic hardware, Integrated VR systems
.



(
4
)

VIRTUAL REALITY SOFTWARE:
Elements of VR Software, Modeling v
irtual worlds, Physical simulation, VR toolkits,
VR
software

available
in the

market
.










(
4
)


VIRTUAL REALITY APPLICATIONS:
Engineering, Architecture, Education, Medicine, Ent
ertainment
, Science
, Training.

(3
)


Total 42

REFERENCES
:

1.

Alan B. Craig, Willliam R. Sherman and Jeffrey D. Will, “Developing Virtual Reality Applications


Foundations of Effective
Design”, Morgan Kaufmann, 2009.

2.

Oliver Bimber and Ramesh Rask
ar, “Spacial Augmented Reality


Merging Real and Virtual Worlds”, A K Peters, 2005.

3.

Gerard Jounghyun Kim, “Designing Virtual Reality Systems


The Structured Approach”, Springer, 2005.

4.

William R. Sherman and Alan B. Craig, “Understanding Virtual Reality :

Interface Application and Design”, Morgan Kaufmann
Publishers, 2003.

5.

Burdea, Grigore C. and Philippe Coiffet, “Virtual Reality Technology”, Wiley Interscience, India 2
nd

Edition, 2003.

6.

John Vince, “Virtual Reality Systems”, Addison Wesley, 1995.

7.

Howard R
heingold, “Virtual Reality: The Revolutionary Technology and how it Promises to Transform Society”, Simon and
Schuster, 1991.



09
PM
0
3

C
OMPUTER GRAPHICS FOR
V
IRTUAL
R
EALITY

I




3

0
2

4


OVERVIEW OF GRAPHICS SYSTEMS:

Elements of Image For
mation, Light, Ray Tracing and Geometric Optics, Luminance and
Color Images, Shadow Mask CRT, Additive and Subtractive Color, Pinhole Camera, Synthetic Camera Model, Advantages, Global
vs Local Lighting.














(
3
)



CLASSICAL VIEWING:
Planar Geometric Projections, Classical Projections, Perspective vs Parallel, Taxonomy of Planar
Geometric Projections, Perspective Projection, Parallel Projection, Orthograph
ic Projection, Multiview Orthographic Projection,
Advantages and Disadvantages, Axonometric Projections, Types of Axonometric Projections, Advantages and Disadvantages,
Oblique Projection, Perspective Projection, Vanishing Points, Three
-
Point Perspective,
Two
-
Point Perspective, One
-
Point
Perspective.













(
6
)


FRACTALS:

Modeling, Sierpinski Gasket, Coastline Problem, Fractal Geometry, Koch Curve/Snowflake, Fractal Dimension,
Volumetric Examples, k
-
Midpoint subdivision, Fractal Brownian Moti
on, Fractal Mountains, Iteration in the Complex Plane,
Mandelbrot Set.














(
5
)


COMPU
T
ER VIEWING:

The OpenGL Camera, Default Projection, Moving the Camera Frame, Moving Camera back from
Origin,

Moving the Camera, OpenGL code, Othe
r Viewing APIs, Projections and Normalization, Homogeneous Coordinate Representation,
Simple Perspective, Perspective Equations, Homogeneous Coordinate Form, Perspective Division, Using Field of View.





(
8
)


SHADING:

Shading, Scatteri
ng , Rendering Equation, Global Effects, Local vs Global Rendering, Light
-
Material Interaction ,Light
Sources, Simple Light Sources, Surface Types, Phong Model, Ideal Reflector, Lambertian Surface, Specular Surfaces, Modeling
Specular Reflections, Shinines
s Coefficient.











(
7
)



HIERARCHICAL MODELING:
Instance Transformation, Symbol
-
Instance Table, Relationships in Car Model, Structure Through
Function Calls, Graphs, Tree, Tree Model of Car, DAG Model, Modeling with
Trees,

Robot Arm, Articulated Models, Relationships
in
Robot Arm, Required Matrices
.












(
6
)


SPECIAL APPLICATIONS:

Stereo display programming, multiport display system, multi screen display system, picking VR
hardware, transformation contr
ols, fly mode navigation, walk through navigation, virtual tack ball navigation, rubber band zoom. (7)













Total 42


REFERENCES
:

1.

Edward Angel,

Interactive Computer Graphics: A Top
-
Down Approach Using OpenGL”, 5
th

Edition, Addison
-
Wesley, 2009
.

2.

David

F Rogers
, “Procedural Elements for Computer Graphics”,
2
nd

Edition,
McGraw
-
Hill, 19
9
8.

3.

OpenGL Architecture Review Board, “OpenGL Reference Manual: The Official Reference Document to OpenGL, Version 1.1”,
Addison
-
Wesley, 1997.

4.

Kilgard.
Mark J. and OpenGL Architecture Review Board, “OpenGL Programming for the X Window System”, Addison
-
Wesley,
1996.

5.

Foley, James, Andries Van Dam, Steven Feiner and John Hughes, “Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice”, Addison
-
Wesley, 1990
.








09
PM
0
4

COMPUTER GRAPHICS
FOR VIRTUAL REALITY II



3

0
2

4


GRAPHICS INPUT
-
OUTPUT DEVICES:

Overview of input, output devices
.





(3)



GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE AND INTERACTIVE INPUT METHODS:
U
ser dialog Input of graphical data, Input function,
Interactive picture construction techniques, Virtual reality environment.






(
6
)


OpenGL PROGRAMMING:

Early History of Applicati
on Programming Interfaces, PHIGS and X, SGI and GL, OpenGL Evolution,
OpenGL Libraries, Software Organization, OpenGL Architecture, OpenGL Functions, OpenGL State, Lack of Object Orientation,
OpenGL function format, Simple Program
s
. Program Structure, GLUT

functions, Coordinate Systems, OpenGL Camera,
Orthographic Viewing, Transformations and Viewing, Two
-

and three
-
dimensional viewing, OpenGL Primitives, Polygon Issues,
Attributes, RGB color, Indexed Color, Color and State, Smooth Color, Viewports.









(1
3
)



THREE DIMENSIONAL GRAPHICS USING OpenGL:
3D transformation, viewing 3D graphical data, Orthographic, Oblique,
Perspective projections, Hidden lines and surface removal, z
-
buffer algorithm, Surface vs Volume Subdivision,
Bezier Surface
s,
NURBS, solids, Boolean operations, kinematics, data exchanges.







(
8
)


VIRTUAL REALITY MODELING LANGUAGE:

Introduction, exploring and building a world, building objects, lighting, sound and
complex shapes, animation and user interaction, co
lors, normals and textures, nodes references.




(6)


HIERARCHICAL MODELING:
Applications of Hierarchical Modeling using O
penGL
,

Code for Robot, Tree Model of Robot, Possible
Node Structure, Generalizations.












(
6
)













Total 42


REFERENCES:

1.

Edward Angel,


Interactive Computer Graphics: A Top
-
Down Approach Using OpenGL”, 5th Edition, Addison
-
Wesley, 2009
.

2.

Foley James D., Van Dam Andries and Hughes John F., “Computer Graphics: Principles and Practic
e”, Pearson Education,
2002.

3.

Donald Hearn and Pauline Baker M., “Computer Graphics”, Pearson Education, 2002.

4.

