Departmental and Faculty norms of p
rogression and assessment being applied. The pass
mark for each module is 50%. To pass the programme, modules totalling 150 credits must
be passed and these must include 140 compulsory modules. All marks from all modules
(passed and failed) are included in

the final classification mark, which must be at least a
50% weighted average. Classification is based on pass (50
-

59%), merit (60
-
60%) and
distinction (70% and above).

32




Learning outcomes

On completion of the programme students should ha
ve shown evidenc
e of being able
to
demonstrate an understanding of concepts, information and techniques in the field of food
science and food biotechnology as informed by research/scholarship in the discipline,
including knowledge of:



the techniques and role of food pres
erv
ation and processing operations



the biochemical and chemical
attributes

and reactio
ns of the major food components



the f
actors impacting on food safety



the effect of food processing on nutritional quality and understanding of the role

of
processed foods

in the diet



traditional and novel uses of biotechnology in food product
ion, GMOs and use of
antibodies



types of food allergy, detection and trends;


To

exhibit competence in the exercise of generic and subject
-
specific intellectual abilities,
including the ability to:



critically evaluate current research, research and advanced scholarship relevant to
food science using concepts from scholarly reviews and

primary sources of
information




demonstrate an understanding of the provisional nature of information and allow for
competing and alternative explana
tions



demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method of enquiry and understand the
principles of hy
pothesis
-
lead research; apply this understanding to the planning and
implementation of an individual research proj
ect in a relevant research area



apply their knowledge and understanding to solving complex problems by collecting
and evaluating appropriate i
nformation, and use it creatively to suggest

innovations
or make decisions.

T
o demonstrate ability in the use and evaluation of research methods and techniques
standard to the food science and food biotechnology discipline, including a theoretical and
prac
tical understanding of:



laboratory methods used in understanding nutrient content of foods, and the effect of
processing on nutrient content;



laboratory methods used in understanding the composition of foods;



Health and Safety practices, including risk ass
essment in laboratory settings;

to apply research skills to generate complex primary data as part of an individual
research project;

T
o take a proactive and self
-
reflective role in working and to develop professional
relationships with others, including
:



s
elf
-
evaluation of skills and competences leading to a personal development plan in
terms of:



generic graduate skills.




33



Transferable (key) skills

S
tudents will have had the opportunity to acquire the following abilities as defined in the
modules
specified for the programme:


T
he skills necessary to undertake a higher research degree in aspects of Food Science or
relevant
discipline

and/or for employment in a higher capacity in the food industry, including
demonstration of:



autonomy, self direction
, initiative and effective decision making in compl
ex and
unpredictable situations



e
ffective self
-
planning in order to prioritise and manage t
ime and resources



effectively;

effective team work
and leadership where applicable



effective communication with i
ndividuals or groups usi
ng a range of methods and
media



effective use of ICT methods for gathering, evaluating, analysing and
presenting
information and data



effective dissemination of research findings though an individual dissertation thesis,
an oral pre
se
ntation and an oral examination



evaluating their own achiev
ement using reflective practice



independent learning and the ability to work in a way which ensures cont
inuing
professional development



critical engagement in the development of professional/disc
iplinary boundaries and
norms.

Assessment

Achievement for the degree of Master (taught programme) will be assessed by a variety of
methods in accordance with the learning outcomes of the modules specified for the
year/programme and will involve the achieve
ment of the students in evidencing an ability to
conduct independent in
-
depth enquiry within the discipline.


This will be evidenced through:



the undertaking of
an independent research project



demonstrating the ability to apply breadth and/or depth of kno
wled
ge to a complex
specialist area



drawing on a range of p
erspectives on an area of study



evaluating a
nd criticising received opinion



making reasoned judgements whilst understanding the limitations on judgements
made
in the absence of complete data



generation, analysis and evaluation of complex research primary data, assessed
though the writing of an individual research thesis, an oral presentation and an oral
examination.

Learning context

For Masters (Taught), Postgraduate Diploma and Postgraduate C
ertificate students the
learning context will include the analysis of, and decision making in, complex and
unpredictable situations. The structure of the programme will provide breadth and/or depth of
study and opportunities for drawing upon appropriate re
sources and techniques.


Opportunities will be provided for students to develop:

-

interests and informed opinions

-

their involvement in the design and management of their learning activities

-

their communication of their conclusions.

34



Students will be
expected to progress to fully autonomous study and work.

Compulsory modules:

Candidates are expected to study
the following
180 credits of compulsory modules and need
to pass 150 credits to include the compulsory to pass modules

(PFP).

FOOD5045M

Microbiological and Chemical Food Safety

20
credits

Semesters 1
& 2

PFP

FOOD5055M

Food Processing

20
credits

Semesters 1
& 2

PFP

FOOD5071M

Research Project

60
credits

Semester 2

PFP

FOOD5125M

Food Biotechnology

10
credits

Semester 2

PFP

FOOD5196M

Impacts of Food Processing on Nutritional Quality

10
credits

Semester 2


FOOD5206M

GMOs, Antibodies and PCR

10
credits

Semester 2

PFP

FOOD5235M

Food and the Allergic Reaction

10
credits

Semester 1


FOOD5241M

Structure and Function of Food Components

20
credits

Semesters 1
& 2

PFP

FOOD5405M

Professional Development for Employment and Research

20
credits

Semester 1














35


MSc Food Science and Nutrition

Programme code:

MSC
-
FOOD/FSN


Duration:

12 Months

Method of Attendance:

Full Time

Programme
manager:

Mr Paul Kajda

Contact address:

p.kajda@food.leeds.ac.uk

Total credits:

180

Entry requirements:



A first degree in a science based subject with at least the equivalent of a lower
second class honours



English requirement for international students
is IE
LTS 6.0 or above, with at least 5.5
in listening and reading, and at least 5.0 in speaking and writing; or TOEFL (internet
based test) of at least 83 with at least 18 in listening, 20 in reading, 20 in speaking
and 21 in writing.


School/Unit
responsible for the parenting of students and programme:

School of Food Science and Nutrition


Examination board through which the programme will be considered:

School of Food Science and Nutrition


Relevant QAA Subject Benchmark Groups:

Although Masters d
egrees are not included in the benchmarks, this programme
fulfils

a large
part of the benchmarks for


Programme specification:

This programme will enable students to:



develop an in
-
depth understanding of food science, food processing and composition
in
rel
ation to nutritional quality




critically appraise the chemical, physical and quantitative changes in nutrients and
non
-
nutrients during food processing and manufa
cture, distribution and storage



understand the concept of food quality and relevance of nutrit
iona
l quality to total
food quality



develop an understanding of the functions of food components and nutrients and
strengthen the understanding of global issues related to nutrition and health of
individ
uals and population subgroups



develop a capacity to c
ritically analyse a problem, action pl
an and scientific
investigation



develop skills such as effective c
ommunication and presentation.


The programme aims to develop an understanding of nutrition from an international
perspective and encourages the
development of research projects that satisfy both the
course requirements and the interests of individual students.





