Alliance College-Ready Public Schools English Learner Master Plan 2012

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Alliance College
-
Ready Public Schools


E
nglish Learner Master Plan


2012




















Adapted from LAUSD EL Master Plan




2


Mission Statement


The mission of Alliance
College
-
Ready Public Schools, a nonprofit charter management organization, is to
open and operate a network of small high
-
performing 9
-
12 and 6
-
8 public schools in historically
underachieving, low income, communities in California that will annually demons
trate student academic
achievement growth and graduate students ready for success in college.


Message from
Judy Burton, President and CEO



Consistent with our mission, we believe all children
, including English Language Learners,

can
learn at high levels and be prepared for college level course work given the opportunity to do so.



We believe that opportunity must include the opportunity to learn rigorous grade level appropriate
content while receiving appropriate intensive
diffe
rentiated
support to develop academic English
Language Proficiency.


We believe that students must be appropriately identified in a timely manner consistent with
State and Federal mandates and that ongoing intensive differentiated support must be provided
in a manner that does not hold English Language Learners back or sepa
rate them from
access
to
the core instructional program
.


We believe that our rigorous high expectations must include English Language Learners without
making excuses or setting lower or different targets for their success.


Alliance school leaders and cla
ssroom teachers are committed to continually learning and
improving instructional strategies as members of a professional learning community driven by
and analysis of
disaggregated data to examine
our progress
.


The primary purpose of the Alliance EL
Master Plan is to establish and communicate the
following:


1.

How the needs of students who are English Learners will be identified

2.

What services will be offered for students who are English Learners

3.

How, where and by whom the services will be provided

4.

How t
he program for students who are English Learners will be evaluated each year and how the
results of this evaluation will be used to improve those services




3

The Alliance EL Master Plan is applicable to all current and new Alliance Schools.

Current Alliance

Schools as of 2012:


HIGH SCHOOLS

1.

Alliance College
-
Ready Academy HS #5

2.

Alliance College
-
Ready Academy High School #16

3.

Alliance Cindy & Bill Simon Technology Acad HS

4.

Alliance Dr. Olga Mohan HS

5.

Alliance Environmental Science & Technology HS

6.

Alliance
Gertz
-
Ressler HS

7.

Alliance Health Services Academy HS

8.

Alliance Huntington Park College
-
Ready Academy HS

9.

Alliance Judy Burton Technology Academy HS

10.

Alliance Marc
&

Eva Stern Math
&

Science HS

11.

Alliance Media Arts & Entertainment Design HS

12.

Alliance Renee and M
eyer Luskin Academy HS

13.

Alliance Susan & Eric Smidt Technology Academy HS

14.

Alliance
William and Carol Ouchi HS

15.

Alliance Tennenbaum Family Technology Academy HS


MIDDLE SCHOOLS

16.

Alliance College
-
Ready Middle Academy #4

17.

Alliance College
-
Ready Middle Academy #5

18.

Alliance College
-
Ready Middle Academy #7

19.

Alliance Jack H. Skirball MS

20.

Alliance Richard Merkin MS

21.

Alliance Christine O’Donovan Middle School





4


Table of
Contents



INTRODUCTION……………………………………………………………………………………………
6

Guiding Principles

For Educating English Language
Learne
r
s
…………………
..........
.

7


CHAPTER 1: INITIAL IDENTIFICATION, PARENT NOTIFICATION OF
INSTRUCTIONAL
PROGRAM OPTIONS, ASSESSMENT,
PROGRAM

PLACEMENT AND RECLASSIF
ICATION
...……
………………
………………………………………………………………………………


11

Chapter

Overview………………………………………………………………………………...…….11

Enrollment Process………………………………………………………………………………...
.
.
11

Language Proficiency Assessments
……………………………………………………………..
1
3

Parent Co
nfirmation Of Program Placement……………………………………………………
1
7

Transfer Students
……………………………………………………………………………………..
1
7

Professional Development For Staff And Administrators On Initial
Identi fi cati on,
Pl acement, And Rel ated Parental Ri ghts/Informed
Consent……………………………
1
9

English Learner Accountability System
………………………………………………………..
20

Reclassification………………………………………………………………………………………...20

Criteria For Reclassification

................................
................................
..........................

20

Monitoring Progress Of Reclassified Students

................................
.............................

21

Reclassifying English Learners With Disabilities

................................
....................


22


CHAPTER 2: INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM
……………………………………………………
23

Chapter
Overview

................................
................................
................................
.....................

….
23

Mainstream English Instructional Program Grades 6
-
12

................................
...........

23

Accelerated Learning Program For Long Term English Learners,

Grades 6
-
12
………
25

Interventions For Students Not Meeting Minimum Progress Expectations

..................

3
0

Guiding Principles
For
Instructional Services To EL
s

................................
................

3
1

English Language Development

................................
................................
....................

3
2

Professional Development ………………………………………………..
……
……………
.

37

Ensuring Access To Core Academic Content

................................
...............................

38

Use Of The Primary Language In Instruction

................................
...............................

40


CHAPTER 4: INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM
-

STANDARD ENGLISH LEARNERS
…….
42

Guiding Principles
For Instructional Services To EL
s

................................
...............

42

Instructional Goals

................................
................................
................................
.................

42

Mainstream English Language Development

................................
................................

42

Ensuring Access To Core Academic Content

................................
.............................

42

Professional Development

................................
................................
................................

42


CHAPTER 5: F
AMILY AND
COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT…………………………………43

Introduction

................................
................................
................................
................................
.

43

Communication With Parents ………………………………………………………
........
....43

Accountability For
Working with Parents as Partners…
..........
............................
..44


`

CHAPTER 6: MONITORING,

EVALUATION, AND ACCOUNTABILITY…………….….46

Chapter Overview

................................
................................
................................
.......


46


5


FIGURES

Figure
1. Initial Identification Flow Chart
……………………………………………………..
23

Figure 2.
Differentiated Mainstream English Instructional Program
……………………………..
25

Figure
3
.

Minimum Progress Expectations for English Learners in
Mainstream English……….
26


Figure
4
.

Accelerated Learning Program for Long Term
English Learners
………………………
27


Figure
5
.

Minimum Progress Expectations
Long
-
Term ELs

Accelerated Learning


Program
……………………………………………………………………………
..
.28

Figure 6
.

English Learner Newcomer Program,
Grades 6
-
12……………………………………
..
29


Figure
7
.

Minimum Progress Expectations for Secondary EL Newcomer Program

.
..
.
............

29

Figure
8
.

EL Program Goals, Evaluation Questions, and Measures……………………………
...
50



APPENDICES……
…………………………………………………………………………………
59

APPENDIX A
: Accountability Systems
……………………………..
……………………….
59

APPENDIX
B
: Progress Monitoring………………………………………………………………..60

APPENDIX
C
: EL Student Progre
ss Profile………………………………………………………
.
61

APPENDIX D
:

CELDT

Test Notification Parent Letter ………………………………………....
.
.62

APPENDIX E
:

CELDT Results Notification Parent Letter………………………………………..64

APPENDIX
F
:

Reclassification Parent Notification Consent Letter……………………………..66

APPENDIX
G
:
Examples of ELD Instruc
tional
Strategies
……………………………………….
74

APPENDIX H
:

CELDT Blueprint for Success, Grades 6
-
8
………………………………………83

APPENDIX I
: CELDT Blueprint for Success, Grades 9
-
12……………………………………..91



REFERENCES …………
…………………………………………………………………………..92







El Program Goals And Related Evaluation Questions & Measures

.........................


46

El Program Eval uati on Questi ons & Measures, By Goal

................................
.....

