Science Fair Project Guide 2013-2014x - Mater Academy ...

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Mater Academy Middle/High


Science Fair Assignment Packet


For the 2011
-
2012

school year






To: Students and Parents

From:
Kenneth Schorr
, Science Fair Coordinator

And the Mater Academy Science Teachers


The

problem, materials, hypothesis
and

background information will be due
September
19
-
20, 2013
, and the Final Project wi
ll be due on or before October
15
-
16, 2013
.
NO late
projects

will be accepted.
This is a MANDATORY
ASSIGNMENT

for all middle school students, which will be worth 10 grades.


This packet outlines the details and requirements of the science fair project
assignment.
Included

in this packet are the required forms
, an explanation of
each part of the scientific proces
s,

the directions for the journal, report, and
PowerPoint/board
, and a judging rubric that will be used by the Science Fair
judges to evaluate each project
.


This year we are requiring a PowerPoint presentation instead of a display
board. The top 5 best

projects for each teacher will be selected for the science
fair and will receive the assistance of the teacher to create their display board.


Students are responsible to select a topic which they would like to investigate.
They will be graded on project
s in individual parts and as a whole. The 10
grades will go into their first 9 weeks grading term. Creativity and
individuality will definitely help their grades
.


Final Drafts need t
o be turned in using a folder.
Your report, PowerPoint
presentation, an
d journal should all have your name on them and be placed
into the folder, which should also have your name on it.


BE SURE TO SAVE ALL OF YOUR WORK ON A FLASH DRIVE, AS
YOU WILL HAVE TO PRESENT IT IN CLASS USING YOUR
POWERPOINT PRESENTATION.






Science Fair Checklist


Use this checklist to keep track of what you have done and what you need to do.


o

Journal

o

Title

o

Problem Statement

o

Background Information

o

Hypothesis

o

Materials

o

Procedures

o

Control

o

Variables

o

Data

o

Results

o

Conclusion

o

Applications

o

Abstract

o

Bibliography



o

Report


o

Power

P
oint


o

Science Fair Forms

(see Teacher Website)


o

Form1

o

Form 1A (with research plan)

o

Form 1B

o

Abstract



Getting Started


Start a Journal



ALL projects require a journal. The journal is where you will keep all of your
information and data to write the report and make your PowerPoint presentation.




Things to write in your journal (IN THIS ORDER)



1.

TITLE:

Every project needs a title. It lets people know what you have worked on. The title
should be in the form of a statement, unless you use the problem statement as your title. Then it
should be in the form of a question.

Example:
Which soap powder is the

best cleaner of catsup stains?

Example:
Cleaning power of soap powders.

2.

PROBLEM STATEMENT:

The problem statement is always written in the form of a question,
even if it is also used as the title. The question tells people what you are trying to find out
.
Example:
Which type of water will help a bean plant germinate the fastest?

3.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION/RESEARCH:

You must complete research related to your
project. It must be in your own words and you must use a minimum of
five

different resources.
Ideall
y, you should go to the library or internet and learn everything you can on your topic.
Observe related events. Gather existing information on your topic. Look for unexplained or
unexpected results. Also, talk to professionals in the field, write or em
ail the companies for
specific information, and obtain or construct needed equipment.

You MUST document your sources correctly in your journal. Please be sure to write in the
bibliography information with each of your sources (see below for more details o
n how to do
this). Each source needs to be written on its own page in your journal with the bibliography
information written with it.

The summery of all of the sources is what you will put into your
report. In your journal, each source should be written

out separately. Be sure to put it in your
own words by summarizing each source. Anything directly quoted should have quotation marks
around it.

4.

HYPOTHESIS:

After gathering information about your topic, you should make a guess about
what you think the an
swer to your question may be. State your hypothesis

in the If/then format,
using the independent and dependent variables to predict the outcome.


Examples:
If I fingerprint 50 different people, then the loop fingerprint will be the most
common.

If I
give bean plants either Pepsi, milk, or lemonade, then the one with the milk will grow the
tallest.

Once you have stated your hypothesis, you can carry out an experiment and collect data.

5.

MATERIALS:

What did you use? List all of the items you used. Tell
how many and how much.

Examples:
20mL of spring water 20mL of tap water 20mL of pond water 12 bean
plants 12 cups for plants 30mL of soil for each plant

6.

PROCEDURES:

List all of the steps of your experiment in the order you w
ill perform them. Be
specific, but try not to make it complicated. The experiment should be repeated
at least

3 times.
The more the tests are repeated, the more accurate your results will be. During experimentation,
keep detailed notes of each and ever
y experiment, measurement, and observation.
Do not rely
on your memory
.
They need to be written into your project journal
. This is your most treasured
piece of work. Accurate and detailed notes make a logical and winning project. Good notes
show consi
stency and thoroughness and will help you when writing your research paper.

7.

CONTROL:

In every experiment, there is a control group. The control group has no variables
added. You use this information to compare your results with.

8.

VARIABLES:

Any item or
factor in your experiment that is changed in order to solve your
problem statement is a variable.

