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SOB SINGAPOEB

1.

"
Labour ProritGovernment split?
"

f~. i

ffanfang Evening Post
-

5.56.

(Editorial)
:

(Summary) Mr.

Mai
-
shall has
-
set the people of Singapore guessing as

to vtio

are trying to
frustrate Singapore's attainment or independence.

His warning ,is some
-
ahat incredible.

All

the people of Singapore are supporting the
claim Tor independence being
-
pressed by Mr.

Marshall,

and Soever tj?ies

o

frustrate this claim
will Tail under

the"
"Height of public consciousness.
-
However, development

these few days
have shorai that the political

crisis Mr,

Marshall has been speaking of comes

from within the
Labour Front Coalition Government itself as

a result of his px
-
oposal to form

a united
anti
-
Communist front with the Liberal

Socialist Party.

Why is Mr.

Max3hall,

who has

been professing Socialism, suddenly tx
-
yin
-

to

join
hands with the rightwing Liberal Socialists?

Is he planning a great change in politics?

He also
held secx
-
et talks with the P
i A. P.

It looks

as if the Chief Minister is

at

the cx
-
ossioads of
politics.

But,

the matter is not so simple.

An important section in the Laboux Front az'e
opposed to his proposal

and the Alliance is

threatening to leave the iabour
-

Fx
-
ont

and join the
PA
P in the Opposition if

the Front

allies with the Liberal Socialists]

A major change in

the
political

situation of Singapore vrould then take place.

Despite Mr.

Marshall "s

categorical

denial of the x
-
umour that

the British Government
has hinted to him to

exclude leftists i.e.

PAP,

from

the independence delegation to London next
month, we seem

to have gather from his movements

these few days

that .here is

something in

the
rumour.

Mr.

Marshall

seems

to be somewhat impulsive in his statements

followin ' his

x
-
eturn
from Switzerland,

Whether or not politically Singapoi"e is facing a serious

crisis

or
undex=going a sudden

change will

be Icnown after

the Labour Front council meeting today

and
the Legislative Assembly meeting on Wednesday.

2.

Save Singapore fron i
ts

insiiinent

crisis

i

Chung Shing Jit Pao
-

6.5.56.

(Editorial):

(Summary)

This

editorial believes

that Mr.

Max
-
shall

was not exaggerating about

the cx
-
isis of
Singapox'e.

In order

to

save Singapox'e

from its

imminent cxrlsis

it advocates

that Government
shold

take decisive measures

to

form a solid anti

Communist front

and stop

all

Couimunist
activities

in instigating labov:r and student

unrests

under cover of denocracy.

While these are
not

allowed in Communist

countxi.es

why should

they be tolerated in democratic countries?

In

telling p&
-
ty

leadex=s of Singapore

that the amalgamation o;.?

the

two

territories must

await

the completion of work by

the
Constitutional

Commission,
-
Tcngku
Abdul Rahman, the

editorial

believes,

ai
d not say all

he wished to

say.

,4


Lvi den
tly


...............................


Evidently the Federation has

succeeded
-
ih its

light £br independence because of the
unity or its political parties. Though Singapore was

the first in demanding
independence,

its ' political parties

are not united.

Tt is nothing wrong if they are really fighting for the
interests or the people.

But it Bill be

a serious matter if

they have ulterior motives

in their
£±|£j.t.

Outwardly Singapore seass

to

be mjoying p
eace but latently

the

crisis

is being
aggravated.

i
T
obody can tell

when

i
the explosion would come.

Probably everybody
jsnows who

are l'esponsible Tor

the poll sical

crisis.

The Government is evidently
hesitating to reveal

the names openly lest
something
-
worse may happen.

Britain has

established her

diplomatic relations with Communist China

ana at

the same time
vri.3h.ea

to maintain her
-

interests

in 8. E.

Asia.

While Government has no. courage

to
.expose the sini
ster

designs of

the Chinese Communists,

it is

only natural

that

the
people choose

to remain apathetic because there iJ no protection for their life.

Hence

the appearance of peace.

However,

latent

activities

are rather
-

extensive in the forms of student
and

labour movements,

These have been intensified,

threatening public peace and
order, biit the Goverisnent has not

taken erfective measures

to

suppress

them. It
seems

thai; such

things

sr
-
e going to prolong and cause extensive effect on
the
-
whole of
Singapore.

The editorial

blames

the local

Gcverrisent for causing misunderstanding in
London in

connecting Singapore Chinese with

the Chinese Communists.

It has

failed

to

give publicity how most Singapore Chinese not only have no

tendency

towards the
Coiam
unists

but

are

deeply detestin
-

the violence and cruelty of

the Conmunists.

Therefore it is nor/ up .to

the local Government

to

choose whether it is

following the old
policy in;ending so maintain its

present condition or is

going to

adopt

a more

courageous

policy in leading the people

to eradicate

Communist

activities
-
.

5.

Independence

above all

Sanayang Si an
p.
Fan
-

7. 56.

(3ai sorial) :

(Translation)

The independence movement oi' Malaya may be said to

be providential

and

answering

x:

the need o:? men.

Eight years

ago,

not only was

the

objective si
.notion still premature, but

uhe subjective strength v/as

rather
-

weak.

If

we

at

that time
rashly

raised our

demand for

independence,

we would have to pay a

very

great price

and
till

failed

o

achieve

the desi
red result.

Light years la.er

today,

however,

the objective
situation has matured and

the subjective s ,ren

th is

daily increasing.

Besides,

the

areat

Iniia has

carried out

all her work, from

independence

to

cons tructior.,

according to

plan. Her success

has

undoubtedly

enhanced our courage

and increased Britain's

confidence in Halaya.

Independence for Malaya may now be said

to be free frorr:

all

obs

ructions.

It

is

only minor issues

uhat are ye
-
J

to

be striven for.

In February

she Federation Chief
sinister,

Xengku Abdul

Kahtr.an,

was
warmly

supported and

greeted with shouts of "Merdeka.'"

viien he stepped down

frail

the plane on his

return from London.

Shy was

the_
-
e sv
h

rejoicing anonv the people or

the Federation?

It was

because

they

are

certain

to

become independent on August

3L

next year..

On

the other hand,

the Singapore Chief Minister

Taore a very gloomy look
i
m
mediately he stepped down from the plane the other day on his return from
recuperation in Switzerland. In his

talk with reporters

at
the airport,

it could be read
between

the line that some people in Singapore were obstructing the claim for
independence.

Such a sudden warning,

like a bolt from

the blue,

has

cast a dark shadow
over the 1,200,000 people of Singapore as well

as

those in
friendly nations,

4io are
interested in independence for Singapore.

W. Lippmann,

noted U.S.

political

commentator,

divides the world into

two

blocs
-

the "Have"

and the

"Have
-
not". The former want to maintain the status

quo;

the latter,

to break it.

This h
as almost became a formula.

Similarly in a

country,

the "Vested Interest"

class

generally stand fbr the status

quo.

Only the common men,

without power
-

02J influence,

are willing to break it.

These two forces,

one for status

quo

and the other against it,

h
ave developed into

a tug

of

war situation in the
process

of Singapore's

claim ibr independence.

Undoubtedly,

in Singapore's society the Progressive and Democratic, parties,

which have been regard as rightist, border in their character on maintaining the
status

quo. As

they want

to

do

so

and maintain their vested interest,

they have inevitably come
under the suspicion of" caring only for the ends without regard to

the means in their
expressions

in political

activities.

Secently these two Parties have merge
d into

a "Liberal

Socialist Party"

vjith
emphasis on Socialism and a new look.

It attracted the attention of

the governing Party,

so much so

that Marshall

and Lim Yew Hock tried

to persuade the Labour Front

to

enter
into

alliance
-
with that Party in order

to strengthen

the united

front in the independence
delegation.

Unexpectedly the Labour Front Council

declined

to

accept Marshall 's

advice ani the matter of


alliance came to

an abrupt end.

And in the ensuing statements
by both sides has been revealed some

regrettable news.

Said the statement

by

the Labour Front:

"The Liberal

Socialist Party has

threatened

to boycott the Mefdeka delegation

if

that Party is not included in the Government line
-
up for the

constitutional

talks

in London".

At first,

I

thought
this

Has

only

a one
-
sided statement.

It was only when
-
John Ede,

spokes

man for that Party,

telephoned our reporter

that "The Liberal

Socialist Party will

not take part in any all
-
party meeting

called in future by

the Labour Front
-

Coalition Government",

that

we realise

the Party is

apparently acting agai
n
st public

opinion.

For,

it is one question how the leaders of the Labour

Front say or act;

but the

claim for Singapore's

independence is

representative of

the

desire of all

the people.

\

It is moot
painful

to note that some people are ver"y interested in party rivalry,

lining up with

the like
-
minded but attacking the dissenting.

Undiscerning,

fickle
-
minded and double
-
tongued,

they indiscriminately go

against anything be it right
or wrong,

raised by o
pponent political parties.

Such wilful

way 05? doing things

we are
not prepared to

accept.

It must be realised

that

the value of a political party lies

in its

capacity

to

represent

the will of the people,

express

their aspirations and demonstrate
their str
ength wherever

the strength of the people reaches,

there is

nothing that is

invincible.

Any task of any magnitude may be successfully carried out,

let alone this
small

independence movement.


On

the

We must

We must understand that

to

claim independence is

the will,

not of any one
political party,

hut of all

the people of Singapore.

Only
-
with one mind to produce
matchless

strength can we convince Britain

to

give us

indepen
dence in advance. In the
process of claiming independence,

all parties,

in the Opposition or on

the Government

side,

must "attend to national distress

before personal

enmity".

Political views may differ
in emphasis,

inclining to

the left or

to

the right,

b
ut

there is

only one aim in

the

claim for

independence.

Lincoln had frankly pointed out,

"A nation cannot have half of its people
as free men and the other half as slaves."

In our claim for independence,

therefore,

oxrr
-

strength and will must be .concentrated
-
without in the least being depleted
or
decentralised, otherwise we would be knocked out one by one.

Well

said Confucius,

"It is not position, that matters, but how position may be
maintained.


What is not yet known
does not matter,' but what may be known".

Four
years

is

a short

time

and. will

go

by soon.'

Who

are mindful first of national

interests?

They may deceive themselves, but not the people.

The unanimous

desire of the people of
Singapore now is for sincere uni
ty to realise independence.

All political parties,

therefore,
must realise

that independence is

above all. Other moves may be boyco cted,

but

the
:
steps

in our claim for independence must be unified and concerted if

they are not to fall

into

confusion.

k.

Stop

the cold war in local political
rivalry

Sin Chew Jit Poh
-

7. 3. 56.

(Bditorial)

:

(Translation)

Today's Legislative Assembly meeting should have been

the most
important one

in nature since its

inauguration last April.

It was

expected

to

work out

the
basic programme for Singapore's

self


government

and independence in preparation for

the coming London Constitutional

Talks,

and at

the same time,

to

reach

a satisfactory
conclusion for

the amalgamation of Singapore with the Federation so

that we

cbiiLd
proceed to exchange views

with

the Federation on

.his

mctter.

However, from

the

development

during

the

last

ten

days,

it appears that such

goals

can hardly be attained.