….



rsing mrogram j onitoring C bffectiveness fnformation qo fmprove
………………….52

Al l iance merformance j anagement

and Account abil it ó for f mpl ement at ion

and oesul t s

⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮
⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮
⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮
⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮⸮





CHAPTER 7: MEETING STATE AND FEDERAL COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS
……
56

Chapt er Overvi ew

................................
................................
................................
......


56

Authorization To Teach English Learners

................................
..............................


56

Funding

................................
................................
................................
................................
......

57



6

Introduction


The Alliance serv
es approximately 9,500 students in 15 high schools and 6 middle schools as of fall
2012 of which
87% are Latino;
22% are English
Learners and 45% are
Reclassified

Fluent English
Proficient (RFEP). Our Alliiancewide 2011
-
12 average
reclassification

rate is 24%
. As we grow to 50
schools our goal is to continuously improve our
reclassification

rate and to achieve consistently higher
rates in each individual school. We are committed to implement
ing research based instructional
methods a
nd strategies to insure that EL students achieve
proficiency in English and
graduate
high
school
ready for success in college


This document describes these services and offers guidance to parents, teachers, and
administrators.



This
Alliance
English Learner Master Plan
outlines systems
and instructional practices expected to be
in place in every school serving
ELs to guarantee that all
ELs in
Alliance Schools

have access to
rigorous curriculum in or
der to become fluent in English, to be profic
ient

all content standards
(common core as of 2014
-
15)
required in the state of California

and demonstrate readiness for
college as measured by college

readiness assessments, passing A
-
G courses with a grade of C or
better to graduate
and
to ensure
compliance with state and federal law and.


The Alliance

recognizes that EL
s have a double curricular load in that
they must become proficient
in
academic English, and they must
be proficient

in
all of the academic content required of all students in
California

and must demonstrate readiness for college including readiness for high school and
taking and passing all A
-
G courses with a grade of C or better to graduate.
This means that ELs
require additional services
and time
to ensure that they acquire E
nglish
and have access to the full
curriculum in a way that makes instruction comprehensible and
meaningful. ELs
must receive

effective

first teaching in the core content and
must receive

services
in addition to

core instruction to
ensure that their lingui
stic and academic needs are met.


All Alliance students receive additional time for learning:



Block schedule with longer uninterrupted instructional periods of 2 hour periods



1 hour longer school day



afterschool tutoring



190 days of instruction



Extended
year for summer session / summer bridge


We will use as a resource the California Department of Education 2010 publication of

Improving
Education for English Learners: Research
-
Based Approaches

and
work in partnership with district
and the state and local levels, so that all students
benefit.




7

GUIDING PRINCIPLES FOR EDUCATING
EL

LEARNERS (
ADAPTED BY ALLI ANCE
COLLEGE
-
READY PUBLIC SCHOOLS
)


___________________________________________________
______________________

PRINCIPLE 1


English learners are held to the same high expectations of learning established for all
students.
We hold the same standards for all student
s including readiness for college level
coursework.
Recognizing that the
education of EL student
s

is multi
-
faceted,
Alliance schools will

work
towards not just
supporting second language acquisition but all educational subjects and needs.


PRINCIPLE 2


English learners develop full receptive and productive proficiencies in English in the
domains of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, consistent with expectations for all
students.

Alliance

recognizes
that we need to be on the forefront in helping
ELLs develop
language skills quickly and effectively.


At the secondary level beginning in grade 6 it is our
expectation that students entering Alliance schools with 3 years of effective EL instructional support
will transition to RFEP within 3 years.


PRI
NCIPLE 3


English learners are taught challenging academic content that enables them to
demonstrate
proficiency in

performance standards in all content areas

(common core beginning in 2014
-
15)
, including reading and language arts,
mathematics, social studies, science, fine arts,
health
and physical education, consistent
with those for all students.
Alliance

further recognizes that
EL
students
must be

provided the same challenging content in all academic areas

with differentiated and
additional support
.


PRINCIPLE 4


English learners receive instruction that builds on their previous education and cognitive
abilities
and that reflects their language proficiency levels.
Alliance

recognizes that ongoing
assessment using
multiple measures is crucial to determine progress and to drive instruction that
focuses on language
acquisition and academic content

through the same interim assessments required of all students and
through ongoing assessment of English p
roficiency
.

Alliance

further recognizes the need to
provide
professional development for
school leaders
, teachers, and all school staff to
support the learning of
ELs in our schools.





8

PRINCIPLE 5


English learners are evaluated with appropriate and valid assessments that are aligned to
state
standards and that
have the same expectations for all students. EL students must also be
evaluated using CELDT assessments to measure progress in English fluen
cy.


PRINCIPLE 6


The academic success of English learners is a responsibility shared by all educators, the
family, and the community.
Alliance
, in partnership with
its

families and community,
will
take
interest and
be
accountable

for the education of EL students. The
Alliance

English Learner Master
Plan
strives to promote the family’s role in the education of ELs
the same as for all students
and to
promote open
communication and avenues for involvement

consistent with our core value of
“Working with parents as partners”.


ALLIANCE
ENGLISH LEARNER MASTER PLAN
BASED ON COMMITMENTS DEFINED IN
ALLIANCE CHARTER PETITIONS


English Learners


College Readiness requires proficiency in English for all students.
Structured English
language development curriculum and instructional strategies is provided for all Alliance students learning
to speak English as a second language and English only students who speak non
-
standard English.

Second
-
language learners and non
-
standard English speakers are expected to demonstrate proficiency in
English language development after three years of instruction.


Teachers participate in training to continually develop expertise in focused English language development
(ELD) instruction
al strategies as well as sheltered ELD strategies in core subjects for non
-
standard
English only speakers and students learning to speak English. Digital content used in blended learning
environments offers more supports for English language learners, incl
uding English as a Second
Language (ESL), primary language support, text
-
to
-
speech, and replay.


Alliance
schools

will meet all requirements of federal and state law relative to equal access to the
curriculum for those who are English Language Learners (EL
L’s). The goal will be to develop high quality
instructional programs and services for ELL’s that allow them to achieve the same challenging grade level
and graduation standards, in the same proportions, as native
-
English speaking students.


The English
language literacy intensive component of the
Alliance instructional
program supports ELL’s
through:



A teaching staff qualified in second language pedagogy.



An after school and summer school program with a strong language literacy focus determined by the
in
dividual assessed needs of each student.



Additional bilingual teacher’s aides in the classroom to assist ELL’s in English intensive classes.


Alliance
schools

offer

the core content areas in a sheltered English environment for students who are not
proficie
nt in English. Sheltered content classes are subject matter content courses designed specially for

9

ELL students. Students who are 2 or below on CELDT English proficiency below and far below on Alliance
interim benchmark assessments and ongoing classroom te
acher assessments are identified for additional
support and assigned additional support classes titled: Math or ELA Support in addition to grade level ELA
and/or assigned math course. The curriculum content for the sheltered English classes is the same as
in
the English only classrooms. Achieve 3000 provides additional support where the MacBook Pro will read
aloud student’s written passage or students can translate the passage into their native language.


To support the environment needed to assure that stu
dents needing English as a second language,
Alliance
schools

recruits teachers who have a secondary credential as well as bilingual or ESL
endorsements (state authorization to teach ELL’s such as BCLAD, CLAD, SB1969), and who not only have
training in seco
nd language pedagogy but also have experience teaching second language learners and
sheltered English classes. All teachers are trained in appropriate methods for teaching ELL’s at various
levels of proficiency. These methods include using bilingual teache
r aides and coaching, preview and
review strategies, and after school tutoring programs that are coordinated with the regular curriculum and
designed for ELL’s.




