Body-Swap Illusion AnsKey - EAPResources

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14 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 11 μήνες)

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rawY2VzN4
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c&feature=related


Answer Key: Body
-
Swap Illusion 2:11

/18

1.

illusion

2.

virtual reality

3.

classical

4.

psychology

5.

perceptual

6.

perception

7.

goggles

8.

swa
pping

9.

mannequin

10.

panic

11.

makeshift

12.

artificial

13.

gender

1.

Where did the research project occur?

1



Sweden

2.

What was project leader Dr. Henrik Ersson interested in studying?
What did he hope to learn more from this?

2



perceptual illusions



normal perception

3.

Take note
s on the steps taken in the first part of the research
experiment

4



volunteers wear virtual reality goggles



researchers brush a pen against the participant’s stomach



at the same time, they brushed a pen against the dummy’s
stomach



this creates the illusion

for participants that the mannequin’s
body was their own

4.

How did researcher Andrew Ketterer explain what happened to

him?

2



his brain rewires the visual information so that you perceive

the mannequin’s body as his own

5.

Did Ketterer feel pain when the rese
archers slid the knife against
the mannequin? Explain.

2



no



he had an automatic reaction to pull away

6.

Take notes on the second part of the experiment.

4



volunteers wore a headset



headset connected to cameras mounted on scientist’s hat



then they faced each

other and shook hands



volunteers perceived they were shaking hands with themselves



person perceived another body as his/her own



happened even for opposite gender or artificial body

7.

What can the findings of this research be used for?

1



research on body ima
ge disorders



develop more advanced versions of computer games

Tapescript:

Shaking hands with yourself may seem like an amusing out
-
of
-
body
experience, the illusion of having your stomach slashed with a kitchen
knife, not so much. But both sensations felt r
eal to most participants in
a Swedish project that some say is opening new doors on virtual
reality.

Dr. Henrik Ersson:

“They’re interested in knowing how we come to
experience that we own our body, and to do that
we have taken a classical approach in psyc
hology.
We study perceptual illusions, and by studying
these illusions we learn more about normal
perception.”

In the experiments volunteers wearing virtual reality goggles
experience the illusion of swapping bodies with a mannequin and a
real person. Rese
archers first brushed a pen simultaneously against
the participant’s stomach and the dummy’s. That creates the illusion
for participants that the mannequin’s body was their own.

Andrew Ketterer:

“Your brain sort of rewires... uh, the visual
information and

then once she start


when she
started brushing the pen against my stomach, I
mean, it just snapped like that so I viewed the
mannequin’s body as being my body.”

Then researchers slid a knife across the dummy’s body.

Ketterer:

“You have the reaction, ‘cau
se she’s not


it’s not like she’s
trying to stab me with it, but you do have the reaction to just
sort of pull away a little bit, because she


I mean, it really
seems like she’s about to


put something sharp against my
stomach ... um, not panic or anyth
ing like that, but it’s just
an automatic kind of ... ‘what?!’ startled response.”

In another experiment, volunteers wore a headset that was connected
to cameras mounted on a makeshift hat that a scientist wore. Then
they faced each other, extended their r
ight arms and shook hands.
Many participants said it felt like they were shaking hands with
themselves. Researchers said the study found under certain conditions
a person can perceive another body as his or her own. That happened
even if it’s of an opposit
e gender or artificial body. There’s hope that
the findings could be used in research on body image disorders, or to
develop more advanced versions of computer games. Ed Donahue, the
Associated Press.