The Parties

in power and

those in

the Opposition are

evidently

enccciny in a political
cold
war with the intention of claiming merit

if successful

and blaming others

if defeated.

The
fluctuation of pri

e in self
-
government and independence is

as

uncertain

as

that of rubber,
changing a

great deal

between morning r nd
aftec.
-
n.oon
.

The public are greatly
bewildered.

For

smooth succ
-
eos

in winning Self

government

and independence,

the
parties

in power

and opposition should reach a minimum agreement

in

the basic principle
on self
-
governme
nt and independence.

This

ic

what

is

highly hoped for by the greatest
majority of

:,he people.

In our editorial

of 1.5.56 we

emphasised

that

the Chief ilinister,

Mr.

David Marshall,

after his

return from sick leave,

shouM

direct his

efforts on

this
matter.

The Labocr Fron ; General

Council meeting night before last rejected Mr.

Marshall's motion proposing to invite

the Liberal

Socialist Party to participate in

the
Government.

This has

obstructed the

road leading to

co
-
operation of

the parties. The
Front in
rejection Mr.

Marshall's proposal passed at

the same

time a resolution

to

support

the

continued leadership of Mr.

Marshall.

3uc
-
h kind of

expression

is

rather

confusing

in the

eyes

of the public

Seen from the position of by
standers,

the

contradictory dec
ision of
the Front might have been motivated by two

things.

On

the one hand,

it feared that there
-
could be additional difficulty in the allocation of

the little powers

and few positions

available if the Liberal Socialists were allowed to participate in
the Government. There
would be

"too little congee for too

many monks". On the other hand,

it fears more that if
Mr. Marshall had to retire from the Front

there would be

the danger

that

even the power it is
holding now might be lost.

Mr.

Marshall

is now in
an awkward position.

Before tabling the
motion of invitation he should have had some negotiation with the Liberal Socialist Party.

How the Party is not only disappointed with non
-
participation in

the Government,

but is

severely rebuked by the Front.

Suck d
evelopment will not in any way help in future

discussions

in the Legislative Assembly.

Out of the 52 seats

in the Assembly,

only 25

are elected,

"he remaining 7 seats

are
filled by 0 ficials

and Nominated Members.

The Parties which hold limited numbers of
elected seats

are opposing one another.

At present the Front has

8 seats;

the Liberal

Socialists,

6;

the Alliance and PAP,

3 seats

each;

and Independents,

5.

From this it is

evident that the Coalition Government formed of the Front and the Alliance does
not have

enough strength.

The political cold wars

during recent months have rendered bona fide
party politics and responsible cabinet to lose much of their due significance and purpose.

Svsch political defeat cannot be covered up.

If the Parties

in Power e
nd those in the
Opposition cannot sincerely discuss

the basic Issue

of self
-
government and indepdnence
they would practically become enemies

to

self
-
government

and independence.

Mr.

Marshall has announced that he is

calling a meeting of

the representative
s

of
all parties

very soon to

discuss

the formation of a delegation

to London for constitutional

talks. This

is

a remedy making amends

after'

the Party in Power
-

has lost Its

absolute
majority in

elected seats.

There is no other

convenient

way out.

We

therefore hope

that all
political par
-
ties

will

.are up

their prejudices

and discuss

to reach agreement on

a minimum
common "basis,

and appoint representatives in fair proportion to participate in the
delegation

(to London) xieally speaking,

the Constituti
onal Delegation will

be assuming
responsibilities

in a work needing much

effort with little hope of

gaining credit.

The
Opposition parties may refuse to participate on

the

ground

that

they are not in power.

Hoever, if

they
-
will participate

they will

surel
y be most welcome

to

the Fcrrtic
-
s

in power.

The present problem is

whether or
-

not

the Labour FrGnt
Cor.liki.cjn

(overnncnt could do
its

best

to

convince

end invite the

oppo
-
iticn p; rticc

in doing suck
a
work which
vd.ll

need
much effort with little hope of gaining credit.

-


The

general p
\
;blie are indeed disappointed with the rivalx
v
y of political
parties

during the last few days. Therefore

the political

cold war must be stopped
at once.

j
#

The mistake of boycotting
"
independence

Wanfang Evening Post
-

7. . 56.

(Editorial)
;

(Translation) The indignanee of the Liberal Socialist Party is aroused because
of the Laborer Front Council's opposition to

the alliance with

that Party.

In
anger

the
Party even


in

the

declares

....

declares

that it is

going to

boycott

the independence delegation
-
in

charge of the
Labour Front.

Yesterday the Party began to

boycott

the
conference ox

representatives of all Parties

called by the Labour Front.

This

conference is

to
discuss how to welcome the British Parliamentary Delegation coming to Singapore
for investigation.

This

is

a very serious affair.

If Singapore political parties

cannot
unite un
anim
ously

So press

for independence with all
-
out effort, it is

feared that,
Singapore's

claim lb r independence will have very little hope of success.

Independence is

the unanimous

demand of the 1,200,000

people of Singapore.

All political p
arties in Singapore,

too,

nnaniinously took the claim for independence

to be

their aim

in the election contest of last April.

All

the voters,

too

elected them only because they would press

for independence.

Therefore,

the seats in the Assembly are divided
without any

Party getting the majority of more than half the number

This is

different from the Federation
-
.
-
here a strong and

powerful DMHO
-
HGA
-
MIC Alliance assunes power, having no need

to

consult with other Parties other

than discussing with the

represe
ntatives of the Sultans.

Although Singapore's

political power is

divided,

the demand for independence is

\

the unanimous

aim.

Under

this

aim Tt is

reasonable

that all strength can still be
concentrated.

Whoever

goes against this

aim breaks his promise to

the people,

coianits political suicide and becomes an offender

against independence.

Whether or not

the Liberal

Socialist Party and

the Labour Front farm an
alliance is

a private affair between the two parties.

But pressing for independence and
self
-
govern
ment is

a public

affair unanimously demanded by all

the people.

If private affairs

are regarded as more important than public affairs,

then

the
style of political parties serving the people mil

be lost.

If the desire in private affairs is

satisfied
-
with

the

threat of spoiling public affairs,

then it

is

"workin;
-

for one's

own

ends".

We hope that

the leaders of various

political parties will

on no account

commit

the "ivrong act of political suicide.

They should compete in

efforts

to press

for
independence
and en no

account boycott

the Independence Delegation.

6.

"
Anxiety about

the fu Sure

of independence
for
-

this

country
"

Chung Shing Jit Pao

-

8. % 56.

(Editorial)
:

(Summary)

Pointing out

the difficulties

facing Singapore's claim for
independence ani

expressing anxiety

about its future,

the editorial observes.

(Translation)

Singapore is

truly in

the midst of distress within and
-
without,

and
particularly embarrassed is Mr.

Marshall. But,

closer observation will

show that

there is

nothing to

fear of tro
uble from without,

for

the

tendency of

the

times

is such that as long
as we ourselves

stand firm and strong and have self
-
respect

and take good

care of
ourselves,

no

force, from outside is strong enough

to

stop us from acquiring
independence and the power
of self
-
determination.

The whole

trouble,

however,

lies

in the struggle of

the politicians

for nothing
but power.

For si;ch an unhappy situation the Labour

Front leaders

cannot be free from
blame.

In April last year, the Labour Front won the election

and
formed a coalition government with the UMH0
-
MGA Alliance,

writing a new page in the history of Singapore. At tht.t time

the million people of Singapore had placed great hopes in the

.Labour Front, because its membership consisted of workers and

the common
people who form the greatest majority of the

Singapore population and because in its political platform

t

it was niindful first of the interests

of the people so

that it would be able

to serve
Singapore devotedly.

During these ten months,

however,

what has

the Labour Front
done for Singapore?

No satisfactory result has been achieved in the trade talks with
Indonesia or in the London talks on' independence and self
-
determination.

The issue
of citizenship still

remains undecided.

Several industrial

disputes
were not properly
handled,

and what disputes had been settled were not as result of efforts by the Front.

What is most despicable is

that rivalry for pov/er

and position has been going on until
there is

internal

split

and manoeuvring against other politica
l parties is

only out of
wilful strife.

The only respectable person is 0r. Marshall

who still retains his
statesmanship and in the face of a crisis is still mindful first of the interests

of this

country.

But single
-
handed,

how can he do?

In the present mo
ve to invite

the Liberal

Socialist Government to form a
coalition government, Mr.

Marshall has definitely thought of the interests of the
nation.

This is entirely due

to his political foresight.

And yet the Labour Front"
General Council not only voted
hxm

down but went all
-
out attacking the Liberal
Socialist Society.

Such attitude is indeed scornful.

The Liberal

Socialist Party may
have been deceived,

despised or

even abused,

but it has been able to show Its
integrity.

It is

the Labour Front itself that is
suffering loss

in reputation,

As Mr.

Yap Pheng Geek has

rightly pointed out,

clashes between individuals

and the strife for
-

ministerial posts

are the

greatest obstacles

to

coalition

government,

and the difficulty lies in the lack of

courage on

the part of

the Labour Front

to keep

the
door of Government wide open.

Independence

and self
-
government for Singapore are possible only If all
political parties would unite.

The Labour Front may be

in power,

but its

foundation is

extremely weak.

Whether or
-

not i;

ca
n bring independence and self
-
determination to

Singapore single
-
handed,,

only facts will

tell.

7.

Marshall

speaj
-
s

too much

Sin Chew Jit Poh
-

6. 776.

(Current

comaent)
:

(Sumnary)

r.

Marshall

is

a voluble speaker,

both in the Legislative Assembly and

to

the Press.

He is fully aware of the

value

to

the Press

of news of an

alarming nature.

Very often,

therefore,

his

stacenents hit headline news

for several days

in succession.

But,

much speech leads

to

error and reaction.

Mr. Marshall's

volubility
is

-
welcome

to

the Press,

but others do

not like some of his

statemaits.

Immediately upon his return from Switzerland,

for instance,

he warned of a

great
crisis

to

come.

Even Mr.

Yap Pheng Geek,

who

is usually in close

contact with
political

circles,

is

bewil
dered and considers

that iir.

Marshall

should

talk less.


In April

The fa

The fact is

that Mr.

Marshall has

been noted for his forceful

speech since the
days

of his.legal.

practice.

Often at

the end of a trial

did he enliven weary
-

reporters as if by
hypnotism.

In the same manner after
-

his

assumption of

government power,

he has

always

created a press

atmosphere advantageous

to him by his

talent in speech.

Little have we
ex
pected that

this talkative habit,

which was

detested only by Opposition parties before,

does not find favour with merchants of neutral stand

now.

8.

In support of Marshall 'a
anti
-
Communist policy

Chung Shing'Jit Pao 10. %56.

(Editorial)
:

(Sunnary)

This

editorial

calls

upon

all people in Singapore to

support Mr.

Marshall in his

determination against Coi.munism and the British Government

to have complete
confidence in his political strategy and go

all

out

to

eliminate Communism.

Despite the absence in Sing
apore of open Conmunist disturbances

as in the
Federation,

the editorial sees

the following complex and delicate situation tirich makes
indepdnence a brain
-
racking problem here:

1.

Being the economic,

political

and military centre in

S. E.

Asia,

Singapore
holds

the key to

the Enti
-
Comnunist strategy of the free
world especially in S.2. Asia.

2.