Sheltered English


Sheltered Instruction is to provide meaningful instruction in content area
s (social
studies, math, science) for transitioning Limited English Proficient (LEP) students towards higher
academic achievement while they are working towards English
fluency
. Instead of providing wate
red
down curriculum for LEP student, sheltered instruction allows for the content to be equal to that of
native English speakers while improving their grasp of the language. The teacher provides varied
methods of instruction that allow students to create m
eaning of multifaceted content in classroom
discussion, activities, reading and writing.



Preview/Review


Teachers present vocabulary prior to presenting core content


Alliance
teachers are trained to use
CA

English Language Development standards. The LAUSD ELD
Handbook is used as a resource guide for curriculum planning. Selected teachers attend appropriate
Alliance and
LAUSD training
when

offered. This allows these teachers to become qualified to train oth
er
teachers during
Alliance
professional development.


Alliance
schools

administer

the California English Language Development Test (CELDT) to all new
students whose home language is other than English on their Home Language Survey and to all English
Learn
ers annually to determine each student’s individual proficiency level and to assess student progress
in acquiring English Proficiency according to State Boa
rd of Education ELD standards to reclassify
students.

Alliance schools

administer CELDT testing as s
tated above
. Students who are CELDT level 4

or
higher will be reviewed for reclassifi
cation based on CST proficiency, ELA course grades of C or higher and
teacher recommendation. Annually the Alliance Data team will provide each school with a list of stude
nts
eligible for reclassification

who have met CELDT Overall 4 or higher and skill areas 3 or higher; Basic or
higher on ELA CST; and C or better in 2 consecutive semesters of ELA.


Non
-
standard English Speakers

Recognizing that many students
in

Alliance

school
s

may not be Standard English speakers, many of the
same guidelines and programs listed above are followed for them so as to ease their transition into
Standard English. Students will be identified by performance in classroom oral language assessme
nts.
The schools objectives will be to have all students achieve proficient/advance performance in oral and
written English Language Arts.
Alliance

school leaders and teachers monitor each student’s performance in

10

their Personal Learning Plan and individua
l student growth profiles. Specific strategies include modeling
standard English; building student communication skills through structured classroom participation in oral
language presentations for project
-
based learning culminations; training teachers in
recognizing non
-
standard English language interference with learning; establishing a culture of appreciation for home
language usage and culture and recognition of the importance of standard English usage in the world of
work and education.





11

Chapter 1
:

INITIAL IDENTIFICATION, PARENT NOTIFICATION OF INSTRUCTIONAL
PROGRAM
OPTIONS, ASSESSMENT, PROGRAM PLACEMENT AND
RECLASSIFICATION


CHAPTER OVERVIEW

Alliance’s

process for initial identification, parent notification, assessment and program placement
of ELs is standardized for consi
stency and equity throughout all schools and is consistent with
LAUSD requirements
. This process is responsive to the educational nee
ds of ELs and the
preferences of parents and
guardians. The process is described in this chapter and illustrated
in Figure 1.


The
Alliance’s

overall goal is to ensure consistency in enrollment, assessment, and sharing of
information regarding the instruct
ional programs, services, and program placement options so
that
all parents can make informed decisions.


THE ENROLLMENT PROCESS

The enrollment process begins when a parent
or guardian
enrolls

their

child
in an Alliance

school.
The main office of each
Alliance
school is designed to be a warm and welcoming place for parents and
children. Each school office
will have

appropriate

staff member available to provide

consistent
information about the instructional program options offered to ELs. All information
is

provided in a
language that parents understand. Every effort is made to ensure the
enrollment process is as
convenient and efficient as possible for parents.
Included with the
enrollment packet
for all
students including EL students
is an explanation of the Uniform Complaint Process to ensure that all
parents
understand how to address any potential concerns with staff.


HOME LANGUAGE SURVEY


Upon initial enrollment, parents complete the Home Language Survey (HLS) section on the
Alliance’s

Student
Registration Enrollment

Packet
, as required by state and federal law. The
purpose of the
HLS is to determine if a language other than English is used in the student’s home.
Prior to
completing the HLS, parents
will

receive an explanation regarding its purpose and uses, as well
as the possibility that their child may be given an assessment to
d
etermine

their English language
proficiency level. In particular, it
will

be made clear that the HLS is
not
used to determine a
student’s
language classification or immigration status.


The
parent or guardian upon the student’s initial enrollment in each
Alliance school completes the survey
.
The information provided
is kept on file as the official information until the initial (first) HLS survey
completed is obtained from LAUSD or other sending school. The

initial

(first)

HLS
take
s

precedence
over any info
rmation

provided on subsequent surveys completed. The information provided on the HLS is
maintained
thereafter in the
Alliance
Student Information System
(PowerSchool)

and the student’s
Master Plan
Folder, located in the child’s cumulative record.

Should LAUSD make their student

12

information system available to and required for independent charter schools, Alliance schools will comply
with its required use as appropriate.


The HLS consists of the following four questions:

1.

What language did the
student learn when he or she first began to talk?

2.

What language does this student most frequently use at home?

3.

What language do you use most frequently to speak to this student?

4.

Which language
do the adults at home most often use
?


These questions are used

to determine a student’s home language status as follows:

English Only (EO)

If the answers to the four questions on the HLS are “English”, the child is classified as
English Only.


Possible English Learner (EL)

If the answers to any of the first three questions on the HLS indicate a language other
than
English, or a combination of English and another language, the child is assessed to
measure his or
her level of English proficiency.


However, if the parent’s response to the first three questions on the HLS is English, and the
response
to the fourth question is other than English, then reasonable doubt may exist as to the
student’s home
language. The school’s administrator/designee must

research the student’s home
language background
using the following indicators, as well as consultation with the student’s
parent:



Parent/guardian requires an interpreter to communicate in English



Parent/guardian speaks to their child in a language other
than English



The HLS is completed in a language other than English (including spelling the word
“English” in
another language; e.g. ingles)



Student initiates interaction with their parents/guardians in a language other than English



It is revealed that the child, while their parent/guardian is at work, is under the care of a
person(s)
who speaks a language other than English



Student, after having been enrolled in the Mainstream English Program designed for students
with fluent
-
English

proficiency for a reasonable length of time, demonstrates a
lack of
comprehension regarding instruction and classroom/school routines conducted in
English


If there is evidence of significant non
-
English exposure, then the pupil must be administered the
state
English language proficiency assessment, currently known as the California English
Language
Development Test (CELDT). The parent will be consulted by a
certificated
school
staff
member
regarding the need to administer the assessment, the results, and the subsequent program
placement of
the child.


NOTE:
When reasonable doubt is established, the school must annotate the HLS to
document
the reasons for CELDT administration. The school administrator/designee
must sign and date
the annotations provided.


13

The parent has the right to amend the HLS at any time. However, if the student has already been
administered the CELDT, any change
s to the HLS will not affect the student’s official language
classification. If the parent amends the HLS prior to CELDT administration, the school must
honor
the changes made while continuing to take reasonable doubt into consideration, given the
probable

impact of the change relative to the parent’s or student's observed linguistic behavior
.


At the time of publication of this document, California uses the CELDT. With the
implementation of
the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and the development of new
corresponding English
Language Development (ELD) standards, the English language
proficiency assessment will be
changed to address these new standards. When this assessment is
adopted by the California State
Board of Education (SBE), this document will be
updated to
reflect the change in the state’s English
language proficiency assessment requirements.


PARENT NOTIFICATION OF INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM OPTIONS


Parents enrolling in Alliance Schools are enrolled in
Differentiated Mainstream English with
ELD
Support Class
.

At the time of enrollment parents are informed of the instructiona
l services
provided
.

