HTML5 - FAQS

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HTML5 - FAQS
1. What is HTML5?
2. What is a SPA (Single Page Application)?
3. Why should I be considering HTML5 as part of my mobile strategy?
4. Is HTML5 supported on all new smartphones?
5. Does HTML5 support on the device browser make my mobile web development easier?
6. How does Kony support HTML5?
7. I use a vendor who supplies me with a lot of mobile-optimized JavaScript libraries and APIs--what does Kony
One give me that they don’t?
8. HTML5 is the new standard for web--do I need to produce native applications any longer?
9. What is a ‘wrapper’ application?
10. What is a ‘hybrid’ application?
11. What features of HTML5 technology does Kony support?
12. How can I deploy HTML5 so that it’s optimized for my business needs?
13. Can I use HTML5 only for those areas of my app where the information is changing often?
14. Can you show me an example demo of how the different implementation methods Kony offers for HTML5
actually look on my phone?
15. Where can I go to find out more about HTML5 technology?
16. Is there a way I can find out what HTML5 features my browser supports ?
17. Will HTML5 support new upcoming hardware in phones such as NFC elements, barometers and such?
18. When will the HTML5 spec be complete?
19. What sorts of things are still difficult in HTML5?
20. Most phones use WebKit in their browsers so they have the same features, right?
21. What are the HTML5 security and privacy issues?
22. What are the security implications for using HTML5 for my business?
23. How does local storage work in HTML5 and what does it mean to me?
24. Will Windows Phone 7 browser work with HTML5?
25. Which browsers/devices will not support HTML5?
26. What is ‘transcoding’, and how does it relate to HTML5?
27. What is ‘scraping’ and how does it relate to HTML5?
28. Can HTML5 work with video and audio? Which types of material can I use?
29. Does HTML5 support Digital Rights Management (DRM)?
30. Does HTML5 support adaptive streaming over HTTP?
31. Where is the official W3C HTML5 FAQ?
32. Where is the WHATWG HTML5 FAQ (the “other” HTML5 standards body)?
Overview
As businesses develop and deploy HTML5 applications, there are loads of burning questions from the basic to
the strategic. The following FAQ offers detailed answers on a wide array of HTML5 topics such as:
Features & functionality of the technology
HTML5 vs. native applications (you guessed it – the answer is BOTH)
Status & outlook for ratification of the W3C standard
Development & deployment considerations
How companies can optimize HTML5 applications for their business and protect their existing investments
How the KonyOne platform and Kony’s expertise in HTML5 helps customers capitalize on this new
technology, allowing them to deploy HTML5 apps on any phone, tablet or browser they choose
How Kony supports the entire spectrum of mobile channels from SMS and mobile web through HTML5
(SPA or URL-based), wrapper apps, hybrid apps, and truly native applications on every commercially viable
operating system
Support of HTML5 is an important part of our “Write Once, Run Everywhere” platform -- regardless of how and
when features are made available to HTML5, Kony allows customers to build great mobile web, hybrid and
native applications as they see fit and take advantage of new capabilities whenever they’re available.
1. What is HTML5?
HTML5 is the latest version of HTML, and includes many new features that, until now, only native applications
have been able to support. Some functionality of HTML5, the specification of which is scheduled for
completion in 2014, has been driven by use cases from mobile phone browsers. Often ‘HTML5’ is used in the
press, media and by web companies to describe HTML, CSS and JavaScript as a basket of related technologies.
We will also use ‘HTML5’ in this sense throughout our site.
a. What is HTML?
Development tools used for the consumer web comprise those for markup - HTML (HyperText Markup
Language), style – CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) and programming (JavaScript). Browsers interpret HTML
and render the content appropriately for the user, but levels of support vary from browser to browser and
HTML can often be displayed differently.
b. What is CSS?
Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) provide the detailed formatting instructions for modern web pages as a
whole. HTML was never intended to format whole web pages or sites, only the individual elements. CSS
addresses this requirement by allowing the developer to change style in one place and have it used
throughout the whole site or a defined series of web pages. CSS3 is the latest version of CSS.
c. What is JavaScript?
Web programming is split between that which lives on the client browser and that which sits on the server.
JavaScript is an interpreted language used to program intelligence into client browser web pages.