In view of Singapore's

strategic importance,

Britain is naturally reluctant

to shirk her responsibility and allow the Communists

to

extend

their
influence.

3.

Some

diehards

clinging to

Colonialism are still attempting to prolong the life of
Colonialism, on the excuse

that disturbances

are still

on.

It is

an undeniable fact,

:he editorial

continues,

that the Conmunists

Eire desiring to

grab
Singapore.

As

the overall
Conmunist strategy is

o

stress politics

above cilitary,

the Communists

are

calling for

an

end

to

Bri
-
ish Colonialism,

not because they really desire independence but because
they are ultimately aiming at grabbing the power of

r
-
overiment and coaamunt sing

°ingapore.

Turning to Britain's

atti'.ode

towards Singapore,

we see

that she has made no

clear

cut

decision and

choice between continuing Colonialism and granting independence.

This may be due

to

conflict of interests

and

the trend of

the

times, but in

th
is life and death struggle between
Communism and the free world,

the latter would suffer serious injury if Communism is not

effectively

challenged and

crushed.

the moot effective weapon is

to

grant

independence

to

Singapore

early under

the banner of freedo
m.

Let

the wise authorities

in Britain not abandon

this

golden opportunity of

laimin"

the hearts

of the p eopl e.

Pacts have shown us

that only Marshall

and the political party under his leadership

are

genuinely and strongly anti
-
Communist in will

and
action.

Indeed,

Sr.

.Marshal 1

deserves our
respect in the way he has

been

tackling the turbulent political

situation since his

coming into power.

Of

course, his

anti
-
Communist statements

and actions

are resented by the 'Communists.

Those who

are now attac
king and bringing charges

against Mr.

Mar
-
snail,

for
-

his

statements

and actions

are doing so not for any other purpose but to

try to bring him down and force the collapse of his political party so

as

to weaken the
anti
-
Communist strength of Singapore.

Su
ch plot on the part of

the Communists

is

far more
treacherous

than armed rebellion in Malaya.

In the interest of the future of independence for
Singapore,

the entire population of Singapore should lend support to Mr.

Marshall's strong will

against
Communism and urge him to action to frustrate

the Communist plot.

As for Britain,

we

consider that

in her genuine concern for the importance of Singapore
she must first of all have complete confidence in Marshall's political strategy and with unmatched
str
ength eliminate Communism in earnest.

This iwuld be

to

the blessing,

not only of the people of
Singapore but

also of Britain and the free world.

It is unity of

the free world that the Communists

are
most

afraid of.

Only by uniting together to fight

the Com
munists to

the finish can we expect to

ensure the security of

the free world and freedom and peace for all mankind.

II.

PSIQg OF STHOfiPOBE AHT) TEE
FEDERATION

1.

Sin Chew Jit Poh
-

8.3.56.

(Editorial)

:

(Sursmary)

This

editorial

explains

that Singapore is

very important

to

the future Malayan nation,

unlike Goa to India. Though

the union of these

two

tezvr
-
itories has been put off because of the
complicated
-
work of preparing the Constitution of the Federation,

it urges

Tengku Abdul Rahman
to make

the neces
sary room in the new Constitution for
-

ultimate union. It also points out

that the
Tengku is unreasonable in fearing that Singapore on account of its recent labour
-

unrest and party
ri
-
ftlry ic

in a more

dangerous

situation

than the

jungle war in

the Feder
ation.

It

therefore hopes

that
politicians

of different parties

will

reduce

their

emotion

and stop

their cold war

so

that

with

cool

brains

plans

could be worked
-
out for the future

and that

the mistaken impression of

the Tengku
could be corrected.

The
editorial

stresses

the value of land and people to

a nation.

The Federation should not
assume the attitude of "take it

or leave it".

There may be some temporary set

back to

the
achievement of

a

uniried Malaya but

the natural

tendency

cannot be reversed or
stopped.

The edi torial

is

aware

that in position Singapore is lower 'than

the Federation as

far as

independence is

concerned.

Even with the modification of the term "if possible",

the Tengku is

certain of independence on lSiSTr

In in
-
gager
-
e

we
-
have not
reached an agreement about
independence.

Not

to mention the powers of

external relations

and external

defence,

even "internal

self
-
government"

is

still

under discussion and study. Even if we

can agree in principle on the union,

we

are not yet in a position

to

vork out

the details.

However,

it is

only natural

that sooner or later
Singapore and the

Federation would be united.

As

both will

be membei
-
s

of

the

Commonwealth,

there is really no

reason why the 50,000 square miles

should be divided into

tvro

countri
es.

As

soon
as

the Federation begins

to


against

carry

carry out plans

for development ana prosperity

it v/ill

feel the

'

need
of

talcing in Sing
-
pore as

its partner.

It is

hoped that

the Tengku
vri.ll

bear this principle in mind when Trorking out the Federation
Constitution and prepare for ultimate union of the tvo

territories

on

terms of equity.

2.

Nanfang Evgiin° Post

-

6
-
, j.
56

(Current

comment)
:

(Svumary)

This

current

comment,

though agreeing with Party
leaders

that there should not

be too mtc
-
h talk on the question of union of
Singapore and the Federation lest it would do harm
to
the
Future
conference between
the tso Governments,

believes


that this issue is'
too important for public opinion to be ignored.

It advocates

that, 'both
the authorities in power and
the public

who

have mouths

to

speai: must
be

allowed

to

express
theii opinion.

1heie ni£y

be

too

much

uolk,

tra if

the
views
ape Given aitn good intention without being prejudiced by
emotion,

they should not do harm to

the future' talis.

If extensive
opinion is sought there leaves only technical questions

to be decided
in the future conference.

This
-
sill be easier wit
hout involving side
issues,

;
.'

br instance,

everybody Trill

agree that Kuala Lumpur shall

be

the political

centre of
the union and Singapore,

the commercial

centre.

Opinion may differ

on viiether Singapore
should

join

the Federation as

an equal partner or

only as a unit.

III.

NATION

BUILDING
ASP

.iALAYAH
NATIONALITY

1.

Determining the snirit of
'
nation bull din for
Malaya

Nanyang Sian.r
-

Pau
-

10.
-
. 56.

(Editorial) :

(Summary)

T?hile Malaya is

to

attain independence by peaceful means

and as

-
he

Constitutional

Commitsion has been set up

to proceed frith

the drafting of Constitution,

this

editorial stresses

the importance of

determining

the 3pirit of nation building for ,'ial
-
ya.

It suggests

following the
spirit of the Independence Declaration of
t
he U.S.A.

on July
h,

1776
that all'men are born equal.

Therefore in buildinj the Malayan nation we shoiila set

the goal

of liberty and

equality which was

the ideal

of

the U.S.

an:l

French revolutions

as

well

as the

Chinese

revolution led by Dr.

3i
-
,n
Yat

sen.

The

editorial believes

that

the U. 3.

has

attained her present greatness

and prosperity
through

the

foresight of her
statesman

and

nation builder,

Thomas

Jefferson who

drafted the
Indepenaence _jecj.ara tl on "laying: do
-
..n
-
the basic

rights of
-

man


liind,

and introduced
liberal lav/ for

the naturalisation of the aliens

when he became

the

third American President.

With this

goal

set,

the
-

Americans have been

enthusiastic

in fighting for

their liberty and basic
rights

as

individuals.

Without this
highest ideal

the U.S.A.,

Ii2:e other new nations

of the world,

might have plunged into

confusion and rivil wars

after indep endenc e.

Jefferson in introducing the naturalisation law declared that he wanted America

to
become

the refuge of oppressed people

from foreign countries.

Thus,

the U.S.

has merged peoples
of all races

as Americans.

While in Malaya,

the Chinese,

Malays, Indians

and other races are living
together,

they should all become Malayans

acquiring all

hxman rights.

Those
-
who

choose Malaya
as

their permanent home and are willing to

owe allegiance to

this

country should be given liberty
and equality.

Thoui Malaya,

unlike America,

is only a small peninsula,

at least" she should make all

those now residing in Malaya Malayan nationals. It is not p
roper to

divide them into

two large
groups

as nationals

and aliens because we need them all

to 'Berk enthusiastically in nation buildinc.

The editorial is
scascve oi the
existence of harrow nationalists who

are opposed, to
giving equal: treatment to all ra
ces.

Eo

ever,

it believes that lmisr
thU JuOldOVS
leadership of
Tengku Abdul Rahman such difficulty and obstacle could be overcome.

In his fight for
independence he has encountered many oppositions but his
uami
staken policy has fi
n
ally won
victory for his

cause.

Therefore it is hoped, that the Tengku would pursue

this highest and supreme
ideal of liberty and equality so

that Malaya would become the ideal and happy country for all races.

2.

Malayan nationality

Hanyang Siang Pau
-

9.3.56.

(Currenc

comment)
:

(Sranmary)

This

current

comment hopes

that the Constitution Commission will recommend a just
and reasonable nationality law for

the new i
-
ialayan nation.

It suggests

(1)

jus soli under which all

those born in Malaya will

automatically become Malayans;

and

(2)

a liberal naturalisation law by
-
shid]. all who have resident in this

country for five to seven years can apply for naturalisation
without the unnecessary language r es tri c tion.

The comment believes

that many of the Malays

are enlightened and farsig
hted.

However,

there are still

obstinate persons who fear

the aliens.

Even Tengku Abdul jjahman is
opposed to Air.

David Marshall's

idea about single nationality though he agrees

to

the

union of
Singapore

and the

Fedexation.

The comment warns

that if

the M
alays

are not willing to

give equal

treatment

to

other
races

and insist on preserving their political superiority the future of Malaya's nation buildinj"
world be very dark.

IV.

DEVALUATION POLICY

AND AUSTERITY
.'
J
BASUBES

Nanyang Si an g Pau
-

5.3.56.

(Editorial):

(Summary)

This

editorial,

although not

sure about

the successful "working of the recent austerity
measures

taken by the British Conservative

Government,

believes

that

further

devaluation of the
pound Sterling
-
is

out

of the

question unless

it

is

absolutely necessary.


Jefferson

The

editorial

The

editorial

describes

the success

of devaluation policy by the former Labour
Government in 19U9 in boosting exports

especially because of the outbreak of the Korean
war in 1950.

However,

the situation is

different now.

Seven years

ago

there was

great

demand for British goods in many countries.

They could not import

them in large

quantities
because of the high price.

Now

there are cheap products from Germany,

Italy and Japan
which are flooding the world market. Even if Britain further devalues her

currency

as

a way
to cut down the

cost of her products,

she may still not be able to compete with the products
of these countr
ies because they may also devalue their

currencies

as

a way to protect

the
sales of their gpods in foreign markets.

During the previous

devaluation the U.S.

helped by
increasing her purchase of natural rubber by 200,000 tons

a year.

Nov/
-
the U.S.

has
purc
hased natural rubber to

the limit of her

consumption.

There vculd not be any significant
increase in purchase.

Therefore Britain v/ould lose more than gain by devaluation

Furthermore,

the Conservative Party is representing the majority of voters

who

have s
table income.

Their livelihood would be worst bit by inflation.

