FUNDAMENTALS OF COGNITION

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FUNDAMENTALS OF COGNITION

PSY 387R (43845
)


Spring 2007

SEA 2.108

Instructor

Dr. Randy Diehl

Office: SEA 4.312B

Phone: 475
-
7595

Office hours: 1
:30
-
2
:30

MW


January 17


I.
Historical

and

conceptual

background

of

cognitive

psychology


Watson, J.B. (19
13).
Psychology as the behaviorist views it. Psych. Rev., 20,



158
-
177.


Miller, G.A. (1953).
What is information measurement?
The American




Psychologist,
8, 3
-
11.


Miller, G.A. (1956).
The magical number seven, plus or minus two: Some limits



on our capacity for processing information. Psych. Rev., 63, 81
-
97.


Chomsky, N. (1959).
Review of
Verbal

behavior
. Language, 35, 26
-
58.


February 21
: First
Exam handed out; due February 23
.


February 23


II.
Visual

processing

and

pattern

recognit
i
on

F
arah, M.
(1995). Dissociable systems fo
r recognition: A cognitive



neuropsychological approach. In S.M. Kosslyn & D.N. Osherson (Eds.),


An

invitation

to

cognitive

science:

Visual

cognition

,

Vol.

2

(101
-
120).

Biederman,
I. (1995).
Visual object re
c
ognition. In S.M. Kosslyn

& D.N.
Osherson (Eds.),
An

invitation

to

cognitive

science:

Visual

cognition

,

Vol.

2

(121
-
166).


Spelke, E.S.,

Gutheil, G., Van de Walle, G. (1995).
The
development of object
perception. In S
.M. Kosslyn & D.N. Osherson
(Eds.)
,
An

invitation

to

cognitive

science:

Visual

cognition

,

Vol.

2

(297
-
330). (Recommended).


March 5


III.
Imagery

Kosslyn, S.M.
(1995). Mental imagery. In S.M. Kosslyn &
D.N. Osherson (Eds.),
An

invitation

to

cognitive

science:

Visual

cognition

,

Vol.

2

(267
-
296).


March 19


IV.
Attention

and

automaticity


Schneider, W., Dumais, S.T., & Shiffrin, R.M. (1984). Automatic and control



processing and attention. In R. Parasuraman, & D.R. Davies (Eds.),



Varieties

of

attention

(pp. 1
-
27). Orlando: Acade
mic.


Pashler, H. (1995).
Attention and visual perception:
Analyzing divided attention.


In S.M. Kosslyn & D.N. Osherson (Eds.),
An

invitation

to

cognitive




science:

Visual

cognition

,

Vol.

2

(1
-
70).


2



March 23


V.
Memory

(short
-
term)


Jonides, J. (
1995). Working memory and thinking. In Smith, E.E. & Osherson,



An

invitation

to

cognitive

science:

Thinking

,

Vol.

3

(215
-
265).


March 30
: Seco
nd Exam handed out; due April 2
.


April 2


VI.
Memory

(long
-
term)



Schacter, D.L. (1989). Memory. In M.
I. Posner (Ed.),
Foundations of



cognitive s
cience

(pp. 683
-
726). Cambridge, MA: MIT.


April 9


VII.
Categorization


Rosch, E. (1977). Classification of real
-
world objects: Origins and




representations in cognition. In P.N. Johnson
-
Laird & P.C.
Wason (Eds.),



Thinking:

Readings

in

cognitive

science

(pp. 212
-
222). Cambridge:



Cambridge Univ. Press.


Medin, D.L.
, & Wattenmaker, W.D. (1987).
Category cohesiveness, theories and



cognitive archeology. In U. Neisser (Ed.),
Concepts

and

conce
ptual




development:

Ecological

and

intellectual

factors

in

categorization

(pp. 25
-



62). Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press.


Smith, E.E. (1995).
Concepts and categorization. In Smith, E.E. & Osherson,



An

invitation

to

cognitive

science:

Thinking

,

Vol.

3

(3
-
34).


April 16


VIII.
Judgment

and

reasoning


Osherson, D.N. (1995). Probability judgment. In Smith, E.E. & Osherson,



An

invitation

to

cognitive

science:

Thinking

,

Vol.

3

(35
-
76).


Shafir, E. & Tversky, A. (1995). Decision making. In

Smith, E.E. & Osherson,



An

invitation

to

cognitive

science:

Thinking

,

Vol.

3

(77
-
100).


Holyoak, K.J. (1995). Problem solving. In Smith, E.E. & Osherson,




An

invitation

to

cognitive

science:

Thinking

,

Vol.

3

(267
-
296).


Rips, L. (1995). Ded
uction and cognition. In Smith, E.E. & Osherson,




An

invitation

to

cognitive

science:

Thinking

,

Vol.

3

(297
-
344).


Cosmides, L. (1989). The logic of social exchange: Has natural selec
tion shaped


how humans reason? Studies with the Wason selecti
on task.
Cognition
,



31, 187
-
276.

Gigerenzer, G. (1991). How to make cognitive illusions disappear:

Beyond heuristics and biases.
European Review of Social Psychology
,

2
, 83
-
115.






3

Apr
il 23



IX.
Artificial

intelligence

and

connectionism


Turing
, A.M. (1963).
Computing machinery and intelligence. In E. Feigenbaum



& J. Feldman (Eds.),
Computers

and

thought

(pp. 11
-
35). New York:



McGraw
-
Hill. (Originally published in
Mind
, 1950, 59, 433
-
460.)


Winograd, T. (1973). A procedural model of

language understanding. In R.



Schank & K. Colby (Eds.),
Computer

models

of

thought

and

language

(pp.


152
-
186). San Francisco: Freeman.


Dreyfus, H.L. (1981). From micro
-
worlds to knowledge representation: AI at an



impasse. In J. Haugeland (E
d.),
Mind

design:

Philosophy,

psychology,




artificial

intelligence

(pp. 161
-
204). Montgomery, VT: Bradford.


Artificial

intelligence

and

connectionism

(cont.)

Searle, J.R. (1981). Minds, brains, and programs. In J.Haugeland (Ed.),
Mind




design:

Philosophy,

psychology,

artificial

intelligence

(pp. 282
-
306).



Montgomery, VT: Bradford.


McClelland, J.L., Rumelhart, D.E., Hinton, G.E. (1988). The appeal of parallel



distributed processing. In D.E. Rumelhart, J.L. McClelland, and the PDP



re
search group (Eds.),
Parallel

distributed

processing.

Explorations

in

the




microstructure

of

cognition,

Vol.

1:

Foundations

(pp. 3
-
44). Cambridge,



MA: MIT.


May 4
:
T
hird Exam handed out; due May 7
.


Textbooks:

Kosslyn, S.M. & Osherson, D.N. (Eds
.) (1995),
An invitation to cognitive
science: Visual cognition. Vol. 2.

Smith, E.E. & Osherson, D.N. (Eds.) (1995),
An invitation to cognitive science:



Thinking. Vol. 3.


Photocopies of all other readings
are
available at
University Duplicating, WEL
2.228,
471
-
1657.


Course grades will be determined by performance on the three exams, all equally
weighted.

Exams are to be e
-
mailed to the instructor as an attachment by 11 a.m. on the
due date
.

Include the entire exam as a single attachment. Label attac
hment with your
first and last name and the exam number.