Web‐ Based Mobile Business Apps May Be Good—But Are They ...

uglyveinInternet και Εφαρμογές Web

24 Ιουν 2012 (πριν από 5 χρόνια και 1 μήνα)

498 εμφανίσεις

 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Web‐Based Mobile Business Apps May Be 
Good—But Are They Good Enough?  
www.sybase.com 
WHI TE  PAPER
 
 
 
  Web Based Mobile Business Apps May Be Good – But Are They Good Enough?   
 
 
 
Contents: 
Let’s Build a Mobile App – No Sweat!.......................................................................................................2 
A Developer’s Dilemma —Cost vs. Functionality: Looking for a Better Way............................................3 
What if Mobile Applications Were Browser‐Based Web Applications?................................................................3
 
Hybrid Applications – Putting HTML5 Apps Inside Native App Containers...............................................5 
Empowering Hybrid Applications with a Mobile Enterprise Application Platform (MEAP)..................................6
 
Advantages of  Hybrid Applications.......................................................................................................................6
 
Real Life Example: Using Hybrid Apps for Dynamic Field Surveys............................................................8 
Going Hybrid or Going Native – When It Makes The Most Sense..........................................................10 
Notes...................................................................................................................................................................11
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

  Web Based Mobile Business Apps May Be Good – But Are They Good Enough?   
 
Let’s Build a Mobile App – No Sweat! 
Consider this scenario.  
A company decides they need a mobile company directory that 
workers can access from their smartphones.  
This is a large organization in which people are on the go. When 
they’re not meeting with each other, they are meeting with 
customers. They only spend 20% of their time at their desks. In the 
course of a typical day, they share information on the fly, and they 
need to know how to contact each other. Also, this company just 
merged with another company. Management wants to get 
everybody up to speed as quickly as possible. 
Developer Bob in the IT department has been studying up on 
HTML5. A company directory seems like the perfect kind of 
application for this. The app will need to work on a couple of 
different kinds of phones, but that’s easy with an internet browser‐
based solution, and HTML5 has some great data handling functions. 
Developer Bob says to his boss, “No Sweat!” Here’s how the project 
goes: 
1. Developer Bob gets to work. His boss stops by. 
“Management says they want this by the annual company 
meeting in four weeks.” He drops a paper on Bob’s desk. 
“That’s the final tally of devices we need to support. Five 
different smartphones plus the iPad tablet.” Developer Bob 
says “OK,” but he wonders about that tablet. 
2. Bob’s boss stops by. “Turns out all the directory info is 
coming out of three different databases.” Developer Bob 
blinks. 
3. Bob’s boss stops by. “Absolutely have to have iron‐clad 
security on all that personal info. What if somebody leaves 
their phone in a taxi? Be like giving away the keys to the 
store.” Developer Bob thinks about securing data on all 
those different devices. He detects a strange emptiness in 
the pit of his stomach. 
4. Bob’s boss stops by. “We decided to add a little social 
networking to the mobile directory – to encourage 
collaboration. We want everybody to be able to build their 
own colleagues list. We also want people to be able to post 
pictures they take with their phone. Nice touch, eh? Could 
come in handy.” Developer Bob has a new twitch under 
one eye, and he notices a tremor in his left hand. 
5. Bob’s boss stops by. “Annual meeting’s coming right up. 
How’s it going Bob?” 
At this critical juncture in our story, we leave Developer Blob in a 
tight spot so we can take a closer look at some of the challenges he 
faces in building the company’s mobile directory application. 
 
  Web Based Mobile Business Apps May Be Good – But Are They Good Enough?   