In order to win the
hearts of the people the Conservative Party must, oppose devaluation. Even seven years

ago

Churchill blamed the Labour Farty devaluation policy for leading the

country to
bankruptcy
nationally and on the international level and criticised the then Chancellor of the Exchequer

as

a ilinister

committing the

greatest blunder. In ensuring that there will be no

further
-

devaluation

the present

Chancellor of the Exchequer also poi
nds out that devaluation would
shake

the confidence

of the vxirld in

the pound Sterling,

and that such

confidence is

of

great
value to 3ritain and the world.

The editorial observes

that

although Britain

is one of

the

countries

which
have not

been

able to

f
ind a satisfactory solution to

their financial

crisis

after

the last
war,

she would rather devote to financial

and economic

austerity measures than resort

easily

to

further

devaluation ss

a
way to

stop inflation of her

currency.

V.

HEW IHDUSTalES AND

EXISTING
INDUSTKIES

KanyanR Siang Pau
-

9.3.56.

(Sal toi'ial)

:

(Summary)

On

the warning in

the Singapore Master Plan

..hat unless

Government

takes measures

to

develop

industries,

there would be unemployment

for

200,000

to
10,000
by 1972,

this editorial

urges

Government

to

take immediate measures

to

solve
difficulties

now facing the existing industries

such as by negotiations

with the
Federation

through diplomatic

channel

for the exemption of import du ties on goods
manufactured in Singapore before

the am
algamation of

the

two

territories.

if existing
industries

co
-
cld be

developed by boosting local consumption,

not only will

the present

employees

not ldse

their jobs but more

of

the unemployed would be given

employment. Thus,

it is better

and more
practicable than

to worry about thousands

of
unemployed persons after 16 yeans,

because unless existing industries

could be
maintained,

investors

would have no

confidence in the

development o

future industries.

Then there would absolutely be no

solution

to

'the problem of unemplo ym ent.

The

editorial points

out

that before a new industry is started,

investors must
first

consider

the possibility of local and foreign

consumption of a product.

We can have
no

control over foreign markets which can be closed t
o us by an order on ban or
restriction.

Therefore investors

could only figure on possibilities.

Unless

they are sure

about local consumption and if their products

can compete with foreign goods from
Europe, America,

Hongkong,

China and Japan in price or in

quality, investors will not
venture to start a new industry.

In other countries! there are tarriff barriers and
restrictions to restrict or ban certain imports

to protect consumption of local
-
products in
the local market but as

a free port Singapore is ha
rdly in a position to

do so.

With a total of seven million people,

the 'editorial observes,

Singapore
and the Federation
-
should be able to provide a good market for many products

and
should attract the interest of investors
in
start new industries.

However
, in reality,

not only must Singapore products meet the strong competition from foreign goods,

but it can have no assurance about market in its

closely linked partner,

the
Federation, Import duties

are imposed on its products

just like goods from other
mem
ber nations of the Commonwealth and foreigi countries.

.With no

assurance of
market,

Singapore has

great difficulty in maintaining her

existing industries.

It
pin
be day dreaming therefore to talk about developing new industries

to solve her
unemployment p
roblem.

The editorial

cites

the instance of shoe manufacturing industry as

an

example.

One
hl
-
r

of the 2,000 vrarkers have lost

their

employment and the remaining half are
suffering hardships

in that

their work has

to be stopped intermittently. This is
representative of other

existing industries in Singapore such as biscuit and soap.

VI.

PUBLIC UTILITIES AND SEASON
-
ABLE PM3FIT

Nanyann: Siang Pau
-

8. 56.

(Editorial)
:

(Summary)

This editorial warns

the S.T.C.

that in
all

socialist countries public utiliti
es
including public transport would be finally nationalised in the interests of the people and
that the Company should either be satisfied with reasonable profit instead of large profit
or

cease operation by

turning it over to

the Government.

It

considers

the announcement
of its manager, Mr. Ewing,

that

the Company has

decided to charge fares according to
mileage and that new tickets

are being printed,

as

arbitrary taking advantage of the 19U8
ruling of the City Council

which has

aroused strong oppositions
from all

circles.

The

editorial point:,

out

that

the

elected government
1
of Singapore is

socialist
in nature.

Although it is now rather pre
-
oc
-
cupied,

it is only a matter of time

that public

transport would be nationalised.

The STC,

as

we all know,

enjoys
many special
privileges

and makes

large profit

overy year by paying its

employees

very low wages.

Though it

agrees

to increase

the wages

after

a strike of nearly five months

it Immediately
put upa demand to

the City Council for increase of fare rates

on
the pretext

that it is

going to

incur additional

expenditure of $1.7 million.

Immediately after its

demand was

turned down by the City Council,

it has

decided to increase fares

despite good advice

from

the Council

end strong opposition from

the public


The

editorial

The edi torial

......

-

15

-

The editorial

explains

that

the 19UB ruling does not provide charging 10 cents

fbr the
first mile as

is

done

by

the STC.

The President of

the City Council has

also warned that if the STC is

going to

charge fares

to

the maximum according to mileage the City Cornell

would also

disagree

to

the minimum fare of 10 cents.

This

is only fair and the expected larger profit
of the Company would
be subject

to

a big discount because most people in City

areas often travel short distances.

There is

also

the possibility

that some new ruling may be passed. It is
-
Sherefore

hoped that the Company
va.ll

be careful not to take .the arbitrary action and draw unfavourable reaction from the general
public

The Chairman of the T. 0. C.

also points out

that the higher fares

would increase the
burden of workers by $10 to $3.2 a month and warns

that workers would

have to

demand higher
pay as

a result.

This is no

empty threat.

This paper has repeatedly pointed out that the many disputes in the STC were due to
meagre pay which also

forced its

employees

to resort

to

corruption.

The Company has

all along
overlooked su
ch invisible losses

and did not make effort to

imporve the

conditions

of its

employees.

Though the Company might hare to

incur Si.7 million to meet increased pay,

it should be able to
make up now that

lie employees have agreed to stop corruption.

During th
e past three weeks

after its
resumption of operation

the

Company should have

some idea how its income has

increased.

We all
know that Chinese bus companies

charge only 5

cents

for the first mile and they all made profit every
year despite higher
-

wages

for

their employees.

Therefore

the

editorial

believes

that

the STC should
be able

to make profit

even after

the increased wages.

As public

transport is a public utility,

the STC should operate it in a reasonable

way.

Instead of raising fares

it should make

ef
forts

to

economise on other items

of expenditure It

appears

that its

management is

only anxious

to maintain its large profit as in

the past in utter

disregard of
public interests

it is

supposed to

serve.

It has overlooked

the fact that

time for monopoly ha
s parsed.

It

should devote

to

serving the public instead of merely protecting the profit of

a few individuals.

The City

Council has

been very reasonable in promising to

reconsider its

aemand

if

the Company

fan furnish reasonable

evidence

that

in meeting

the new financial

commitments, the Company really

cannot make

reasonable profit without increasing its present fares.

3y reasonable profit

the City
Council

evidently did not

expect the Company

to make

the same large profit as in the past.

VII.

INCOME TAX

(AMSKariSST)
OPJlINANCE

1.

Passing of Income Tax
(Amendments)

Ordinance

Hanfang Evening Post
-

8.3.06.

(Editorial)
:

(Summary)

This

editorial

agrees

with the Chief Minister

that income tax evasion in Singapore
is

quite serious

and

that

the

number of tax
-
payers

should have been more than

20,0O0.

On the method of investigating tax evasion,

however, the editorialjsees

that it is an

extremely, troublesome affair, be it with retrospective effect of nine years or six years. Unless

the
Assemblyme
n themselves set a good example,

it doubts if

the method adopted in the Ordinance is
practicable,

because the ways of evading tax are subtle and closely guarded and some people

even
do hot record the

amounts

of their profits

in account books.

In principle,

the editorial

continues, nobody is against the amendments whi eh are
intended to

stop evasion,

what is regrettable is that Governs ait thinks only of increased revenue
andjiot of the welfare of the wage
-
earners who form the ma3ority of the taxpayers

and h
ave no way
of evading even one cent of income tax.

Host of them have family burdens

and are lav
-
abiding.

Indeed they are the most pathetic section of the common people.

=ince the Chief Minister is aware
of their plights we hope Government in catching the "
big fish" will not forget about

the "small

fish"

struggling in the dry pond.

2.

The Income Tax

(Amendment J "Ordi
n
ance

Sin Chew Jit Foh
-

lC
-

6
-

(Editorial):

(Summary)

Now that

the Income Tax (Amendment)

Ordinance has passed is

third reading ai:
-
l
":
-
5come law,

this

editorial points out that despite E?
c

Marshall s

defence that it was

aimed at the
"big fish"

the

a
-
nendments make no

distinction between big and small

fish.

It,

therefore,

believes

that the
n

fish will suffer.heavl
.?
blew because the bi
g fish are always well organised,

employing
legal

ana accoi.Tnting experts

and their books

could be prerervrd for

eight

to

ten years without
difficulty.

The Income 'Jar L'epar imer.t

can hardly find fault with

them.

The

Surfer ers
-
.rill

be
lir.ited to

the

middle and lower

classes

of rusinessr
--
..

Materially and spiritually they have

great

difficult"" in ntaiatairing the minimum system of accountancy and

the safs
-

keeping of

their
account books.

If they have

to

worr;
-

all

the

time

abc ut

the visit of Income

Tax inspectors

to

show

their whole set

of account books

and annual

statements

of thdir assets

from 19U7;

one can

easily
imagine

their anxiety

rnc; difficulty.

This might have great adverse effect

on their

tran.Suetd.on

of
ordinary business. Therefore,

the

editorial feels

that "oofore the big fish are caught in

the
net,

most
of

the small

fish will have suffered.

The editorial

praises

the income tax as

a good system of taxation in moier:i

countries.

It
however does not be
lieve the usefulness

of merely inspecting tax payers'

account books

and
banking accoints

in increasing the

efficiency of the Income Tax Department,.

Instead it urges

that
Department to review its work in

the past

to

see if

there were defects,

if it has

dealt severely with
dod
-
ers

or

if

there was

the corruption of letting dodgers

go

intentionally.

The editorial

is

more
afraid that those intentional

dodgers

have always

had their safe way out. For instance

there is

the
prevailing practice of collecting "tea

money" in letting out houses

after

the war.

Many Government
officials

had income from

corruption and unscrupulous

elements made money by coramitting
crimes.

They never paid any income tax.

Even with

the Amendment

they will

not in

the least b."
Effected.

O
n

the o ther hand the amendments will

open the wny to

extortion exposing

the small

fish

to

intimidation.

It is up

to

the Government

to

prevent

ths happening of such thing.


On

the

3.

No

such

.

-

16

-

3.

No

such law in other country

Sin'Chew Jit Poh
-

9. .;6,

(Current
COED
en t):

(Summary)

This

current comment believes

that after

the passing of the Income Tax

(Amendment)

Ordinance,

those who sell

brain tonic would

have a boom business

because people generally cannot remember

their accounts

for

the past 20 years

and
tte "snail

fish" have no place

to store the books.

High officials often forget in the
affernoon v/hat they said in the morning and politicians

often for
get what

they
promised in public speeches.

The small

fish should have worse memory.

Such an Ordinance,

the

comment observes,

is non
-
existent in Britain and
other countries

and came quite as

a surprise. Those who

t.ninV of making investments in
Singapore
may have to hesitate.

hm

Implementation a problem

in Chew Jit Poh
-

10.5.56.