Examples include displaying a dynamic table of data or popping up a dialog. Several third party vendors
provide access to their own JavaScript libraries and APIs which help in ensuring their functionality is
supported and implemented consistently across the different browsers.
2. What is a SPA (Single Page Application)?
A Single Page Application is a way to deploy web code (HTML, CSS and JavaScript) into a desktop, tablet or
mobile browser such that most of the UX and business logic runs completely locally in the browser without
having to request information from the server, as ‘normal’ web pages do. With HTML5 in this mix, the browser
application can look, feel and behave very much like a native application. Most SPAs download all their
client-side code on the first use (request), and then store it in a special part of the browser’s cache for
subsequent visits by the user.
Communication to the server, perhaps only for update-check purposes, is then made on an as needed basis
(directed by JavaScript) - often by way of web services - which pull dynamic application data in an analogous
way to native applications.
3. Why should I be considering HTML5 as part of my mobile strategy?
Mobile web is an important consideration for your mobile strategy, and HTML5 promises to be the new stan
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dard for mobile web on all new smartphones in the market today. HTML5 enables rich browser-based
applications which can do many of the things only native applications have been able to do in the past. For
example, HTML5 apps can access certain native hardware like GPS and local on-device storage, as well as allow
for excellent UX elements such as 3D animation, canvas drawing capabilities and more. Many additional use
cases can therefore now be supported through HTML5 browser-based apps than before, and providing users
an easy way to engage with your company without requiring them to download an app. often makes a
compelling business case.
4. Is HTML5 supported on all new smartphones?
Most new smartphones do support HTML5. The new Windows Phone 7 with its Mango IE9 browser, for
example, brings HTML5 to that operating system for the first time. HTML5 support is still an emerging basket
of technologies, however, and as such many features are implemented partially in some browsers or not at all
in others. Kony One handles these anomalies now, and will continue to do so over time as the specifications
solidify.
5. Does HTML5 support on the device browser make my mobile web
development easier?
HTML5’s support for features found until now only with native applications makes it easier to have a mobile
web UX much closer to that of a native app UX. In addition, your desktop web developers – who are already
familiar with HTML, CSS and JavaScript tools - can quickly and easily take advantage of its new features. The
kind of effort involved will really depend on the features you want to make available to your users, and the
browsers you explicitly want to test for and support. For this reason a ‘lowest common denominator’ approach
– i.e. developing for HTML5 features with the broadest support – is a popular choice. Kony One supports this
approach, but importantly also allows you full flexibility in choosing from all of HTML5’s features. This is
accomplished by your designers ensuring different browser/devices optimally take advantage of their own
unique HTML5 features, while the Kony platform handles – in a single code base - all of the various levels of
browser support for you.
6. How does Kony support HTML5?
Kony One has supported thousands of browser version combinations since its release in 2007. When HTML5-
capable browsers came onto the market, Kony added support for all of the various deployment options - and
differing levels of feature support - and we will continue to do so. Customized markup is delivered to each
HTML5-capable device browser based on its unique capabilities, so users have the best possible user
experience for their particular device, rather than being served a ‘lowest common denominator’ approach as
the only option.
7. I use a vendor who supplies me with a lot of mobile-optimized JavaScript
libraries and APIs--what does Kony One give me that they don’t?
Kony provides a world-class integrated development environment including state-of-the-art design assistance
such as a fully-featured inline debugger, Quick Preview utility, code autocomplete, cross-platform widget librar
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ies, code profiler, and cross-platform build tools integrated with manufacturers’ original device
emulators. Importantly, any third party libraries written in a different language can be easily accessed,
integrated and reused. Existing JavaScript development with libraries from products such as JQuery Mobile,
Sencha Touch, SproutCore, Node.js and others can then be leveraged across a wider mobile web channel
footprint. All Kony One development effort for the mobile web and HTML5 can then be leveraged for other
channels such as native mobile or tablet apps, social media, kiosks and more – without leaving the Kony One
Studio environment
8. HTML5 is the new standard for web--do I need to produce native applications
any longer?