36




Learning outcomes

On completion of the programme students should have shown evidence of being able:


T
o demonstrate an understanding of concepts, information and techniques in the field of
food science and nutrition as informed by research/scholarship in the discipline, including
knowledge of:



the techniques and role of food preservation and processing

op
erations



the biochemical and chemical attributes and reactio
ns of the major food components



the f
actors impacting on food safety



the effect of food processing on nutritional quality and understanding of the role

of
processed foods in the diet



analysis of n
u
trients and in vitro techniques



role of functional foods and polyphenols in the diet
.


T
o exhibit competence in the exercise of generic and subject
-
specific intellectual abilities,
including the ability to:



critically evaluate current research, research a
nd advanced scholarship relevant to
food science and nutrition using concepts from scholarly reviews and
primary
sources of information



demonstrate an understanding of the provisional nature of information and allow for
competing
and alternative explanatio
ns



demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method of enquiry and understand the
principles of hypothesis
-
lead research; apply this understanding to the planning and
implementation of an individual research project in a r
elevant research area



apply t
heir knowledge and understanding to solving complex problems by collecting
and evaluating appropriate information, and use it creatively to suggest innovations
or make decisions.



T
o demonstrate ability in the use and evaluation of research methods and
techniques
standard to the food science and nutrition discipline, including a theoretical and practical
understanding of:



laboratory methods used in understanding nutrient content of foods, and the effect of
processing on nutrient content;



laboratory metho
ds used in understanding the composition of foods;



Health and Safety practices, including risk assessment in laboratory settings;



to apply research skills to generate complex primary data as part of an individual
research project;



to be aware of ethical is
sues and developments in understanding of nutrition.


T
o take a proactive and self
-
reflective role in working and to develop professional
relationships with others, including Self
-
evaluation of skills and competences leading to a
personal development plan
in terms of:



generic graduate skills;





37







Transferable (key) skills

S
tudents will have had the opportunity to acquire the following abilities as defined in the
modules specified for the programme the skills necessary to undertake a higher research
deg
ree in aspects of Food Science and Nutrition or relevant
discipline

and/or for employment
in a higher capacity in the food industry, including demonstration of:



autonomy, self direction, initiative and effective decision making in compl
ex and
unpredictable

situations



effective self
-
planning in order to prioritise and manage time and resources



effective team work
and leadership where applicable



effective communication with individuals or groups usi
ng a range of methods and
media



effective use of ICT methods

for gathering, evaluating, analysing and presen
ting
information and data



effective dissemination of research findings though an individual dissertation thesis,
an oral prese
ntation and an oral examination



evaluating their own achiev
ement using reflective
practice



independent learning and the ability to work in a way which ensures cont
inuing
professional development



critical engagement in the development of professional/disciplinary boundaries and
norms.

Assessment

Achievement for the degree of Master (taug
ht programme) will be assessed by a variety of
methods in accordance with the learning outcomes of the modules specified for the
year/programme and will involve the achievement of the students in:

evidencing an ability to conduct independent in
-
depth enqui
ry within the discipline.

This will be evidenced through:



the undertaking of
an independent research project



demonstrating the ability to apply breadth and/or depth of knowled
ge to a complex
specialist area



drawing on a range of p
erspectives on an area of

study



evaluating and cr
iticising received opinion



making reasoned judgements whilst understanding the limitations on judgements
made
in the absence of complete data



generation, analysis and evaluation of complex research primary data, assessed
though the
writing of an individual research thesis, an oral presentation and an oral
examination.

Learning context

For Masters (Taught), Postgraduate Diploma and Postgraduate Certificate students the
learning context will include the analysis of, and decision making

in, complex and
unpredictable situations. The structure of the programme will provide breadth and/or depth of
study and opportunities for drawing upon appropriate resources and techniques.


Opportunities will be provided for students to develop:



interests

and informed opinions



their involvement in the design and management of their learning activities



their communication of their conclusions.

38





Compulsory modules:

Candidates are expected to study
the following
180 credits of compulsory modules and need
to pass 150 credits to include the compulsory to pass modules

(PFP).

FOOD5045M

Microbiological and Chemical Food Safety

20
credits

Semesters 1
& 2

PFP

FOOD5055M

Food Processing

20
credits

Semesters 1
& 2

PFP

FOOD5071M

Research Project

60
credits

Semester

2

PFP

FOOD5145M

Nutrition and Health

10
credits

Semester 2

PFP

FOOD5196M

Impacts of Food Processing on Nutritional Quality

10
credits

Semester 2

PFP

FOOD5241M

Structure and Function of Food Components

20
credits

Semesters 1
& 2

PFP

FOOD5270M

Food
Analysis

10
credits

Semester 2


FOOD5405M

Professional Development for Employment and Research

20
credits

Semester 1


FOOD5425M

Personalised Nutrition

10
credits

Semester 1













39


MSc Food Quality and Innovation

Programme code:

MSC
-
FOOD/Q&I


Duration:

12 Months

Method of Attendance:

Full Time

Programme manager:

Dr Peter Ho

Contact address:

p.ho@leeds.ac.uk


Total credits:

180

Entry requirements:



BSc qualification in a Food programme or equivale
nt in
relevant science subject


Minimum qualification 2ii.



English requirement for international students is IE
LTS 6.0 or above, with at least 5.5
in listening and reading, and at least 5.0 in speaking and writing; or TOEFL (internet
based test) of at least 83 w
ith at least 18 in listening, 20 in reading, 20 in speaking
and 21 in writing.


School/Unit responsible for the parenting of students and programme:

School of Food Science and Nutrition


Examination board through which the programme will be considered:

Sch
ool of Food Science and Nutrition MSc Exam Board


Programme specification:

At the end of the programme students should:



demonstrate in
-
depth knowledge of the scientific principles underpinning the
relationship between food quality, food safety and product

design and new product
development;



critically evaluate key issues in food legislation and novel developments pertinent to
food quality and safety that include the ISO standards for quality and food safety
management systems;



demonstrate research skills i
ncluding literature evaluations, method design, project
planning, data analysis and result dissemination;



be confident in their own professional abilities and be aware of their limitations, be
self
-
evaluative, reflective practitioners and lifelong learners
.


The programme will provide students with a learning environment that immerses them into
real
-
world situations in food product development and quality assurance through the use of
group
-
based learning activities that requires them to use their knowledge
and skills attained
through multi
-
disciplinary learning modules in various scientific fields (that includes applied
food sciences, engineering and mathematical sciences, management studies).


The programme has 100 credits of modules addressing the followi
ng:



A 10 credit module (specific to this programme) in food safety and quality management will
examine ISO quality management systems (ISO9000, ISO22000), the application of Hazard
Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) systems, statistical process con
trol.



A 10 credit module that addresses methods for measuring sensory, texture, rheology and
food structure and their application in research and industry. Students will receive practical
training in sensory evaluation and the use of industry standard co
mputerised sensory tools.



