MSc_Student_Handbook_2011_2012x - School of Food ...

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1




MSc Student Handbook


Intro
duction and Welcome!

Welcome to the School of Food Science & Nutrition at the University of Leeds.

The Staff here hope that you are ready to commence your studies, and that you will find your
time here both enjoyable and rewarding.


This

MSc

Student Handbook is intended to be a source of useful information about the
School and how it operates. Included, amongst other things, is full information about the
courses and modules available in the School, how student progress is monitored and
assess
ed, and who to contact for assistance. Please read the Handbook carefully, as it will
help you get the most out of your studies and time at Leeds.


The Student Handbook can also be downloaded from the School’s website which you can
access at
www.food.leeds.ac.uk

. The School website also contains lots of useful information
for current students.


The
University

Taught Students Handbook

is available via your Portal or you may find it
at
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/qmeu/tsg/











2


Contents


Introduction and Welcome








1

Contents

page










2

Calendar for Academic Year








3

Contact Details for Staff








4

School Support Office










8

Communications &
Where to find Information





9


Email










9


School Notice Board








9


Student Pigeon Holes








9


School Website








9


Blackboard VLE








9


The Portal









9


Central Student Services







10


Leeds for Life









10


Partnershi
p Agreement







11


Social Networking








11


School Organisation









12


Head of School








12


Director of Student Education







12


Personal Tutors








12


Timetabling









13


Year Group Tutors








13


Industrial Placement
Coordinator






13


Health & Safety Coordinator







14


Security









14


First Aid









14

Get Involved










15


Staff Student Committee







15


Year Group Meetings








15


Peer Assisted Learning Mentors






16


Food Society









16


The Edge









16


Leeds University Union







16

School and University Services







17


School Common Room







17


Library










17


Careers Service








17


Equality & Disability Services







17


Student Counselling Service







18

Room
Numbers









19

Frequently Asked Questions








20

Student Education









21


Attendance









21


Coursework & Assessment







21


Mitigating Circumstances







21


Cheating & Plagiarism







22


Examinations









23


Progression

& Degree
Classification






24


How to Calcula
te Degree Classifications





25

MSc

Programmes of Study








26

Module Details









47

Appendix 1
-

Partnership Agreement







91

3


Calendar for Academic Year 2011
-
12


2011


Monday 19
th

September to Friday
23
rd

September

Introduction Week

Wednesday 21
st

September

University Session Begins

Monday 26
th

September

Semester 1 Teaching begins

Friday 21
st

October

Deadline to change Semester 1 modules

Tuesday 15
th

November

Provisional Semester 1 exam timetable
on web

Friday 9
th

December

Final Semester 1 exam timetable on web

Friday 9
th

December

End of Semester 1 teaching.

Friday 23
rd

December 2011 to
Monday 2
nd

January 2012

University Closed for Christmas Holidays



2012


Monday 9
th

to Friday 20
th

January

Semester 1 Examinations.

Monday 23
rd

January

Semester 2 teaching begins

Wednesday 25
th

January

Deadline to submit any Special Circumstances
relating to Semester 1 teaching and examinations

Friday 3
rd

February

Provisional marks available
online for Semester 1
examinations

Friday 17
th

February

Deadline to change Semester 2 modules

Wednesday 7
th

March

Provisional Semester 2 exam timetable on web

Friday 16
th

March

Last day of teaching before Easter break

Monday 19
th

March to Friday 13
th

April

Students Easter Holiday Period

Friday 6
th

April to Tuesday 10
th

April

University closed for Easter Bank Holiday

Monday 16
th

April

Teaching begins after Easter break

Monday 16
th

April

Final Semester 2 exam timetable available on web

Friday 4
th

Ma
y

End of Semester 2 Teaching

Monday 7
th

May

University Closed


Mayday Bank Holiday

Tuesday 8
th



Friday 11
th

May

Revision Week

Monday 14
th



Wednesday 30
th

May

Semester 2 Examination Period

Monday 4
th

& Tuesday 5
th

June

University Closed


Bank
Holiday

Wednesday 6
th

June

Deadline to submit any Special Circumstances
relating to Semester 2 teaching and examinations