That all depends on your business and your mobile strategy. Organizations often see mobile web – specifically
HTML5 and the consumer march toward faster and better smartphones – as an easy start or entry point into
the mobile world. With Kony, 100% of your investment in development for mobile web, for example, is reused
and ready if and when you decide to produce mobile native applications – whether for mobile devices, tablets,
or both. Additionally, most companies see the need to continue supporting traditional mobile web and native
applications in addition to HTML5 since not all browsers support HTML5 and its feature set continues to evolve,
insofar as there will always be browser functionality unique to particular devices – often arriving through
software updates as well as with new hardware. In the future, some companies may find that HTML5
can replace native applications for them. Others may find they still need native abilities. Kony handles the
technology for you, so you can easily change as your business changes and you don,t have to worry
about adding new development teams or rewriting any code.
9. What is a ‘wrapper’ application?
Wrapper applications are native mobile applications in which most of the functionality is handled by a web
page. The mobile web page might be produced with HTML5 or traditional, pre-HTML5 mobile web
technologies, where the ‘wrapper’ is native code which in many cases is just enough to satisfy application store
entry requirements. Some companies choose to create wrapper applications to reuse their existing mobile web
site, yet still choose to deploy native applications in the respective application stores to ensure coverage for
both discovery , an optimal UX and ultimately to let their potential consumer choose for themselves.
10. What is a ‘hybrid’ application?
Hybrid applications, sometimes called “mixed-mode” applications, are mobile wrapper applications that mix in
more native functionality alongside web functionality. For example, one tab of a hybrid application might be
implemented using native code to take advantage of native hardware such as a video camera, or a
camera-based barcode scanner library, while the rest of the application is essentially a mobile web site within a
thin application wrapper. The native components in hybrid applications, of course, require native code
development for all supporting infrastructure in the various device channels. Kony One allows you specify at
the form level exactly how it is to be deployed – either mobile web (including HTML5 as either server-fed or as
a SPA), making it easy to build and maintain hybrid applications alongside your other mobile apps.
11. What features of HTML5 technology does Kony support?
Kony supports a majority of HTML5 technology implemented in today’s mobile browsers. Supported cat
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egories include input, markup and audio/video elements, application caching with local and session
storage, CSS gradients and 2/3D transformations, browser touch events with the gesture API. In addition a
range of HTML5 JS APIs are supported including third-party JS widgets, geolocation , native JSON parsing,
hashchange and more.

12. How can I deploy HTML5 so that it’s optimized for my business needs?
Kony lets you deploy HTML5 in any combination of ways so you can do what’s right for your business. We
support HTML5 SPA and traditional server-side deployments, either or both of which can be exposed to your
users inside a mobile browser, a wrapper or a hybrid application. If your business exposes data that changes
frequently then a hybrid, server-side HTML5 deployment may be an optimal choice. For companies with slow
moving data – in addition to supporting traditional native mobile applications – deploying HTML5 as a SPA
with only occasional server chatter will be worth evaluating to ensure an excellent UX.
13. Can I use HTML5 only for those areas of my app where the information is
changing often?
Certainly. Kony supports hybrid applications which are designed to do just this.

14. Can you show me an example demo of how the different implementation
methods Kony offers for HTML5 actually look on my phone?
If you have a mobile phone with a browser which supports HTML5 (to find out – go to http://www.haz.io from
your mobile browser), visit http://html5.konylabs.net to see a basic HTML5 application, showcasing features
specific to HTML5 technologies. Then point your mobile browser to http://html5.konylabs.net/spa to see a SPA
HTML5 deployment. Note how it loads much faster the next time you visit that site, since the pages are now
cached in your browser. Kony also has a number of HTML5 applications by forward-thinking organizations such
as Scottrade and Marriott Corporation.

15. Where can I go to find out more about HTML5 technology?
Visit the W3C web site and the WHATWG sites at:
http://www.w3.org/html/wiki and http://wiki.whatwg.org/wiki respectively.
16. Is there a way I can find out what HTML5 features my browser supports ?
Although detecting HTML5 support is not an exact science, point your mobile or desktop browser to the
following sites for more information :
http://diveintohtml5.info/
http://caniuse.com/
http://haz.io
http://html5doctor.com/
https://developer.mozilla.org/
http://dev.opera.com/articles/html/
17. Will HTML5 support new upcoming hardware in phones such as NFC
elements, barometers and such?