EL students take all regular core academic courses with differentiated SDAIE support
strategies and in addition are provided ELA and Math support classes
based on assessed need.
We believe it is essential for EL students to have access and opportunity to learn at
high levels
with differentiated support instead of being tracked into separate lower level ELD courses.


LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY ASSESSMENTS


ENGLISH

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY ASSESSMENT


INITIAL IDENTIFICATION


State and federal regulations require that if the student’s HLS indicates a language other than
English is used at home, the student’s English language proficiency level must be assessed.
Students
will be assessed within 30 calendar days at the beginning of the school year, or within 2
weeks if a student enrolls during the school year. In addition, parents must be notified of the
assessment results and program placement within 30 calendar days of in
itial enrollment.


NOTE:
In accordance with
Education Code (EC)
,
initially
-
enrolling

students identified
by
the HLS as potential ELs
may not be exempted

from taking the state
-
adopted English
language
proficiency assessment.


The purpose of the English language proficiency assessment is to officially determine a student’s
language proficiency level in English. It is also used on an annual basis to measure progress in
acquiring English. In California, at the time of this publica
tion, the CELDT is the state
-
adopted
language
proficiency assessment.


14

Based on a student’s overall performance on the CELDT, he/she may be classified as an English
Learner (EL) or an Initially Fluent English Proficient (IFEP) student. Once a student is
ide
ntified
as an EL, the student must be annually assessed with the CELDT until he/she meets
th
e eligibility
criteria and is R
eclassified to Fluent English Proficient (RFEP).


Prior to CELDT administration, all test examiners (classroom teachers

or Alliance certificated
EL/
CELDT
Designee
)
must obtain annual
certification by completing online
Alliance
CELDT
administration professional
development
.

Classroom teachers
or the Alliance CELDT
Coordinator

are responsible for administering the CELDT as
follows:


CELDT Assessment
:

Students a
re to be tested in their
advisory or
grade
-
level English classrooms.


Initial CELDT assessments must be hand
-
scored at the school site so that an
interim
language
classification can be identified for each student assessed. This score is used to determine
appropriate program placement for students identified as ELs. The overall proficiency level

must
be communicated to the parent using the

Initial Parent Notification

of Language Test
Results and
Confirmation of Program Placement

letter within 30 calendar days of initial
enrollment.


At the end of the testing cycle, student test booklets are submitted to the test vendor for official
scoring.
The test vendor provides the
Alliance

with official CELDT results. The CELDT results
are to be
accurately and permanently recorded in the
Alliance

SIS

(PowerSchool)
.

The Alliance
CELDT Director
will upload CELDT results into PowerSchool.
Should
LAUSD make its SIS system available to
independent charter schools, Alliance schools will record the results in LAUSD SIS and PowerSchool.


NOTE
: If there is a discrepancy between the unofficial hand
-
scored results and the
official
score provided by the te
st vendor, the official score overrides the unofficial hand
-
scored results
.


ELs with disabilities must be assessed with the initial or annual CELDT. ELs with disabilities
may be
tested using the California Department of Education (CDE)
-
approved
Testing Variations,
Accommodations,
and Modifications
, which is updated annually. The Individualized Education
Program (IEP) team must
document in the student’s IEP any accommodations or modifications
used, and these must not deviate
from those approved by

CDE. All ELs with disabilities will be
assessed with the CELDT annually after
they have been identified as ELs.


ELs with moderate
-
to
-
severe disabilities are to be assessed in accordance with their IEP.


ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY ASSESSMENT


ANNUAL
ASSESSMENT


State and federal guidelines require each EL to be assessed annually to determine their progress
in
acquiring English language proficiency. This assessment is given within a test window prescribed
by California
Education Code
.
Alliance ensure

that each EL is assessed annually,
and the

15

assessment results and program placement are communicated to parents in writing within
30 days of
the start of school, using the
Annual Parent Notification of Language Test Results and
Confirmation of
Program Pla
cement
.


The Alliance CELDT Director will prepare and provide the Parent Notification letter for principal
signature. Each Alliance school will be responsible for distribution of the letter and collection of parent
signature.
The official CELDT assessment results are provided to
parents in a language they
understand when the results become available from the test publisher.
Information on how to interpret
the CELDT results is available in various languages. Parents
may request
a meeting to discuss the
assessment results.


INITIAL LANGUAGE CLASSIFICATION/STATUS


A student’s initial language classification or status is determined by their overall performance on
the
initial English language proficiency assessment, currently the
CELDT.


Based on the
performance level, a
student may be classified as follows:

English Learner (EL)

The overall performance level on the initial CELDT is Beginning, Early Intermediate, or
Intermediate. A
student may also be classified as an EL if the
overall performance level

is Early Advanced or
Advanced, but with skill area scores of Beginning or Early Intermediate in Listening, Speaking,
Reading or
Writing (grades 6
-
12).


Initial Fluent English Proficient (IFEP)

The overall performance level on the initial CELDT is Early Advanced or Advanced,
with Listening,
Speaking, Reading, and Writing skill area scores of Intermediate or
higher (grades 6
-
12). This result
can occur when the student enters school already fluent
in English and the home language(s) or when
the student has had minimal exposure to the other language(s) spoken in the home.


NOTE
: Students classified as IFEP are not eligible to receive EL services and will
receive
grade
-
level instruction in an instructional program designed for native
-
English
and fluent
-
English speakers.


_____________________________________________________________
___________________

ANNUAL LANGUAGE CLASSIFICATION/STATUS


Parents of ELs will be notified each year of their child’s current language classification along
with the
annual assessment results. A student will remain an EL until he or she has met the criteria for
reclassification.




16

PRIMARY LANGUAGE ASSESSMENT


Students designated as ELs on the basis of initial CELDT results are not automatically assessed
in
their primary language. ELs enrolling in
Spanish for Native Speakers will

be assessed in their
primary language

in Alliance schools t
hat offer Spanish as a f
oreign l
anguage

to meet the A
-
G
requirement for foreign language to determine the appropriate Spanish course level.



Results of the primary language assessment are placed in the student’s
Master Plan Folder

and
permanently recorded in
PowerSchool
(Alliance SIS)
. This information may be used as one indicator of
the student’s
level of literacy development in the primary language.


PARENTAL NOTIFICATION OF INITIAL ASSESSMENT RESULTS AND PROGRAM
PLACEMENT


Parents of students (ELs and IFEPs) who are administered the
initial
CELDT must receive
official
notification, within 30 calendar days, informing them of their child’s:



Initial English language proficiency level and how it was assessed



Official language cl
assification



Instructional program placement


In addition to the above, parents must also receive information regarding the:



Various instructional program options, educational strategies, and educational materials
to
be used in each program



Reclassification, or program exit, criteria



Instructional program for ELs with a disability (with an IEP) and how such program will
meet the
objectives of the IEP



Expected rate of graduation for ELs

(expectation is the same for all Alliance students)


Parents of ELs and IFEP students are informed of the above information via the
Alliance’s

Initial
Parent
Notification of Language Test Results and Confirmation of Program Placement
letter, and the
Parent
Notification of
Reclassification Criteria
. Parents are advised to contact the school if they should
need
additional information.


PARENTAL NOTIFICATION OF ANNUAL ASSESSMENT RESULTS AND PROGRAM
PLACEMENT


Parents of EL students who are administered the
annual

CELDT must receive official
notification within 30 calendar days, informing them of their child’s:



Annual English language proficiency level (provisional, then official when results
become
available) and how it was assessed



Official language classification


17


TRANSFER STUDENTS

TRANSFERS BETWEEN LAUSD
AND ALLIANCE, BETWEEN ALLIANCE
SCHOOLS
, AND
BETWEEN ALLIANCE AND OTHER SCHOOLS


Intra
-
Alliance and Inter district/organization

transfers are initiated at the school site by the parent.
Alliance schools generate
Alliance transfer doc
ument
,

LAUSD

school
s generate

the
P
upil Accounting
Report (PAR),
with student information needed for the
receiving school. The Transfer/PAR form

is given
to the parent to be submitted to the receiving school upon
enrollment.