(Current comment)
:

(Close summary)

Conmenting on

the Financial

Secretary's

speech in the Legislative
Assembly

that

the aim of the Income Tax (Amendment) Or
dinan
ce is to

control th
e "big
fish",

this current comment opines

that no

exception will surely be taken

to

the official

quarters'

determination

to

catch tax
-
dodging "big fish" and the intention

LO
look into

"old
accounts" but it considers that

the method of

execution is

a
problem.

Wandering

why

there have been few

cases

of people

charged for tax dodging
in

the past,

the

ccisent observes

tnat those executing the law would be given more
opportunities of corruption if their integrity is

questionable.

The

comment

considers

no l
av/ is

effective if

the authorities

do

not

clean
up

ihe

adoinis iration

and hopes

that this

time it Y.dll

no
i
be

"a big noise

with a little
result" giving some people

the opportunity of making money.

5.

"
Eat

the bip; fish ana let the small

fish

ro
"

Hanyang Sianf; Pau
-

10.5.56.

(Current

comnent)

:

(Summary)

This

current

comment

agrees

"with i.'.r.

.'.iarshall

that the

Income Tax

(Amendment)

Ordinance is

to

deal v.'ith "big fish" because in

catching one big fish the
Government vail

be able
to

let go

several hundred or several

thousand small

fish

and
with the

support of large number of

the small

fish Government
vri.ll

be secure with no
very.

However it observes

that

the task of

catching big fish is

raJier

difficult because

they possess

reverse scales

and only statesmen

with

great prowess have the

courage

to

catch them.

The

comment points

or.t

that

the

efficiency of

a

good government

could be
judged by

the kind of fish it

eats

-
whether big or tEmall.

If a

goveriiment

eats
only big
fish

and let small

fish

go,

the Government will

be strong,

being supported by

the great
number

of snail

fish.

Since 19U7

the wage earners have surfered from payinr
-

income

tax.

Their salaries

are reported by

their

employers

and

:Jhey

-
anno I

evade

even one
.'cent.

-

-

17

-

!

'
;

They were given np reduction for the support of their parents and other relatives.

On the other
hand the big fish with ranch greaoer incomes

could have many waya

to

claim deductions

and
paid only small amounts

in tax.

The
comnirint also

cites

the big fish in China,

some of. ,whom had access

H)

the
national

treasury and remitted large amounts

of money'jto foreign countries.

Host taxes

were
borne by small

fish
-
who! were taxed
v
to

exhaustion.

Hence the fall

of the Nanking gov
ernment!

or even any government in history.

VHI.

POLICE STATEMENT

AND THE

'.,

.

tgj
? SUSICa, PARTY
'

"

1.

Police refuse permit for

Chinese Musical Party

i

Nanyang.

Sin Chew and Ch
unr Shin
e;
-

(5.56)
:

I
The Chinese Gong
-
Musical Party has

applied to

the
Police for a permit

to
stage a variety concert later this month in aid of the Chinese School Student Aid Fund.

The Police have now refused a permit.

The great majority of tie items

are adapted from
songs

and dances

from S.ed China and Russia, with no local

bearing whatever.

Changes

in words

and omissions make it

clear that

the sponsors hope to lull

the police and public
into

the belief that their purpose is

cultural, while leaving all

the Chinese Communist
associations

clear to

their audience.

Out of

the 29

Items in their programme,

apart from 2
of their

own Club songs,

only 3 can have any direct Malayan association:

a musical item
called "The Rubber Trees are Blooming",

an Indian folk dance,

and a "Friendship Dance"
uihich is

described as

depicting the life

of the people in Malaya.

The first item is

a Youth Song,

-
siiich is

taken from a collection of Soviet
Union Songs.

The

second item,

a song called "We are the Iron Smelters",

is

adapted
from a Russian Bong.

Where

the original

song has phrases of Communist
association,

the words have been

changed but

the

tone remains the same.

For instance,

"training
for

a bright new society" becomes

"training for a bright future";

-

the last line "the
happy people have become fortunate".

The fourth item is a song with the t
itle "The Sun which never sets,

rises

from

the Plains".

This is

adapted from a Mongolian folk
-
song which praises Hao Tze
-
tung and
the Communist Party.

Specific mention o:'

these names has been carefully deleted and
other lines

changed.

The line which in th
e original reads

"They sing about

their new
livelihood and the Communist Party" has

been

changed

to

"They sing about

their new
livelihood and the sun".

The fourth stanza which opens

"Oh,

Chairman Mao and

the

Communist Party shine brightly

at our growth" ha
s been omitted.

In the fifth item, a song called "Happy Sinfeiang", taken from a "Collection
of People's Songs" published by Radio Peking, there have been

extensive

changes.

The
lines

-

"Since

the

coming of Communist Party

I

The poor people have been freed

The Libration Army has

assisted us,"


They wore

'
-
JT

..

aj?e

changed.

.......

-

18

-

--

19

-


are changed to


'

"Since the coming or
brightness

The poor people are happy Labour has,

given is
happiness".

The lines

"The Sed Flag is fluttering over

the plain"

and "The People

are grateful

to Chairman
Mao"

are omitted.

Another item,

"The South Wind 31ows" which is

described _ as

a Shensi

folk song is

taken
from a book entitled "New Liberation Songs", published by the Democratic Cultural Publications
Company,

Hong Kong.

Under the Chinese National Musical Items

is

an item called "The Flowery drums of Foong
Yaung"

a genuinely traditional

tune

-
which has now been adonted and adapted by the Chinese
Conmunist Party which has

added their own words

to make it suit

their Party purpose.

It is published in

the book "10,000 miles",

published in Shanghai

and in, TStoiefc

the first number is

the Internat
ional,
the second

the C.P. G.

national

anthem.

-
Another

dance is

called "Son of the Tibetan Dance".

The
v.ords ire in praise of kao Tze
-
tung and the theme is

the "liberation" of the Tibetan people thanks

to

the
Chinese Coccunist Party,

it ends with the lin
e "Long Life, Ion5 life to

die People's

leader,

Mao
Tze
-
tung" .

Of the Dance items,

one is

called "The Chi Village Dance" which in spite of its

Chinese
name is

an adaptation of a Russian folk dance of

the Ukraine

take from a Book of Dances publisned by
the

Communist Cultural

and Amusement Publishers,

Shanghai. Another called "The dance of

the
Grinding Machines"

is

tacen irom a Book of Dances published by

the People's Physical Cultures
Publishers,

Peking.

Prom

these items it is

quite

clear

that

the backgroun
d of

these songs

and

iances

ia
Communis t

end is

in no

sense Malayan.

They build up sympathy foe

she Chinese Comnunist Party.
Such concerts not

only

rontribute ho thin

;o building a Malayan nationalism but hinder its

growth.

Programmes

of

this kind are put

forward as

exercises in

-
ulture but

-
hey are exploiting

the prestige of
China's

rich

culture for

he iisiaediate poll Aral purposes of

the Comftunist Party.

Those viio

make use
of

culture

in this way for political

ends

are

the real

enemies of Chinese

culture.

They follow a well
-
established pattern of Co=aauni3t subversion.

It
WHS
.'.
-
CO
Tze
-
tung who
s ci d

that

"the literary workers of the Comntaiist Party should unite themselves

together with all

the literary men and artistes outside

the Party. Healso

s
aid in

the same article
"We must

do

our Vest

to make literature a

component part oi'

'die whole rachinery of

the
revolution."

These views find an echo

in

the motto printed in the Programme of a

recent Chinese
iliddle S tool

Concert with a similar
programme.

Its mo : to

was

";:usic itself must be a weapon
with which

to

stru'
-
le".

While this

situation

ontinues,

the Police rr.ust be alert

to

the exploitation for subve.
sive purposes

of

the wealth of Chinese cul ;ure

end the pcioe in its

achievements,
whether

the exploitation is

deliberately or

unwittingly carried out.

2.

Statement by cthe Gone; Musical Society denying plot to
subvert

the Government

Hanyang
&
Sin Chew
-

6. 3. 56.

(Mews

Item)

:

' V

(Translation)

1.

Singapore is

an elected Government
body.

Since the

elected Government is

elected by the people, how can we be under

the suspicion of attempting to

subvert the Government? We know Singcpore is advancing rapidly towards independence and
that

the people of

Singapore are definitely not opposed
to to

independence.

As

a lawful,

registered body,

this 3oeie"ty has aid.

the more no plot to subvert the Government.

2.

In art there is no national distinction.

As

a body

promoting healthy art, we are happy to accept any healthy, excellent art whatever
country it may
come from.

Defending the Chinese,

the Chief fiinister Mr.

Marshall has said,

"It must be realised
that to be proud. (?)
-
of the honour of the. home country and to

accept

Conxnunisii.

are

o"wo

differ em;

i
.nin
gp altogether".

Thus it may be se
en that our fervent love for the

culture

and art of
our own race has nothing to do with propagating the Gomnunist ideolofy.

Also,

from the ordin
pointed out in the Gavemment: statement on red shadow

n be discerned,

.and ria; is more,

the items we have
selected nave been popularly

adopted in
Singapore and the Federation of Malaya for many years.

If the originals have been amended and
since we do not have these originals for comparison,

we all

the more

do not know they

are works
propagating the Communist
ideology.

5.

The charity show we are putting up

this

time is motivated

by our realisation of the misfortune

to

Chinese

education as a result of

the increasing number of
people denied the opportuni ;y of schooling.

It is

the bounden duty of all justice
-
mind
ed people
to

safeguard Chinese education.

Apart from

this,

we h
-
ve no other intention whatever.

U.

As

to

the

Government charge that our show is

to

'exploit

the prestige of

culture for

the political purposes of tile Communist Party',

we consider

that

this
has

greatly affected the cultural

circles.

Unless

this idea is

eradicated,

we fear it will hinder

the
normal

activities

of the

cultural circles.

For

this

reason,

we hope

the authorities

concerned will

discriminate between right and wrong,

and that all sect
ions

of the public vail give us fair and just
support.

IX.

REPORT OK

CHINESE EDUCATION

1.

Nanyanre Sianyc Fau
-

7.3.56.

(News item)
:

At a meeting on 6.3.56,

the Chinese Education Corani ttee expressed dissatisfaction
with the Report on Chinese Education,
which v/as

considered

to

be

completely not in keeping
with the Tive principles laid down by

the Assembly of Chinese Public. Bodies.

The meeting
decided

to

solicit views extensively from various

quarters

for

the drafting of

a memorandum
within wen weeks.

Vi
ews were

expressed in the meeting by Chen Ewang Feng,

President of
Singapore Chinese Primary School Teachers


2.

Statement

Association


dSJ

Association,

Chuang
Kwei

Chang,

and Lin Hsieh Tah,

Principal

of Hanyang Academy of FineT&rt3.

Representativesof Singapore

Bus Iforfeers Onion and Arte Assoc
-
iationKweireconmendea' toy

the meeting to be co
-
opted as members of Education TStudySub
-

Committee.

(
AH paper3)

-



..............


2.

Hanyang Siang Pan
-

7. 3. 56.

(Hews

item);

This is

the conclusion of a long memorandum by the Singapore Chinese Primary
School Tecciers Association on the "Report on Chinese Education";

Prom the recommendations of
the
.Report one r"dola there is nothing
new at all.