OpenGL Architecture Review Board, Mason Woo, Jackie Neider and Tom Davis, “OpenGL Programming Guide: The Official
Guide to Learning OpenGL, Versio
n 1.1”, Addision
-
Wesley, 1997.

5.

Wright, Richard S., Jr. and Michael Sweet, “OpenGL Super Bible: The Complete Guide to OpenGL Programming for Windows
NT and Windows 95”, Waite Group Press, 1996.

6.

Georg Glaeser and Hellmuth Stachel, “Open Geometry : Open GL+ A
dvanced Geometry”, Springer Verlag, 1999.

7.

Rankin John R., “Computer Graphics Software Construction”, Prentice Hall, 1989.

8.

Rogers and David, “Procedural Elements for Computer Graphics”, McGraw
-
Hill, 1985.



09
PM
05
LINEAR SYSTEMS THEORY

3 0 0 3


MODELS OF
LINEAR SYSTEMS:
Linear Systems and State Equations, Linearization of Nonlinear Equations
.




(4)


VECTOR SPACES:

Vectors, Vector Spaces, Gram
-
Schmidt Procedure, Subspaces and Vector Projection Theorem
-

Linear
Operation of Vector Spaces


Definit
ion of Linear Operator, Operator as Spaces, Simultaneous Linear equations
.



(8)


EIGENVALUES AND EIGENVECTORS:


A
-
Invariant Subspace, Definition of Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors, Finding Eigenvalues
and Eigenvectors, The basis of Eigenvectors, Si
ngular Values
-

Functions of Vectors and Matrices


Linear Functionals, Multi Linear
Functionals, Quadratic Forms, Function
o
f matrices
.









(7)


SOLUTION TO STATE EQUATIONS:

Linear Time Invariant (LTI) systems, Homogeneous Systems, Syst
em models and
decompositions, The Time Invariant Case, Solving Discrete Time Systems
.







(5)


SYSTEM STABILITY:

Lyapunov Stability, Lyapunov’s Direct method, External Stability, Relationship Between the Stability Types
.

(4)


CONTROL
LABILITY AND OBSERVABILITY:

Definitions, Controllability Tests for LSI systems, Model Controllability and
Observability, Controllability and Observability of Time Invariant Systems, Discrete Time systems, Controllability and Observ
ability
under Sampling.








(5)


SYSTEM REALIZATIONS:

Minimal Realization, Specific Realization, Markov Parameters, Balanced Realization, Discrete Time
System Identification
.








(5)


STATE FEEDBACK AND OBSERVERS:

State feedback for SISO Systems, Multivariable Canonical Forms, Observers
.

(4)


Total 42


REFERENCES:

1.

João P. He
s
panha, “
Linear Systems Theory

, Princeton University Press, 2009
.

2.

Chen, C.T.
,

"Linear System Theory and Design" Oxford University Press, 2009
.

3.

Panos J. Antsaklis
,
Anthony N. Michel
,

A Linea
r Systems Primer”
, Birkhäuser, 2007
.

5.

T. Kailath,

Linear Systems

, Prentice
-
Hall, 2000.

6.

John S. Bay, “
Fundamentals of Linear State Space Systems

, McGraw Hill, 1999
.

7.

Wilson J. Ru
gh,

Linear System Theory

,

Prentice Hall, 1996
.

8.

C.A. Desoer and F.M. Callior,

Linear System Theory

, Springer Verlag, 1994.



09
PM
06
3D USER INTERFACES


3
1

0
4


INTRODUCTION
:


Terminology, Application Areas
.










(3)









HARDWARE TECHNOLOGIES:
Visual Displays, Auditory Displays, Haptic Displays
, Choosing

Output
Devices for 3D User
Interfaces.













(6)


3D USER INTERFACE INPUT HARDWARE:
Input device characteristics, Desktop input devices
,

Tracking Devices
, 3D Mice,
Special

Purpose Input Devices, D
irect Human Input
, Home
-

Brewed Input Devices, Choosing Inpu
t Devices for 3D Interfaces
.


(
8
)


3D INTERACTION TECHNIQES:

3D Manipulation tasks
, 3D

Travel Tasks, Theoretical Foundations of Wayfinding, System Control,
Case Study
, Symbolic

Input Tasks, Design Guidelines, Beyond Text and Number entry
.







(
6
)


DESIGNING AND DEVELOPING 3D USER INTERFACES:
Strategies for Designing and

Developing
,

Guidelines
,

Evaluation
.


(6)


ADVANCES IN

3D USER INTERFACES:
3
D

User Interfaces for the Real World
,
A
ugmented
R
eality

Interfaces as 3
D

Data
Browsers, 3D Augm
ented Reality Interfaces, Augmented Surfaces and Tangilble Interfaces, Agents in AR, Transitional AR
-
VR
Interfa
ces
,

future of 3
D User Interfaces
,
3D UI Technology, 3D Interaction Technique
s, 3D UI Design and Development
.



(
9
)


3D USER INTERFACE M
ATHEMATICS:
Scalars, Vectors, Points, Matrices, Quaternions
.




(
4
)



Total 42

REFERENCES:

1.

Takeda N., Kiyokawa K. and Takemura H., “A Virtual Walk through System with a Wide Field of View Stereo Head Mounted
Projective Display
”, IEEE Symposium, 2008.

2.

Pusch A., Martin O. and Coquillart S., “Hemp
-

Hand


Displacement
-

based Pseudo


Habits : A Study of a Force Field
Applications”, IEEE Computer Society, 2008.

3.

Ji Sun Kim, Dennis Gracanin, Lally Singh H, Kresimir Matkovic and Jos
ip Juric, “A Tangible User Interface System for CAVE
based on Augmented Reality Technique”, IEEE Computer Society, 2006.

4.

Doug A
Bowman, Ernest Kuijff, Joseph J. LaViola, Jr. and Ivan Poupyrev, “3D User Interfaces, Theory and Practice”, Addison
Wesley, USA,

2005.

5.

Jon Barrilleaux, “3D User Interfaces with Java 3D”, Manning Publications Co., USA, 2000.



09
PM
07

MODELING AND SIMULATION OF

VIRTUAL FACTORY

3 0 0 3


INTRODUCTION:

Introduction to VR and application of VR software in modeling and simulation of en
gineering systems


use of
discrete event simulation
.









(2)


DATA EXCHANGE FOR MANUFACTURING:
Role of information exchange and distributed databases in ma
nufacturing,

m
anufacturing message specification.







(6)


FACTORY LAYOUT AND MODELING:

Modeling of layout, cells, machines, materials handling


human ergonomics
.

(
8)


KINEMATIC MODELING OF EQUIPMENT:

Kinematic representations for equipments and layouts
.





(6)




ASSEMBLY SEQUENCE AND CAD/CAM:

Relationship among CAD/CAM and robotics


Robot programming
.


(6)


EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE:

Modeling of maintenance of equipments
.





(7)







SIMULATION IN THE FACTORY:

Safety in the workplace



I
ssues and use of simulation software
.





(7)




Total 42




REFERENCES
:

1.

Alan Craig, William Sherman

and

Jeffrey Will,

Developing VR
A
pplications

, Morgan Kaufmann Publishers, 200
9.

2.

