Cat_single_cage_cleaning_protocols_2011 (1)x - DLSMProject

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14 Δεκ 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 10 μήνες)

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Cat cage cleaning protocols

for single compartment housing

Ideally cats should be housed in double compartment cages or walk
-
in runs or rooms that permit easy
cleaning without disruption of the cat. Even for cats housed in single compartment cages, “spot
cleaning” can be effective provided the cages are not too me
ssy. Placing hiding boxes in cages can
facilitate this by giving the cat a place to hang out while the cage is tidied up. More information on “spot
cleaning” is available on our
website
. If spot cleaning is not possible but there are sufficient cages to

assign two per cat, assigning
two cages that go together
(above/below or adjacent)

is more ideal than
swapping cats to
the next open cage or
a facing cage bank
,

or putting cats in carriers during cleaning
, as
it
allows all clean work to be combined, and “
dirty” work to be accomplished after cat handling is
complete. This also
permits less handling of the cats

during cleaning

(and therefore less
stress and
contamination through fomite spread). Cages that go together should be given the same number.
(This
p
rotocol was written for a shelter that used Trifectant®, but any safe parvocidal disinfectant with
moderate to good detergent qualities could be used.)

For shelters that aren’t able to spot clean and
don’t have two cages per cat, a one cage/one carrier
per

cat protocol is provided below.


Regardless of the cleaning method used, a few things to always do/remember

Put on protective clothing (e.g. jumpsuit, smock, over
-
size t
-
shirt) and other protective gear as
needed. Remove this when you are done cleaning an
d before going on with your day.

Walk through the room and observe each cat. If there is any sign of illness in cats housed in
healthy cat areas, mark that cage
(e.g.
with a laminated “medical alert” tag
)

and do not clean
that cage until all other cleanin
g has been completed. Signs of illness include eye or nasal
discharge, depression or lethargy , vomit, diarrhea or blood in the cage.

Remember that cleaning can be a very noisy and stressful time for cats. Open and close cage
doors, remove and replace food

bowls, set down litter pans, etc. as quietly as possible. Avoid
raucous music or wear earphones.

Two cage per
cat
daily
cleaning protocol

1.

Stock a cleaning cart with Trifectant®
*

sprayer, paper towels,
extra bedding

and a bucket with water
and soap.

2.

P
ut
on a clean smock or gown.

3.

Put on a clean pair of gloves.

4.

Remove each healthy cat in the cage bank from its cage and place it into the clean
cage
next to the
current
cage. If the cat has any bedding or toys, move these to the clean cage with the cat unless

they are heavily soiled. Rinse and replace water dishes if not heavily soiled, or provide fresh water
dishes.

5.

Once all healthy cats have been moved, move any unhealthy looking cats. Change gloves
between
and
after moving unhealthy cats.

6.

Remove and discar
d all soiled paper, litter pans and used food dishes into trash. Stack used food
dishes on the cart. Put dirty bedding in the laundry hamper.

7.

Sweep debris out of any heavily soiled cages using paper towels or hand broom and dust pan.

8.

Using the Trifectant
® spray or squirt bottle spray all empty cages including all surfaces and doors.
Wipe all surfaces with a paper towel to remove any smeared on dirt or debris. Spray again with
Trifectant® and wipe with a paper towel.

9.

Line the cages with clean newspaper i
f desired

10.

Place a fresh dish of dry food in the cage.

11.

Remove soiled scrub top or gown and change into a clean pair of gloves before moving on to
another cage bank.

12.

Clean and mop the floor as usual.

13.

When you are done cleaning, spray and wipe around cart h
andle or any surface that has been
touched throughout the cleaning procedure using hand sprayer with disinfectant and paper towel.

14.

Transport soiled blankets to laundry, soiled dishes to kitchen.

15.

Restock cart.

16.

Spot clean cages throughout the day as neede
d.


* This shelter happened to use Trifectant
, but any disinfectant with moderate detergent activity and
reliable inactivation of un
-
enveloped viruses could be used in its place. If bleach or related products are
used, or for cages between use by different cats, surfaces should be pre
-
cleaned with de
tergent and
water followed by application of disinfectant.



Cat cage cleaning when neither spot cleaning nor two
-
cage
-
per
-
cat is feasible


Cat cage cleaning when neither of the above options is available is a difficult proposition and there is no
perfect answer.
P
lacing a cat in a holding cage while
its

cage is cleaned, then replacing the cat in its cage
and putting another cat in the same ho
lding ca
ge can lead to significant disease spread. It is unlikely that
the holding cage can be thoroughly disinfected between each use, and even if an effort is made, unlikely
that sufficient contact time and drying can be achieved. Cage cleaning in a “jig
saw puzzle” fashion, that
is cleaning one cage, moving a cat into it, then cleaning the just vacated cage and moving another cat
into it is likely to also result in some disease spread, at least between the cat that has just occupied the
cage and the one t
hat has just arrived. This can be reduced by using a “move down one” method
wherein one cage is left open at the end of each bank, and cats are moved one cage to the left or right
each day. Clip
-
on cage numbers or numbered clipboards can be moved with the
cats so the actual
number on the cage remains the same. However, this method has the considerable disadvantage that
each cat needs to adjust to a new cage every day, a process that
multiple studies have

directly linked to
activation of feline respiratory d
isease.