NOTE: Students enrolling in
Alliance schools do net require “permission” from current school. Student records are requested
upon first day of actual enrollment.


The receiving school must request the student’s cumulative record from the previous school.
Upon
receipt, the site principal at the receiving school is responsible for reviewing the accuracy of the
student’s records, including information in
Alliance
PowerSchool or the LAUSD

Student Information
System (SIS), and ensuring that the st
udent is prope
rly placed in English Immersion
instructional
program
with appropriate instructional support
as
determined by the students CELDT levels and ELA
achievement

in the student’s current records.


TRANSFERS FROM OTHER CALIFORNIA PUBLIC SCHOOL DISTRICTS


Students transferring into the
Alliance

from another public school district within California must
present
documentation verifying enrollment. Ideally,
after submission and notification of acceptance of student
application,
student records such as the HLS,

state assessment scores, including the CELDT, and
official language classification (EO, IFEP, EL,
RFEP) are presented at the time of enrollment. If these
documents are available at the time of
enrollment, Alliance schools do
not need to follow the initial
identification and assessment process.
If the parent provides the student’s records, staff will enter the
information into
PowerSchool and
SIS
(
should it be made available
)

and meet
with the parent to
discuss instructional pr
ogram placement
in English Immersion
. If the information is not
available,
staff must contact the previous district to request the student’s information. All
student information
from a previous district should be
entered into PowerSchool
.


NOTE
: Due to student confidentiality requirements, student records can only be
transmitted via fax or U.S. mail.
Student records cannot be sent via email
.


TRANSFERS FROM OUT
-
OF
-
STATE OR FROM ANOTHER COUNTRY


The initial identification and assessment process i
s to be

used for students entering an Alliance
School
from another state or country.



18

Students enrolling in
an Alliance School

who were born in another country may have two different
enrollment dates: (1)
Alliance

enrollment date and (2) U.S. enrollment date.

Alliance School

Enrollment Date

The student’s first day of attendance is the o
fficial enrollment date in an Alliance School
.


U.S. Enrollment Date

The student’s first day of attendance in a U.S. school is
the official U.S. enrollment date.

For example, a student from Argentina enrolled in a Pennsylvania public school on
February
9, 2010 and moved to California in 2011. On September 20, 2011, the student
enrolled in an
Alliance
school. The
Alliance school

enrollment date is September 20, 2011, while the U.S.
enrollment date is February 9, 2010
.


The
Alliance

initial enrollment procedure is fol
lowed for students entering an Alliance school
who are
new to the state or from another country. The student’s
Alliance school

enrollment date is entered
into
the student’s records and the student database system

(PowerSchool)

as the date the student first
enrolled in a
California school or (when appropriate) the date the student first enrolled in a U.S. school.
Th
e
student will be placed in the grade level that is aligned with the student’s age and/or transcripts.


Students who initially attended a California public school, relocated out of state, and returned to
attend a
California public school again should have
the initial identification and assessment
information on file.


TRANSFERS FROM PRIVATE SCHOOLS


The initial identification and assessment process is to b
e used for students entering an Alliance
school
from a private school. The student’s
Alliance

enrollment date is entered into
PowerSchool
and
the
LAUSD
Student
Information System (SIS)
(if available)
as the date the student first enrolled in
a California public school. The
student will be placed in the grade level that is aligned with the
student’s age and/or transcripts.


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR STAFF AND ADMINISTRATORS ON
INITIAL
IDENTIFICATION, PLACEMENT, AND RELATED PARENTAL
RIGHTS/INFORMED CONSENT


The
Alliance will provide

ongoing annual professional development
via Web
inar

Video
, at new
teacher orientations and as an elective work session and annual professional development
conference
for administrators and staff,
including special education teachers and staff, on legal
requirements and

EL Master Plan implementation.



Alli
ance

procedures
relating to the implementation of the identification and placement requirements of
this
English
Learner Master Plan
, including but not limited to:



Initial identification



Mainstream English with ELD Support

Program Description



19



Communicating

assessment results to families effectively



P
arental rights and informed consent regarding initial identification and
instructional program


Those who must participate in the training include but are not limited to:
Alliance instructional staff,
site
admi
nistrators, teaching staff, counselors
,

staff
members who work with EL

student records, office staff
members responsible for registration,
Alliance
EL
/ CELDT Designees
, special education teachers,
paraprofessionals, and other support
staff as necessary. New
staffs responsible for student enrollment,
including all site administrators are

required

to c
omplete this training
.


The training places special emphasis on sensitivity to parents, including how to make parents feel
welcome, and how to ensure that they are
fully

informed and able to take an active role in
the
Alliance
English Immersion
program
provided
for their child.


Training for site

staff
must take place at least annually
, prior to or within 10 days of the opening of
schools for
the year, or when new staff members have been employed.


ENGLISH LEARNER ONLINE ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEM

Schools are responsible for
inputting

updated school level
information
into PowerSchool
. Information

is
stored in
the
Alliance

Data Warehouse
System

each year.
The Home office uploads information into
PowerSchool for CELDT, CST and ELA grades
as it becomes available.



The system is one way to ensure that there is a consistent and effective
procedure in place
thro
ughout the Alliance
for enrolling, assessing, identifying and placing ELs,
as well as notifying
parents of ELs regarding their rights and options. The accountab
ilities include, but are not limited to:
CELDT Training for All Test Examiners
,

Alliance Master Plan
Mainstream
English
with ELD Support

Informational
Meeting,

Initial Notification Requirements for Parents of English Learners,
and
Classr
oom Organization
).


RECLASSIFICATION

Alliance schools reclassify

EL students to Reclassified English Fluent Proficient (RFEP)
when
students meet reclassification criteria
. This decision is made using criteria that include



CELDT
assessment of English language proficiency



Basic

performance level on CST



Grade of C or better 2 consecutive semesters

in English
-
Language Arts,



Teacher evaluation



and parent consultation

via signed consent
.


Once ELs are
reclassified, they retain RFEP status for the rest of their educational care
ers.
The

academic progress of RFEP students must be monitored for a
minimum

of two years, as required
by
state and federal guidelines, and if their continued linguistic and academic performance
declines or

20

stalls, interventions are provided to ensure that
these students reach and maintain

g
rade level
academic proficiency. A full description of the reclassification process is detailed
below.


CRITERIA

FOR RECLASSIFICATION

ELs are reclassified to fluent English proficient based on the following multiple criteria that are
identified in
the California
Education Code
and recommended by the State Board of Education
(SBE). The
minimum criteria to be considered for reclassificatio
n are:



Score of Basic or above on the most recent California Content Standards Test (CST) or
CMA
in English
-
language arts



English proficiency on the CELDT: Overall level of Early Advanced (level 4) or
Advanced
(level 5) with each domain score (Listening, Speaking, Reading, and Writing)
Intermediate (level
3) or higher



Teacher evaluation based on student grades/progress report marks

of C or better
*



Parent consultation and approval


*In the event that a student meets the CELDT and CST/CMA criteria but
not
the grade/ progress
report
mark requirements, the school’s
Language Appraisal Team (LAT)

must

meet to analyze
other
student data that demonstrates grade
-
level proficiency. The following multiple measures
may
be
considered:



Score of Basic or higher on
Alliance
-
adopted standards
-
based ELA assessments or
standards
-
based ELA
benchmark assessments
(grades
6
-
12)



Report
card grades/progress report marks in equivalent ELA courses (secondary)



Prior CST/CMA scores



Authentic student work samples, especially writing samples



California High School Exit Examination (CAHSEE) scores


RECLASSIFICATION PROCESS


The administrator/designee
(Alliance ELL Leaders)
at each school site is responsible for ensuring that ELs
who meet the
eligibility criteria are reclassified in a timely manner. The
Alliance Research Data tem
must generate
s

rosters from the
PowerSchool
dat
abase of EL students who have met the CST/CMA
and CELDT criteria. This process begins when the official results of the CST/CMA and CELDT are
released, as well as at th
e end of each semester reporting period
:

1.