Doru Talab and

Angelos Amditis
, “
Product Engineering
-

Tools and Methods Based on Virtual Reality

, Springer
P
ublications,
2008.

3.

Paolo Pedrazzoli, Marco Sacco, Anders Jonsson and Claudio R. Boer, “Virtual Factory Framew
o
rk: Key Enabler for Future
Manufa
cturing”
,

Springer US, 2007.

4.

Stjepan Bogdan, Frank L. Lewis, Zdenko Kovaic and Jose Mireles Jr., “Virtual Factory Modeling and Simulation”, Springer
London, 2006.

5.

Gerard Jounghyun Kim,


Designing VR
Sy
stems

, Springer
-
Verlag London Limited
,

2005.



09
PM
0
8

/ 09PD04
PRODUCT LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT


3 0 0 3


MOTIVATION AND INTRODUCTION:

e
-
commerce, B
2
B, B
2
C forms of business, extended enterprise, concepts in PDM


product
life cycle, business objects, work flows, versions, views, product structure, change proc
esses, work list, information flow model in
product development, engineering bill of materials and manufacturing bill of materials.







(10)


COMPONENTS OF PLM SOLUTIONS:

Object oriented approach in product development solutions, phase ga
te process in product
design


disparate databases and connectivity, use of EAI technology (middleware)


cases for preparation of combined BoM and
other reports. Component supplier management and sourcing.









(10)


PRODUCT VISUALISA
TION:

CAD neutral environment and visualisation of products, standard softwares, use of visualisation in
several stages of lifecycle, reviews, mark up


case studies.










(8)


ROLE OF PLM IN INDUSTRIES:

(like auto, aero, electronic)


other possible sectors, ten step approach to PLM, benefits of PLM.

(5)


DETAILS OF MODULES IN A PDM/PLM SOFTWARE:

Example.









(3)


BASICS ON CUSTOMISATION OF PDM/PLM SOFTWARE.








(6)


Total 42

REFERENCES:

1
.

John

Stark, “Global Product: Strategy, Product Lifecycle Management and the Billion Customer Question”, Springer Publisher,
2007.

2
.

Michael Grieves, “Product Life Cycle Management”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2006.

3
.

John Stark, “Product Lifecycle Management: 21 C
entury Paradigm for Product Realisation”, Springer Publisher, 2005.

4
.

Leon Alexis, “
Enterp
rise Resource Planning
“, Tata McGraw Hill, 2002.

5
.

David Ferris

and
Larry Whipple
, “Building an Intelligent E
-
Business”, Premier Press, 2001.

6
.

Kevin N Otto and Kristin L Wood, “Product Design”, Pearson, 2001.

7
.

Damer Amer, “The E
-
busin
ess Revolution”,

Prentice Hall, 2000.

8
.

Faisal Hoque

and
David Orchard
, “e
-
Enterprise: Business Models, Architecture and Components (Breakthroughs in Application
Development)”, Cambridge University Press, 2000.



09
PM
09

COMPUTER AIDED ENGIN
EERING AND VISUALIZATION

3 0 0 3


INTRODUCTION:
Introduction to

Computer Aided Engineering


Finite Element Structural Analysis


Heat Transfer Analysis


Computational Fluid Dynamics








(3)


STATIC ANALYSIS OF SOLID MECHANICS PROBLEMS:
Overview of static a
nalysis
problems, types of elements,
displacements, stresses
.







(
5
)


DYNAMIC
ANALYSIS OF SOLID MECHANICS PROBLEMS:
Dynamic Equations of Motion


Types of dynamic analysis
.


(
5
)


OUTPUT OF RESULTS ON TO FILE:

N
odes
,

elements
,
boundary conditions
,

displacements of nodes
,

stresses of elements at
gauss points, nodes, in local

coordinates, global coordinates
,

strains in elements at gauss points, at nodes in local coordinates,
global coordinates. Frequencies
,

Mode shapes
,

complex eigen values
,

composite elements failure indices.


(3)


VISUALIZATION:
Visua
lization in dedicated post processors, in light weight generic post processors, visualization of stress
contours (lines), displacement contours, strain contours
.







(2)


COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS

AND

CF
D TECHNIQUES
:

Overview of CFD,
governing equations
,
numerical methods
related to CFD
, Finite element method, finite differen
ce

methods, types of CFD problems
.








(
7
)


OUTPUT RESULTS

AND
VISUALIZATION
:


G
rids, panels, displacements, v
elocit
ies, accelearations, pressures
, p
ressure plots,
streamlines, vortex, particle trace
.











(
6
)


HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS:
Overview of heat transfer,
Mathematical analysis
,
Finite Difference Methods
,
Finite El
ement
Methods
, types of problems in heat transfer
.











(
5
)


OUTPUT OF RESULTS

AND
VISUALIZATION
:


Grids, Nodes,
displacements,
meshes, temperatures at nodes, iso
-
temperature
plots
.












(
6
)


Total 42

REFERENCES:

1.

Jaluria Y., “Design and Optimization of Thermal Systems”
,

CRC Press, Taylor and Francis Group, 2008
.

2.

Reddy J
.
N., “An Introduction to the Finite Element Method,”
Second Edition, Tata McGraw Hill, 2006.

3.

Singerasu So Rao, “The Finite Element Method in Engineering,” Butte
r
worth Heinemann, 2005.

4.

Robert F Boehm, “Developments in the Design of Thermal Systems”, Cambridge University Press, 2005.

5.

Bathe and Klaus Jurgen, “F
inite Element Procedure,” Prentice Hall Inc. 2004.

6.

Muralidhar K. and S
u
ndararajan T., “Computational Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer,” Narosa Publications, 2003.

7.

Chung T.J., “Computational Fluid Dynamics”, Cambridge University Press, 2002.

8.

Smith T.F., “Therma
l Fluid System Design Notes”, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, 2001.

9.

Patankar

and

Suhas V., “Numerical Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow”, Hemisphere Publishing Corporation 1980.



ELECTIVE COURSES



09PM
11

/

05MX03
SIMULATION

AND MODELING












3 0 0 3


Principle of computer model
ing and simulation
-

Monte Carlo simulation
-

Nature of
computer model
ing and simulation
-

Limitations
of simulation, areas of application.











(3)




System and environment
-

components of a system
-

discrete and continuous systems. Models
of a system
-

A variety of mode
ling
approaches.











(3)




Random number generation, techniques for generating random numbers
-

Midsquare method
-

The midproduct method
-

Constant
multiplier technique
-

Additive congruential method
-

Linear congruential method
-

Tauswarthe meth
od
-

Tests for random numbers
-

The Kolmogorov_Smirnov test
-

The Chi
-
square test.









(4)


Random variable generation
-

Inverse transform technique
-

Exponential distribution
-

Uniform distribution
-

Weibull distribution.

Empirical continuous

distribution
-

generating approximate normal variates
-

Erlang distribution.






(4)



Empirical Discrete distribution
-

Discrete Uniform distribution
-

P
oisson distribution
-

Geometric distribution
-

Acceptance
-

Rejection
technique for Poisson distribution
-

Gamma distribution.











(4)



Design and evaluation of

simulation experiments
-

Input
-

Output analysis
-

variance reduction techniques
-

Antithetic variables
-

verification and validation of simulation models.