Friday 15
th

June

End of Session

Friday 29
th

June

Official results available on web via Portal

Friday 29
th

June

August resit

application information on web

Monday 9
th



Friday 20
th

July

Degree ceremonies

Thursday 19
th

July

Deadline to apply for August resit examinations

Wednesday 1
st

August

August Resit examination timetable on Portal

Tuesday 14
th



Friday 24
th

August

August Resit examination period

Monday 27
th

& Tuesday 28
th

August

University closed
-

Bank Holidays

Friday 31
st

August

Deadline to submit any Special Circumstances
relating to the August resit examination period

Wednesday 12
th

August

August Resit

results published online via Portal

Monday 17
th



Friday 21
st

September

Introduction Week for Session 2012
-
13

Wednesday 19
th

September

University Session 2012
-
13 Begins

Monday 24
th

September

Start of Semester 1 Teaching for session 2012
-
13

4


Contact
Information

Below you will find contact details for all School staff.


Academic and Technical Staff










Dr Mahmood Akhtar






Mrs Michelle Carter


Postdoctoral Research Fellow





Research Officer

Food Colloids







Nutrition & Public Health

m.akhtar@leeds.ac.uk






m.carter@leeds.ac.uk


Tel: 0113 3432970







T
el: 0113 3438908


















Dr Nisreen Alwan






Dr
Jianshe Chen

Clinical Research
Fellow






Senior
Lecturer in
Food Science

n.alwan@leeds.ac.uk






j.chen@food.leeds.ac.uk


T
el: 0113 3436990






Tel: 0113 3432748











Dr Victoria Burley






Dr
Andrea Day

Senior Lecturer in
Nutritional





Lecturer in
Food Science

Epidemiology








a.j.day@leeds.ac.uk


v.j.burley@leeds.ac.uk






Tel: 0113 3432965


Tel: 0113
3433418

















Prof. Janet Cade






Dr Tristan Dew

Professor of Nutritional






Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Epidemiology

& Public Health





Food Biochemistry

j.e.cade@leeds.ac.uk






t.p.dew@leeds.ac.uk

Tel: 0113
34
36946






Tel: 0113 3432979


5









Dr Charlotte Evans






Dr Mel Holmes

Lecturer in Nutritional






Lecturer in Food Processing

Epidemiology







Deputy Health & Safety Officer

c.e.evans@.leeds.ac.uk






prcmjh@leeds.ac.uk

Tel: 0113 3433956






Tel: 0113 3432950












Dr Rammile Ettelaie






Mr Paul Kajda

Senior Lecturer in Food Sci
ence





Director of Student Education

r.ettelaie@food.leeds.ac.uk





First Year/ MSc Tutor

Tel: 0113 3432981






p.k.kajda@food.leeds.ac.uk









Tel:

