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MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 02139

2.001 MECHANICS AND MATERIALS I

Fall 2008

Instructor: Professor Carol Livermore, Room 3-449C; 253-6761; livermor@mit.edu

Units: (3-2-7)

Lectures: Monday and Wednesday 11:00-12:30; Room 1-190

Livermore Office Hour: Monday 2:00-3:00

Recitations: Rec 1: Thursday 9:00-10:30, Room 1-307 (Prof. J.H. Williams, Jr.)
Rec 2: Thursday 11:00-12:30, Room 1-307 (Prof. J.H. Williams, Jr.)
Rec 3: Thursday, 1:00 – 2:30, Room 1-307 (Prof. J.H. Williams, Jr.)
Rec 4: Thursday, 3:00 – 4:30, Room 1-307 (Prof. Anette Hosoi)
Rec 5: Friday 9:00-10:30, Room 1-307 (Prof. Anette Hosoi)
Rec 6: Friday 11:00-12:30, Room 1-307 (Prof. Anette Hosoi)

Supporting Materials
:

Texts:
Required: (available at the COOP)
1. Mechanics of Materials. Seventh Edition: R.C. Hibbeler, Pearson Prentice Hall,
2007. (With some care, you should be able to work with a sixth edition copy
instead.)
2. Roadmap to 2.001, Simona Socrate. Available on Stellar.
3. Handouts
Recommended:
4. An Introduction to the Mechanics of Solids. Second Edition: S.H. Crandall, N.C.
Dahl, T.J. Lardner, McGraw Hill, 1978.

Prerequisites: 8.01, 18.02

Corequisites: 18.03
Note: Pre- and Co- requisites are strictly enforced.

Subject Summary:
This course provides an introduction to the mechanics of solids with applications to
science and engineering. We emphasize the three essential features of all mechanics
analyses, namely: (a) the geometry of the motion and/or deformation of the structure, and
conditions of geometric fit, (b) the forces on and within structures and assemblages; and
(c) the physical aspects of the structural system (including material properties) which
quantify relations between the forces and motions/deformation.

Learning Objectives:
1. Model (idealize) simple structural elements under load. This includes modeling the
element geometry, the loading conditions, and the constraints enforced by the supports
or by adjacent structural elements.

2. Analyze the models and predict their structural response: the deformations,
displacements, and rotation caused by the applied loading and constraints.

3. Explain the results obtained when analyzing models. This includes identifying how the
system’s response depends on its geometry and loading, and predicting the results of
changing the geometry or loading.

4. Explain the meaning and significance of 2.001 concepts to “intelligent non-experts”.

Web Resources:
All handouts, problem sets and solutions will be available on Stellar at
http://stellar.mit.edu/S/course/2/fa08/2.001/.

The Stellar site will also serve as a message board for announcements about the class. If
you preregistered for the course, you should already have access to the website (you will
need certificates). If you have difficulties accessing the website, please send an email to
the TAs.

Lectures:
Each week, the class will meet on Mondays and Wednesdays 11:00am-12:30pm in Room
1-190. Lecture is mandatory.

Recitations:
Each week (starting September 11), students will meet for a 1.5-hour recitation section
consisting of 10 - 20 students. Attendance during these sessions is mandatory. The
recitation sections will consist of additional discussion of course material, examples and
experiments. These sections serve three main purposes: (1) they provide a more informal
opportunity to explore issues and ask questions about lectures, texts, or previously
assigned material which requires clarification; (2) example problems will be presented and
discussed, and (3) they provide opportunities to further explore course topics with
experiments.

Recitation Instructors:
Prof. Anette Hosoi peko@mit.edu; x3-4337; Room 3-262
Prof. James H. Williams, Jr. jhwill@mit.edu; x3-2221; Room 3-360

Teaching Assistants:
Karolina Corin korin@mit.edu
Feras Eid feraseid@mit.edu

TA Office Hours:
The teaching assistant will be available for consultations during designated office hours.
Office hours will be Monday and Tuesday evenings 7:00-9:00pm in Room 1-307.
Teaching assistants are themselves graduate students with special constraints on their time.
Accordingly they will be available for consultations only during the advertised hours!