 
A Developer’s Dilemma —Cost vs. Functionality: 
Looking for a Better Way  
Until recently, companies going mobile faced a choice. They could buy and customize out‐of‐the‐box mobile 
applications, or they could build their own using an integrated development environment native to the 
devices that will run their applications. 
Out‐of‐the‐box point solutions are quicker to deploy, but they have disadvantages. They often need 
customization to work just right for a particular business use case. They also have proprietary tools for 
customization, configuration, and management that are specific to the application. After deploying a few 
out‐of‐the‐box point solutions, companies find themselves spending enormous amounts of time managing 
them. 
Building your own native apps enables you to have the exact functionality you want. There is, however, a 
catch. Building native applications requires special knowledge of the languages, Software Development Kit 
tools, and device features unique to each native environment. Mobile application developers are typically 
specialists. If you need an iPhone app, you find an iOS developer. Then if you need that app to work on an 
Android device, you find an Android developer who can rebuild the application for the Android device.  
Companies envisioning their mobilized future worry over the prospect of using high‐priced specialists to 
build each application several times over, or using high‐priced resources to customize commercial 
applications for each device. This is especially true in light of today’s business imperatives: 
 Surveys show that over 50% of enterprises now support more than one mobile operating system, 
and 25% support more than three
1
, but the number could, in fact, be higher than that. There is a 
growing trend for mobile workers to bring their own devices to work. A recent survey revealed that 
over 80% of IT departments have had requests to migrate business applications to personal mobile 
devices.
2
 
 Companies who avoid development costs by buying out‐of‐the box solutions customize those apps 
70% of the time.
3
 This means customizing for all supported devices is very expensive. 
If only there was a simpler way to build mobile applications……… 
What if Mobile Applications were Browser‐Based Web Applications? 
Turning web applications into mobile apps has a certain appeal. Anyone with a browser‐enabled 
smartphone or tablet, which is pretty much any smartphone or tablet on the market today, would be able to 
run a web application. Web applications could be built once, and they would work on any mobile device 
with a browser. Also, the skills required to build web apps are much easier to find than those needed to 
build iPhone or Android or Windows Phone applications. 
It’s a nice idea, but up to now HTML, the technology used to build web pages, has been very limited in the 
way it can run applications. However, recent advances in HTML, collectively referred to as HTML5, have the 
whole industry taking a closer look. And what is the industry seeing? 
It seems that HTML5 offers a great way to build simple mobile applications that work on any device. 
However as Developer Bob found out the hard way, there can be complications. For instance: 
 Bob’s boss told him to secure the directory information that downloads to devices. Every device 
and browser handles data differently, so now he’s got to create something different for each 
device; 
 Collecting directory information from different back‐end servers is complex and time‐consuming; 
 The whole social networking feature is impossible for Bob. HTML5 doesn’t even support direct 
controls over phone hardware like cameras.  
 

  Web Based Mobile Business Apps May Be Good – But Are They Good Enough?   
 
What seemed like a straightforward project quickly evolved into something Developer Bob couldn’t handle 
with HTML5, and he has no native app developer skills. They will need to find five native application 
developers to do all this, and the cost will be huge. It’s no wonder Bob is about to go over the edge. 
Native applications and HTML5 applications each have advantages and disadvantages as summarized in the 
following table: 
Mobile Browser HTML5 Applications
Native Applications
Advantages
 Ability to provide offline data storage using the
native cache in the browser’s device, which
may be secured if the device file system is
encrypted.
 Portability of these applications between
devices lowers development costs.
 Less specialized app development skills also
lowers development costs.
 JavaScript language is cross-platform.
 Improvements over previous HTML
capabilities include: threaded performance,
more graphic capabilities, support for video
playback.
 
 Use of device specific hardware and associated
functionalities.
 Use of native SDK applications such as:
personal information management, email,
SMS, photostream, browser.
 Much larger data storage.
 Enhanced security features mean native apps
can be built more secure.
 Native apps run faster: better integration with
graphical processor, and native languages
operate much faster than JavaScript.

Disadvantages
 Limited ability to process large data volumes.
 No direct access to device specific hardware.
 No control over which devices are connecting
to the enterprise’s web server.
 End users must self-provision apps &
bookmark links; not able to send one app to all
device users at one time.
 No ability to use push messaging to distribute
notifications and content to employees.
 Not able to securely access and handle
extensive amounts of business data.
 Unable to customize the look and feel of the
HTML pages for different devices; each page
needs to be changed individually for this to
occur.

 HTML5 applications are slower than native
apps – more difficult to give the “on device”
application user experience.

 HTML5 and CSS3 are not supported on all
device platforms' browsers.