A 20 credit module (specific to this programme) that will examine novel techniques used in
industry for new product development (The Stage
-
Gate® process, Quality Function
40


Deployment) and application of experimental design techn
iques and Kansei engineering.
Students will be introduce to management tools used in project management, assemble a
product design concept and formulate product design specification that integrates consumer
needs

and expectations.

A 60 credit group project

(specific to this programme) that will provide students with an
experience in tackling different aspects of a product development process from product
conception through to product launch. Students will apply knowledge and skills to produce a
product meet
ing product quality and safety requirements, conformance to food legislation
and addressing consumer preferences.


Learning outcomes

On completion of the programme students should ha
ve shown evidence of being able

to
demonstrate in
-
depth, specialist knowledge and mastery of techniques relevant to the
scientific disciplines of Food Quality, Food Safety, Product design and new product
development and/or to demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of concepts, inform
ation
and techniques at the forefront of these disciplines, that includes a knowledge of:



the principles of quality, quality assurance and quality management and the
application of quality tools and techniques in solvin
g food quality control problems

proce
dures for implementing a Hazard Analysis Critic
al Control Point (HACCP)
system



Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) and Good Hygiene Practice (GHP) prerequisi
te
programmes



i
nstrumental techniques for mon
itoring food quality and safety



key issues in food legis
lation in the UK and internationally and its implementation in
control and manage
ment of food quality and safety



important microbiological safety issues in food and the scientific basis of key
approaches used by the industry in orde
r to minimise risk to co
nsumers



the range of chemical safety issues in food, how t
hey are minimised and regulated

procedures for the design, application and interpretation of statistically valid sensory
analysis methods for assessing food quality,
consumer choice and preferences



scientific principles and methods for measuring food texture, structure and
rheological properties and their application in the

food industry and for research



p
rinciples and techniques involved in a f
ood product development process



the application of produ
ct design, sensory analysis and project management
techniques in product development



experimental design techniques in product design, optim
isation and product
formulation



the principles underlying industrial food processing for preservation and

conversion

of food commodities



relevant heat

transfer and fluid flow theory



the theoretical basis and technology of the m
ajor food processing operations.


T
o exhibit mastery in the exercise of generic and subject
-
specific intellectual abilities
including the ability

to:



carry out basic chemical and microbiological risk assessments,



understand the principles of audits and discuss the use of different audit tools i
n a
quality assurance programme



identify, select and apply appropriate statistical process control techniq
ues for
mon
itoring food quality and safety



outline appropriate procedures in conducting a hazard analysis, and identify potential
hazards and Critical Control Points (CCP
s) in a food production process



describe sensory properties of food and select sensory

analysis techniques for
measuring sensory attributes (e.g.
, appearance, flavour, texture)

41




outline instrumental measurement techniques for food texture and discuss the
relationship between sens
ory and food texture attributes



describe the use of rheology

to describe the mechanical properties of solids and
liquids, characteristic behaviour of
solutions, gels and dispersion



describe how food structure can be measured and how it relates to texture, flavour
and sensory perception of food



describe sensory prop
erties of food and select sensory analysis techniques for
measuring sensory attributes (e.g.
, appearance, flavour, texture)



understand the mechanisms and principles

governing food oral processing

recognise and apply appropriate.


T
o demonstrate a comprehen
sive understanding of techniques applicable to their own
research or advanced scholarship, including the ability to:



formulate a product design specification that integrates the 'voice of the consumer' by
using the Qua
lity Function Deployment method



employ

sensory techniques for characterising sensory attributes and d
etermining
consumer preferences.


Transferable (key) skills


S
tudents will have had the opportunity to acquire the following abilities as defined in the
modu
les specified for the programme.

T
he

skills necessary to undertake a higher research degree in Food Science and/or for
employment in a higher capacity in the food industry or area of professional practice which
may include the demonstration of:



autonomy, self direction, initiative and effect
ive decision making in compl
ex and
unpredictable situations



effective self
-
planning in order to prioritise and manage ti
me and resources
effectively



effective team work
and leadership where applicable



e
ffective communication with individuals or groups usi
n
g a range of methods and
media



effective use of ICT methods for gathering, evaluating, analysing and p
resenting
information and data



effective dissemination of research findings though an individual dissertation thesis,
an oral prese
ntation and an oral exa
mination



ability to use computerised sensory tools t
o plan and design sensory tests



ability to use statistical programs for experimental design an
d analysis of
experimental data.



evaluating their own achievement by developing a capacity for self
-
audit and
that of
others by participating in peer
-
review



self direction and effective decision making in compl
ex and unpredictable situations

I
ndependent learning and the ability to work in a way which ensures continuing professional
development, which includes the ability to:



work together to compose and summarise real world situations in product
development in written and oral forms as part of

a team



work as part of a team to solve real world f
ood quality and safety problems



critical engagement in the development of professional/disciplinary boundaries and
norms.

42


Assessment

Achievement for the degree of Master (taught programme) will be assesse
d by a variety of
methods in accordance with the learning outcomes of the modules specified for the
year/programme and will involve the achievement of the students in:



evidencing an ability to conduct in
-
depth enquiry as a team in the area of food
quality,

food safety, product des
ign and new product development



demonstrating the ability to apply breadth and/or depth of knowledge to a complex
specialist area drawing on a range of pe
rspectives on an area of study



evaluating a
nd criticising received opinion



ma
king reasoned judgements whilst understanding the limitations on judgements
made in the absence of complete data.

Learning context

For Masters (Taught), Postgraduate Diploma and Postgraduate Certificate students the
learning conte
xt will include the analys
is of

and decision making in, complex and
unpredictable situations. The structure of the programme will provide breadth and/or depth of
study and opportunities for drawing upon appropriate resources and techniques.


Opportunities will be provided for stud
ents to develop:



interests and informed opinions



their involvement in the design and manageme
nt of their learning activities



their communication of their conclusion
s

Students will be expected to progress to fully autonomous study and work.

Candidates will
be required to study 180 credits.

Compulsory modules:

Candidates are expected to study
the following
180 credits of compulsory modules and need
to pass 150 credits to include the compulsory to pass modules

(PFP).

FOOD5045M

Microbiological and Chemical Food

Safety

20
credits

Semesters 1
& 2

PFP

FOOD5055M

Food Processing

20
credits

Semesters 1
& 2

PFP

FOOD5270M

Food Analysis

10
credits

Semester 2


FOOD5280M

Functional Foods

10
credits

Semester 2


FOOD5405M

Professional Development for Employment and
Research

20
credits

Semester 1


FOOD5450M

Industrial Project: Food Innovation

60
credits

Semester 2

PFP

FOOD5460M

Food Product Design and Development

20
credits

Semesters 1
& 2

PFP

FOOD5470M

Sensory Properties, Food Texture and Structure

10
credits

Semester 2

PFP

FOOD5480M

Monitoring and Control of Food Quality and Safety (Food
Safety and Quality Management)

10
credits

Semester 1

PFP


43


MSc Nutrition

Programme code:

MSC
-
FOOD/N


Duration:

12 Months

Method of Attendance:

Full Time

Programme manager:

Dr Caroline Orfila

Contact address:

c.orfila@leeds.ac.uk


Total credits:

180

Entry requirements:



BSc qualification or equivalent in a relevant Biological, Health
or Food
-
related
science subject



Minimum
qualification 2ii



English requirement for international students is IE
LTS 6.0 or above, with at least 5.5
in listening and reading, and at least 5.0 in speaking and writing; or TOEFL (internet
based test) of at least 83 with at least 18 in listening, 20 in

reading, 20 in speaking
and 21 in writing.