(5)


Discrete event simulation
-

con
cepts in discrete
-
event simulation, manual simulation using event scheduling, single channel queue,
two server queue, simulation of inventory problem.











(7)


Simulation languages
-

GPSS
-

SIMSCRIPT
-

SIMULA
-

SIMPLE_1, Programming f
or Discrete event systems in GPSS, SIMPLE_1
and C.












(8)


Case studies
-

Simulation of LAN
-

Manufacturing system
-

Hospital system.








(4)






















Total 42

REFERENCES:

1.

Jerry Banks,
John S. Carson
,
Barry L. Nelson

and
David M. Nicol
,

“Discrete Event System Simulation”, Prentice Hall, 5
th

Edition
, 2009.

2.

Averil M. Law and W. David Kelton, “Sim
ulation Modeling and Analysis”, McGraw Hill, 2006.

3.

Francis Neelamkovil, “Computer Simulation and Modeling”, John Wiley & Sons, 1987.

4.

Narsingh Deo, “System
Simulation
with
Digital

Computer”
, Prentice

Hall, 1979.






09
PM
12

HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION

3 0 0

3


USABILITY OF INTERACTIVE SYSTEMS:
Goals and Measures
-

Motivations, Universal Usability, Goals for Profession, Guidelines,
Principles, and Theories
.















(4)


DEVELOPMENT PROCESSES:


Managing Design Processes
-

Organizational

Design to Support Usability
-
The Four Pillars of
Design
-

Development Methodologies
-

Ethnographic Observation
-

Participatory Design
, Scenario

Development, Social Impact
Statement for Early Design Review, Legal Issues
.










(4)

EVALUATING IN
TERFACE DESIGNS:

Introduction
-

Expert Reviews
-

Usability Testing and Laboratories
-

Survey Instruments,
Acceptance Tests,
-
Evaluation During Active Use
-

Controlled Psychologically Oriented Experiments.





(5)


INTERACTION STYLES:

Direct Manipul
ation and Virtual Environments
-

Examples of Direct Manipulation, Discussion of Direct
Manipulation
-
3D Interfaces, Teleportation, Virtual and Augmented Reality. Overview of Menu Selection, Form Fill
-
in, and Dialog
Boxes
-

Command and Natural Languages
.









(6)


COLLABORATION AND SOCIAL MEDIA PARTICIPATION:

Introduction:

Goals of Collaboration and Participation, overview of
Asynchronous and Synchronous Distributed Interfaces
.










(5)


DESIGN ISSUES:
Quality of Service, Intro
duction:

Models of Response

-

Time Impacts,

Expectations and Attitudes, User
Productivity, Variability in Response Time, Frustrating Experiences

-

Balancing Function and Fashion, Error Messages,
Nonanthropomorphic Design, Display Design, Web Page Design
.










(6)


INFORMATION SEARCH:

Searching in Textual Documents and Database Querying, Multimedia Document Searches, Advanced
Filtering and Search Interfaces. Information Visualization, Introduction:

Data Type by Task Taxonomy, Challenges
for Information
Visualization.















(6)


CASE STUDY:

Human computer interaction in industrial applications
.









(6)


Total 42

REFERENCES:

1.

Ben
Shneiderman and Catherine Plaisant
,

Designing the User Interface: Strategies for Effective Human
-
Computer
Interaction

,
5
th

Edition
,
Addison
-
Wesley, 2010
.

2.

Alan Dix, Ja
net Finlay, Gregory Abowd and Russell Beale, “Human
-
Computer Interaction”, Prentice Hall, New Delhi, 2004.

3.

John M. Carroll, “Human Computer Interaction in the New Millennium”, Pearson Education, 2002.

4.

Hackson J
.
T
.

and Redish J
.
C
.
, “User and
Task Analysis
f
or Interface Design”, John Wiley and Sons, New York, 1998.



09
PM
13
/ 09PP21 / 09PD02

H
UMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING


3 0 0 3


INTRODUCTION:

Definition, human technological system, multidisciplinary engineering approach, human


machine system,
manual, mechan
ical, automated system, human system reliability, conceptual design, advanced development, detailed design and
development, human system modeling.











(6)


INFORMATION INPUT:

Input and processing, text, graphics, symbols, cod
es, visual display of dynamic information, auditory,
tactual, olfactory displays, speech communications.










(4)


HUMAN OUTPUT AND CONTROL:

Physical work, manual material handling, motor skill, human control of systems, controls and
d
ata entry devices, hand tools and devices.











(4)


WORKPLACE DESIGN:

Applied anthropometry, workspace design and seating, arrangement of components within a physical
space, interpersonal aspects of work place design, design of repetit
ive task, design of manual handling task, work capacity, stress,
fatigue.














(7)


ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS:

Illumination, climate, noi
se, motion, sound, vibration.






(5)


BIOMECHANICS:

Biostatic

mechanics, statics of rigid bodies, upper extremity of hand, lower extremity and foot, bending, lifting
and carrying, biodynamic mechanics, human body kinematics, kinetics, impact and collision.






(6)


BIOTHERMODYNAMICS AND BIOENERGI
TICS:

Bio
-
thermal fundamentals, human operator heat transfer, human system
bioenergetics, thermoregulatory physiology, human operator thermo regularity, passive operator, active oper
ator, heat stress.


(6)


HUMAN FACTORS APPLICATIONS:

Human error, ac
cidents, human factors and the automobile, organizational and social
aspects, steps according to ISO/DIS6385, OSHA’s approach, virtual environments.








(4)


Total 42


REFERENCES:

1
.

Bridger R
.
S., “Introduction to Ergonomics”, Tayl
or and Francis, 2003.

2
.

Chandler Allen Phillips, “Human Factors Engineering”, John Wiley & Sons, 2000.

3
.

Martin Helandar, “A Guide to Ergonomics of Manufacturing”, Taylor and Francis, 1996.

4
.

Mark S Sanders, “Human Factors in Engineering and Desig
n”, McGraw Hill, 1993.



09
PM
14

/ 09PP12 / 09PD06


DESIGN BY FINITE ELEMENT METHOD


3 1 0 4


FORMULATION OF SOLID AND STRUCTURAL MECHANICS PROBLEMS:
Generalized Hooke's law, Strain Energy density
function, Elastic symmetry, Stress strain relationship, stra
in displacement relationship, boundary conditions, compatibility equations,
Equilibrium equations. First law of thermodynamics and energy Equation.









(7)


ENERGY AND VARIATIONAL PRINCIPLE:

Calculus of variations: The variational oper
ator, Extremum of functional, Natural and
essential boundary conditions, Principle of virtual displacements, Principle of total potential energy, Principle of virtual
forces and
complimentary potential energy, Hamilton principle, Castigliano's theorems.









(7)


BASIC PROCEDURE OF FEM:
Discretization of the domain, basic element shapes, discretization process, node numbering
scheme, assemblage of element equations and incorporation of boundary conditions.





(7)


INTERPOLATION MODELS:
Polynomial form of interpolation functions, selection of the order of the interpolation polynomial,
simplex, complex and multiplex elements, interpolation polynomial in terms of nodal degrees of freedom, converge
nce
requirements, linear interpolation polynomials in terms of global coordinates and for vector quantities, coordinate transform
ation.