There’s nothing in the HTML5 specification which says so – so the answer is “probably, but there’s no way to
tell.” It’s likely that browsers will implement access to some of the more popular of these components before
the standards are written, but there will be some inconsistencies. It is the nature of competitive browser
vendors to provide you the user with unique features to get you to stay with their product, and this is similar to
how most functionality has been implemented in desktop and mobile web browsers to date. Native
application developers will certainly have access to hardware first since they don’t have to wait for browser
vendors to provide this for them - this is a major reason many applications will likely be hybrid applications – to
get the best of both worlds as their business requires.
Regardless of how and when features are made available to HTML5, Kony has you covered. Build great mobile
web, hybrid and native applications as you see fit and take advantage of new capabilities as and when they’re
available.
18. When will the HTML5 spec be complete?
According to W3C, the standards body entrusted with getting it finished: “HTML5 is a work in progress. We
expect to be feature complete by May 2011. W3C is developing a comprehensive test suite to achieve
interoperability for the full specification by 2014, the target date for Recommendation. W3C’s primary goal is to
ensure that the HTML5 standard is of the highest quality and allows the creation of interoperable
implementations. The timeline in the charter is based on implementation expectations and development of
a test suite. The timeline is designed to help the industry plan for adoption. Ongoing active participation by
browser vendors, other software developers, and the community in implementation and testing will help
ensure the successful and timely roll out of the standard.”
19. What sorts of things are still difficult in HTML5?
HTML5 technology is presented through a browser - a ‘browser app’ – and as such has several aspects which
are not as optimized for user interaction as a native app. For example, very long scrolling lists run slower in
browsers even with HTML5. Accessing certain hardware like barometers, cameras, near field communication
(NFC) chips and so on is not available presently. The security of locally-stored data is still not widely adopted
as being bullet-proof with HTML5, and in general interpreted (JavaScript) and rendered (HTML and CSS) code
delivers a generally slower experience, processor-for-processor, than a compiled native app. Trying different
approaches with HTML5 deployment mixes (SPA vs. server-fed) together with providing coverage via native,
wrapper and hybrid apps continues to be good advice we hear from most of our customers
20. Most phones use WebKit in their browsers so they have the same features,
right?
Actually, no. WebKit is a common starting point for many browsers, but manufacturers often make many
changes to differentiate their browsers and optimize support for their devices, as well as basing their browser
on a WebKit build which differs from their competitors. Additionally, notable non-WebKit mobile browsers
include IE9’s Trident (in Windows Phone 7), Opera’s Presto and Firefox’s Gecko engines.

21. What are the HTML5 security and privacy issues?
According to W3C, the standards body: “Now entering its third decade, the Web has evolved from a Web of
documents into a formidable platform for networked applications that let us share information and services
over the Internet. In this highly connected environment, it is important that powerful Web applications be
designed with sensitivity to user privacy and security needs. The risks associated with modern Web
applications are familiar to the HTML5 community.
HTML5 and related specifications are being developed in W3C’s open standards process. This process allows
expert review of features along with their security and privacy implications. Rich functionality that was
previously available only through proprietary plugins is now documented in an open specification for all
experts to review and improve. We’re pleased to see the HTML5 specifications subject to rigorous public review,
since that helps make the Web a more secure environment.
Some security issues are not confined to HTML5. W3C and IETF are working closely to specify technologies and
protocol extensions to mitigate some issues (such as cross-site request forgery and cross- site scripting).”
22. What are the security implications for using HTML5 for my business?
It’s too early to tell. As with any widely-used software technology, malicious hackers will find ways to exploit
holes. Companies should evaluate security from technical and policy standpoints when they design their apps,
and build them in from scratch. For example, financial services companies may not want to deploy SPA apps at
all because hackers can read the entire source code which may give clues on how to compromise access. Native
applications, however, which are compiled, are more difficult to reverse engineer or read. Unnecessarily expos
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ing your company’s inner workings can easily be engineered out of any mobile strategy.