0113 3432977




















Mr Ian Hardy







Dr Santosh Khokhar

Laboratory Teaching Technician





Senior Lecturer in
Food Biochemistry

Food Technology Laboratory





&

Nutrition

i.hardy@food.leeds.ac.uk





Second Year Tutor

Tel: 0113 3432950






s.khokhar@leeds.ac.uk









Tel: 0113 3432975




















Dr Peter Ho







Dr Lisa Marshall

Lecturer in Food Processing





Lecturer in Food Chemistry

p.ho@leeds.ac.uk






Industrial

Placement Tutor


Tel: 0113 3430358






Health & Safety Coordinator









l.j.marshall@leeds.ac.uk









Tel: 0113 3431952






6









Dr Joanne Maycock






Dr Caroline Orfila


Laboratory Teaching

Technician





Lecturer in Nutrition

Food Analytical Laboratory





Undergraduate Admissions Tutor

j.maycock@leeds.ac.uk







c.orfila@leeds.ac.uk

Tel: 0113 3432977






Tel: 0113 3432966









Miss Susan McCourt






Prof Malcolm Povey

Laboratory Assistant






Professor of Food Physics

Food Technology L
aboratory





m.j.w.povey@food.leeds.ac.uk

s.p.mccourt@leeds.ac.uk





Tel: 0113 3432963

Tel: 0113 3432950















Prof Mike Morgan






Mr Miles
Ratcliffe

Head of School







Laboratory Teaching Technician

Professor of Food Biochemistry





Food Analytical Laboratory

m.r.a.morgan@leeds.ac.uk





Deputy Health & Safety Officer

Tel: 0113 3432959






m.ratcliffe@leeds.ac.uk









Tel: 0113 3432977








Prof. Brent Murray






Mr Paul Slade


Professor of Food Colloids





Database Manager

Final Year Tutor







Nutritional Epidemiology Group


b.s.murray@leeds.ac.uk






p.slade@leeds.ac.uk



Tel: 0113 3432962






Tel: 0113 439570












Ms Camilla Nykjaer






Miss Claire Whittle

Research Assistant






Research Support Officer

Nutritional Epidemiology Group





Nutritional Epidemiology Group

c.nykjaer@leeds.ac.uk






c.whittle@leeds.ac.uk

Tel: 0113 3439576






T
el: 0113 3432869

7



Prof Gary Williamson

P
rofessor of Functional Foods

Postgraduate Research Tutor

g.williamson@leeds.ac.uk

T
el: 0113 3438380




School Administrative / Support Staff









Mrs Catherine
Roberts






Miss Angela Morrison

School Administrator






Postgraduate (Research)

c.roberts@food.leeds.ac.uk





Student Support Officer

Tel: 0113 3434543







a.j.morrison@food.leeds.ac.uk









Tel: 0113 3432986












Mrs Nicola Bhuller






Miss Debbie Senior

Postgraduate (Taught)






Undergraduate
Student Support
Student Support Officer






Officer

n.bhuller@food.leeds.ac.uk





d.senior@leeds.ac.uk


Tel: 0113 3430347







Tel: 0113 3432958





Mr Matthew Taylor

PA to Head of School

m.i.taylor@leeds.ac.uk

Tel: 0113 3432959






8


School Support Office

The School Support Office is located in the main foyer. Here you will be able to request
information
,

obtain

advice and submit any forms relating to yo
ur programme. The support
staff
are

always happy to help with any query, no matter how trivial it may seem. Miss
Debbie Senior is the Undergraduate Support Officer
, Mrs Nicola Bhuller is the Taught Post
Graduate (MSc) Support Officer and Miss Angela Morrison is the Research Post Graduate
(P
hD) Support Officer. However any of the staff are happy to assist with all questions and
queries.


Please note the opening times of the office below:




School Support Office Opening Times


Week Day

Opening Times

Monday

9.30am


P⸳Mpm

que獤ay

V⸳Mam


P⸳Mpm

tednesday

V⸳Mam


P⸳Mpm

qhu牳摡y

V⸳Mam


P⸳Mpm

䙲楤iy⁡m

V⸳Mam


12.MM noon

䙲楤iy⁰m

1⸳Mpm


P⸳Mpm





























9


Communications & Where to Find Information


E
-
Mail

The School of Food Science &

Nutrition will regularly send important information, reminders
and requests to students via your University email. You are required to check your email on
a regular basis and respond to any requests from staff in a timely manner.


Students may have their University email forwarded to a different account if required. See
http://iss.leeds.ac.uk/downloads/how46.pdf

for details.


As the University allocates only a limited in
-
bo
x quota students are requested to empty their
university email boxes on a regular basis to ensure all emails from staff can be delivered.


Messages for staff may be sent via email. The email addresses for all staff in the School of
Food Science & Nutrition

can be found in the contacts se
ction of this handbook on page 4.


School Notice Boards


You will find information and announcements posted on the School notice boards which are
located in the foyer. The School also has an electronic Information Point Boar
d located
outside the Reception desk. Please remember to check these boards regularly for up to date
news and announcements.


Student Pigeon Holes

There are student pigeon holes located on the ground floor corridor. Any post received for
students within
the Support Office will be placed in the pigeon holes. These are labelled
alphabetically. Lecturers will often return coursework to the pigeon holes in the year group
slots.



School Web Site

The School web site can be found at
www.food.leeds.ac.uk
. Here you will find lots of
important information and links to resources for
new and
current students.


