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27 Οκτ 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 7 μήνες)

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Summary




Computers as tools in the workplace:

Computers are often used in production tasks like documents or graphic production and

management. There are often used as tools to perform many other less obvious tasks in the
workplace. This covers some of those tasks and may prompt you to identify other uses of
the computer in the workplace
.


Communication:


The computer has the capacity

to work as an organisational communication tool
. It can also
be used as a
n

internal

and external communication, such as emails to all employers or an
industry newsletter sent to

subscribers on a mailing list.



Device configuration:

Some devices will straight away work after being installed, such as
PNP devices. They

identify themselves to an operating syste
m when they are plugged in, and
when the system
detects the new device, it

reconfigures itself to use the
device. More often, how
ever,
devices still need to be configured by hand manually and if they are
to
work their best.



Control panel

Lots of devices such as a mouse, a printer, a keyboard, a monitor etc all have an applet in
the operating systems control panel where users can
adjust the original settings or the
behaviour in the hardware
.


BIOS



Your computer’s

easy

input/output system includes lots of settings

vital to its operation. You
would enter the BIOS usually by pressing a key such

as ESC or DEL as the PC is turning on.

In
the BIOS you can adjust very

basic settings for the computer, like the hard disk size, which
devices the PC

should use to boot up, whether the PC should use power saving settings, if
you want to look for a USB keyboard and some more.

Be heaps careful w
hen adjusting the
BIOS settings. Some settings can prevent

your PC from turning on or working properly.
Some settings could disable key

hardware devices.




The registry


The registry is a database of system sett
ings used by Microsoft Windows.
It’
s a
dangerous
place to be if you don’
t know what you’
re doing. The
registry gives out a

little

bit of help and
pretty much it does not give any

p
rotection if you make
any
mistakes. I
f you know what you
are doing,

be sure to

resurrect

or optimise any

devices by

tinkering with the registry, it is
a
little like dancing in a mine
field. It is better to leave the registry well alone
.



Hardware settings


Some devices,
mainly the old ones

can be configured by adjusting

the

hardware settings

for it
. More modern
devices are software

controlled

completely. Some e
xamples of hardware settings are dials,

switches,

dip

switches and jumpers
.


Compatibility


There are lots of different

types of compatibility to be considered when installing or

mod
d
i
ng hardware &

software
. Incompatibility can lead to systems

failing or not working optimally
.


Plug and socket compatibility


Most plugs have sockets

that match, also

the wrong plug cannot be

physically inserted

into the wrong socket. This isn’t
always

correct/true. PS/2 mouse
& keyboard plugs + sockets are

identical

in the physical way
,

but plugging a mouse plug into the keyboard socket at the back of your

PC is
n

t going to work

at all!


Operating system compatibility


A piece of software is
written to run on a system that
operates, a system like

Microsoft Windows or Apple Mac computers/laptops.

It can
’t

run on a different operating

system without some form of translation.


Protocol compatibility


Protocols means
rules

for communication

for networking. They are

discussed in

good

detail in Chapter

7 and

chapter

9. Devices using different protocols usually

can
’t
communicate with each other
. I
t’
s like

they are speaking

a different language or different languages
.
E.g.

networking software designed to use

TCP/IP won’t work on a network if it only uses
SPX
/IPX
.


Hardware compatibility


There are

different forms of hardware

lots of the time
, which can
’t

be

Changed
. A small computer system interface
h
ard disk, will not work if plugged into an IDE

Hard

disk con
troller


and vice versa

(Example)
.


Resource compatibility


Software, and some hardware
requires ce
rtain types or amounts of
resources

from a
system
. A

video/computer

game,
E.g. may

require at least 256 MB of RAM

(Random access
memory),

or

maybe a certain

make of video card, or a certain version of DirectX.


Disk size and format compatibility


Obviously, a 3
-
1/2 inch disk
won’t

fit i
nto a 5
-
1/2 inch disk drive. W
hile a DV
D will fit into a
CD drive, do not

expect it to work. In the same

way, a floppy disk w
ritt
en on a Mac OS
probably won’t

be readable on a

Linux or Microsoft Windows PC without special translators
being

installed.