School/Unit responsible for the parenting of students and programme:

School of Food Science and Nutrition


Examination board through which the programme will be considered:

School of Food Science and Nutrition
MSc Examination Board


Relevant QAA Subject Benchmark Groups:

There are no QAA Benchmarks available for programmes at MSc level.

A HESA consultation document discussing MSc benchmarks was consulted.


Programme specification:

At the end of the programme stu
dents should be able to:



demonstrate in
-
depth knowledge of the scientific principles underpinning the
relationship between d
iet, human health and wellbeing



critically evaluate the current issues and developments pertinent to the nutrition
discipline, and
propose new insights and sol
utions to diet
-
related problems



demonstrate research skills including literature evaluation, method design, project
planning, data an
alysis and result dissemination



be confident in their own professional abilities and be aware o
f their limitations, be
self
-
evaluative, reflective practitioners and lifelong learners.


Distinctiveness of the programme

The

programme will produce postgraduate graduates with the knowledge, competences and
skills to tackle situations and problems in the field of nutrition and nutritional science. The
programme is designed to equip students with subject
-
specific and generic gra
duate skills to
be successful in future graduate employment.


The syllabus has been designed according to accreditation guidelines set by the UK
Voluntary Register of Nutritionists, and we will seek accreditation as soon as possible
(generally after one y
ear of the programme being active/recruiting). Accreditation will
enhance employment prospects of graduates, and will be a distinctive feature of the
programme, as only a few MSc programmes (8) are accredited in the UK.


The programme will foster student

s ability to be self
-
evaluative and reflective practitioners,
with knowledge of their competences and skills, but also of their limitations and their training
needs. This concept will be initiated in the FOOD5400M graduate skills module, where
44


students wil
l develop their own training and development plan in terms of generic skills, and
also in FOOD5410M Nutrition: Policy and Practice, where students will reflect on their
knowledge and skills as relevant to nutritional practice, but the approach will be embe
dded
throughout the programme.


The programme will use a research
-
led approach to deliver knowledge and skills at the
forefront of the discipline. This approach will be used throughout the programme but will be
most apparent in the FOOD5440M Advances in Fo
od Science and Nutrition module. In this
module, students will choose a research area relevant to the research grouping of the
School (Food Colloids and Processing, Food Chemistry and Biochemistry, Nutrition) and will,
with the help of an academic tutor, u
ndertake a critical evaluation of the literature and write a
research proposal to answer a research question, as identified by the student and the tutor.


The project (60 credits) will be undertaken in one of the research laboratories, or within the
contex
t of a work
-
based placement. The emphasis will be placed on the generation of
primary data, and the discussion of research results in the context of current knowledge and
opinions in the field.


The programme has 50 credits of core modules that will delive
r essential knowledge,
competence and skill, as required for accreditation purposes (FOOD5420M Personalised
Nutrition (20 credits), FOOD5410M Nutrition: Policy and Practice (20 credits) and
FOOD5195M Food Processing and Nutritional Quality (10 credits)). T
he programme
incorporates 20 credits of collaborative provision through the ICON5001M Research
Methods in Human Nutrition module, taught by staff from the Nutrition Epidemiology Group,
Faculty of Medicine and Health.


Learning outcomes

On completion of the

programme students should have
shown evidence of being able to

demonstrate an advanced understanding of concepts, information and techniques in the field
of nutrition as informed by recent research/scholarship in the discipline, including knowledge
of:



the effect of food processing on nutritional quality and understanding of the role of
processed foods in the diet



the biochemical and physiological basis underlying the link between diet/nutrients,
health and disease



the scientific principles underlying nu
trient requirements of individuals at different
stages of the life cycle and the concept of personalised nutrition



the factors that influence food consumption



the scientific, social and economic principles which inform the development of policy
and the dri
vers and barriers that affect policy implementation;


E
xhibit competence in the exercise of generic and subject
-
specific intellectual abilit
ies,
including the ability to:



critically evaluate current research, research and advanced scholarship
relevant to n
utrition using concepts from scholarly reviews and primary
sources of information



and use this information to write an original review of the literatu
re and
identify research needs



demonstrate an understanding of the provisional nature of information and
allow for competi
ng and alternative explanations



demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method of enquiry and
understand the principles of hypothesis
-
lead research; apply this
understanding to the planning and implementation of an individual resear
ch
proj
ect in a relevant research area

45




apply their knowledge and understanding to solving complex problems by
collecting and evaluating appropriate information, and use it creatively to
suggest innovations
or make decisions
.


D
emonstrate ability in the use

and evaluation of research methods and techniques standard
to the nutrition discipline, including a theoretical and practical understanding of:



the principles of nutritional epidemiology and survey
-
type approaches to
investigate food and nutrient consumpt
ion, nutrient intakes, dietary habits and
health/nutritional status of individuals and populations



laboratory methods and database methods used in understanding nutrient
content of foods and diets, and the effect of processing on nutrient content

laborator
y methods used in biomarker analysis as relevant to nutrition

anthropometric methods as relevant to nutritional/health assessment



H
ealth and Safety practices, including risk assessment in laboratory settings

ethical considerations in r
elation to nutritiona
l research



apply research skills to generate complex primary data as part of

an individual
research project.


T
ake a proactive and self
-
reflective role in working and to develop professional relationships
with others, including self
-
evaluation of skills an
d competences leading to a personal
development plan in terms of:



generic graduate skills



subject specific skills and competences as specified by the UK Voluntary
Register of Nutritionists, including an understanding of legal and ethic
al
boundaries of the
profession



demonstrate an understanding of the analysis of food composition.


Transferable (key) skills

S
tudents will have had the opportunity to acquire the following abilities as defined in the
modu
les specified for the programme and t
he skills necessary to undertake a higher
research degree in nutrition or other relevant
discipline

and/or for employment in a higher
capacity in the food/health/leisure industry or as a professional nutritionist, including
demonstration of:



autonomy, self

direction, initiative and effective decision making in complex and
unpredictable situations



effective self
-
planning in order to prioritise and manage time and resources
effectively



effective team work and leadership where applicable



effective communicatio
n with individuals or groups using a range of methods and
media



effective use of ICT methods for gathering, evaluating, analysing and presenting
information and data, as relevant to the nutrition discipline



effective dissemination of research findings thou
gh an individual dissertation thesis,
an oral presentation and an oral examina
tion



evaluating their own achiev
ement using reflective practice



independent learning and the ability to work in a way which ensures cont
inuing
professional development



critical e
ngagement in the development of professional/disciplinary boundaries and
norms, particularly though a review of the literature in a relevant subject area, and
the undertaking of an independent research project.