(7)


STATIC ANALYSIS OF SOLID MECHANICS PROBLEMS:
Analysis of bar, space truss, beam, plates
-

triangular membrane,
rec
tangular, isoparametric formulation and axisymme
tric formulation. case studies.





(7)


DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF SOLID MECHANICS PROBLEMS:
Dynamic equations of motion, consistent and lumped mass matrices,
free vibration analysis, dynamic response us
ing finite element method, case studies.




(7)


Total 42

REFERENCES:

1
.

Reddy J
.
N., “An Introduction to the Finite Element Method”,
2
nd

Edition, Tata McGraw Hill, 2006.

2
.

Singerasu So Rao, "The Finite Element
Method in Engineering", Butterworth Heinemann, 2005.

3
.

Klaus Jurgen Bathe, "Finite Element Procedures", Prentice Hall Inc.
,

2004.

4
.

Reddy J
.
N., “Energy Principles and Variational Methods in Applied Mechanics”,
2
nd

Edition, John Wiley & Sons, 2002.



0
9
PM
15

MECHATRONICS

3 0 0 3


INTRODUCTION:

Introduction to Mechatronics, need and applications, elements of mechatronic systems, role of mechatronics in
automation, manufacturing and product development.





(3)




SENSORS AND FEEDBACK DEVICES:
Importance of sensors in Mechatronics, Static and Dynamic characteristics of sensors
,errors and output impedance of sensors, transducers for measurement of displacement, strain, position, velocity, noise
, flow,
pressure, temperature, humidity, vibration, liquid level, vision sensors.






(10)


CONTROL ELEMENTS AND ACTUATORS:
On/off push buttons, control relays, thermal over load relays,
contactors, selector
switches, solid state switches. Mechanical actuators


types of motion, gear trains, belt and chain drives, screw rods, Electrical
actuators, solenoids, DC drives and AC variable frequency drives, AC and DC motors, servomotors, stepper

motors, linear motors.
Hydraulic and Pneumatic controls, functional diagram
-

control valves, cylinders and hydro motors.




(9)



COMPUTATIONAL ELEMEN
TS AND CON
TROLLERS
:

Basic concepts of control systems


open loop, closed loop, semi closed
loop control system, block and functional diagrams controllers for robotics and CNC, linear and rotary encoders, timers, coun
ters,
microprocessors and microcontrollers:
archi
tecture and pin details,

introduction to PLC, simple programs for process control
application based on relay ladder logic
-
Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Systems (SCADA) and Human Machine Interface
(HMI).






(10)




INTERFACIN
G SYSTEMS:

Introduction to interfacing of different hard wares in industry, need for networks in industrial plants,
hierarchy and structure of networking, RS 232 based network, Ethernet, TCP/IP, MAP/TOP.






(5)






APPLICATION OF MECHATRONIC SYSTEMS:
Introduction to factory automation and integration, design of simple Mechatronics
systems, Case studies based on the application of mechatronics in manufacturing, autotronics, bi
onics and avionics.





(5)




Total 42


REFERENCES:

1.

Appu Kuttan K
.
K., “Introduction to Me
chatronics”
,

Oxford University Press, 2007.

2
.

Sabri Cetinkunt, “Mechatronics”, John Wiley, 2007
.

3
.

Doeblin E
.
O., “Measurement Systems Design and applications”, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 2006.

4
.

Mahalik N
.
P., “Mechatronics : Principle, Concepts and
Applications”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2005.

5.

David G Alciatore and Michal B Histand, “Introduction to Mechatronics and Measurement Systems”, McGraw Hill Publishers,
2005.

6
.

Jon Stenersons, “Fundamentals of Programmable Logic Controllers”, Sensors and Communi
cations”, Prentice Hall, 2004
.

7
.

Bolton W., “Mechatronics”, Pearson Education Asia, New Delhi, 2004.

8
.

HMT, “Mechatronics”, Tata McGraw Hill Publishers, New Delhi, 1998.

9
.

Sabre Soloman, “Sensors and Control Systems in Manufacturing”, McGraw Hill Publ
ishers,1994.

1
0
.

Yorem Koren, “Computer Control of Manufacturing Systems”, McGraw Hill, New York, 1983.



09
PM
16
/ 09PP28 / 09PD13

MICRO ELECTRO MECHANICAL SYSTEMS

3 0 0 3


INTRODUCTION:

Historical development of VLSI, MEMS, Nano Technology and applicatio
ns.




(3)


VLSI TECHNOLOGY:

Refreshing basics of electronics, BJT, MOSFET, logic and memory chips, Moore’s law, silicon wafer
processing, oxidation, resist spinning , lithography
-
optical, e beam, x
-
ray, ion beam,
immersion, computational, virtual; projection
tools, etching, etch stop, diffusion / doping, thermal annealing, CVD & PVD, sputtering epitaxy, assembly / packing.



(15)


MEMS:

application in various fields.

Sensors
-

Classification of se
nsors, signal conversion, ideal characteristics of sensor,
mechanical sensors, displacement and accelerometers, pressure and flow sensors,

bio sensors,

actuators, manufacturing
processes
-
bulk and surface micro machining, LiGA, screen printing, hot embossi
ng, nano imprint, micro stereo lithography, soft
lithography, ion beam machining, laser processing, materials, MOEMS, micro fluidics, scaling, design and fabrication


modeling
softwares, mems packing.













(14)








NANO SYSTEMS:
Definition of nano technology, top and bottom up approach, AFM, STM.





(2)


APPLICATION OF NANO ENGINEE
RING:

Nano
-
grating system, nano
-
lithography, manufacturing of nano band accurate parts
-

machining of soft metal mirrors with diamond turning, mirror grinding of ceramics, ultra
-
precision block gauges, balls for rolling
bearings, ultra precision centreless

grinding

,

Latest research topics in micro and nano technology.




(8)




Total

42

REFERENCES:

1
.

Premchand Mahalik N., “MEMS”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2008.

2.

Bharat Bhushan, “Handbook of Nano Technology”, Springer, 2004.


3.


May G
.
S. and Sze S
.
M., “Fundamentals of Semiconductor Fabrication”, John Wiley & Sons Inc, 2004.

4
.


Tai Ran Hsu, “Mems & Micro Systems Design and Manufacture”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2003.

5.


Chang C
.
V. and Sze S
.
M., "VLSI Technology", Tata McGra
w Hill, 2003.

6
.

Norio Taniguchi, "Nanotechnology", Oxford University Press, 2003.

7
.

Mark J Madou, "Fundamentals of Micro Fabrication", CRC Press, 2002.

8
.

Julian W Gardner, "Micro Sensors, Principles and Applications", CRC Press, 1997.



09
PM
17

/
09PP09


ADVANCED MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS

3 0 0 3


INTRODUCTION:

Overview of machine tools, types of CNC machines, multitask machines, hard machining.






(4)


CNC TURNING CENTRE:
constructional features
-

structures, guide/slide ways, bal
l screws, guideways, turret, curvic coupling,
power pack, spindle, bearings,

programming: interpolators, ISO and EIA standards, G and M codes, canned cycles.



(7)


CNC MACHINING CENTRE:
constructional features, automatic tool changer, tool magazi
ne, automatic pallet changer, feed drives,
spindle drives, feed back devices, programming, programming using CAM packages.







(7)


OTHER CNC DRIVEN MACHINES:

Laser, plasma cutting, EDM, ECM.