Blackboard VLE

The VLE is used for information and resources for all your modules. Academic staff will post
announc
ements, lecture notes and discussion threads here. You can log onto the VLE via
your Portal or at
:
https://vlebb.leeds.ac.uk/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp



The Portal

You can access all t
he above resources via your student Portal. The Portal also allows you
access to Student Services, the Library, Leeds University Union and many other resources.
You can log into the Portal with your username and password at
https://leedsportal.leeds.ac.uk/uollogin/login.html






I
mportant Note

It is your responsibility to check your email and the School notice boards at
frequent intervals to make sure you keep up to date with all important
announcements and information.

10


Central Student Services Centre

The Student Services Centre is located in t
he
Marjorie & Arnold Ziff Building

(campus
map building no 77). The Student Services Centre operates a counter service and deals with
certain student administration queries

that are not dealt with in the School
, for example,
registration confirmation
certificates, council tax exemption certificates, student ID card
queries, bursary and grant cheques, copies of official transcripts and certificates and much
more. The Student Services Centre also has a cash office where students can pay fees.

Please visi
t
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/studentservicescentre/counterservices/index.htm

for
further information.


Student Services Counter
(Ziff Building)
Opening Hours


Week Day

Main
Counter

Monday

9am
-
5pm

Tuesday

9am
-
5pm

Wednesday

10am


Rpm

Thursday

9am
-
5pm

Friday

9am
-
5pm






Leeds for Life

Leeds
for
Life


We want all our students to get the best out of the whole experience of coming to study at
the University of Leeds.


We want Leeds students and graduates to be distinctive, to
stand

out from the competition by being able to demonstrate academic excellence
and the skills
and attributes that fit them for the challenges of the 21
st

century.


Leeds for Life encapsulates
that aim; it’s the way we view the Leeds University academic community to which you
belong.


Societies, volunteering, internships, sport, work
-
experience, project work


these are all
opportunities which can provide you with really valuable experience and new or enhanced
skills that will benefit you while you are at University and when you move on. Funding is
available, through the Leeds for Life

Foundation, to help you to undertake your own
projects.



The Leeds for Life student dashboard gives you easy access to explore the variety of
opportunities offered at Leeds and provides you with on
-
line forms to help you prepare for
your personal tutoria
ls. Records of your personal tutorials can be stored in the ‘Living CV’
area of the dashboard alongside your University Transcript, the notes you’ve made about
Leeds for Life opportunities and links you want to keep to relevant websites. You’ll be able
to

draw on this information (and the guidance on developing a CV and career planning which
is also provided) when compiling your CV, filling in job applications or asking your tutor for a
reference.


To find out more about what
Leeds for Life

can do for you
, log in via the Portal and discuss
it with your personal tutor at your first meeting.


11


Partnership Agreement

The Partnership Agreement is an example of the University’s values in practice as they
relate to
student education
. It describes the shared respo
nsibilities of staff and students,
working together as members of a learning community. It was developed jointly by students,
represented by LUU, and the University, represented by the
Student Education

Board. The
agreement establishes general principles

and guidelines which will be interpreted by
individual Schools and disciplines in ways appropriate to their own context. Students should
therefore consider the Agreement alongside more detailed information provided by their
parent School.

A copy of the Partnership Agreement
will be posted on the School notice boards and
can

also

be found at:
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/partnershipagreement

shown in Appendix 1.





Social Networking Sit
es

Social Networking Sites (SNS), such as Facebook or MySpace, and blogs are becomingly
increasingly useful tools. Leeds University Union and even some Schools make frequent use
of these for communication purposes. Students are, however, requested to use s
uch sites
carefully. Neither the University nor LUU would in any way wish to inhibit freedom of
expression, but students are reminded that any libellous, defamatory or personally abusive
comments about other students or about staff or the posting of images

of individuals without
their consent could be viewed as bullying/harassment, and could have legal/disciplinary
implications.