46


Assessment

Achievement for the degree of Mas
ter (taught programme) will be assessed by a variety of
methods in accordance with the learning outcomes of the modules specified for the
year/programme and will involve the achievement of the students in evidencing an ability to
conduct independent in
-
dep
th enquiry within the discipline.

This will be evidenced through:



the undertaking of an independent research project



demonstrating the ability to apply breadth and/or depth of knowledge to a complex
specialist area



drawing on a range of perspectives on an

area of study



evaluating and criticising received opinion



making reasoned judgements whilst understanding the limitations on judgements
made in the absence of complete data



generation, analysis and evaluation of complex research primary data, assessed
tho
ugh the writing of an individual research thesis, an oral presentation and an oral
examination.

Learning context

For Masters (Taught) students the learning context will include the analysis of and decision
making in, complex and unpredictable situations. T
he structure of the programme will
provide breadth and/or depth of study and opportunities for drawing upon appropriate
resources and techniques.


Opportunities will be provided for students to develop:



interests and informed opinions



their involvement in

the design and management of their learning activities

their communication of their conclusions.

Students will be expected to progress to fully autonomous study and work.

Compulsory modules:

Candidates are expected to study

the following

180 credits of compulsory modules and need
to pass 150 credits to include the compulsory to pass modules

(PFP).

FOOD5071M

Research Project

60
credits

Semester 2

PFP

FOOD5145M

Nutrition and Health

10
credits

Semester 2


FOOD5196M

Impacts of Food
Processing on Nutritional Quality

10
credits

Semester 2


FOOD5270M

Food Analysis

10
credits

Semester 2


FOOD5405M

Professional Development for Employment and Research

20
credits

Semester 1


FOOD5410M

Nutrition: Policy and Practice

20
credits

Semesters 1

&
2

PFP

FOOD5425M

Personalised Nutrition

10
credits

Semester 1

PFP

FOOD5445M

Nutrition and Health Research

10
credits

Semester 2

PFP

ICON5011M

Introduction to Public Health Nutrition

15
credits

Semester 1

PFP

ICON5013M

Introduction to Nutritional
Epidemiology

15
credits

Semester 2

PFP

47


Module Details

for MSc Programmes

FOOD5016M
:

Physical Aspects of Food

10 credits

Module manager

Dr R Ettelaie

Email:

r.ettelaie@leeds.ac.uk


Taught

Semester 1

Pre
-
requisite qualifications
:

A BSc degree in chemistry, biochemistry, biological sciences or related science, or chemical
engineering.

Objectives



To explain the nature of food as a medium for chemical reactions and the effects of
electrolytes, non
-
electrolytes, pH and dispersed phases on the structures and
r
eactivities of food components



To examine in detail the mechanisms of non
-
enzymic browning, f
ood additive
-
food
component reactions, and methods of control.

Syllabus



General description of the aqueous and non
-
aqueous environment in food



Specific and general effects of electrolytes and non
-
electrolytes on equilibria in
concentrated systems



Mechanism
s of reactions of sulphite and sorbic acid with food components



Measurements and significance of pH in food; ionisation of proteins



Distribution of ions between aqueous and protein gel phases



Effects of surfactants on the activity and reactivity of preserv
atives



Applications in Food Systems

Teaching methods

Delivery type

Number

Length hours

Student hours

Lecture

11

1.00

11.00

Practical

1

3.00

3.00

Tutorial

2

1.00

2.00

Private study hours

84.00

Total Contact hours

16.00

Total hours (100hr per 10
credits)

100.00


Private study



6 hours: practical report



20 hours: preparation for
t
utorial and exercises



33
hours: reading for lectures



25 hours: examination and preparation.

48


Progress monitoring

P
ractical
classes
and contributions to tutorials.


Methods
of assessment


Coursework

Assessment
type

Notes

% of formal
assessment

In
-
course
Assessment

Numerical examples class work
-

continuous assessment

10.00

In
-
course
Assessment

Laboratory class work
-

continuous assessment

5.00

Total percentage (Assessment
Coursework)

15.00



Exam
ination
s

Exam type

Exam duration

% of formal assessment

Unseen exam (MCQ, essays,
etc.)

1 hr 30 mins

85.00

Total percentage (Assessment Exams)

85.00



Reading list

The
reading list

is available from the Library website











49


FOOD5045M
:
Microbiological and Chemical Food Safety

20 credits

Module manager

Professor Mike Mor
gan

Email:

m.r.a.morgan@adm.leeds.ac.uk


Taught

Semesters 1 & 2

Pre
-
requisite qualifications

A BSc degree in chemistry, biochemistry, biological sciences or related science, or chemical
engineering

Objectives

On completion of the module, students should:



have an understanding of the important microbiological safety issues in food and the
scientific basis of the key approaches used by the industry in order to

minimize risk to
consumers



understand the
range of chemical safety issues in food, how they are minimized and
regulated. In both areas, students will be expected to be knowledgeable on the
relative risks and to be able to carry out basic risk assessments.

Syllabus



The key food poisoning microorgan
isms; microbial ecology of foods; process hygiene
-

engineering and microbiology



Predictive modelling of microbial growth and survival



Hazard analysis and critical control point techniques (HACCP)



Inherent (natural) food toxicants, their production and pro
perties



Mycotoxins (aflatoxins, trichothecenes, ochratoxins, and fumonisins), their
production, properties and regulation



Food contaminants (pesticides, veterinary drug residues), hazard and regulation



Food additives, hazard and regulation; acrylamide in f
ood, a new safety issue?


Teaching methods

Delivery type

Number

Length hours

Student hours

Lecture

26

1.00

26.00

Seminar

4

1.00

4.00

Private study hours

170.00

Total Contact hours

30.00

Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)

200.00



Private study



Private study on lecture material, directed reading and preparation for examinations:
160 hours



P
reparation for seminars: 10 hours.





50


Progress monitoring



Through mid
-
session submitted multiple choice test



2 x 1,000 word essays.


Methods of assessment


Exams

Exam type

Exam duration

% of formal assessment

Unseen exam (MCQ, essays,
etc.)

3 hr 00 mins

100.00

Total percentage (Assessment Exams)

100.00


Reading list

The
reading list

is available from the Library website

















51


FOOD5055M
:
Food Processing

20 credits

Module manager

Dr J Chen

Email:

j.chen@leeds.ac.uk


Taught

Semesters 1 & 2

Pre
-
requisite qualifications

Acceptance onto MSc
Programme

Objectives

On completion of this module, students should be able to:



understand the principles underlying industr
ial food processing for preservation and
conversion of food commodities



understand relevant heat transfer and fluid flow theory



u
nderstand the theoretical basis and technology of the major food processing
operations.