 Native apps are not compatible with other
operating systems. This means a version of the
app needs to be built for each operating system
supported by the organization.
 Collecting developer expertise for multiple
platforms can be challenging.
 Maintaining native apps on different devices
and operating systems is time consuming and
expensive.
 Trying to develop consistent content for each
supported platform on different SDKs can be
challenging.
 
Developer Bob is in a tough spot. However, there is a simpler way to solve this problem, and it doesn’t 
involve choosing between HTML5 and native applications.  
 
  Web Based Mobile Business Apps May Be Good – But Are They Good Enough?   

 
Hybrid Applications – Putting HTML5 Apps Inside 
Native App Containers 
What if you could marry a web application with a native application?  
What if you could do this so the HTML5 application can perform device specific functions through a native 
application component of some kind? If Developer Bob had something like that, he could do everything his 
boss was asking for, no sweat! 
It turns out there is such a thing, and it is called a web 
container. A web container is a native application designed 
to process generic function calls from a web application. 
This does two things: 
 It enables a generic HTML5 web app to perform 
functions that are highly specific to a particular 
device type’s hardware and data handling 
capabilities; 
 By using native app containers for each device type 
supported in a business mobility environment, it 
becomes possible to create a single HTML5 
application that performs advanced, device specific 
operations on all the different devices. 
Suddenly a single web application can have nearly the same capability as native apps created for each 
supported device. But where do all the hybrid app containers come from?  
 
 
 

  Web Based Mobile Business Apps May Be Good – But Are They Good Enough?   
 
Empowering Hybrid Applications with a Mobile Enterprise Application 
Platform (MEAP) 
Creating a container for a web application is half the solution. Containers are themselves native 
applications, and you will need as many different containers as device types you support. Managing an 
enterprise of devices, containers, and hybrid applications is nearly impossible without a mobile application 
platform having these capabilities:  
 Containers that are fully integrated into the platform environment. Not all web containers are 
created equal. An enterprise‐grade web container should: 
o tie into back‐end data and support server‐driven events, messages, and notifications; 
o manage content through a single administrative interface that is integrated with the 
platform identity and security services; 
o support single, consistent encryption across different devices. 
 Applications can be written 
in standards‐based HTML5, 
JavaScript (the standard 
scripting language used to 
create web applications), 
and CSS (Cascading Style 
Sheets – the standard style 
sheet language used to 
define the formatting and 
appearance of web pages). 
These are technologies 
familiar to web developers. 
This enables them to 
incorporate open‐source 
frameworks and also select 
their preferred development 
environment. 
 Strong application 
management capabilities 
that enable you to distribute 
applications based on 
operational roles and device types, and enforce a device and application management strategy. 
A MEAP simplifies the process of building and deploying hybrid applications. 
Advantages of Hybrid Applications 
Hybrid applications offer very specific advantages in a business mobility environment. These include: 
 Hybrid applications reduce application development costs: Hybrid applications enable developers 
with less specialized skill sets to build an application once for all the devices in a business mobility 
environment. How important is this? Research shows that building hybrid applications is about 1/3 
the cost of building equivalent functionality in native applications. In some instances, cost savings 
can be far greater than that.
4
 These savings add up when multiplied by all mobile applications and 
supported device types. 
 Hybrid applications deliver critical native enhancements to the cross‐platform benefits of HTML5 
and web applications: These include such features as push, device APIs, security, and provisioning, 
  Web Based Mobile Business Apps May Be Good – But Are They Good Enough?   