Problem Sets:
Problem sets will typically be handed out on Wednesdays and due the following
Wednesday. To receive credit, problem sets must be handed in at the beginning of class on
the due date. Problem sets will not necessarily be assigned every week because of tests,
holidays, etc. Late problem sets will not be accepted. The lowest problem set grade will
be dropped.

Honesty on Problem Set Assignments:
You are welcome, and encouraged, to work on the assignment problems with fellow
students. A good way to learn the material is in small study groups. Such groups work
best if members have attempted the problems individually before meeting as a group. Of
course, the assignment solution that you turn in should reflect your own understanding,
and not that of your fellow students. In other words, do not copy directly from other
students. If it is obvious that such direct copying has occurred, we will disallow that
homework.

Tests:
There will be two one and one-half hour quizzes and a three-hour final exam. These will
be closed book. Two pages of notes (one-sided) are permitted for each quiz, four pages for
the final.

Tutorials:
The TAs will hold a tutorial session one or two days before each quiz. Details will be
announced prior to each tutorial.

Grading:
Homework 13%
Quiz 1 15%
Quiz 2 25%
Recitations 12%
Final Exam 35%

RECITATION SCHEDULE

Sec. 1
(Thurs.)
Room 1-307;
9:00-10:30
Prof.
Williams
Sec. 2
(Thurs.)
Room 1-307;
11:00-12:30
Prof.
Williams
Sec. 3
(Thurs.)
Room 1-307;
1:00-2:30
Prof.
Williams
Sec. 4
(Thurs.)
Room 1-307
3:00-4:30
Prof. Hosoi
Sec. 5 (Fri.)
Room 1-307;
9:00-10:30
Prof. Hosoi
Sec. 6 (Fri.)
Room 1-307;
11:00-12:30
Prof. Hosoi
Sept. 11 Sept. 11 Sept. 11 Sept. 11 Sept. 12 Sept. 12
Sept. 18 Sept. 18 Sept. 18 Sept. 18 Sept. 19 Sept. 19
Sept. 25 Sept. 25 Sept. 25 Sept. 25 Sept. 26 Sept. 26
Oct. 2 Oct. 2 Oct. 2 Oct. 2 Oct. 3 Oct. 3
Oct. 9 RFQ Oct. 9 RFQ Oct. 9 RFQ Oct. 9 RFQ Oct. 9 RFQ Oct. 9 RFQ
Oct. 16 Oct. 16 Oct. 16 Oct. 16 Oct. 17 Oct. 17
Oct. 23 Oct. 23 Oct. 23 Oct. 23 Oct. 24 Oct. 24
Oct. 30 Oct. 30 Oct. 30 Oct. 30 Oct. 31 Oct. 31
Nov. 6 RFQ Nov. 6 RFQ Nov. 6 RFQ Nov. 6 RFQ Nov. 7 RFQ Nov. 7 RFQ
Nov. 13
cancelled
Nov. 13
cancelled
Nov. 13
cancelled
Nov. 13
cancelled
Nov. 14
cancelled
Nov. 14
cancelled
Nov. 20 Nov. 20 Nov. 20 Nov. 20 Nov. 21 Nov. 21
Dec. 4 Dec. 4 Dec. 4 Dec. 4 Dec. 5 Dec. 5

Nov. 27 & 28 = Thanksgiving holiday – no recitation this week
RFQ – Review for Quiz

LECTURE SCHEDULE

(An approximate lecture schedule is given below with text reading assignments listed)

Statics - Elements of equilibrium (Hibbeler 1.1-1.2)
Date Lecture Contents
Sept. 3
Wednesday
1 Course outline. Review of forces and moments.
Equilibrium equations for a rigid body.
Sept. 8
Monday
2 Equilibrium of a deformable body. Free body
diagrams. Reactions at supports. Internal forces.
Linearity and superposition.
Sept. 10
Wednesday
3 Distributed applied loads and resultants. Multi-part
structures. Reactions at joints. Two-force members.
Planar trusses (method of joints).
Sept. 15
Monday
4 Friction