Application, version, and file format compatibility


While software

usually

can

read files created by earlier versions of the

same softwar
e,
the
reverse is rarely true
.


Other forms of compatibility



Language:

Some software is written in a particular language, which

may be of no use to
you if you don’t speak that language.



File size:

Some documents, especially multimedia fil
es, can be so large

that your system
cannot process them in real time.


Performance


Software +
hardware will only perform optimally if it has sufficient

resources and is
configured correctly. If performance is below par, look

into the resource needs of
the
equipment. Often extra RAM, a better

video card or a faster hard disk can produce greatly
improved

performance
.


Testing and troubleshooting


Testing is a procedure to ensure equipment is operating correctly.

Troubleshooting is a procedure to find and
solve the cause of a problem.

A methodical and logical approach is needed in both cases.

To test successfully, you first need to know what you are testing
for
.

These are the testing
criteria
. For example, you might test a printer for

speed, reliability, an
d accuracy of output. You might test a file server for

durability or robustness. You can test a website for the clarity of its

message.


Paperwork: Warranties, manuals, registration

and support


Few people like paperwork


filling in warranty forms, assets

registers,

fault logs, reading manuals, registering software. They all consume

valuable time. But reconsider.

If you don’t read the warranty for some equipment, how will you know

what to do if it fails? Does it need to be returned to the manufacturer?

Wil
l it be serviced on site? When does the warranty expire? What faults

does it cover? Having a brief record of these things will help you when

equipment finally dies.


Maintaining hardware devices


For hardware components to operate correctly and reliably
they should

be clean. Covering a computer, monitor or keyboard with a dust cover

can significantly reduce the amount of dust and dirt that settles on these

items.


Cleaning a mouse


The current popular mouse design works by using a mouse ball and at

least
two internal rollers. The smooth movement of the mouse pointer

depends on the smoothness and cleanliness of the rollers and ball. If the

ball or rollers get dirty they can become quite coarse making mouse

movement jagged
.


Cleaning a monitor


Dust can sett
le on monitors, which can easily be cleaned with a lightly

dampened cloth. Specialised monitor wipes are available that are designed

to dissolve the oily marks left by fingerprints, etc. Do not attempt to wipe

all parts of a monitor, you should only wipe t
he screen when necessary.


Printers and scanners


Different types of printers require different maintenance tasks. Many

printers contain inbuilt maintenance tools, such as test print pages,

printer

head cleaning, printer head alignment, and warnings when ink or

toner is running low.


Maintenance resources


In your hardware maintenance role you may require the following

resources:

• cleaning materials, for example, alcohol
-
based screen wipes for

moni
tor screens and scanner glass

• cleaning appliances for plastics

• a keyboard vacuum




Think about
questions:


1)

Should you blow dust and dirt off hardware

Components
? Why/why not?


2)

What are some measures that manufacturers have taken to ensure that devices

are
plugged into the appropriate sockets in a computer system?


3)

Why should hardware devices be cleaned?



Think about Answers:


1)

No, you should not blow dust off hardware because sometimes if you blow,

you
could spit, then

your spit could get inside the ha
rdware and it isn’t g
ood for it and
could possibly stuff the hardware up
overtime,

you should wipe

the

dust off
hardware

with a clean, dry soft towel or cloth or something like that
.

2)



3)

Hardware devices should be cleaned because if you don’t clean them it
could cause
them to break or not work properly because the dust could get inside, build up, and
get jammed inside
. Also if this question refers to being cleaned out, like formatting a
HDD, it is very important to clean the hardware once every now and then
or search
for viruses because if viruses get in, it could screw up your hardware device,
especially a computer
.






Try this Questions



1)

Under the supervision of your teacher, clean

all applicable components of the
computers in

your classroom, including
monitors, keyboards,

mice, printers,
scanners. Don’t forget the file server is running all day, every day, and suffers

more
from dust accumulation than desktop

computers.


2)

Prepare a ‘cleaning list’ for the

future computer
cleaning personnel,

including tips

on
wha
t to do
and

what not to do.



Try this Answers


1)

...

2)