 
 Hybrid applications provide a consistent level of data security across all devices: Containers 
enable developers to use native device memory for data storage. This means you can store more 
data than would be possible with a simple web application, and the data can be stored more 
securely using techniques like data encryption.  
 Hybrid applications simplify developers' access to back‐end data: Because MEAP containers can 
have all the necessary hooks to back‐end data sources built into them, it is easy for a developer to 
connect to a corporate data source and build data rich mobile applications. 
 Hybrid applications simplify application management: As companies become more mobilized, 
they will be supporting an ever‐growing portfolio of mobile applications. Application management 
becomes a matter of some importance in a mobile enterprise. A MEAP‐based mobility strategy that 
includes app containers as part of the platform solution simplifies application management in these 
ways: 
o It becomes a simple matter 
to push new hybrid 
applications out to workers 
whose devices are already 
set up with containers. 
o In mobile business 
environments where 
companies permit personal 
liable devices (these are 
personal devices workers 
adapt for business use – 
something that surveys 
show is now done by 
nearly 60% of mobile 
workers
5
), hybrid app 
containers make it is easy 
to separate business 
applications from personal 
use applications.  
o In cases where a device is 
retired or an employee 
leaves the company, it 
becomes an easy matter to remove business applications from the device without 
affecting non‐business related features and applications. 
o Hybrid applications are easier to update. When it comes time to modify or update an 
application, the change is made once in the hybrid app and then pushed out to all the 
users and their different device types across the enterprise. 
So how can these advantages be put to practical use? Let’s look at an actual case. 
 

  Web Based Mobile Business Apps May Be Good – But Are They Good Enough?   
 
Real Life Example: Using Hybrid Apps for Dynamic 
Field Surveys 
For a major global fast food brand, maintaining food and service quality is integral to the brand and to the 
business. To keep tabs on how each of its many thousands of restaurant locations is doing, one company 
has 3500 auditors located around the world. These auditors go to restaurants, order meals, and evaluate 
the experience by answering survey questions.  
Auditors use a Windows‐based laptop running a special survey application. Each day they log in and sync 
their system. When they do this, they download a list of places they will audit, along with information 
specific to each business (such as location, contact information, and the manager’s name). They also get a 
questionnaire unique to each business. This questionnaire varies depending on factors like the country 
(language), the type of facility (not all restaurants offer exactly the same menus or services, so questions 
vary depending on the restaurant type), and the purpose of the evaluation (a food quality evaluation will 
have different questions than a facilities management evaluation). The questionnaire also has design 
features that make it fast and easy for auditors, like question trees and collapsing question categories. 
This system works pretty well, but it is showing its age. A couple of key issues: 
 The original developer is no longer going to support old technology used to build this application. 
 Survey questions are added and changed all the time. Any new solution needs to be able to 
generate the highly dynamic survey forms auditors use in the field.  
 Survey results are stored on auditors’ laptops until they log in and synch their system. Then the 
data downloads to the master database. If auditors store more than a few surveys before synching 
and downloading, data is garbled and they lose survey results. To avoid this, they sync up after 
every survey. 
 Auditors would like to use devices 
that are more portable than the big, 
clunky laptops. They would prefer to 
use tablets and smartphones to 
capture their survey data. 
One approach would be to turn the survey 
application into native applications for specific 
mobile devices. However, this would require 
building in‐house developer expertise so that 
they could maintain the ever‐changing survey 
forms. The maintenance costs would be huge. 
A new, MEAP‐based hybrid application solution 
offers a far more cost effective way to do this. 
All the back‐end data exchange is managed 
through native app containers. The dynamic 
survey, which is user interface design intensive, 
would be handled as an HTML5 web 
application. This approach has clear 
advantages: 
 Application code and logic already 
written in JavaScript or HTML can be 
cut and pasted into new hybrid apps 
built on the MEAP platform. 
  Web Based Mobile Business Apps May Be Good – But Are They Good Enough?   

 
 Generating dynamic forms and updating questions is much easier using a web application 
approach, and it does not require the company to build a whole new kind of technical expertise. 
 The survey application is totally portable to different mobile device types, like tablets and 
smartphones running web app containers. 
 The survey works whether the device is online or offline, and if the device is temporarily 
disconnected, the data is queued, then synched in the background when the connection is 
restored.  This means auditors no longer need to stop, find a place they can log in, and synchronize 
after each audit. It enables them to be more productive auditors. 
In addition to these benefits, the hybrid application approach opens the door to easily adding completely 
new capabilities, such as: 
 Pushing auditing schedules out to auditors rather than waiting for them to download a schedule. It 
also simplifies schedules changes. If an auditor is unavailable, that person’s schedule can be pushed 
to someone else. 
 Adding mapping and navigation – instead of simply posting an address as part of an auditing 
assignment, that information can now hook directly to a mapping or navigation function available 
on the mobile device. 
 Adding imagery, so auditors can photograph that poorly assembled burger or that kitchen hazard. 
This approach to field auditing is easily adaptable to other kinds of businesses, such as insurance adjusting 
and underwriting, home inspections as part of a mortgage origination process, property surveys, and any 
kind of operation that requires on‐site inspection. 
Clearly hybrid mobile applications offer unique advantages, but are they always the best approach? Are 
there times when a pure native application is the better way to go?  
 