Syllabus



Introduction to industrial
food processing, including hygienic

design and operation of
plant
preparation of foods for processing



Basic fluid flow and heat transfer theory



Liquid/liquid and liquid/solid separation processes



S
ize reductio
n processes



Theory and practice of food dehydra
tion, freezing, chilling, concentration, thermal
sterilisation, extrusion cooking, packaging



Preservation by additives



Packaging



Integration of unit operations (dairy product, fruit, coffee and a baked product).



Teaching methods

Delivery type

Number

Length hours

Student hours

Revision Class

1

1.00

1.00

Class tests, exams and assessment

2

1.00

2.00

Lecture

1

1.00

1.00

Lecture

32

1.00

32.00

Practical

11

3.00

33.00

Tutorial

2

1.00

2.00

Private study hours

129.00

Total Contact hours

71.00

Total
hours (100hr per 10 credits)

200.00




52


Private study



Practical reports: 30 hours



Preparation for tests: 10 hours



Background reading for lectures: 64 hours



Preparation for examination: 25 hours.


Progress monitoring

Monitoring of progress will be through
continuously assessed practical reports, from mid
-
semester tests and from tutorial work.


Methods of assessment


Coursework

Assessment
type

Notes

% of formal
assessment

In
-
course
Assessment

Assessment 1 at end of semester 1

15.00

Report

Practical reports

25.00

Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)

40.00




Exams

Exam type

Exam duration

% of formal assessment

Unseen exam (MCQ, essays,
etc.)

3 hr 00 mins

60.00

Total percentage (Assessment Exams)

60.00



Reading list

The
reading list

is available from the Library website







53


FOOD5071M
:
Research Project

60 credits

Module manager

Prof Gary Williamson

Email:

g.williamson@leeds.ac.uk


Taught

Semester 2

Pre
-
requisite qualifications
:

A BSc degree in chemistry, biochemistry, biological sciences or related science, or chemical
engineering.

Objectives

The application of fundamental sc
ientific principles to solve problems in food and nutrition
research.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module, students will have:



completed a laboratory research project or a computer based research project ora
l

survey based pr
oject



gained
experience in the collation, analysis and presentation of scientific data,
includi
ng the use of computer packages



prepared and submitted a research paper, in a scientifically acceptable format;

developed skills in the appropriate and selective use of libra
ry resources, including
computer based search tools including online databases such as ISI Web o
f
knowledge, Medline and PubMed



the competence to read critically a scientific paper and to identify

the key features of
the study



the competence to interpret d
ata presented in scientific papers and to assess them
critically in order
to draw appropriate conclusions



gained an understanding of a broad range of subject areas in food science, food
chemistry or in nutrition.

Syllabus

The application of fundamental sci
entific principles to solve problems in food or nutrition
research. Students will be given a choice of research topics relevant to the research activity
of the School and, in some cases, suggested by industrial companies.


Teaching methods

Private study ho
urs

600.00

Total Contact hours

0.00

Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)

600.00


Private study

Library
-
based literature review equivalent to 7.5 credits in second semester followed by
supervised laboratory
-
based individual experimental research project
until after the end of
semester 2.

54


Methods of assessment


Coursework

Assessment
type

Notes

% of formal
assessment

Research
Proposal

Assessment of literature review

9.00

In
-
course
Assessment

Continuous assessment of laboratory work

35.00

Investigative
Project

Dissertation at end of study

43.00

Oral
Presentation

Oral examination in August

13.00

Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)

100.00



Reading list

The
reading list

is available from the Library website















55


FOOD5115M
:
Colloid and Dairy Science

10 credits

Module manager

Dr Rammile Ettelaie

Email:

r.ettelaie@food.leeds.ac.uk


Taught

Semester 2

Pre
-
requisite qualifications

BSc Food Chemistry or related discip
line.

Objectives

To understand the principles and practice of colloid science with particular
reference to the
stability, structure and texture of dairy
-
based oil and water systems.

Syllabus



Terminology and concepts of colloid science;
creaming, aggregation, gelation



Stabilisation by adsorbed protein; role of emulsifiers and hydrocolloids; colloida
l
aspects of milk and crea
m; emulsion and foam formation



Fat crystallisation and texture of water
-
in
-
oil emulsions; margarine; butter; ice
-
cream;
cream liqueurs.

Teaching methods

Delivery type

Number

Length hours

Student hours

Lecture

18

1.00

18.00

Seminar

7

1.00

7.00

Private study hours

75.00

Total Contact hours

25.00

Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)

100.00


Private study



36 hours reading for lectures



14 hours preparation for seminars



25 hour exam preparation.

Progress monitoring

Through

attendance at lectures and attendance and contribution to seminars.

Methods of assessment


Exams

Exam type

Exam duration

% of formal assessment

Unseen exam (MCQ, essays,
etc.)

1 hr 30 mins

100.00

Total percentage (Assessment Exams)

100.00

Reading list

The
reading list

is available from the Library website


56


FOOD5125M
:
Food Biotechnology

10 credits

Module manager

Professor G Williamson

Email:

g.williamson@leeds.ac.uk


Taught

Semester 2

Pre
-
requisite qualifications

BSc in a science or engineering subj
ect

Objectives

To provide an understanding of biotechnology as it relates to the food industry.

Syllabus



Origins

of Biotechnology



Genetic manipulation of organisms involved in food manufacture



Legislation and social issues related to biotechnology in food.


Teaching methods

Delivery type

Number

Length hours

Student hours

Laboratory

2

3.00

6.00

Lecture

16

1.00

16.00

Seminar

2

1.00

2.00

Private study hours

76.00

Total Contact hours

24.00

Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)

100.00


Private study



Essay: 10 hours



Preparation for seminars: 3 hours



Laboratory reports: 6 hours



Background reading: 32 hours



Examination and preparation for examination: 25 hours.


Progress monitoring

A
ttendance at lectures and laboratory classes and from contributions at seminars.




57


Methods of assessment


Coursework

Assessment
type

Notes

% of formal
assessment

In
-
course
Assessment

Laboratory class work
-

continuous assessment

5.00

Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)

5.00


Exams

Exam type

Exam duration

% of formal assessment

Unseen exam (MCQ, essays,
etc.)

1 hr 30 mins

95.00

Total percentage (Assessment Exams)

95.00


Reading list

The
reading list

is available from the Library website
















58


FOOD5145M
:
Nutrition and Health

10 credits

Module manager

Dr A J Day

Email:

a.j.day@leeds.ac.uk


Taught

Semester 2

Pre
-
requisite qualifications
:

BSc in a science subje
ct

Objectives

To

gain knowledge and understanding of the functions of food and nutrients and their
relationship to health and disease.

Syllabus



Dietary minerals and health



Functional foods



Dietary supplements



Nutrition from an international perspective



Polyphenols and hea
lth



Antioxidants and their health benefits



Diabetes, obesity & heart disease



Appetite control and obesity



Dietary assessment methods.


Teaching methods

Delivery type

Number

Length hours

Student hours

Laboratory

4

3.00

12.00

Lecture

15

1.00

15.00

Private

study hours

73.00

Total Contact hours

27.00

Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)

100.00


Private study
:



30 hours: reading for lectures



9 hours: laboratory



9 hours: preparation of essay



25 hours: examination and preparation.