Independent Variable


Manipulated variable (the one you decided to change)



There should
only be one!

Dependent Variable


Responding variable (the one that responded to the change you made.)

9.

DATA:

This is what you are measuring. You will record your data into a data table, and
represent your data with charts, graphs, etc…

Observations are an important part of your data.
Don’t forget to write down what you observe using your senses.

Data must be in the form of
numerical (quantitative) data. This means you must have numbers that you can put into a data
table and make a graph(s) with.

When creating graphs, please remember
the words DRY MIX. This stands for:

D


dependent variable

R


responding variable

Y


Y
-
axis


M


manipulated variable

I


independent variable

X


X
-
axis


This means that the dependent (responding) variable always goes on the Y
-
axis and the
independent
(manipulated) variable always goes on the X
-
axis


10.

RESULTS:

State the findings of the experiment based upon the data you observed and analyzed.
Record the results.
This is a written explanation of what happened with your data. Be detailed.

11.

CONCLUSION:

Y
our conclusion should begin with a statement on whether or not the results
supported your hypothesis. Include a description of problems that might have affected the
results and why. Also include any new discoveries that you have made in addition to the r
esults
of the experiment.

12.

APPLICATIONS:

State
how you could use this information
in real life.

13.

ABSTRACT:


COMPLETE PROJECT TITLE (all in capital letters, as it appears on the project)

Student’s name (Last name, First name, Middle initial if used)

A.

Purpose

B.

Hypothesis

C.

Procedure

(summary only)

D.

Results

(summary only)

E.

Conclusions

THE ABSTRACT SHOULD BE 250 WORDS MAXIMUM
.


14.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

List
(Cite)
the sources that you used. Follow the example for the working
bibliography below.

Use APA format.

Books

:
Hyman, Sidney.
(1985).
The American President.

New York: Collins,

p.
146
.


Encyclopedia
:
Strong, David.
(1991).
“Australia”.
World Book.

Volume 26,
p
p. 296
-
301
.


CD ROM Encyclopedia
:
“Witches”.
(1996).
Encarta.

Version 7.2 CD
-
ROM. Chicago, Illinois
:
Encart
a.

Internet

To cite files from the internet, give the author’s name, last name first (if known)

followed by first
initial only
;
the date of the document or last revision (if available) or the retrieved date;
the full
title of the work (in quotation marks)

or the title of the web page if no title is available
; the title
of the complete work (if applicable)
, in italics; any version or file numbers

(if available)
;
and
the
protocol (i.e. “http”) and the
full URL
.


Merka, L
.
(1993).
“A Hypertext History of Multi
-
User Dimensions.”
MUD History.

http://www.utopia.com/talent/lpb/muddex/essay



If author is unknown:


_____. (1993). “A Hypertext History of Multi
-
User Dimensions.”
MUD History.

http://www.utopia.com/talent/lpb/muddex/essay



If published date is unknown:


Merka, L. (Retrieved 2010). “A Hypertext History of Multi
-
User Dimensions.”
MUD History.

http://www.utopia.com/talent/lpb/muddex/essay



** The Journal does not have to be perfect. Do not worry
about whiting out things. Please just draw a line
through what you want to change a
nd write on a new
page.

Write Your Report



Your report should be written in the format shown below. Be sure to follow all directions and
answer all questions related to each section.



Your report should be written AFTER your experiment is completed, and AFT
ER you have all
information required in your Journal. Your journal is your guide to writing your report.


REPORT

INSTRUCTIONS:


Your report should be typed using standard style (i.e. “Times New Roman”), size 12 font
and printed in black ink.

You should h
ave 1

inch margins all the way around. It should be
put together neatly in the order written below. Each section should be clearly labeled.
Make sure each section in on a separate sheet of paper.
The
rough draft of the
report
and
the data/graphs will b
e turned in no later than September 17th
.

Your final draft of your
report should be
AT LEAST

11

pages long, since you h
ave 10 sections for your report
, and
the background information needs to be at least 2 pages
. The final draft should be placed
in a fol
der with the printout of your PowerPoint presentation and your journal.


I.

Title Page



Center the project title, then put your name, address, school, and grade
at the bottom right.

II.

Table of Contents


Include a page number for the beginning of each section.

III.

Introduction


The introduction sets the scene for your report. The introduction
includes your hypothesis, an explanation of what prompted your research, and what
you hoped to achieve.

IV.

Background information


This is where you write up the research you
completed
on your project,
in your own words!!!


If your research is not in your own words, you
will automatically be given an “F” on this section of your project.

Be sure to cite
your sources for anything you paraphrase from someone else’s documents or f
or what
you quote directly! To cite your source in your writing, use the following format:

(Author last name, date, page # or shortened website)

Example:
(Smith, 2010, pg 10) or (Smith, 2010,
www.abc.com
)



Be sure to put into “quotes” anything that is word for word from the source,
however this should be limited to statistics like:
“One in every 5 girls will get
pregnant before they reach 18 years old” (Smith, 2010,
www.abc
.com
).