23. How does local storage work in HTML5 and what does it mean to me?
HTML5 enables support for caching applications locally (AppCache) and support for storing local application
data (SQLite, localStorage). The localStorage mechanism stores data in the browser with a key. SQLite uses the
browser to store data in a SQLite relational database. Storing data on the client is useful in many cases but, of
course, keeping sensitive or confidential data on the client might pose a security risk. In addition, maintaining
database consistency and syncing might also pose challenges from a technical and a performance perspective.
Like any tool, storing data locally won’t solve every problem and thinking these things through at the design
stage can help avoid common pitfalls arising at development or deployment time.
24. Will Windows Phone 7 browser work with HTML5?
Windows Phone 7 supports HTML5 with its new Mango update as of October 2011, through Mobile IE9. Prior
versions do not offer support.
25. Which browsers/devices will not support HTML5?
Mostolder devices don’t support HTML5 and will not be upgradeable in the future to offer such support. Refer
to sites like http://caniuse.com to see lists of browser versions that support certain HTML5 features. See also
http:///haz.io which will report which HTML5 features your browser supports.
26. What is ‘transcoding’, and how does it relate to HTML5?
Transcoding is a technique used by some mobile network carriers and private companies to dynamically
transform an entire web site (usually the desktop version) to render on a variety of devices. Challenges with
this approach relate to changes in the source web site content or structure, where errors often occur, and when
certain data are served to the browser. These problems may be very difficult to identify, reproduce and fix since
they’re data-dependent. Additionally, as user experiences through mobile, tablet and desktop channels
improve, the transcoding ‘lowest common denominator’ approach often does not satisfy increasing user
expectations.

27. What is ‘scraping’ and how does it relate to HTML5?
Scraping refers to the technique of pulling information from a web source destined for human consumption.
Mobile sites sometimes “scrape” data from the desktop web sites if web services aren’t available, and HTML5
sites can be scraped just like other web sites. Scraping requires mature technology and coordination with
source and destination web site teams to ensure stability. Kony provides robust tools for both scraping and
web services, and provides useful tools for seamlessly and painlessly migrating from scraping to web services
as your technology infrastructure improves.
28. Can HTML5 work with video and audio? Which types of material can I use?
HTML5 supports playing video and audio without the plug-in specifications required by previous HTML
versions, and in so doing offers web developers a direct way to call media without needing third party plug-ins
such as Adobe’s Flash Player or Microsoft’s Silverlight. However, not all HTML5-capable browsers support all
types of video and/or audio types, so it’s your responsibility to ensure coverage by deploying and optimizing
multiple types of video codec/containers. From an access standpoint, remember that HTML5 doesn’t yet
support accessing the mobile device’s camera hardware for still or video usage.

29. Does HTML5 support Digital Rights Management (DRM)?
The HTML5 spec is silent on DRM. The intent according to the standards body W3C is that DRM will be handled
by the codec (such as H-264, Xvid , etc.) within a client media player access experience.
30. Does HTML5 support adaptive streaming over HTTP?
According to W3C, HTML5 has left streaming to the web browsers to implement. Safari for example provides an
extension to handle streaming for the content specified by the HTML5 video element tag.
31. Where is the official W3C HTML5 FAQ?
http://www.w3.org/html/wiki/FAQs
32. Where is the WHATWG HTML5 FAQ (the “other” HTML5 standards body)?
http://wiki.whatwg.org/wiki/FAQ
About Kony
Kony enables enterprises to offer consumers and employees feature-rich mobile applications
in less time and at lower costs than any other solution. Leveraging a Write Once, Run
Everywhere single application definition, applications are designed and developed just once,
in a device-independent manner, and deployed across multiple channels, including native
applications, device-optimized mobile web, SMS, web gadgets, kiosks, and tablets. Kony’s
unique platform is proven to future-proof a company’s mobile investment by enabling
applications to be changed once for all channels, ensuring faster adoption of new operating
systems and standards as they are introduced, while eliminating maintenance, upgrade and
future development costs.
For more information, please visit www.kony.com. Connect with Kony on Twitter, Facebook
and LinkedIn.
Kony Solutions, Inc.
7380 West San Lake Road #390

Orlando, FL 32819
Tel: 1-321-293-KONY (5669)
www.kony.com
html5@kony.com
© 2011 Kony Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved. Kony and the Kony Platform are trademarks of Kony Solutions, Inc.
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