(5)


RO
BOTICS:

Introduction, overview, classification of robots, major components of robot, specification, applications, recent trends,
constructional features
-

mechanical elements used in robot, motion conversion, end effectors, electrical elements, control of
robotic
joints, robotic sensory devices,

robot kinematics.











(7)


ADVANCED CONCEPTS:

Cellular manufacturing, group technology, flexible, lean
manufacturing.



(5)


MATERIAL HANDLING:
Industrial trucks, manual, p
owered automated guided vehicles, types of vehicles and AGVS application,
vehicle guidance technology, vehicle management and safety,
conveyors, cranes and hoists.




(4)


SIMULATION:

Simulation of job shop, flow shop, facto
ry layout and inventory system.








(3)


Total 42


REFERENCES:

1
.

Joshi P
.
H., “Machine Tool Hand Book, Design and Operation”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2007.

2
.

Jerry Banks and John S Carson, "Discrete Event System Simulation", Prenti
ce Hall of India, New Delhi, 2003
.

3
.

Steve Krar, “Computer Numerical Control Simplified”, Industrial Press, 2001.

4.

Richaerd D Klafter, Thomas Achmielewski and Mickael Negin, “Robotic Engineering


An Integral Approach”, Prentice
-
Hall
India, 2001.

5
.

HMT, “Mechatronics”, Tata McGraw Hill, 1998.

6
.

Radhakrishnan P., “Computer Numerical Control, (CNC) Machines”, Newness


Butterworth and Co. Publisher Limited, 1992.

7
.

Kulwise R
.
A., “Basics of Materials Handling” M.H. Institute, New York, 1986.



09PM1
8
/
09PP13

/ 09PD21


RAPID PROTOTYPING

3 0 0 3


INTRODUCTION:
Need for the compression in product development, history of RP systems, survey of applications, growth of RP
industry, classification of RP systems.













(4)


FUS
ED

DEPO
SITION MODELING:

Principle, process parameters, path generation, applications





(5)


SELECTIVE LASER SINTERING:

Types of machines, principles of operation, process parameters, data preparation for SLS,
applications.















(5)


STEREOLITHOGRAPHY SYSTEMS:
Principle, process parameters, process details, data preparation, data files and machine
details, applications.















(4)
















LAMINATED OBJECT MANUFACTURING:

Pr
inciple of operation, LOM materials, process details, applications.

SOLID GROUND CURING:
Principle of operation, machine details, applications.





LASER ENGINEERED NET SHAPING (LENS)
:
Net shaping development at Sandia National Lab.







(2)


CONCEPT MODELERS:

Principle, Thermo jet printer, Sander's model market, 3
-
D printer, Genisys Xs printer, JP system 5, object
quadra system.













(4)


RAPID TOOLING:

Indirect rapid tooling
-

silicone

rubber tooling, aluminum filled epoxy tooling, spray metal tooling, cast Kirksite, 3D
Keltool, etc., direct rapid tooling
-

direct AIM, quick cast process, copper polyamide, rapid tool, DMILS, prometal, sand casting
tooling, laminate tooling, soft tooling

Vs hard tooling.









(7)


SOFTWARE FOR RP:

STL files, overview of solid view, magics, mimics, magics communicator, etc., internet based softwares,
collaboration tools.













(4)



RAPID MANUFACTURING PROCESS OPTIMIZATION:

Factors influencing accuracy, data preparation errors, part building errors,
errors in finishing, influence of part build orientation.










(2)


ALLIED PROCESSES:

Vacuum casting, surface digitizing, surface generation from point cloud, surface modification, data transfer
to solid models.















(5)


Total 42

REFERENCES:

1.

Terry Wohlers, "Wo
hlers Report 2001", Wohlers

Associates, 2008
.

2.

Pham D T and Dimov S S, "Rapid Manufacturing", Verlag, 2001.

3.

Paul F Jacobs, "Stereo lithography and other RP&M Technologies", SME, 1996.

4.

FDM Maxum User Guide.

5.

FDM 1650 User Guide.

6.

Sinterstation 2500 plus System

User Guide.

7.

MK
-
Technology Gmbh. System User Guide.








09PM19 /
09PD14


COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS AND HEAT TRANSFER

3 0 0 3


INTRODUCTION:

Basics of fluid flow, derivation of the governing equations
-

conservation of mass, momentum and energy.

(5)


GRID GENERATION:

Choice of grid, grid oriented velocity components, cartesian velocity components, staggered and collocated
arrangements, adaptive grids.











(4)


DIS
CRETISATION:

Finite difference method, forward, backward and central difference schemes, explicit and implicit methods.
Properties of numeri
cal solution methods,
stability analysis, error estimation.









(5)













CFD TECHNIQUES:

Mathematical classification of flow, hyperbolic, parabolic, elliptic and mixed flow types, Lax
-

Wendroff
technique, MacCormack’s technique, relaxation technique, a
rtificial viscosity
, ADI technique, pressure correction

technique, SIMPLE

algorithm, u
pwind schemes, flux vector splitting.












(14)


FINITE VOLUME METHOD:
Introduction, difference between FDM and FVM, approximation of surface integrals, approximation of
volume integrals, i
nterpolation practices, implementation of boundary conditions.








(3)


TURBULENCE MODELING:

Turbulence energy equation
-

one
-
equation model, k
-
ω model, k
-

ε model.







(3)


APPLICATIONS:
Fluid dynamics and

h
eat transfer problems.









(8)














Total 42

REFERENCES:

1.

Muralidhar K
.

and Sundararajan T
.
, “Computational Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer”, Narosa Publications, 2003.

2.

Chung T
.
J
.
,
“Computational Fluid Dynamics”, Cambridge University Press, 2002.

3.

Joel H Freziger

and

Milovan Peric, “Computational Methods for Fluid Dynamics”, Springer Publications, 1999.

4.

John
D Anderson, “Computational Fluid Dynamics


The Basics with Applications”, Mc
Graw Hill, 1995.

5.

Versteeg H
.
K
.

and Malalasekara W
.
, “An Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics
-

The Finite Volume Method',
Longman, 1995.



09PM20 /
09PD11


DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

3


0

2

4


BASIC CONCEPTS:

Introduction to databases
-

Convent
ional file Processing
-

Purpose of Database system
-

Characteristics of
database approach
-

Advantages of using DBMS
-

Database concept and architecture
-

Data Abstraction
-

Data Models
Instances
and schema
-

Data independence
-

schema architecture
-

Compo
nents of a DBMS
-

Database Languages
-

Database Manager
-

Database Administrator
-

Database Users.

.








(
6
)


DATA MODELING:

Introduction
-

Data Associations
-

entities, attributes, relationships
-

Type role and st
ructural constraints
Weak
and Strong entity types
-

Design of Entity relationship data models (ERD)
-

Generalization
-

Aggregation
-

Conversion of ERD into
tables
-

Applications
-

Introduction to Network data model and Hierarchical data model.





(
7
)


FILE ORGANIZATI
ON:
Storage Device Characteristics
-

Constituents of a file
-

Oper
ations on file
-

Serial Files
-

Sequential Files
-

Index Sequential Files
-

Direct Files
-

Data Retrieval
-

Indexing using Tree Structures.