The University will not seek in anyway

to monitor the use of such sites, but if issues of
concern are raised by individuals, it has a duty of care to investigate and take and
appropriate action. In the first instance, this would typically be a request to remove or amend
the relevant text or im
ages. However, if this request does not lead to a resolution, the
University reserves the right to take action under the General University Disciplinary
Regulations. The individuals concerned might also initiate legal action independently of the
University
. We are particularly keen that student members of the University do not
inadvertently post items that might lead to risk of action.


If students have genuine concerns or complaints about their course or any other provision
from the University, the most e
ffective route to having these addressed is to use the
established procedures including raising the issue with their personal tutor, Head of School
or their Student
-
Staff Forum. Students may also of course use the University Complaints
procedure which can

be found at
http://campus.leeds.ac.uk/docs/stucompsproc.DOC
.










12


School Organisation


Head of School


The Head of the School of Food Science &

Nutrition is Professor Mike Morgan. Professor
Morgan is based in Stead House and is always happy to meet with students. Appointments
may be made to see him via his PA, Mr Matthew Taylor, Please see the contacts on page
4

for details.



If you wish to lea
ve the University before the end of session you must seek
permission from the Head of School.



Director of Student Education


Mr Paul Kajda is the Director of
Student Education

for the School of Food Science &
Nutrition and as such is responsible for al
l aspects of
Student Education Services

within the
School. Students should first meet with their personal tutor to discuss any issues or
concerns, however all students are also welcome to make an appointment to see Mr Kajda
for advice regarding progress, e
xaminations, module choices and changes of programme.



Personal Tutors

Every student who is parented by the School of Food Science & Nutrition is allocated

a
Personal Tutor. This is a member of academic staff and a student will normally stay with the
same Personal Tutor for the duration of their studies. The role of a Personal Tutor is to offer
help and advice on a range of issues and should be the first poin
t of contact for students
who have a problem.

Personal Tutoring should:



Support the academic, personal and professional development of the student.



Support students and help develop independent learning



Raise awareness of opportunities available to studen
ts



Promote the University values,
Student Education

Partnership Agreement and the
Leeds for Life

initiative.


You will find the name of your Personal Tutor on the School notice board in the foyer and
also on
Leeds for Life

at
http://leedsforlife.leeds.ac.uk/

after the start or the academic
year
.


Students should meet with their Personal Tutor at least three times a year. Appointments will
also be made available after the examinatio
n results are published
.



13


Timetabling

If you have any clashes with your timetable this should be reported to the Student Support
Office as soon as possible. Mrs Catherine Roberts, School Administrator, deals with all
aspects of timetabling. The School wil
l not always be able to rearrange module times and
students should be aware that if a clash occurs with an elective module, then a different
elective may need to be chosen which fits
in
with the compulsory FOOD modules
timetable
.



Year Group Tutors

The fu
nction of the Year Group Tutor is to ensure the smooth running of the programmes for
the year for which they are responsible. There are two group meetings held per year


one in
each semester


where all the year’s cohort are invited to attend to discuss a
ny issues or
problems that students may have experienced.

You may also approach your Year Group
Tutor at any other time throughout the year if you have an issue you wish to discuss.

The Year Group Tutor’s are:



Year One

/ MSc






Year Two








Mr
Paul Kajda







Dr Santosh Khokhar

p.k.kajda@food.leeds.ac.uk





s.khokhar@food.leeds.ac.uk

0113 3432977







0113 3432975


Finalists


Prof Brent Murray

b.s.murray@leeds.ac.uk

0113 342962




Industrial Placement Coordinator


Dr Lisa Marshall is the
Industrial
Placement Coordinator and as such coordinates the
arrangements for students who take a year out in
Industry. Dr Marshall regularly updates the
job
s

notice board in the foyer with placement and career opportunities and also has a
website for current opportunities which you may find on the main School webpage at
http://www.food.leeds.ac.uk/placement/
.


14


Health & Safety
Coordinator

Dr Lisa Marshall is

also
the Health & Safety Officer for the School of Food Science &
Nutrition. She is happy to address any questions or concerns you may have relating to a
ny
health and safety issue. Dr Marshall will deliver a health and safety talk to all new students
during Introduction Week.
Please see your Intro Week timetable for details. If you miss this
talk you must arrange an alternative time with Dr Marshall as you

will not be allowed to work
in the laboratory until you have attended a Health and Safety talk.