P
rogress monitoring
:

A
ttendance at lectures and from laboratory reports.

59


Methods of assessment


Coursework

Assessment
type

Notes

% of formal
assessment

In
-
course
Assessment

Laboratory class work
-

continuous assessment

20.00

Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)

20.00




Exams

Exam type

Exam duration

% of formal assessment

Unseen exam (MCQ, essays,
etc.)

1 hr 30 mins

80.00

Total percentage (Assessment Exams)

80.00



Reading list

The
reading list

is available from the Library website














60


FOOD5196M
:
Impacts of Food Processing on Nutritional Quality

10 credits

Module manager

Dr Santosh Khokhar

Email:

s.khokhar@leeds.ac.uk


Taught

Semester 2

Pre
-
requisite qualifications

First degree in a science subject

Objectives

On completion of this module students should be able to evaluate phy
sical and chemical
effects of food processing techniques on the nutritional quality of raw materials and food
products.

Syllabus



Nutritional significance of processed foods in the diet; effects of food processing on
nutritional quality; losses and gains of

both macro and m
icronutrients in the food
chain



Fortification during processing and manufacturing; nutrition labellin
g and nutrition
claims



Functional foods; manufacturing and claims



Catering tech
nology and nutritional quality



Kinetics of specific nutrien
t losses.


Teaching methods

Delivery type

Number

Length hours

Student hours

Lecture

17

1.00

17.00

Practical

3

3.00

9.00

Private study hours

74.00

Total Contact hours

26.00

Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)

100.00




Private study



9 hours: laboratory

reports



30 hours: reading for lectures



10 hours: essay preparation



25 hours: examination and preparation


Progress monitoring

Attendance at

lectures and progress in laboratory sessions and seminars.



61


Methods of assessment


Coursework

Assessment
type

Notes

% of formal
assessment

In
-
course
Assessment

Experimental work

20.00

Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)

20.00




Exams

Exam type

Exam duration

% of formal assessment

Unseen exam (MCQ, essays,
etc.)

1 hr 30 mins

80.00

Total percentage
(Assessment Exams)

80.00



Reading list

The
reading list

is available from the Library website














62


FOOD5206M
:
GMOs, Antibodies and PCR

10 credits

Module manager

Professor M Morgan

Email:

m.r.a.morgan@leeds.ac.uk


Taught

Semester 2

Pre
-
requisite qualifications

First degree in a science subject

Pre
-
requisites


FOOD5125M

Food Biotechnology


Objectives

On completion of
this module student
’s

should be able to:



un
derstand the principles of PCR



understand the principles of
polyclonal, monoclonal and r
ecombinant antibody
production



understand the uses and limitations of antibodies in food pro
tein analysis



understand the uses and limit
ations of PCR in food analysis



understand the principles behind detection of GMOs
in food
using antibodies and
PCR
.

Syllabus

The immune system; the in vitro use of antibodies; antibody production; antibody structure;
recombinant antibodies; antibody
-
targeted interactions; ELISA and applications in analysis of
food proteins; production of GMOs;
the
PCR

reaction; and its use in analysis; detec
tion of
GMOs by antibody and PCR

methods; Nobel Prize winners i
n immunoassay and PCR
.


Teaching methods

Delivery type

Number

Length hours

Student hours

Lecture

12

1.00

12.00

Practical

2

3.00

6.00

Seminar

3

1.00

3.00

Private study hours

79.00

Total Contact hours

21.00

Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)

100.00



Private study



32 hours: reading for lectures



1
4 hours: reports for practicals



8 hours: report writing



25 hours: examination and preparation.

63


Progress monitoring

Through practicals and attendance at lectures and seminars.


Methods of assessment


Coursework

Assessment
type

Notes

% of formal
assessment

Written Work

1 x 1,000 word written exercise

10.00

Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)

10.00



Exams

Exam type

Exam duration

% of formal assessment

Unseen exam (MCQ, essays,
etc.)

1 hr 30 mins

90.00

Total percentage (Assessment Exams)

90.00


Reading list

The
reading list

is available from the Library website













64


FOOD5235M
:
Food and the Allergic Reaction

10 credits

Module manager

Professor Mike Morgan

Email:

m.r.a.morgan@leeds.ac.uk


Taught

Semester 1

Pre
-
requisite qualifications

Entry to a MSc Food Science scheme

Objectives

On completion of this module, students should be able to understand the elements
and
concepts of food allergy from immunology to food labelling regulations, from plant
biotechnology to diagnosis and clinical science, and the human responses to food allergy.


In addition, students should have an appreciation of how the food industry and

regulatory
authorities can strive to minimise the presence of 'hidden allergens' in food products, and
how biotechnology plays a key role in scientific possibilities (positive) and public perception
(negative).

Syllabus

The module will begin by looking at

myths associated with food allergy before explaining the
molecular nature of food allergens, the molecular and cellular nature of the allergic
response, how food allergy is caused and is diagnosed, and who suffers (and dies) from it.


Detection of allerge
ns will be described.


The perceived risks of GMOs and biotechnology will be contrasted with possible beneficial
aspects of biotechnology.


Assessment of novel food proteins for allergenic potential will be described.



Teaching methods

Delivery type

Num
ber

Length hours

Student hours

Lecture

12

1.00

12.00

Practical

1

3.00

3.00

Seminar

2

1.00

2.00

Private study hours

83.00

Total Contact hours

17.00

Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)

100.00



Private study



17 hours: directed reading and essay



6
hours: laboratory report



5 hours: preparation for seminars



25 hours: examination and preparation



30 hours: reading for
lectures
.

65


Progress monitoring

Attendance at lectures, contributions to seminars and from essay writing.


Methods of assessment


Coursework

Assessment
type

Notes

% of formal
assessment

Report

Essay and practical report

10.00

Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)

10.00




Exams

Exam type

Exam duration

% of formal assessment

Unseen exam (MCQ, essays,
etc.)

2 hr 00 mins

90.00

Total percentage (Assessment Exams)

90.00


Reading list

The
reading list

is available from the Library website













66


FOOD5241M
:
Structure and
Function of Food Components

20 credits

Module manager

P
r
ofessor B.S.

Murray

Email:

b.s.murray@leeds.ac.uk


Taught

Semesters 1 & 2

Objectives

On completion of this module, students should:



be able to understand

the structure of pr
otein, carbohydrate, and lipids



be able to understand the functional properties of these molecules in foods and re
late
structure to functionality



understand the nature and properties of enzymes, especially of these oxidising
enzymes, pr
oteolytic enzymes, esterases and other hydrolt
ytic enzymes important in
foods



understand the
relation of structure to colour



know of the c
hemical contribution to flavour



also be able to understand the physical properties of micronutrients and their
chemica
l reactivity.


Learning outcomes

On completion of this module, students will know and understand:



about the structure of proximate food components and be able to relate t
his to
function within the food



about enzyme action and how enzymes are involved in pr
oducing f
ood properties
and use in foods



about the chemical na
ture of food colour and flavour



about the physical properties of micronutrients and their chemical reactivity.


