Using the HIT Model to Support Better Decisions

trextemperΜηχανική

22 Φεβ 2014 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 1 μήνα)

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Proposed
a
rticle

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or other communication outlet


Using
the
HIT Model
to Support

Better Decisions


In today’s
economic climate
,
it
is now

essential to
prioritiz
e

where to invest
limited
fund
s
to
implement best managemen
t practices for controlling pollution.


T
ools
, such as computer
models,

are being developed
t
o

help
support such decisions

with better information.


On October 22, 2010, a workshop was held at
both Grand Valley State University in Grand
Rapids and Ferris S
tate University in Big Rapids
. This workshop

introduce
d interested

participants

to
the
most recent version of the
High Impact Targeting
(
HIT
)

Model.


The workshop
was generously supported by the Frey Foundation.


The HIT Model was developed by researchers

at the Institute of Water Resources at Michigan
State University
. The model was developed
to improve water quality by addressing erosion and
sedimentation

in
the
rural areas of
watersheds
located
in the Great Lakes region
.


Stream sedimentation
is often

caused by

the accelerated erosion of soils.
As workshop
participants understand, s
ediment loadings continue to pose a major threat to water quality

in
both the Lower Grand River Watershed and the Muskegon River Watershed
, their home
watersheds
.


Even tho
ugh sediment is a natural component of rivers and streams, it is considered a pollutant
.
The impacts
from

erosion and s
ediment
ation
also
include deterioration of

natural habitat,
navigation, flood control, and recreational uses
in

the watershed.


Managing

erosion and sedimentation remains a challenge for watershed management efforts.
Controlling sedimentation
often requires increased levels of effort
in the form of time, money,
and
persistence.


The HIT Model offers a tool for
identifying and
optimizing b
est management practices for
erosion and sedimentation control in a watershed.

The
October
workshop provided a forum for
participants

to
experience

the most recent version

of the HIT Model

and to offer their
recommendations for improving the model
.


As th
e workshop organizer, the
A
nnis Water Resources Institute at GVSU

was also able to
collect invaluable insight
from workshop participants

on
the use of the HIT Model
.
Perhaps o
ne
of the most
useful

conclusions from the workshop was
the
growing

interest in
h
aving
such tools
available to
those
m
ak
ing

critical local decisions
o
n how best to improve water quality.



End


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