(
7
)


RELATIONAL MODEL:

Introduction to Relational Data Model
-

Basic Concepts
-

Enforcing Data Integrity Constraints
-

Relational
Algebra Operations
-

Extended Relational Algebra Operations
-

Assertion and Triggers
-

Introduction to views.




(
4
)


RELATIONAL DATABASE MANIPULATION:

Introduction to Structured Query Language (SQL)
-

SQL Commands for Defining
Database, Constructing Database, Manipulations on Database
-

Basic Data Retrieval Operations
-

Advanced Queries in SQL
-
Functions in
SQL
-

Aggregation
-

Categorization
-

Updates in SQL
-

Views in SQL
-

Different types of
views
-

Theoretical
Updatability of Views.












(
7
)


DATA BASE DESIGN THEORY:

Data base design process
-

Relational Database Design
-

Relati
on Schema
-

Anomalies in a
database
-

Functional dependencies
-

Axioms
-

Normal forms based on primary keys
-

Second Normal form, Third Normal form,
Boyce
-

Codd Normal form
-

Examples
-

Multi
-
valued dependencies
-

Fourth Normal form
-

Reduction of an E
-
R
schema to Tables
-

Converting EER Diagrams to relations
-

Practical database design tuning.







(
8
)


DATABASE SECURITY, INTEGRITY CONTROL:

Security and Integrity threats
-

Defense mechanisms
-

Transaction and
concurrenc
y control mechanisms
.












(
3
)


Total
42

REFERENCES:

1.

Date C J, "An Introduction to Database Systems", Pearson Education Asia, 2005.

2.

Elmasri Rand Navathe S

B, "Fundamentals of Database Systems", Pearson Education, 2004.

3.

Raghu R
amakrishnan and Johannes Gehrke, "Database Management System", McGraw Hill, 2004.

4.

Silberschatz A

and

Korth Hand Sudarshan S, "Database System Concepts", McGraw Hill, 2003.

5.

Thomas Condly

and

Carolyn Begg, "Database System", Pearson Education, 2003.

6.

Graem
e C Simsion, "Data Modeling Essentials", Dreamtech, 2001.




09PM21 /
09PD20


ENTERPRISE COMPUTING

3 0 0 3


ENTERPRISE FOUNDATIONS:

Enterprise Architectural overview
-

object oriented software development for enterprise
Component
Based software develo
pment for enterprise. Java Enterprise System.




(5)


ENTERPRISE DATA ENABLING:

Enterprise Data
-

Basis of JDBC, Drivers, Con
nection, Statement, Result Set,
Advanced JDBC
features
.















(8)


DISTRIBUTED ENTERPRISE COMMUNICATIONS ENABLING:

Distributed Enterprise Communications Basis
-

RMI
Communication
-

CORBA communication
-

DCOM Communication.



(4)


ENTERPRISE WEB ENABLING:

Web Browsers and Web Servers in Enterprise. Web Programming, XML. Java Servlets
-

Java
Server pages, JavaServer Faces, JSTL, Struts.





(12)


MULTITIER ENTERPRISE COMPUTING:

Java Beans, Enterprise Java Beans, Stateless Session Beans, Stateful Session Beans,
Message Driven Beans, Entity, Accessing EJB in web services.






(13)



Total

42

REFERENCES:

1.

Eric Jendrock, Jennifer Ball, Debbie Carson, Ian Evans, Scott Fordin and Ki
m Haase, “The Java EE 5 Tutorial
", Addison
Wesley, 2006.

2.

Dave Crane, Eric Pasc
arello and Darren Jame, "Ajax in Action", Manning, 2006.

3.

Raghu R

Kodali, Jonathan R Wetherbee and Peter Zadrozny, "Beginning EJB 3 Application Development", Apress, 2006.

4.

Bill Burke and Richard Monson Haefel, "Enterprise Java Beans 3
.
0" O'Reily, 2006.

5.

K
ito D

Mann, "JavaServer Faces in Action", Manning, 2005.

6.

Jason Hunter
,
"Java Servlet Programming"
,
O’ Reily
&
Associates Inc.
,
2001.

7.

Dustin R

Callaway, "Inside Servlets
"
-

Addison Wesley, 2001.

8.

George Reese, "Database programming, with JDBC and Java”, O
'Reily, 2000.

9.

Paul J Perrone
,

Venkata S

R

Krishna R and Chayanti, "
Building Java Enterprise Systems with J2EE", Techmedia, 2000.



09PM22 /
09PP14


IT IN MANUFACTURING

3 0 0 3


INTRODUCTION:

Role of internet and information technology in manufacturing,

present market constraints, extended enterprises,
B2C and B2B, PLM and PDM.













(6)


PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT AND ISSUES:

Product lifecycle, sequential engineering Vs concurrent engineering, concurrent
engineering and information tech
nology,
Global Product and Product Complexity,
product development and its relevance
, make to
stock, assemble to order, engineer to order situations
.









(9)


USE OF CAD
, CAE

AND CAM:

Modelling of geometry of parts, modeling of asse
mblies, different modeling packages and
standards for data exchange between different softwares
, use of analysis softwares, use of manufacturing process simulation
softwares.
















(9)


AUTOMATED PROCESS PLANNING:

Process planning,

structure of a process planning software, information requirements for
process planning, operation of a typical computer aided process planning software, group technology.



(5)


PLANNING OF RESOURCES FOR MANUFACTURING THROUGH IT:

Background, r
ole of MRP
-
II, MRP software, manufacturing
applications, engineering applications, financial applications, marketing applications, dynamic enterprises, ERP, SCM, virtua
l
manufacturing
, knowledge of inventory and BOM
.











(6)


COLLA
BORATIVE ENGINEERING:

Faster design throughput, web based design, changing design approaches,

engineering
change management, product configuration management,

extended enterprises, enterprise wide product visualization, enterprise
application integration f
or PLM.













(7)


Total 42

REFERENCES:

1.

John Stark, “Global Product: Strategy, Product Lifecycle Management and the Billion Customer Question”, Springer Publisher,
2007.

2.

John Stark, “Product Lifecycle Management: 21 cen
tury paradigm for Product Realisation”,

Springer Publisher, 2005.

3.

Dave Garwood, “Bills of Materials for a Lean Enterprise”, Dogwood Publishing Co., 111 Village Parkway, Third Edition, 2004.

4.

Radhakrishnan

P, Subramanyan

S

and

Raju

V, “CAD/CAM/CIM”, New Age
Int
ernational Publishers,

2002.

5.

Cornelius Leondes, “Computer Aided Design
-

Vol 2: Computer Integrated Manufacturing”, CRC Press, 2001.

6.

Mikell P Groover, “Automation, Production Systems and Computer Integrated Manufacturing”, Prentice Hall, 1998.

7.

Puente E

and

Macconaill P, “Computer Integrated Manufacturing”, Springer
-
Verlag, 1998.

8.

Kant Vajpayee S, “Computer Integrated Manufacturing”, Prentice Hall, Inc, 1995.


09
PM
23 /
09PP
19


IMAGE PROCESSING
AND MACHINE VISION

3 0 0 3


INTRODUCTION:


Image represen
tation, binary, gray and color images, digital image fundamentals, basics of image processing,
imaging requirements, human vision and machine vision.