Alliance Research Data team and
EL
L Leaders

review the rosters for accuracy and missing data
(e.g.
missing CELDT scores for a specific language domain).

2.

Students who have met the reclassification criteria are identified and parents are informed
of
their proficiency, both orally and in writing.

3.

Pare
nts must review and sign the
Notification of Reclassification
.


NOTE: When students have met all reclassification criteria
except
the CST/CMA, a special
meeting
will be held in spring (prior to the administration of the CST/CMA) for parents of
ELs. They will be

21

informed of the significance of reclassification and advised that their child
need only meet the
CST/CMA criterion on the next test administration to be eligible for
reclassification. If the
CST/CMA criterion is met, the
Alliance Research

Data team

will
reclassify the student prior to
the beginning of the next academic year. Schools must ensure that newly reclassified students
are scheduled in the appropriate classes. Parents will be

notified of the student’s reclassification and
given the

opportunity to communicate with a
n

Alliance EL/CELDT

Designee

if they have questions.


MONITORING PROGRESS OF RECLASSIFIED STUDENTS

At least once yearly,
the
school

Language Appraisal Team (LAT)

will meet

to review the performance
and
progress of RFEP students, using the RFEP Monitoring Roster. The
school
LAT includes the
principal
or designee (Alliance
school
ELL Leader)
, the student’s classroom teacher(s), and other
personnel as appropriate, such as counselors, specialist teachers, in
tervention teachers,
EL
Experts, and/or parents of the student being reviewed. The review of students
who have met
reclassification criteria takes place in late summer/early fall after the release of CST/CMA scores and by
teacher request for students

not meeting proficiency benchmarks in
Language Arts or Math. For
secondary students not meeting proficiency benchmarks in core content areas, staff will meet to
analyze student assessment data and decide on next steps.


In
addition to meeting for progres
s monitoring of students not meeting proficiency benchmarks, the

LAT will maintain a report to keep a record of RFEP student progress that will include, but is not

limited

to, data on CST/ CMA scores,
interim benchmark

assessment results, curriculum embedded
assessments and teacher evaluation reports.


The site administrator/designee
(Alliance school ELL Leader)
coordinates the monitoring of
reclassified students. All RFEP students are monitored at th
e end of each repor
ting period
semester
(secondary)
for a
minimum

of two years following reclassification. Additionally, at the high school level,
the college counselor monitors graduation criteria checks twice a year
.


If a student is not making satisfactory progress after reclassification, the LAT must meet with the
classroom
teacher(s) to develop a

support/
intervention instructional plan.

Appropriate
support/
intervention measures may include, but are not limited to, an
y of the following:



Student/teacher/parent conference



Content
-
based language development support classes



Online p
rimary language support



Placement in reading, writing, or math support
/
differentiated
intervention
class



After
-
school academic support
,
tutoring



Online English Language Development Support



Extended
year/ Summer Session





22

RECLASSIFYING ENGLISH LEARNERS WITH DISABILITIES


The reclassification criteria apply to EL Special Education students being considered for
reclassification; however, a CMA
-
ELA score of Basic or higher may substitute for CST
-
ELA if the
student takes that assessment. The IEP team should be consulted when reclassifying an EL
with
disabilities. IEP teams
will

verify that in addition to meeting the criteria for
reclassification, students
with ELD goals in their IEPs have mastered those goals before the students are reclassified.




23


New
enrollee to ALLIANCE

Figure 1. Initial Identification Flow Chart

Home Language Survey

Mainstream

English

Program

No
primary

language other

than English

English Only

Primary language other than English

or
reasonable doubt regarding

accuracy of HLS responses

IFEP

ELD
1
-
2


ELD Instructional Support Provided Based on Specific CELDT Skill and ELD
Overall Level, ELA

Grade, CST Performance Level to close gap between criteria
and student performance:

Alliance Research
Data Team Sends
Roster of ELs Eligible
for
Reclassification

Parent receives notification letter with test
results,

confirmation of program placement, and
program components

and exit requirements
within 30 calendar days, or within 2
weeks if

student enrolls during school year





Students are placed in
Differentiated Mainstream English with
appropriate ELD Support based on identified need.



Mainstream ELA with ELD Support Class



Newcomer Intensive ELD with Primary Language
Support



Intensive Accelerated ELD Support for LTELs

Assess English proficiency using CELDT

within 30 calendar days at the beginning

of school year, or within 2 weeks if

student enrolls during school year

Grades

Score/s



6
-

12

Overall 1


3
or

Overall 4


5 with any

skill area of 1 or 2


Parent receives EL program

information and
is informed re

initial

Master Plan placement

English Learner (EL)

Emphasis on

Listening & Speaking

ELD Skills

Emphasis on

Reading & Writing

ELD Skills

ELA Intervention

CST BB, FBB CST
Intervention



Grades

Score/s

6
-

12

Overall score of

4


5 with all

skill areas at 3+


Review EL Student Profile Data to Determine Progress towards
Reclassification Criteria at beginning of the year, and at end of each
semester:

School Site
EL/CELDT Designee
Reviews EL Profile
Data for Accuracy

ELD 3

EL/CELDT Designee
Sends & Collect Signed
Parent Letters CELDT
Results & Reclassific
a
tion

E
LD 4
-
5








24

CHAPTER

2
:

INSTRUCTION PROGRAM OPTIONS


CHAPTER OVERVIEW

Alliance schools provide

a
rigorous

Differentiated
Mainstream

English
Language

program

with
differentiated
instructional
support
tailored to meet the diverse needs of
ELs.
The Alliance English
Immersion program

guarantee
s

access
to a full, comprehensive curriculum with scaffolds and support
for students at different English
language proficiency levels. The ultimate goal of
the Alliance English
Mainstream

program is for ELs to prepare to
participate fully in A
-
G courses and to graduate from high
school ready for college and careers.
In 2004, beginning with the first Alliance high school,
the Alliance

committed to have the same high expectations for ELs and to provide intensive differentiat
ed support to
insure their success with readiness for college upon graduation.


Differentiated Mainstream English

in Alliance schools
insures that

ELs with disabilities have an
equal opportunity to participate in a
program consistent with their IEP.
Differentiated English
Immersion

also allow
s

for equal access to
students who are advanced learners or
gifted and talented
.

No
ELs
are excluded from the core curriculum
based solely on their English language
proficiency level.


The following pages briefly
describe the components of
Alliance

Mainstream

English Language
for
secondary students in grades 6
-
12
, and
summarize the following in table format:
Staff credential
requirements; and Relevant parent information. Additional tables delineate the expectations for a
student’s linguistic and academic
progress
in the English Immersion

model by time in
Alliance schools
.



MAINSTREAM ENGLISH INSTRUCTIONAL
PROGRAM, GRADES 6
-
12 (SECONDARY)

The goal of this program is to ensure that secondary ELs
to progress linguistically and academically to
meet ELD proficiency and grade
-
level
standards. These students receive differentiated ELD
instruction and scaffolded ac
ademic
content instruction and support and have access to A
-
G
course requirements to be college
-
prepared and career ready. This program option also meets the
needs of reclassified students to
ensure that their linguistic and academic skills are comparable
to the
performance of their native
-
English speaking peers.