There are strict regulations governing laboratory work and these must be adhered to at all
times. Please see the Health & Safety website for more information

which you may find at:

http://www.leeds.ac.uk/safety/index.htm



Security

The School operates a rigidly enforced policy concerning arrangements for the use of
,

and
access to the building. This is for both personal safety and general security reasons and
students should note the following in particular:



The building is locked outside of the hours of 08.30 and 17.15 Monday to Friday



All visitors must be signed in

and out of

the visitors book
, located on the reception
desk,
and must be accompanied at all times when in the School



You must obtain written permission from either Dr Marshall or Professor Morgan to
work in the School outside of normal working hours



You
must comply with the rules of the laboratory you are working in and the
regulations set by the laboratory supervisor
. Failure to do so may result in you being
removed from the laboratory. If in doubt…ask!!!



Lockers are available for students on a first
-
com
e
-
first
-
serve basis as bags and coats
are not allowed in the laboratories. Lockers are located throughout the building on all
levels. Students should provide their own padlock, key and label. No valuables
should be left in the lockers.


Students should
make sure they are aware of all fire safety procedures and evacuation
routes and should also familiarise themselves with the School’s First Aiders and the first aid
points which are located around the School on each level.


The School operates a strict no
smoking policy in accordance with the University’s
guidelines and the Health Act 2006 which effectively bans smoking in the workplace and
enclosed public buildings.



First Aid

The School has a number of fully trained First Aiders who are able to assist in

case of injury
or students feeling unwell. You will find First Aid boxes located around the School and in
every laboratory. The list of First Aiders with contact details will also be located at the side of
each box and on the School notice boards. Pease c
ontact your nearest First Aider to request
assistance.

First Aiders are also located in the main lecture blocks (e.g. Roger Stevens). They can
usually be located by contacting the Porter’s office, details of which can be found at the front
of each lecture
theatre.


Important Note
:
All mobile phones and electronic devices should be
switched off during lectures, tutorials and laboratory classes.
The wearing of
headphones in the School, and especially in the laboratories is strictly
forbidden.

15


Get Involved!


Here at the School of Food Science & Nutrition we believe that University life is not only
about academic achievement! Being at University also offers a great chance to become
involved with extracurricular activities, be this academic, sporting, social or
otherwise.



Have a Voice!

It is important for students to be able to express their views and opinions regarding any
aspect of their University experience. As such there are a number of Committees, Societies
and forums both within the School and the
University which students can get involved in.



Staff
-
Student Committee

The Staff
-
Student Committee

is made up of elected student representatives and members of
academic staff. It meets
twice a year

to discuss issues raised by students. The minutes of
th
ese meetings are circulated to all members of academic staff

in the School
. Issues raised
by the Staff
-
Student Committee are discussed by the
School’s Student Education Committee
which takes action

where appropriate.


Students are invited to put forward t
heir names for consideration for membership of the
Committee
at the start of each academic session
. Each of the following group of students is
entitled to representation.


Food Science Year One (1 rep)

Food Studies and Nutrition Year One (2 reps)

Nutritio
n Year One (1 rep)


Food Science Year Two (1 rep)

Food Studies and Nutrition Year Two (2 reps)

Nutrition Year Two (1 rep)

Food Science / Food Studies/Nutrition students on European/International programme

(
1 rep)

Food Science / Food Studies/Nutrition
students on the Industrial programme (1 rep)


Food Science
Finalists

(1 rep)

Food Studies and Nutrition
Finalists

(2 reps)


MSc

(1 representative per programme)

P
h
D (2 reps)



Year Group
M
eetings

Year Group meetings will take place twice a year where the
entire student cohort can meet
with their respective year group and Year Group Tutor (see page 13) to discuss any issues
or concerns and raise any queries or problems. In previous years’ these meetings have
resulted in changes in how the School manages pro
grammes, modules and teaching. Your
opinion counts!





16


The Food Society

The Food Society is the ‘social club’ of the School. It offers the chance to meet students from
different years and to share experiences. The Society organises a variety of events, su
ch as
team sports, visits of various kinds and an annual dinner. All members of the School are
eligible to join. The Society has its own notice board located in the School foyer where
details of activities are posted. Watch out for forthcoming events!