The
Committee snoulu
±~ar&
strong faith in independence,

thoroughly break the fetters left on us
by the Colonial

education policy
-

to

the Malayan people in their advance to

complete
independence and self
-
determination,

accept public opinion an
d give all

communities equality
in education.

In the

Eeport,

recommendations on many questions

have not been made according to
facts;

they have even been jrilfully distorted.

We do

not point out these questions point by
point,

because of

the f ear tha"8
the people's claim for principles

will

be obscured.

As regards

the point that the Conmittee has

the courage to suggest

equal educational status

for

all

communities,

this has our whole
-
hearted support.

That the members of the Co.
-
imittee can see
the harm
done by Colonial

education policy to

education of the

(various)

communities

and
point it out is

gratifying. But we feel

that only "pointing out the unreasonableness of Colonial

education policies

while lacking the

courage to abolish these unreasonable poli
cies

and
hesitating over giving them up,

is

disappointing.

We should direct

at

the various

existing problems such as

grants
-
in
-
aid and
languages,

co
-
ordinate with the prospects

of independence and

self
-
determination,

grasp
the principle beneficial

to natio
n
-
building,

in order to make an overall

review to

draw up

an education policy in keeping with the interests

of

the various

r
-
o:7imuJii ties

in Malaya.

Finally, we want to state that we are in full support should the new education
policy being drcfted be be
neficial to

independence.

X.

SAKYAKG UNIVERSITY

1.

Bright prospects

for

the Sanyan
University

Sin Chew Jit Poh
-

5. 5.56.

(Editorial)
:

(Summary)

The Nanyang University

has male another progress

in publishing the names of 330

successful

candidates out of
660 who participated in the entrance examinations.

The number

of
students

for

the new university will be over 600 including those who

successfully passed the
preparatory classes. There will

be a further

group

to

attend

the preparatory" classes. Therefore

there will

be 1,000 people in the university including the teaching staff.

The

editorial

therefore
sees

bright

prospects

and cherishes high hope in the new university It also has

great confidence in the
tea
chi
ng staff under the. two Deans,

Messrs.

Chang a
nd Chen,

because "they are all men of great
learning and good experience and have devoted their life to

the development of university
education.

This new institution of learning is

also

an ideal place for

them

to work in,

free from
anyi traditional restric
tions.

In this respect,

therefore,

the Nanyang university occupies

a superior
place undreamt of hy other universities.

Therefore they should not let this opportunity pass away.

The date for

the opening of the university will be announced soon.

The
editorial sees

that all people from the Deans

down to

the students

are very busy during the past months.

They
have to

arrange internal

affairs

and establish external

relations.

The university needs modem
management and has

to

distribute rights and responsi
bilities in close co
-
ordination

The
committees

in various places must work together and supply the necessary funds so

that the
management can proceed smoothly with their work without having to worry about finance.

The editorial also

congratulates

the 60
0 successful students because all

the advantages

the new university enjoys

are aolely for

them.

It is a paradise for their training in character and
profession.

It is

also a new field for their exploitation under the guidance of their teachers. After
-

the
opening of

the university they should work together
-
establish a new way of living.

They will
pursue

education in their respective fields.

They should help

and co
-
operate with their

teachers
and arrange books in the library and equipment la laboratories.

They may even have to help in
arranging playgrounds

and planting of flowers

in the gardens. This will form a part of their
ideal life while pursuing their studies.

They should become a part of and be Integrated into the life
of

the university.

This

is

a ra
re opportunity opening only to

the first group of students

in a new
university.

The 500 or 600 students must avail

themselves

of this

opportunity and leave
something to be long r
-
emembered by others

after
them
.

2.

The main function

University s
hould be

the

training

of teachers for Chinese middle schools

Hanyang Slang Pan
-

5. "5. 56.

(Current

comment)
:

(Summary)

This

current

comment

explains

the acute shortage of teachers

in Chinese middle
schools

after

the usual

supply from China has been

cut

off

during the past

eijht years,

and supports
the letter

of

the Chinese School Teachers

Union in the Federation requesting the

early opening of
higher teachers training classes

in

the Nanyang University

(see also Hanyang editorial

of 15. 2.
56).

It points

out

that

the limited number of qualified

teachers have

either'

rpt old,

retired or

changed occupation during there

eight years.

Furthermore,

after the introduction of

the new salary
3cale in the Federation since 1953 many of

the

teachers

in

the Chinese mi
ddle schools
-
with
university

education preferred to

teach in primary schools instead of middle schools

for higlier
pay.

Hence the acute shortage.


prospects

..
-

XI.

MALAYAN

to

the Hanyang

XT.

MALAYAN

CHINESE AMD POLITICS

-
1
-
.

Politics
-
ean
-

control

economy

Hanyang
-

Sianp; gql'
-
. 3. 56.

(Curr eat comment):

(Summary)

This current comment agrees

with the speech made by Tan Siew Sin in a mass
Chinese meeting in Malscca

that 17

months from now Britain will

retain government to

the people
of Malaya, that the

future of Chinese in Malaya viouli be

tragic if the Chinese remain indifferent

to politics

and that politics

can control

economy and all

wealth would come to naught if
-
witho
ut
political protection.

The Chinese in Malaya,

the aonaaeiit points out,

cared only for making money without
any interest in politics.

In the past taey were only overseas

Chinese domiciled in a foreign country.
They could not and should not interfere in
politics

of others. It is

different now.

Malaya is

acquiring the new status of an independent nation and we Chinese mil be Malayans instead of
overseas Chinese and will be one of the major races.

Therefore we must chance OT3r attitude

and
pay

attention to
politics instead of economy only.

While politics can control

economy and
suffocate us,

any economic development of ours must be supported by poli+Q.cal

conditions
before it can succeed. Therefore Mr.

Tan's warning should be heeded by Chinese in Malaya.

2.

Malayan Chinese should

take part in politics

Hanyang Slant Pan
-

6. 3, 56,

(Current

comment):

(Summary)

While Chinese are no longer

just

travellers like before,

and because

they have
adopted "Malaya as

their permanent home,

this

cur
-
rent comment urges

all

Hal ay an Chinese

to
take an active part in local polities,

particularly in

the nation building plans

and the drafting of
constitution.

They should not be passive and led by others by

the nose.

The

comment points

o u t

that no

one

can live aloof from
politics.

For instance,

because of

the rubber ban, rubber cannot be scld at good price

thus

causing unemployment and in
turn robbery and lawlessness.

Even if v/e have no interest in politics,

politics will

:ome

to us.

It

is
useless to

adopt

the nood of ost
rich thinking that others

will

give us more sympathy if v/e

do not
meddle in

their affairs. Politics

directly

concerns

our ov.n security

and is

the affairs of

all.

It is not
jeerely a matter of sympathy from others.

It is

obligation

as

well,

as

right.

In

a

democratic

country
legislature is

the highest body for

enacting laws.

If we have good reason

to oppose a Bill

we car.
raise orr voice before its first,

second or

third reading.

But,

after

a Bill

is

formally passed in

the
legislature,

opposition will

be

to
o

late.

Furthermore v/e can

choose legislators

before v/e cast our sacred votes.

We must

examine

the ability,

character

and experience of a

candidate

during the

election.

All

citizens
have the' right

to

vote

and

to be voted for.

Therefore everyone should t
rain himself in politics

by

Joining a political party to his living.

Hanyang Siang Pau
-

7.3.56.

(Current

comment)
:

(Summary)

In the Federation the.Chinese population comprises

-
2.3 million out
-
of a total of 6
million.

It was indeed regret

-
&&q that
Chinese registered voters were only 20£ of the total. This

current

comment blames

the Government for its undue restrictions in the nationality law but it also
observes

that a great number, of qualified Chinese.voters voluntarily sacrificed their
-

right and

failed to register.

In order to raise the political position of the Chinese and for
the

protection of their
interests i1j advocates

that besides

fitting positively for citizenship,

steps must also be taken to

encourage eligible Chinese voters not to foref
eit their right.

They should

-
fcalBB the warning bow
the Chinese in neighbouring
-
countries are ill
-
treated and suffering under cruel laws.

They should
know the passage of one law Bould reduce their million dollars
-
aorth of property to nothing.

If they
lose their political position, all

their interests will nave no protection.

The comment points out that in this

country it is very appropriate for

the Chinese to

claim
the right of participating in the Government.

Nobody can blame them because Chinese have

made
great contributions to

this

country as

evidenced by history. It is

also well known that the Chinese
have love for and owed allegiance to

this

country.

While Malaya is in the process of nation building
the Government should see afar and relax the citi
zenship law to permit the Chinese to play their part
in the nation building so

that all

races

could work together hand in hand for

the prosperity of

the new
nation.

XII.

MABCH 8 WOMEN'S DAY

1.

Women's Day Celebrations

Hanyang & Sin Chew
-

9.3.56.

(News

Jyems);

(Summary) March 8 Women's Day was

celebrated yesterday in Singapore separately by
four groups.

1.

P.A.P.

Women's Leanue

Celebration was

in

the form of a Mass itally at Shenton Way at 3 p.m.

All women in
Singapore were called upon to unite and claim

independence.

Speeches

were made by Lee Kuan
Yew, Mrs.

Elliott

(University of Malaya lecturer), Lim Chin Siong, Lim Chui Chan

(President of

the
PAP Women's League).

A lengthy manifesto was

issued and copies

distributed at

the rally.

The
follovnng six reso
lutions were adopted:
-

1.

Resolute

end

to

the Colonial

system.

2.

To

request

that Government make March 8 a public holiday.

3.

To

request legislation for monogamy.

U.

, To

request

that

Government

give absolute

freedom of publication,

association and speech.


5.

The Chinese

.........................


5.

To

request

......

5
-

To request that

Government

give absolute freedom

for

equal "work. .

...

____

-

___


--
.
-



---
:



6.

To request ending or Malayan war
by peaceful means.

2.

Joint celebration by Singapore Factory and Shop Workers Union.

Tailors Union,

Spinning Workers

Union.

Cafe a
n,d,
-

Hotel Employees Union,

at

the Badminton
Hall

at 10.UP P.m.

Addressing the meeting were Miss

Quel' Tai Eng (Chairman),
Miss Tan Lee
Eng (a preparatory committee member), Lee Kuan Yew, Lim Chin Siong,

Pone Sv/ee
Suan,

l'epresentative of UMHO Women's Section,

Wee Kok Kuang (president of City
Council Labour Unions Federation),

and representatives

of Chinese Middle School
Stud
ents Union and other public bodies.

Unity of all wraien was

called for in order to
remove unreasonable social system,

claim, equality and help

to

claim independence far
Malaya.

The following three resolutions

were adopted:

1.

March 8 be made a public holiday.

2.

AH
-
out support for the setting up of the Women's

I Federation.

3

Bequest legislation to protect women's rights.

3.
Joint celebration by Singapore C
h
inese Primary School Teachers Association and Han
Chiau. and Chonp; Kock altmni association at Hokklen Huay

Kuan Hall

at 7; fj] u.m.