 
10 
  Web Based Mobile Business Apps May Be Good – But Are They Good Enough?   
 
Going Hybrid or Going Native – When It Makes The 
Most Sense 
Hybrid apps make a lot of sense for many different kinds of mobile business applications. There may be 
times, though, when a native application provides some advantages. 
Hybrid applications are ideal in these situations: 
 Your organization has access to web developers, but you do not have mobile developers who 
can support multiple device operating systems. 
 You are building an application that will run across the enterprise or run on a variety of mobile 
devices. 
 The application needs to look different on different mobile devices or for different users (if, for 
instance, you have localization requirements, or you are deploying the same app to different 
businesses or divisions). 
  You need to produce the application quickly and keep development costs low. 
Pure native applications may make sense in these situations: 
 Your organization has native application development expertise readily available. 
 You are building a specialized application that will run on only one kind of device, and you have 
the expertise to develop and maintain it. 
 The application relies heavily on graphical or processing performance, such as an 
analytics/business intelligence interface. 
To realize the greatest advantage from the hybrid app 
approach to building and deploying mobile applications, 
you will need a platform‐based mobility strategy in 
which the MEAP supports fully integrated app 
containers. That means the containers: 
 tie into back‐end data and support server 
driven events like messages and 
notifications; 
 use open‐source, standards‐based HTML(5) 
and JavaScript libraries as well as existing 
applications; 
 support single, consistent encryption across different devices. 
For more information about using and deploying hybrid mobile applications, click here
, or contact a Sybase 
or SAP representative. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
What about Developer Bob?
Without going into all the details,
Developer Bob is doing fine.
It’s true he totally blew his deadline
of delivering the new mobile
company directory in time for the
annual meeting. However ever since
he championed the use of hybrid
web apps, Bob has become widely
regarded throughout the
organization as a very brilliant guy.
  Web Based Mobile Business Apps May Be Good – But Are They Good Enough?   
11 
 
Notes 
 
1   
Reitsma, Reineke. “The Data Digest: Which Mobile Operating Systems Do Enterprises Support?” Forester Blog, 
January 7, 2011.
 
 
2
  Herrema, John. “Personal Mobile Devices in the Enterprise: What IT Needs to Know.” Digital Discourse, May 
17, 2011.             


3   
Frost & Sullivan. “Adoption of Premium Mobile Enterprise Applications ‐ The U.S.Perspective in 2010.”

April 6, 
2011. 
 

  
Sybase pragmatic research. 
 
5
   “
Mobile App Management & the Enterprise App Store.” App Central, 2011.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SYBASE, INC.  
WORLDWIDE HEADQUARTERS 
ONE SYBASE DRIVE 
DUBLIN, CA 94568‐7902 USA 
Tel: 1 800 8 SYBASE 
 
www.sybase.com 
 
Copyright © 2011 Sybase, Inc. All rights reserved. Unpublished rights reserved under U.S. copyright 
laws. Sybase, and the Sybase logo are trademarks of Sybase, Inc. or its subsidiaries. ® indicates 
registration in the United States. SAP and the SAP logo are the trademarks or registered 
trademarks of SAP AG in Germany and in several other countries. All other trademarks are the 
property of their respective owners. 05/11.     
iPhone and iPad are registered trademarks of Apple, Inc. 
BlackBerry®, RIM®, Research in Motion®, SureType®, SurePress®, BBM® and related trademarks, 
names and logos are the property of Research In Motion Limited and are registered and/or used in 
the U.S. and countries around the world. Used under license from Research In Motion Limited.