Syllabus



P
rotein structure, types of protein structure in foods, relationship of 2

degree & 3
degree structure to 1 degree structure



Amino acid side chain interactions. Food processing affects on protein structure and
interactions in food matrix. Functional properties of proteins, denatur
ation,
aggregation and gelation



Monosaccharide an
d polysaccharide structures. Gelation properties. Modification of
s
tarch and effects on properties



Lipid structure and classification. Crystallisation, cry
stal structure and polymorphism



Physical importance and measurement of solid fat content. Microbiological stability,
texture, mouthfeel, taste, spreadability, colour and
physical stability of margarine



Enzyme kinetics and denaturation. Proteolytic

enzymes in foods. Oxidising enzymes
and Micronutrients, physical properties and chemical reactivity.



67


Teaching methods

Delivery type

Number

Length hours

Student hours

Lecture

20

1.00

20.00

Practical

39

1.00

39.00

Private study hours

141.00

Total
Contact hours

59.00

Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)

200.00


Private study



33 hours: Practical reports



6 hours: Directed reading



102 hours: Background reading, preparation and examination


Progress monitoring

Weekly laboratory reports


Methods of
assessment


Coursework

Assessment
type

Notes

% of formal
assessment

Practical

Laboratory class work

25.00

Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)

25.00




Exams

Exam type

Exam duration

% of formal assessment

Unseen exam (MCQ, essays,
etc.)

3 hr 00
mins

75.00

Total percentage (Assessment Exams)

75.00


Reading list

The
reading list

is available from the Library website



68


FOOD5270M
:
Food Analysis

10
credits

Module manager

Paul Kajda

Email:

P.K.Kajda@food.leeds.ac.uk


Taught

Semester 2

Objectives

On completion of this module, students:



should be able to analyse a food for major nutrients, and understan
d the limitations of
the procedu
res



will understand chemical methods used to assess bioavailabilty, and will gain
laboratory experience in some proce
dures to assess bioavailability



will understand HPLC and GLC techniques, their role and limit
ations in anal
ysis of
nutrients



will be able to design an analytical protocol a
nd apply this in the laboratory



will gain laboratory experience in analysis of nutrients, and in planning laboratory
experimentation.

Skills outcomes



Laboratory skills



Planning skills



Presentation and problem solving



Group working



Numeracy and data evaluation skills



Recording and use of analytical data



Technical report writing skills.

Syllabus



Introduction and analytical planning



Methods of calibration

and assessment of errors



Theory and practice of selected techniques used in food analysis including
spectroscopic, chromatographic, electrophoretic, and immunological methods



Chemical methods used to assess bioavailability of selected nutrients



The practical component will provide

experience of some techniques described in
lectures and will include an open ended problem requiring analytical planning.


Teaching methods

Delivery type

Number

Length hours

Student hours

Lecture

18

1.00

18.00

Practical

6

3.00

18.00

Private study hours

64.00

Total Contact hours

36.00

Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)

100.00


69


Private study



1
0 hours: prep work for practical assignment



15 hours: report writing



18 hours: reading for lectures



22 hours: examination work


Progress monitoring

Progress is
monitored through attendance and periodic laboratory reports and prep work for
practical exercise.


Methods of assessment


Coursework

Assessment
type

Notes

% of formal
assessment

Practical

Practical component

20.00

Total percentage (Assessment
Coursework)

20.00




Exams

Exam type

Exam duration

% of formal assessment

Unseen exam (MCQ, essays,
etc.)

1 hr 30 mins

80.00

Total percentage (Assessment Exams)

80.00


Reading list

The
reading list

is available from the Library website








70


FOOD5280M
:
Functional Foods

10 credits

Module manager

Professor M. Morgan

Email:

m.r.a.morgan@leeds.ac.uk


Taught

Semester 2

Objectives

On completion of this module, students will have an understanding of the health, scientific,
regulatory and economic issues raised by 'functional foods'.


Students will
be able to combine scientific understanding gained in this and other modules
with 'real world' interests in improving health and in generating added value in the food
industry.

Syllabus



Definitions of functional foods
-

regulatory and international aspects



The economic importance of functional foods



Delivery of bioactive food components



Probiotics



Probiotics and health



Novel fats



Novel fats and health



Minerals and micronutrients



Functional foods and obesity



Flavonoids and functional foods



Flavonoids and hea
lth



GMOs as functional foods



Advertising of functional foods



Investigation into functional components of commercially available functional foods.


Teaching methods

Delivery type

Number

Length hours

Student hours

Lecture

16

1.00

16.00

Private study hours

84.00

Total Contact hours

16.00

Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)

100.00


Private study



32 hours: 16 x 2 hours reading per lecture



16 hours: directed reading and preparation12 hours: Assignment 1500 words
-

investigation of functional
components



24
hours: Private study and preparation for examinations.

71


Progress monitoring

From assignment and attendance at lectures


Methods of assessment


Coursework

Assessment
type

Notes

% of formal
assessment

Assignment

.

20.00

Total percentage (Assessment
Coursework)

20.00




Exams

Exam type

Exam duration

% of formal assessment

Unseen exam (MCQ, essays,
etc.)

2 hr

80.00

Total percentage (Assessment Exams)

80.00


Reading list

The
reading list

is available from the Library website













72


FOOD5405M
:
Professional Development for Employment and Research

20 credits

Module manager

Dr Caroline Orfila

Email:

c.orfila@leeds.ac.uk


Taught

Semester 1

Pre
-
requisite qualifications

Relevant undergraduate qualification

Module summary

This

module will allow students to assess their own training needs in terms of subject
specific and interpersonal skills that essential for a career in food science and nutrition. This
module will demonstrate the importance of the scientific method and researc
h design for
successful problem solving.


By the end of the module, students will be confident in information retrieval, literature
evaluation, scientific writing.


The module will also cover the principles and applications of scientific design (includin
g
hypothesis testing) and practical experimentation, data analysis and basic statistics, as
relevant to the discipline.

Objectives

The module aims to:



foster students ability to be self
-
evaluative and to identify their training needs through
complet
ion a p
ersonal development plan



develop academic graduate skills relevant to research and graduate employment in
food science and nutrition, including information retrieval and evaluation, scientific
writing, oral presentation, research design and hypothesis test
ing, generic laboratory
skills, data analysis and manipulation, and basic statistics.

Learning outcomes

Upon completion of the module, students should be able to:



evaluate their own competencies and skills and indentify needs for further training as
part

of a personal development plan



demonstrate information retrieval skills, including the use of literature databases and
critically evaluate information provided by primary and s
econdary sources of
information



apply the scientific method of hypothesis
-
led re
search and select an appropriate
research design to inves
tigate a relevant issue/problem



demonstrate practical laboratory skills generic to th
e food and nutrition discipline



demonstrate data analysis skills including methods in data manipulation and basic
statistics, the use of IT database, data ha
ndling and statistical software



demonstrate written communication and oral skills in the context of scientific
dissemination