25

DIFFERENTIATED
MAINSTREAM ENGLISH INSTRUCTIONAL
PROGRAM, GRADES 6
-
12


Figure
2
.
Differentiated
Mainstream English Instructional Program, Grades 6
-
12 (Secondary)

Program Goals:
Ensure ELs
progress towards meeting ELD proficiency and grade
-
level content
standards. Ensure RFEP students’ linguistic and academic skills are comparable to the
performance of their native

English speaking peers. Appropriate for ELs “reasonably fluent in
English” (E
LD levels
3

-

5).

Students Served

Program Components

Staffing &

Credentialing

Parent

Information



ELs who are

“reasonably

fluent in
English”
(ELD 4
-
5)



ELs with “less

than
reasonable

fluency in

English” (ELD 1
-
3)
with
appropriate support

ELs meeting
“reasonable fluency:”

1.

ELA support

period focused on

academic language development.

2.

Mai nst r eam Language Ar t s

course with EO/RFEP/IFEP

student s

3.

Access t o i nst r uct i on i n al l

curri cul ar areas ali gned to

content
standards usi ng SDAIE

methodology

4.

Differentiated instruction and

SDAIE strategies used in content
classes

5.

S
tandards
-
based materials and
supplemental materials are used.

6.

Instructi on overwhel mi ngl y i n

English with primary language
support
per student need.

7.

For ELs with “less than reasonable
fluency in English” (ELD 1
-
3) and
for
schools with small numbers of

ELs at
levels 1
-
3:


NOTE: Most EL students entering
Alliance schools are ELD 3

or higher
.
Fewer than 3 or 4 students at ELD 1 are
enrolled in a single school. Therefore,
individualized
services must be provided
vs
.

c
lassroom level.

See Appendix B for

state
-
approved

credentials,
certificates,
permits, and

supplementary EL

authorizations.



Parents of ELs

at ELD
1
-
3 are

informed of
Mainstream English
program

and ELD
differentiated support
.


Counseling

provided
for

parents of ELs

to
ensure they

understand that

the
Mainstream

English

Program is

designed
for

ELs at ELD
levels 4
and 5

and that
appropriate
differentiated support is
provided to meet the
needs of students ELD
1
-
3





26

Figure
3
. Minimum Progress Expectations for English Learners in
Mainstream English
(Secondary)


Minimum Progress Expectations for English Learners in Mainstream English
(Secondary)



ELD

Entry
Level

End
1
st

Year Enroll ed

End of
2
nd

Year
Enrolled

End of
3
rd

Year
Enrolled

End of
4
th

Year
Enrolled

ELD
1
-
2

-

Improve mi ni mum 1
ELD Level

-

Improve ELD Ski l l s 1
l evel

-

ELA CST l i kel y FBB

-

Improve ELA
Grade

-

Improve mi ni mum 1
ELD Level

-

Improve ELD Ski l l s 1
l evel

-

ELA CST l i kel y FBB

-

Improve ELA

Grade


-

Improve mi ni mum 1
ELD
Level

-

Improve ELD Ski l l s 1
l evel

-

Improve ELA Grade

-

Improve CST to at
l east BB


Check for
Recl assi fi cati on
El i gi bil ity
Requi rements

-

ELA Grade C

-

CST Basi c or
Hi gher

-

CELDT Ski l l s 3+

ELD 3

-

Improve mi ni mum 1
ELD Level

-

Improve ELD Ski l l s 1
l evel

-

Improve ELA CST
fr
FB
to BB

-

Improve ELA Grade


-

Improve mi ni mum 1
ELD Level

-

Improve ELD Ski l l s 1
l evel

-

Improve ELA Grade

-

Improve ELA CST to
not l ess than BB


Check for
Recl assi fi cati on
El i gi bi l i ty Requi rements

-

ELA Grade C

-

CST Basi c or Hi gher

-

CELDT Ski l l s
3+

Check for
Recl assi fi cati on
El i gi bi l i ty
Requi rements

-

ELA Grade C

-

CST Basi c or
Hi gher

-

CELDT Ski l l s 3+

ELD 4

Check for
Recl assi fi cati on
El i gi bi l i ty Requi rements

-

ELA Grade C

-

CST Basi c or Hi gher

-

CELDT Ski l l s 3+

Check for
Recl assi fi cati on
El i gi bi l i ty
Requi rements

-

ELA Grade C

-

CST Basi c or Hi gher

-

CELDT Ski l l s 3+

Moni tor Progress i n
ELA and Math

Moni tor Progress i n
ELA and Math


ACCELERATED LEARNING PROGRAM FOR LONG TERM ENGLISH LEARNERS,
GRADES 6
-
12
(SECONDARY)


The goals of this instructional program model are to accelerate the academic ELD and to attain
academic proficiency in core content subjects for ELs who have attended school in the US for
more
than
four

full years (i.e., beginning their
fifth

year and beyo
nd), but still have not met the
criteria to be
reclassified. This program option ultimately aims to reduce the risk of dropping out of school, ensure
that these students are able to perform at a level comparable to their native
-
English speaking
peers, have

access to and meet A
-
G graduation requirements to be college
-
prepared and career
-
ready.




27

ACCELERATED LEARNING PROGRAM FOR LONG TERM ENGLISH LEARNERS,
GRADES 6
-
12


Figure
4
. Accelerated Learning Program for Long Term
English Learners, Grades 6
-
12


Program Goals
: Accelerate the academic ELD and academic achievement of Long
-
Term EL
(LTELS)
students* so they are
reclassified and able to meet college
-

and career
-
ready standards comparable to
native
-
English speaking peers in
Mainstream English
classrooms.


*ELs in grades 6
-
12 who have not reclassified
after
five full years or more in U.S. schools.


Students Served

Program Components

Staffing &

Credentialing

Parent

Information

ELs in grades 6
-
12
who have completed
five full years or
more
in U.S. schools
but
have not yet met
reclassification

criteria
.


NOTE:


Most
EL
students ent
ering
Alliance schools in
grade

6
are LTELs
having

already been
enrolled in LAUSD
schools 5 or more
years. Most EL
students entering
Alliance schools in
grade

9 have already
been in LAUSD
schools for 8 or more
years.

1.

Advanced, content
-
based ELD

emphasizing oral and written

academic language development

with
an emphasis on expository text.
Includes instruction in organization

strategies and support for other
content classes.

2.

Access to instruction aligned to
content
standards. Students
clustered in
heterogeneous

Mainstream English
content classes.

3.

Explicit language and literacy
development across curriculum
using
SDAIE strategies.

4.

Focus on study skills and critical
thinking
in all content areas.

5.

C
ounselor
or
school
EL/CELDT
designee or other
faculty member to
monitor
LTEL

language proficiency
level, test
results, goals for meeting
grade
level standards, and progress
toward
reclassification.

6.

Alliance

data systems are
configured to
identify and monitor
progress of LTELs
for teachers and
administrators.

See Appendix B for
state
-

approved
credentials,
certificates,
permits, and

s
upplementary EL
authorizations.


Parent and child meet
at least twice yearly
with a designated
f
aculty member to
review

L
TEL

progress,
program
placement,
test
results, and goals
for
meeting
reclassification

criteria and

accelerated
academic

progress
targets
.