Another important consideration in cat cage cleaning is control of disease spread via handler contact
with soiled supplies. In the course of picking up dirty newspapers

or bedding
, emptying litter pans and
so on, the cleaning attendant’s hands
, ar
ms

and clothing become heavily contaminated.
While gloves
can be changed between cats, changing tops after cleaning each cage is of course unrealistic.
This means
either having two people clean each cat ward (it should take half as long, so no more total s
taff hours
are required) with one person assigned to handle all dirty material, and the other to handle cats and
clean supplies, or having one person put on a protective smock and gloves, go through and remove all
dirty materials, clean the cages, then cha
nge gloves and remove the smock before handling clean
supplies. After cleaning is completed, all cleaning staff should change clothing and shoes before going on
to handle animals for the rest of the day.

Some of the issues with cleaning cats in single comp
artment cages can be partially mitigated by
assigning a carrier (e.g. an airline carrier, feral cat box, or cardboard carrier) to each cat throughout its
stay. If cage size is sufficient and the style of the carrier appropriate this can stay in the cage wi
th the cat
and double as a hiding space. However, if the cage size is < 6 square feet, it may not be ideal to take up
limited floor space in which case the carriers should be stored separately but labeled for each cat. Either
way, this eliminates the need
to clean a holding area between cats. It also means one person can go
through prior to cleaning


when their clothing and arms are relatively uncontaminated


and gently
place each cat in its own carrier, changing gloves between cats. They can then go thro
ugh and complete
all cleaning
, followed by a change into a clean top before gently returning the cats to their original
cages. Carriers need only be cleaned in between cats instead of after each use, and at least cats will be
held in a somewhat familiar en
vironment during cleaning. Carriers should be placed on elevated shelves,
never stacked haphazardly, left of the floor or exposed to spraying during cleaning.

The protocol below was designed for a shelter that felt cats had to be removed from cages daily
for
effective cleaning

because transient staff or inmate
-
workers were unable to distinguish a daily spot
cleaning and more thorough “in
-
between
-
cats” protocol
.
At this shelter it was possible to move all cats
out of the room during cleaning. If cats are in

the room during cleaning, disinfectant and cleaner should
be squirted on and wiped off with single use rags or paper towels rather than using hoses and sprayers.

Sample
single compartment
cat cage cleaning protocol

1.

Stock the cart with litter pans, food a
nd dishes, paper towels, gloves and other needed supplies.

2.

Put on the smock hanging by the door inside the ward.

3.

Put on a clean pair of gloves.

4.

Remove eac
h cat in the ward from its cage

and place in its assigned carrier (cage number should
be noted on carr
ier).
Change gloves between each cat*.
Place the carriers
on the shelves
in the
hall outside the ward.

5.

Remove and discard soiled paper, dump litter pans into trash, stack used litter pans and food
dishes on the cart. Put dirty bedding in the laundry hamper
.

6.

Sweep debris out of any heavily soiled cages using the hand broom and dust pan designated for
that ward. Sweep the floor of the ward. Remove stray turds using a paper towel. (This step is not
needed if there is not much litter on the floor and the drains

can easily handle what there is.)

7.

Fill and attach the disinfectant sprayer and make sure it is set to the correct dilution.

8.

Spray all cages with disinfectant, in
cluding all surfaces and doors.

9.

Using the stiff bristled brush assigned to that ward, scrub al
l cages including doors.

10.

Spray floor with disinfectant and scrub with brush.

11.

Disconnect the disinfectant sprayer and rinse cages and floor with water.

12.

Fill the sprayer with bleach and make sure it is set to the correct dilution.

13.

Spray cages, including side
s, doors, and floor with bleach solution.

14.

Squeegee cages

or wipe dry with paper towels

if needed.

15.

Transport soiled blankets to laundry, soiled dishes to kitchen.

16.

Remove soiled smock, put on a clean pair of gloves.

17.

Place clean paper, bedding, fresh food and

water in each cage.

18.

Replace cats in th
e same cage they were in before
.

19.

Spray and wipe around doorknob using hand sprayer with disinfectant and paper towel.

20.

Restock cart.

21.

After all cleaning is completed, remove
gloves and wash hands.

*
I
deally gloves are
always changed between each cat, especially in areas housing newly
admitted, juvenile or ill cats. Cheap plastic “sandwich
-
making” gloves can be used for this
purpose. If this is not always possible, gloves should at least be changed in between housing
are
as, before and after cleaning, and after handling any cat suspected to be ill. Gloves must
be changed between each cat

whenever handling sick cats or cats that have a known
exposure to serious infectious

disease such as panleukopenia.