Miss

Chen Yu


chan,

presiding over the meeting,

exhorted all

to

step up
learning,

increase their own laio'ledge,

and go one step further

to

educate the

great" mass

of
woman labourers. Other

speakers

at

the meeting included
Principals

of Tao Han and
Ohong Hock Schools,

and
-
representatives

of Preparatory Committee of Han Ewa Girls '

High School

and Singapore Chinese Primary School Teachers.

The meeting was presided over by Miss Li Sur
-
hui.

Among the

guests,

other

than 1,000 sc
hoolboys,

were Assaablyman Lee Kuan Yew,

Chuang Chu

lin

(Fi'incipal

of
Chung Cheng High School).

Ta.m Wee Keng (representative of English Teachers Union,

Chinese Schools),

representatives

of students'

parents, Preparatory Committee of

the
Cultural Society,

Primary School Teachers Association,

Preparatory Committee of

the
Women's Federation,

Pan
-
Malayan Students ?ederation

and varioi:s

schools.

Sun Loh
-
wen announced on behalf of

the boy members

of the Union the
presentation of a poem

to

the

girl members

as

a

gift for

the day.

Because of the limited

time for the meeting
-
only a fiance,

"Unite under

the flag of Miadle Schools

Students
Union",

was performed.

Li Su

hui,

the Chairman,

pointed out in her address that Malaya was full

of
sexy films nowadays,

that radi
o broadcasts

were mostly "yellow" sonrs,

that "yellow"
novels and pictorials

were everywhere,

net only harming Malayan youths but making
'romen unprotectedly become sacrifices

under the crimes

created by "yellow"

culture.

Among puest

speakers,

Sun Loh

wen,

dealing with

the origin of Women's
Day,, said

that

the

eight
-
hour work system
WBB
raised by women workers

in

the U.S.

in
1909 and a clash took place between

them

and

the Police over

their

demonstration.

In the following year Hiss

Zeilkxn,

a German
women's movement

leader, moved in the International Women's

Conference(?)

that

!

March 8 be stipulated International Women's Day,

and the Day

was boisi with the adoption of her motion.

Sun also praised

the girl members of the Middle Schools

Students Union
for

their spirit of unity which they had so

enthusiastically

demonstrated in the past.

.'

Speaking next,

Chuang Chu
-
lin praised the students

,

for their recent movement

to step up learning,

which has been

favourably reflected in reports by teachers

and
students

results.

In view of Malayanisation, he urged them to

go on

with

the movement to meet

the future needs for talent.

He

also pointed out the injustice of spending $3g million on

,

_}_

expatriate allowances, which is equivalent to grant

in

aid

to the
Chinese schools. In conclusion, he spoke in favour

of monogamy.

;

h

Addressing the rally in Kuo
-
yu, Lee Kuan Yew,

adviser

4

to

the Union,

spoke highly of women's

contributions

to history

?

and of

the Importance of women's organised strength to

the attainme
n
t of
independence.

He also pointed out that unlike Indonesia and Burma,

Singapore
still has no law to protect the rights of women.

2.

Origin of Women's Day

Nanyanr Siang Pau
-

8. % 56.

(Current comaent)

;

(Summary)

Quoting the statement on the
"International Women's Day",

today,

issued
by the Government authorities

and published in the Press yesterday,

this

current
comment observes

that this day is

interpreted by the Conmunist Party as founded by it
As

the "Dictionary of New Knowledge",

which wa
s

quoted in the Government
statement,

was published after Shanghai

came under the Chinese Communists,

the
comment shows

no

surprise at

the natural

inclination in its

interpretation

towards

the
Corsnunist Party.

Quotinr "Tzu Hai" published by Chung Hwa Book

Co.,

the co.iment says

that "iiarc
-
h 8"

as

International

Women's Day was the resolution of

the second
international

conference,

in 1910 of

the World Women Socialists,

and

that it

cannot be
considered as

a Communist day

even if Communist

countries

attach s
ome special

significance to

the day.

From

the

second paragraph of

the authorities'

statement, the

conment opines,

we
believe

the Commintern has

the intention to

use

"women's unions"

as

a means

of pushing on
world revolution, but women's

organisations

all
oyer

the world have not

completely accepted i ts
leadership.

Hecountint the history of su'fragette movement which "egan in northern
Europe,

Britain and the U.S.,

the comment says that no

outsider knows how much
opportuni :y of activity Russia gives

to wome
n as

women have no

opportunity to
participate in high level political activities

of Russia,

which is loudest in calling for
women's

rights,

and Bussian women are not seen in many international social

functions.

Since

the U.N.

Charter

stipulates

completely
equal rights for women,

the

conrnent

concludes,

the

centre of women's movement nowadays

is

to

shoulder

the same
responsibility as men in pressing for peace,

democracy,
-

freedom

and independence.


In

the

XXII.

S.T.C

.........................


-

26

-

Hf

"


XUI..

S.T.C.

FAKES

ffanfang Evening Post
-

5. % 56.

(Edltorial):

(Summary)
-

This paper cites oppositions from all

quarters

to

the decision of the STC to
increase its fares

talcing advantage

of an old ruling,

and urges

all

elected Assemblymen

to fulfil

the responsibility entrusted to

them by the people and not to

tolerate a Company malting excessive profits at the expense of

the public and bringing detrimen
tal

consequences

to society as

a whole.

~

_,

The decision of the Company to increase i
\
,,
-

fares from 25

cents

to
MO
or 50
cents is in total disregard of the opposition

of all people

and the suggestion of the City
Council that the STC should wait for

tuo m
onths more

to

see if there mil be an actual
loss.

The Company is

evidently determined to mate excessive profit without waiting to
see if there mil be actual JLoss

after the corruption by its

employee has stopped. It is
talcing advantage of a loophole in

the law.

XTV.

B0H.D AFFAIBS

1.

Karachi

conference is not to be taken
too lightij
:

Chung Shine; Jit Pao

-

7. 56.

(Editorial)
:

(Sumnary)

This

editorial

observes

that

the

2nd 3EAT0

Council conference which
opened yesterday in Karachi in which the Foreign
Ministers

of eight

signatory nations

are participating is mainly to survey its

annual reports

and

to

vcrk out

a nev/ programme
for the

ensuing year,

and therefore is

only a meeting of routine nature.

However,

ss

recent Russian overtures in South East Asia,

sccomp
-
mied by offers of economic

and
technical

aid,

have

strengthened

the feelings

that

the Wess faces

ijfp
most dangerous

threat ever levelled arainst its position in the area,

the

conference i:

not

to

be

taken too
lightly'In vieT, of Kussia'E new drive

to

extend her influence in the area.

iio

doubt,

the

edizo.i.l

continues,

SKATO

v;as

a deterrent

and was purely on
a defensive nature.

Bui since Coimunist subversion . ©mains

a major

threat

in

South East
Asia,

it

is

time

that

the

conference should

. lonely

examine the situation

and lay

the
foundation for military

alliance to

offset

the existing danger.

It poin s

out

that Russia's
change of policy in stabilising the still

fluid situation in South East Asia is

not

due

to

any

chaniye of heart.

The Co.anunists

are Striving by means

other

-
than

aggression

to

ccjiieve their aim of domination.

Therefore,

the editorial suests

that

the SEATO conference would also

devise new

Sac tics of propaganda to substantiate the universal belief

thet

the only

effective way

to

cou
nter

the Communist sinister

designs

is by setting up

a collective
defence alliance.

For

the presens,

the frustration of
-
Russian subversion should he a

task
oi

utmost importance.

To

achieve

this

aim,

it is necessary

to

emphasise the political}

military as

v;ell

as

economic

aspects

and,

above all,

to

understand the aspirations of

the
people of South East

Asia.

In conclusion,

the editorial

gives its blessing to the SEATO
conference and wishes

it every success.

2.

High officials

(of many countries) now
-
gather
ing
in Karachi

Nanfang Evening Post 7. j. 56.

(Editorial):

\
:.

(Sunmary) On the

day of the 2nd SEATO

council meeting in

-

Karachi attended by Foreign Ministers

and military experts

of the eight member nations,

this

editorial wishes

them safety

and success.

_

In the press

conference at New Dehli, ilr.

Selwyn Lloyd,

British Foreign
Secretary,

is

quoted to have said that "the danger of "Korld war is

receding and the SEATO

and the HATO

are purely defensive organizations."

He told India's council on world
proble
ms that "We are not interested in their territory or have any wish to interfere with
their social development".

Mr. Dulles,

the U.S.

Secretary of State,

has said on his

arrival at Karachi

that
"We shall

discuss

thetways

and means of improving security and
welfare of the signatories
and it is believed that under this free atmosphere the conference will produce very good
results".

The French Foreign Minister has

emphasised the

importance of having a unified policy on Indo

China.

-

...

All

these statements,

th
e editorial observes, nave shown the sincerity of the
Western Powers

to promote peace and it atgurs well for the conference.

The editorial

therefore expresses

these hopes in the conference:

(l)

To

find a
common acceptable solution on she issue of Indo
-
Chin
a;

(2)

To

have more discussion on
the promotion of people's

welfare;

and

(3)

To put into

practice what Mr. Lloyd has said of
non
-
interference in other countries' social

development.

3
-

World situation facing a new change

Kanyang Siang Pau
-

6. % 56.

(Editorial)
:

(Sunmary)

This

editorial

expresses

anxiety over

the world situation

arising from the unrest
in

the Middle East which, if not carefully handled,

night easily lead to a great war. It agrees
wi;th the statement

two

days ago by the French Foreign
Minister

that Britain and the U.S.

are paying too much attention to

extending'milli tar
-
y influence in various

areas

to

the
neglect of political
1

and

economic

development in

these areas because the use of nuclear
weapons has

rendered all ordinary military
equipments ineffective.

While the Eastern bloc
is

energetically launching a peace offensive,

it

is

better for the West to

fight with the same
weapon

to

show the
-
.vorld who

is really sincere in upholding peace.

History,

the editorial points out,

tells us

that all ualitary enthusiasts

have
invariably solicited their cssi destruction and those who

exhibited brutal

force never died a
natural

death..

Eden, it is learnt, is gaing to exchange views on the world situation with
Mollet,

the French Premier.

v


I


In

The

29

The editorial
-

earnestly hopes

that

the West would re
-
examine the world situation
and. rind an

effective method

to

ensure world peace.

This,

it believes,

will

help

greatly in the political

development

or all

countries

particularly

the countries

in Asia
which have nearly acquired independence. They ape generally vacillating at the
crossroads not knowing where to

go.

If

the U.S.,

Britain and
-
Fran
ce change their old
strategy and launch a large
-
scale peace movement

to

have their voice penetrate into

the Eastern
-

bloc.,' there is

every possibility to prevent

them from

carrying out

their
ambition for

aggression.

.

In conclusion

the editorial
laaihtains

that in

the future world 7/e must

appeal

to

the highest wisdom of mankind to

give up barbarous

bloody ar and prevent
all

tragedies

so that mankind will really progess.

h.

The Communists

benefit by neutrality

Ghuns ShJTi,cr Jit Pao
-

9.
-
. 5.6.

(
Editorial):

(Summary)

This

editorial

condemns

India and Egypt as not really neutral but

to help

the
Communists by frustrating the

, harmless

defensive pacts of the West such as SEATO

and Baghdad. It urges

the West

to

wake up

and not

to tolerate the
continuation of the

situation

as

a result of

their "neutrality".