** The full citing goes in the bibliography section of your report.


V.

Experiment


Describe
in detail

the
procedures

used to collect your data or make
your observations. Your procedures should be detailed enough so that someone
would be able to r
epeat the experiment from the information you gave.
This can be
written in step format instead of paragraph form.
Include detailed photographs or
drawings of self
-
designed equipment.

VI.

Discussion


The discussion is the essence of your paper. The results
and
conclusions should flow smoothly and logically from your data. Be thorough. Allow
your readers to see your train of thought, letting them know exactly what you did.
What observations did you make?
Compare your results. Include a discussion of
poss
ible errors. How did the data vary between repeated observations of similar
events? How were your results affected by uncontrolled events? What would you do
differently if you repeated this project? What other experiments should be
conducted?

(Be sure

to both describe your results and answer the questions above for
this section)

VII.

Conclusion


Briefly summarize your results. Be specific, do not generalize.
Never introduce anything in the conclusion that has not already been discussed.

Your
conclusion
should begin with a statement on whether or not the results supported your
hypothesis. Include a description of problems that might have affected the results and
why. Also include any new discoveries that you have made in addition to the results
of the e
xperiment.

VIII.

Acknowledgements


You should always credit those who assisted you,
including individuals, businesses, and educational or research institutions. Identify
any financial support or material donations received, but do not put on display board.

IX.

B
ibliography

X.

Abstract



Typed on the Abstract Form



Sample
A
bstract


COMPLETE PROJECT TITLE (all in capital letters, as it appears on the project)

Student’s name (Last name, First name, Middle initial if used)



周q⁦潬汯睩湧⁰a牴猠獨潵汤l
扥⁩湣汵摥搠楮⁡渠d扳瑲ac琺




PURPOSE:


Why is the research being done?


2.

HYPOTHESIS:

What is the expected outcome of the research?


3.

PROCEDURE:

Briefly, in paragraph form, describe the materials used and
how the experiment w
as done. This section should not be a
list, but a summary of your methods.


4.

RESULTS:

Briefly summarize the data from charts and graphs in
narrative form. Be sure to include measures of central
tendency and variation. Include only info
rmation collected
during the study. (Do
NOT

include previous years’ results).




CONCLUSIONS:

Briefly, in narrative form, cite interpretation of the results.
Briefly, compare findings with other research. Include
suggestions for procedural improvements and

recommendations for future study, as well as applications
for the research.




THE ABSTRACT SHOULD BE APPROXIMATELY 250 WORDS AND FIT IN THIS
SPACE. THE BOX IS NOT SUPPOSED TO BE PART OF THE ABSTRACT, IT SERVES
ONLY AS A GUIDE.



Create Your PowerPoint



Your PowerPoint should be created after your experiment is done, and after your report is
typed.



The PowerPoint presentation is an OUTLINE of your project. It SHOULD NOT be the
same as the report.



The PowerPoint should only contain the basic information
of your project, the details
should be explained in the report.



You should have 1 slide for each of the following:

o

Title Page that includes your name, grade, and period number

o

Problem Statement

o

Hypothesis

o

Materials

o

Procedures

o

Variables/Constants

o

Data


Cha
rts, graphs, data tables

o

Results


this is a summary describing your data in words

o

Conclusion

o

Application

o

Pictures



Science Fair Forms


**All Projects need the following forms:

Form 1, Form 1A (with research plan), Form 1B, and the Abstract








GRADING WILL BE AS FOLLOWS:

(This project is worth 10 grades!)

1.

Project section 1 through 5



(
2 Grades
)
do you have all the parts? Is it a feasible
project? This is due September 2
nd

and is a rough draft.

2.

Project Sections 6

through 8


(
2 Gra
des
) this is the experiment portion of your
project. Is it detailed? Is it logical? Is it easily followed? Be sure to include all
information from the experiment and any information that resulted from the experiment.

3.

Project Section 4


this is the resear
ch paper section. Did you do accurate research?
Does the research reflect your experiment? Is the paper in your own words? Is the paper
cited correctly?


REMEMBER THAT IF IT IS NOT IN YOUR OWN WORDS,
YOU WILL AUTOMATICALLY BE GIVEN AN “F”!!
-

Needs to
be at least 2
pages.

4.

Project Section 9


Bibliography


This section should be alphabetical. Be sure to
make sure you use the format listed in the project outline. Be sure to list ALL sources
that you used in your research, and for your project in this s
ection.

5.

Powerp
oint Presentation



do you have all the parts? Is it evident that you did it and
not your parents?

6.

Report Organization



Is it organized correctly? Is it typed and formatted correctly?
Are all sections on their own sheet of paper? Are all
the sections labeled correctly and
clearly?


(As described in the project outline)

7.

Project Section 10


Abstract and Forms


Should be approx. 250 words and include
required information, and typed onto the Abstract Form. All forms should be included


For
m 1, 1A (with research plan), 1B, and Abstract form

8.

Project Journal

-

Does the notebook contain all information? Is it complete? Is it
detailed?