Slender structural members (bars) in uniaxial loading (1.3 – 1.4, 2.1 – 2.2, 3.1 – 3.4,
4.2 – 4.3)
Date Lecture Contents
Sept. 17
Wednesday
5 Stress and strain in uniaxial loading. Young’s
modulus.
Sept. 22
Monday
Student holiday – No classes
Sept. 24
Wednesday
6 Axially loaded slender members: Axial force diagram.
Axial force  axial stress  axial strain 
elongation
Sept. 29
Monday
7 Inhomogeneous structures: effective section properties
of composite bars. Elongation vs. displacement:
compatibility and boundary conditions



Statically indeterminate structures (Hibbeler 4.4 – 4.5)
Date Lecture Contents
Oct. 1
Wednesday
8 Introduction to statically indeterminate structures with
axially-loaded deformable members.
Oct. 6
Monday
9 Statically indeterminate structures with axially-loaded
deformable members: the displacement method and
the force method.

Stress tensor, strain tensor, and an introduction to constitutive relations (Hibbeler
1.5, 3.4 – 3.6, 4.6, 10.6)
Date Lecture Contents
Oct. 8
Wednesday
10 Normal and shear stress. Stress tensor. Equilibrium.
Displacement field. Axial and shear strain. Strain
tensor. Introduction to constitutive relationships.
Oct. 13
Monday
Columbus
Day
(Holiday)
Oct. 15
Wednesday
11 Quiz 1 (in class)
Oct. 20
Monday
12 Elasticity and isotropy. Hooke’s law. Linear isotropic
thermal expansion.
Oct. 22
Wednesday
13 Plane stress vs. plane strain. Stress and strain in
cylindrical coordinates.

Cylindrical, thin-walled pressure vessels (Hibbeler 8.1)
Date Lecture Contents
Oct. 27
Monday
14 Cylindrical thin-walled pressure vessels. Internal
pressure  stress  strain  deformation.
Statically indeterminate configurations.

Circular shafts in torsion (Hibbeler 5.1 – 5.2, 5.4 – 5.5)
Date Lecture Contents
Oct. 29
Wednesday
15 Torsion of axisymmetric shafts. Torque shear
stress field  shear strain field  angle of twist.
Structural response. Polar moment of inertia.
Nov. 3
Monday
16 Inhomogeneous structures: effective section properties
of composite shafts. Compatibility and boundary
conditions. Statically indeterminate structures with
torque-loaded deformable members.
Nov. 5
Wednesday
17 Quiz review
Nov. 10
Monday
Veteran’s
Day
Holiday
Nov. 12
Wednesday
18 Quiz 2 (in class)



Slender beams in bending (Hibbeler 6.1 – 6.6, 12.1 – 12.3, 12.5-12.7, 12.9)
Nov. 17
Monday
19 Introduction to beam bending. Conventions for
internal resultants. Shear Force and Bending Moment
diagrams: FBD method and differential relations.
Nov. 19
Wednesday
20 Bending moment axial stress field  axial
strain field  curvature. Structural response. Area
moment of inertia.
Nov. 24
Monday
21 Inhomogeneous structures: effective section properties
of composite beams.
Nov. 26
Wednesday
22 Beam deformation. Relationship of slope and
deflection to curvature. Compatibility and boundary
conditions. Beams with variable bending moment.
Dec. 1
Monday
23 Symmetry and superposition in beam bending.
Statically indeterminate structures with deformable
beams in bending.

Stress and strain transformations (Hibbeler 9.1 – 9.7, 10.1 – 10.4, 10.7)
Date Lecture Contents
Dec. 3
Wednesday
24 Transformation of the Cartesian components of the
stress tensor in a rotated reference frame. Mohr’s
Circle. Principal stresses, principal directions, and
maximum shear stress.
Dec. 8
Monday
25 Strain transformation. Yield and failure criteria.
Dec. 10
Wednesday
26 Example problems; review for final.