The editorial

attributes

all

the

trouble in

the Middle East,

Indo
-
China and
Sorth Africa

to

the instigation and attempt of expansion by Russia and Coitir.unist China,

and sees that

the develo
pments

in

these dangerous spots

are all advantageous

to

the
Conmunitts.

For instance,

in Indo
-
China the Vietminh are a product of ilcseow
and
-
Pelting.

They occupy North Vietnam and the

two provinces

of Laos.

In

conjunction
with Communist China

they

scared
off

the pro
-
West Cambodia which is nov/ raising the
banner of nexitrality.

In the Middle East some Arab nations led by Egypt are frustrating the
Baghdad Pact, assuming the seeding attitude of neutrality. This has left heir docs
-
.vide open for Communist
infiltration.

In

the

issue
of

Kashmir,

it

is only right

for

the SSATO

Conference

to
help

find a

solution.

But India has adopted a strong attitude permitting no

o

tside
interferenee for which the Coinauniats

would have a gro.rid

to

call

the West
imperialists.

After

'
-
he

dismissal of General

Plubb by Jordan,

Egypt is now advqcating
joint financial

aid

to

Jordan

together with Saudi

Arabia and Syria so

that Jordan will

sever relations with Britain.

She is

also

calling
-

the

entire Arab bloc

to boycott

Iraq for
her participation

in

the Ba
-
hdad pact.

These actions

of Sgypt,

the

editorial

asserts,

cannot be said to be neutral
because being neutral one

should not

take interest in matters

of

the

.either

side and
would be very careful in

-
liat he does

or say
s

lest he she
-
Id be blamed as siding, with
one of

the opposite blocs.

The editorial

regrets

that

the West still hopes

to win over

these neutral
nations

and is

evidently

tolerating

their actions

and attitude,

with

the result

that

they are
harassing the Wes
t

"to

the advantage of

the Communists.

5.

General

election of the Republic

of South Vietnam

Chung Shing Jit Pao
-

5..56.

(Editorial):

(Summary)

Referring to

the general

election yesterday of the Republic of South
Vietnam,

this

editorial

sees

the birth of
a new independent
-

nation,

thus

concluding
the chapter of the 80
-
year French colonial rule in Indo
-
China.

It attributes the glorious

achievement exclusively to the

.vise leadership of Ngo Dinh Diem.

The editorial

gives

a short description of bovr Indo
-

China was

divided into

two

and how North Vietnam was

ceded to the Vietminh Communist regime by a surrender
type of Geneva agreement,

which stipulated a general

election for South Vietnam in July
with a view to forming a unified government. Seeing that thi
s was

a despicable intrigue on
the part of the Communists to swaThw up the whole of Indo
-
China by the Communists,
Ngo Dinh Diem has

been quick enough to reorganise the Sotrth Vietnam Government by
deposing Bao Dai,

the Chief of State,

and pro claiming a Re
public

thus saving South
Vietnam from falling into

the orbit of the Communists.

There have been strong oppositions from Communist

China,

Korean Communists

and Vietminh on the

general

election

of South Vietnam,

accusing
-
both America

and Ngo Dinh
-
Diem of

ha
ving broken the

Indo
-
China agreement.

Even India is

echoing

them.

Bat since South Vietnam is not

a signatory to

the

Geneva agreement,

why should she accede

to

the plot of selling

out

the interests

of South Vietnam?

Therefore,

their shouts

are unworthy of n
ote.

-

In

conclusion,

the editorial

wishes

the new Republic of South Vietnam
success.

6.

Diplomatic policy of France

Nanfang Bveninr
-

Post
-

9. % 56.

(Editorial)
:

(Summary)

This

editorial,

discussing the

changing diplomatic policy of France after
the
second world war,

observes

that despite the new turn in favour of closer relations
with Communist countries,

there is

the following tendency as seen in election
speeches

of the Socialist Party:

1.

No

intention for

the time being

to leave the NATO.

2.

All

out

efforts

to seek International

harmony beginning with

the
i
-
sues

of

disarmament

and atomic

control.

3.

Strengthening

the leaderships of U.S.A.,

Britain and France

in

the
Western bloc,

particularly co
-
operation between Bi
-
i tain and France.


Nevertheless,

it is

not

diplomatic policy that constitutes the most vexing
problem to

the French Cabinet.

If

the North African issue is ,
-
settled,

the

"diplomatic

capital"

of France in the international

political

arena

vri.ll

be greatly
enhanced.,

,

Situation .......

5
-

General

7.

Situation

on

the

Indian Peninsula

is

-
.7or
-
th;y of

attention

Sin Che
-
.? Jit Foh
-

9. % 56c

(Editorial) :

(Summary)

This

editorial

expr
-
esses

anxiety that after

the support

given by
Khrushchev and Bulganin to India on the issue of Kashmir during their visit

to India,

the SEATO

Conference in Karachi has now riven support

to Pakistan in her demand
for sovereignty over Kashmir.

This Itsue,

it observes,

has now become a point of
dispute between East and West,

complicated by racial and religious

aspects

similar

to

those in Israel.

As India is so near

to Malaya,

the aggravation of the issue is

of great

concern

:o

lis

in iialaya,

The editorial

explains how India is

a country stronger

than Pakistan,

how she
has

raised her vorld position as

third influence and how she refused to hold

a plebiscite in
Kashmir as ordered by

the U.S.

for fear that Kashmir has a majority population of
Muslims.


On the other hand Pakistan has

joined SEATO

and

Baghdad Pacts

and sided
with the West,

evidently

to offset her inferior position against India.

The West cannot
disappoint

their ally in PafcLs
-
tan after Russia launched tire diplomatic offensive and are
forced to

give open support to Pakistan in order

to

maintain

the unity of the allies,

Furthermore,

Pakistan is

a country opposing the separation of religion
from poli
-
ios,

contrary to

the policy pursued by India.

Among the Indian population of

3,800,000,000 there

are hO,000,000 Muslims,

and amonr
-

the Paki
stan population of
76,000,000

:he
--
e

are

also over 20, ,00,000 Hindus.

Therefore if religious

and racial

prejudices

are

to let loose,

the whole of the

Indian Peninsula would be out of

control.

This

is similar

to

the dispute between Israel

and

the Aral) blo
c

and will

add danger

greatly

to

the diplomatic war being engaged in ie world.

8.

Critical

situation in the

Mi idle East

Sin Chew Jit Poh
-

6
-
. ~..
r
;6,

(Editorial)
-
;

(Summary)

This

edi

orial

analyses

the

critical situation in the Middle East
-

It
points

c

t

.he.

the

si;:tden

dismissal of Lt.
-
Gen.

John Glul
-
b Pasha by Jordon has

deprived

Jie West of

the

control

over Jordon's Arab Legion.

This

aggravates the
dispute between Israel

and Egypt

and increases

the influence oT neutralists lea by
Saudi Arabia.

It is

also an indirect victory for Russia.

On

the other nana,

Washington has

its

hands

tied on atco ntof

the

coming
Presidential

election.

It is

not in a position to

form resolute diplomatic policy.

For
instance, in

the recent

shipment of

arms

to Saudi Arabia

t
he U.S.

has not only
disappointed Israel which opposes

the sales

of
CXTTI
S

to

the Arab nations

but also

dissatisfied Saudi Arabia which received

the arms.

The editorial

sees

certain similarity between

the

3EAT0

and Baghdad Facts.

The participation of
Pakistan in

the SEATO

ha.s incurred

the opposi tion of India

and

the suspicion

and dissatisfaction of Burma

and Indonesia.

This

similar

to

the

opposition of Egypt

to

the Baghdad Pact.

Both

of

them may

force

the unity of

the neutralists

in South Asia and

th
e Kiddle East,

wholly against

the original

intention of the West in forming these

two pacts.

The

letsons

learnt

from

the Middle East may

as

well

J

apply to S.E.

Asia.

'ijir

U/ST. iV

PCTlfiS


____________

.

MALAY

PRESS

APPEAL

TO KAijSHALL

TO

3E PRANK
WITH TSE PEOPLE

Utusan I
-
ielayu

-

7.6.56.

(Editorial)
:

(Translation) We are proud thatpETS, David Marshall and his Party are not orepared to accept
thai Liberal Socialist Party as a partner in his Joalitioa Government. The Labour Front is a
socialist party. Even though
1
'there are many weaknesses and shortcomings in its socialism,
fere feel that such
-
weaknesses should not be further weakaied by raisin: with the capitalist
influence of the Liberal Socialists.

The

decision of kr.Marshall

and

the Labour Front in rejecting
the liberal Socialists is

a bold one.

We say "bold" because it is

said that the decision ?as made amidst strong pressure
from the Colonial Office.

Fe
\
rere

informed that

r.

L ennox
-
Boyd

and his

senior officers

in Empress .Place

had urged kr. Marshall

to

accept the
Liberal Socialists'§n his Coalition Government.

Singapore's

representative delegation to

the
April

talks

in London should

include representatives of

the Liberal

Socialist Party as

representatives

of the Coalition Gover
nment.

tush,

it was reported,

is Mr. Lennox
-
3oyd
;
s

demand.

If Mr.

.arshall

does not accept

the Liberal Socialists,

it

is

said

that

the colonial Office
would refuse to

recognise his

representatives

as

those rho

really r epreseat the people of
Singapore.

That is why kr.

Leonox
-
Boyd will be

'self
-
government"

and

"independence"

kr. Marshall

has

taken

action

to

oppose the
-
wish of the
Colonial Office.

We

should praise his

idleness

and wisdom. "
-
But

praise alone is not

enough.

k
r.
karshall has

shown that he is not prepared

to

dance

to the tune of

the Colonial Office. The
Colonial Office will

definitely not keep quiet

about Hr. Marshall's

stubbornness.

Should v?e let

him stand

alone to face "the Colonial Office

3ut f
-
.r. Karshall

himself should be bold

in

taking further

action.

He

should act

boldly In the sense

that he need
no

longer

depend

on

his

strength

In

the Legislative Assembly.

He

should

"get

out"

of

the Legislative Assembly in

the

sense

that

he

should

appeal

to

the

eoole,

many of whom are outside the Assembly,

to

support him.

Mr.

..arshall

s'lould nop

depend
on

the

strength of the

teoole's voices

outside

the Legislative Assembly and

get

that

supoort

a
--

fully

as

possible in

order

to

face his

present

crisis.

r
.,'

The peoole
want

independence without

any conditions. Singajore's
independence should not

depend on any conditions forced

from oxitside,

such as

the

condition

that

there should be Liberal Socialists in the Labour
Front
-
0KN0
-
5
-
iCA
-
SKH
\
: Alliance Government.

The people'
s

qualification

for
inde
pendence is

a qualification based

solely on

the people's awareness

and

rights.

V'e

oropose

that

:
r. Marshall

call

a People's

Congress

to

discuss

the'difficulties which have now clearly become our

joint

difficulties

and

crisis.

An
Independence Front led by

'
:
.r.
karshall

should be

forced now comprising all

classes of

the peocle

all

political

parties

and

trade unions

in

this

Colony,"to

decicfe

the

attitude

of

the

people of Singapore on

independence

for

the Colony.






Mr.
!
-
iarshall.

V


reluctan
-

to

grant Sincraoor
e.