(6)


IMAGE PROCESSING FUNDAMENTALS:

Image sampling and quant
ization, image enhancement, gray level transformations,
histogram processing, sharpening and smoothing, spatial and frequency domain filters, restoration, segmentation, edge and lin
e
detection, thresholding, representation.











(12)


IMAGE OPERATIONS AND ANALYSIS:

Study of various image operations, 2D and 3D measurements, image information, feature
extraction, image based knowledge interpretation, template

matching.





(8)


MACHINE VISION:

Image sensing and acquisition, types of cameras for machine vision, their principles, different lighting system,
Lens equation, Resolution of image, Depth of field, Volume of visio
n,


laser vision system, elements of vision system and their
functions, software’s for image processing.











(8)


APPLICATIONS:

General application in various fields, factory automation and machine vision, dimensional measurement,
identification of flaws and defects, pattern recognition applications, sorting and counting, study of surface finish, tool we
ar
measure
ment, robot application, safety monitoring.









(8)



Total


42

REFERENCES:

1.




Tinku Acharya

and Ajoy K Ray, “Image Processing


Principles and Applications”, John Wiley and Sons Publication, 2005.

2.




Rafael G Gonzalez and Richard E Woods, “Digital Image Processing”, Pearson Education, 2002.

3.




Linda G Shapriro and George C Stockman, “Com
puter Vision”, Prentice Hall, 2001.

4.




John C
Russ, “The Image Processing Handbook”, 3
rd

Edition, CRC Press, 1999.

5.




Davies E

R, “Machine Vision


Theory, Algorithms, Practicalities”, Academic Press, 1997.

6.


Ramesh Jain, Rangachar Kasturi and

Brain G Schunck, “Machine Vision”, McGraw Hill, 1995.

7.




Robert R Schalkoff, “Digital Image Processing and Computer Vision”, John Wiley and Sons Publication, 1989.




09
PM
41 Industrial Visit & Technical Seminar

1 0 2 2

The student will make atleast tw
o technical presentations on current topics related to the specialization. The same will be assessed
by a committee appointed by the department. The students are expected to submit a report at the end of the semester coverin
g the
various aspects of his/
her presentation together with the observation in industry visits. A quiz covering the above will be held at the
end of the semester.

09
PM
51

Virtual Modeling & Simulation Laboratory

0
0
3
2

In this course, students will be provided with an orientation

programme on the following equipment/software for a duration of 15
hours. After this orientation, each student is expected to formulate and complete an activity of interest which has to be der
ived from
the orientation programme under the guidance of a f
aculty. The details like background, problem definition, state of
technology/knowledge in that area by a good literature review

(5 latest papers), objectives, methodology, equipment that can be
used (from the orientation programme), results from the exper
iments and their interpretation
with respect to

the
assumptions/background and a formal conclusion are expected in the report which is to be submitted at the end of the semester
.
This work is evaluated for the credit assigned. Expected hours needed for thi
s work is 40 hours.

Topics for orientation programme

1.

Introduction to virtual reality hardware. (Projectors, Glove
s
, Glasses and other Peripherals.)

2.

Introduction to VR software. (
Software architecture
, Components, Third party products.)

3.

Conversion of CAD models into VR models.

4.

Adding behavior to CAD models.

5.

Use of VR hardware peripherals (Glass, Glove etc.) for immersive effect.

09
PM
52

Virtual Prototyping & Design Laboratory

0
0
3
2

In this course, students will be provide
d with an orientation programme on the following equipment/software for a duration of 15
hours. After this orientation, each student is expected to formulate and complete an activity of interest which has to be der
ived from
the orientation programme unde
r the guidance of a faculty. The details like background, problem definition, state of
technology/knowledge in that area by a good literature review

(5 latest papers), objectives, methodology, equipment that can be
used (from the orientation programme), r
esults from the experiments and their interpretation
with respect to

the
assumptions/background and a formal conclusion are expected in the report which is to be submitted at the end of the semester
.
This work is evaluated for the credit assigned. Expected

hours needed for this work is 40 hours.

Topics for orientation programme

1.

Creation of assemblies of products in VR.

2. Conversion of assemblies to VR models.

3. Creation of digital mockup addition of behavior.

4. Ergonomic and aesthetic studies.

5. Creation of a full fledged immersive environment for product / system evaluation.


09PM55 /
09PP
55 / 09PD55

OBJECT COMPUTING AND DATA STRUCTURES LABORATORY

2 0 3 4


PRINCIPLES OF OOP:

Programming paradigms, basic concepts and benefits of OOP, a
pplications of OOP.



(
1
)


INTRODUCTION TO C++:

History of C++, structure of C++, basic data types, derived data types, symbolic constants, dynamic
initialization, type modifiers, type casting, operator and control statements
, input and output statements.



(
2
)


CLASSES AND OBJECTS:

Class specification, member function specification, scope resolution operator, access qualifiers,
instance creation, member functions, function prototyping, function compone
nts, passing parameters, call by reference, return by
reference, in line function, default arguments, overloaded function. Array of objects, pointers to objects, this pointer, dyn
amic
allocation operators, dynamic objects. Constructors, parameterized const
ructors, overloaded constructors, constructors with default
arguments, copy constructors, static members and static objects as arguments, returning objects, friend function and friend c
lass.




(8)








OPERATOR OVERLOADING:

Operator function, overloading unary and binary operator, overloading the operator using friend
function.












(2)


INHERITANCE:

Defining derived class, single inheri
tance, protected data with private inheritance, multiple inheritance, multi level
inheritance, hierarchical inheritance, hybrid inheritance, multipath inheritance, constructors in derived and base classes, a
bstract
classes.












(
3
)


INTRODUCTION TO DATA STRUCTURES:

Abstract data types, primitive data structures, analysis of algorithms, notation.
(3)










ARRAYS:

Operations, implementation of one, two and multi dimensioned arrays,

different types of array applications.


(
3)


STRINGS:

Implementation, Operations, applications
.






(
1
)


STACKS:

Primitive operations, sequential implementation, applications. Rec
ursion definition, process and implementation using
stacks, evaluation of expressions.










(
1
)


QUEUES:

Primitive operations, sequential implementation, applications. Priority queues, dequeues.




(1)



SORTING:

Insertion sort, selection sort, bubble sort, heap sort, radix sort algorithms and analysis.




(3)


Total

28

REFERENCES:

1.

Bjarne Stroustrup, ''The C++ Progra
mming Language", Addison Wesley, 2004
.

2.

Stanley B Lippman and Josee Lajoie, "The C++ Primer", Addison Wesley, 2005

3.

Harvey M Deitel and Paul J Deitel, "C++ How to Program", Prentice Hall, 2007

4.

Aaron M Tanenbaum, Moshe J Augenstein and Yedidyah Langsam, "Da
ta structures using C and C++", Prentice Hall of India,
2005

5.

Sahni Sartaj, "Data Structures, Algorithms and Applications in C++", Universities Press, 2005.

6.

Nell Dale, "C++ Plus Data Struct
ures", Jones and Bartlett, 2006

7.

Mark Allen Weiss, “Data Structures
and Algorithm Analysis in C++", Addison
-
Wesley, 2006.

8.


Robert L Kruse and Clovis L Tondo, “Data Structures and Program design in C", Pearson Education, 2005