28

Figure
5
. Minimum Progress Expectations for Accelerated Learning Program

for Long
-
Term ELs


Minimum Progress Expectations for Accelerated Learning Program

f
or Long
-
Term
ELs


ELD Entry
Level

End 1
st

Year Enroll ed

End of 2
nd

Year
Enrolled

End of 3
rd

Year
Enrolled

End of 4
th

Year
Enrolled

ELD 1
-
2

-

Improve mi ni mum 1
ELD Level

-

Improve ELD Ski l l s 1
l evel

-

ELA CST l i kel y FBB

-

Improve ELA Grade

-

Improve mi ni mum 1
ELD Level

-

Improve ELD Ski l l s 1
l evel

-

ELA CST l i kel y FBB

-

Improve ELA Grade


-

Improve mi ni mum 1
ELD Level

-

Improve
ELD Ski l l s 1
l evel

-

Improve ELA Grade

-

Improve CST to at
l east BB


Check for
Recl assi fi cati on
El i gi bil ity
Requi rements

-

ELA Grade C

-

CST Basi c or
Hi gher

-

CELDT Ski l l s 3+

ELD 3

-

Improve mi ni mum 1
ELD Level

-

Improve ELD Ski l l s 1
l evel

-

Improve ELA CST fr
FB to BB

-

Improve ELA Grade


-

Improve mi ni mum 1
ELD Level

-

Improve ELD Ski l l s 1
l evel

-

Improve ELA Grade

-

Improve ELA CST to
not l ess than BB


Check for
Recl assi fi cati on
El i gi bil ity Requi rements

-

ELA Grade C

-

CST Basi c or Hi gher

-

CELDT Ski l l s 3+

Check for
Recl assi fi cati on

El i gi bil ity
Requi rements

-

ELA Grade C

-

CST Basi c or
Hi gher

-

CELDT Ski l l s 3+

ELD 4

Check for
Recl assi fi cati on
El i gi bil ity Requi rements

-

ELA Grade C

-

CST Basi c or Hi gher

-

CELDT Ski l l s 3+

Check for
Recl assi fi cati on
El i gi bil ity Requi rements

-

ELA Grade C

-

CST Basi c
or Hi gher

-

CELDT Ski l l s 3+

Moni tor Progress i n
ELA and Math

Moni tor Progress i n
ELA and Math


ENGLI SH LEARNER NEWCOMER PROGRAM, GRADES 6
-
12 (SECONDARY)

The goals of this instructional model are to acquire Early Intermediate or Intermediate academic
English language proficiency and to develop core academic skills and knowledge for immigrant
students new to U.S. schools. This program ensures that newcomers are better prepared to
participate, with support, in sheltered and Mainstream English language cl
assrooms.


This model
also supports acculturation to new school routines and communities. It is designed to
foster
literacy and academic skills in English of middle
-
and high school
-
age recent immigrants who
sometimes arrive with limited primary language l
iteracy and formal schooling.


Primary
Language may be used for some core academic subject instruction when resources are
available
in the student’s native language. A newcomer in LAUSD is defined as a student enrolled
in a
U.S. school for fewer than two years and who is at beginning levels of English proficiency. This
program model is an intensive, specialized, one
-

to three
-
semester strand within a school where

29

students may also participate in Mainstream English non
-
core su
bjects such as art, music and
physical education.


ENGLISH LEARNER NEWCOMER PROGRAM, GRADES 6
-
12 (SECONDARY)


Figure
6
. English Learner Newcomer Program, Grades 6
-
12 (Secondary)

Program Goals
: Rapid acquisition of English and acculturation to U.S. school life.

Students

Served

Program Components

Staffing &
Credentialing

Parent

Information

ELs in grades 6
-
12 who
have

b
een

enrolled in

U.S. schools

for
2 years
or less and are ELD 1
-
2
overall
and in skill areas.


NOTE:

Typically there
are fewer than 1 or 2 if
any Newcomer EL
students in a single
Alliance school. Alliance
schools must still be
prepared to meet the
needs even only one
Newcomer ELD 1 EL
student enrolls.


At least 3 periods daily
of

online
specialized ELD that focus on
both the
language of school

and the core
content

Acculturation to life in the

U.S. and Los Angeles


Access to Mainstream English
courses

with Google Doc

or other

translations were feasible.


Access to sheltered content
classes
when the student reaches high Early

Intermediate or Intermediate level of
English proficiency.
Primary language
instruction
in the content areas when

resources are available
.


Peer tutors will be assigned as
partners to
support newcomer
students where possible.

See Appendix B for
state
-
approved
credentials,
certificates,
permits, and

supplementary EL

authorizations.

Parent and child

meet at least
twice
yearly with a

designated
faculty

member to review

academic progress.


For
Newcomer EL
students
,
particular those enrolling in high
school,

who will not be able to

complete

graduation
requirements

before the age of
19, a transition
plan will be
developed for the
student to
matriculate to

Adult
School or

Community

College to

complete
requirements
.




Figure
7
. Minimum Progress Expectations for Secondary EL Newcomer Program

Minimum Progress Expectations for Secondary EL Newcomer Program

ELD Entry
Level

End 1
st

Year Enroll ed

End of 2
nd

Year
Enrolled

End of 3
rd

Year
Enrolled

End of 4
th

Year
Enrolled

ELD 1
-
2

-

Improve mi ni mum 1
ELD Level

-

Improve ELD Ski l l s 1
l evel

-

ELA CST l i kel y FBB

-

Improve ELA Grade

-

Improve mi ni mum 1
ELD Level

-

Improve ELD Ski l l s 1
l evel

-

ELA CST l i kel y FBB

-

Improve ELA Grade


-

Improve mi ni mum 1
ELD
Level

-

Improve ELD Ski l l s 1
l evel

-

Improve ELA Grade

-

Improve CST to at
l east BB


Check for
Recl assi fi cati on
El i gi bil ity
Requi rements

-

ELA Grade C

-

CST Basi c or
Hi gher

-

CELDT Ski l l s 3+





30

INTERVENTION FOR STUDENTS NOT MEETING MINIMUM PROGRESS
EXPECTATIONS


The minimum progress expectations benchmarks have been defined to assist parents, educational
personnel and students to understand what constitutes appropriate progress for the students’
instructional program and when students require additional support. A
ll ELs are monitored
regularly to ensure adequate progress toward acquiring English proficiency and mastery of grade
level
academic content. When students fail to meet the expected progress benchmarks,
interventions
are provided to accelerate learning and
parents are notified in writing of the
student’s specific
areas of need as well as the intervention(s) that are being provided.


The progress benchmarks described in this Master Plan are annual benchmarks, but students
must be monitored much more frequently to ensure that academic deficits do not develop. It is
important to examine the achievement of the student’s “true peers” (similar language

proficiencies, culture and experiential background) to determine if they are
progressing or not. If
several “true peers” are struggling, this is an indication that the core instruction is less than
optimal for that entire group of students. When the progress of a particular student is
substantially slower than the students’ true pe
ers, the student requires additional support in the
form of an intervention.


The process for monitoring student progress and the required
components of interventions
are discussed in the following chapter.





31

CHAPTER 3: INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES FOR ENGLISH

LEARNERS


GUIDING PRINCIPLES FOR INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES FOR EL
S

AND SEL
S


Alliance schools are commi
t
ted

to implementing the following three guiding principles in all of
its
instructional services for ELs and SELs:



ELs and SELs
have

a variety of linguistic and cultural abilities that are viewed as
assets.



Focused instruction for these students builds on their cultural and linguistic strengths and
provides
meaningful access to a curriculum that is standards
-
based, cognitively complex,

rigorous, and
coherent.



All teachers are teachers of language and content.


CHAPTER OVERVIEW

This chapter addresses the language development needs of English learners and articulates the
Alliance

guiding principles of instruction for ELs.
Instruction is

designed to ensure that EL students
acquire English language proficiency, master academic