Th
e Edge

The School of Food Science & Nutrition is lucky enough to be located directly opposite the
University’s new Sports Hall facilities which compromise:



Leeds'

largest indoor sports halls with performance

sports floors and lighting



a fantastic 25m
,

8 lane swimming pool



the largest fit
ness suite of any UK university
with

state
-
of
-
the
-
art equipment



3

dedicated class studios



a performance strength and conditioning facility



squash courts



climbing wall



and a whole range of additional facilities for customers to enjoy 52 weeks of the year















Students can join a number of sporting teams ranging from rugby, football and hockey to
lacrosse and water polo. For further information visit:
http://sport.leeds.ac.uk/default.asp?section=2&sectionTitle=Home




Leeds University Union

The Leeds University Union (LUU) is independent of the University and is run by six elected
students. The LUU is supported by staff and volunteers and is keen to get all students
involved in University life. Students can also obtain help and advice on all
aspects of
University life, get careers guidance, help with accommodation and join numerous clubs and
societies amongst other things. The LUU also houses great bars and places to eat where
students can meet to relax and catch up. For further information an
d to see all the LUU has
to offer please visit:
http://www.leedsuniversityunion.org.uk/







17


School and University Services



The School Common Room

The School Common Room is situated on the first floor of the building. All students and staff
are welcome to use the
C
ommon
R
oom. The Common Room is also used for meetings and
seminars so please be aware that there may be occasions when it is out of use. Y
ou will
always be notified of these times beforehand.


Please Note: The Common Room must be kept clean and tidy by those who
use it. Remember others use this facility

also. Clean up after yourself
!



Library

The University boasts an extensive collection
of books, journals and manuscripts which are
housed throughout the three main libraries on campus. The University libraries also offer an
extensive range of electronic resources to help students with their studies. The resources for
the School of Food Scie
nce & Nutrition may be found mainly in the Edward Boyle Library,
although you may also find useful books and journals in both the Brotherton and the Health
Sciences Libraries. Please visit
http://library.lee
ds.ac.uk/site/

for further information.


The University also offers a number of study skills lectures and seminars which are designed
to enhance transferable skills. A full programme of workshops and on
-
line tutorials and
resources can be found at
http://skills.library.leeds.ac.uk/




Careers

The Careers Service at the University is designed to offer a range of services to both new
students and those about to graduate. The Careers Services offer help in writing a C.V,
completing job applications, work experience and much more. The Careers Servi
ce also has
drop
-
in sessions where students can obtain any career related advice.

Please visit their website at:
http://careerweb.leeds.ac.uk/index.asp





Equality & Disability

The University of Leed
s is committed to delivering a world class, innovative and flexible
learning environment for students as well as a supportive and professional working
environment for our staff. Equality issues are absolutely central to delivering on these aims.

The Equali
ty Service has two main functions: to promote good practice within the University
across the main protected characteristics

(race, gender including sexual orientation, religion,
disability, pregnancy/maternity, marital status, and age) and assess and co
-
or
dinate the
academic support requirements of disabled students.


Please visit the website for further information:


Equality Services
http://www.equality.leeds.ac.uk/

Disability Services
http://www.equality.leeds.ac.uk/for
-
students/disability/

Dyslexia Screening
http://www.equality.leeds.ac.uk/for
-
students/dyslexia
-
screening/


The School
also has a Disability Officer


Miss Debbie Senior, who will be able to assist with
information and point students in the right direction with any questions or queries regarding
a
ny aspect of equality and disability. If you have any questions please contact Debbie.

18


Student Counselling Service

The Student Counselling Service is available to all students. The Counselling Service
provides
access to
self help resources

and
many other
resources
to help you cope with the
stresses and pressure you might be facing while studying at University.


These pressures
can intensify at certain times of the year or can occur if unexpected problems arise in our
personal lives.


Friends and family ca
n

be very helpful but sometimes

you might feel that you
need something more to help you cope or get back on track.

You may make an appointment to see a counsellor, or the Counselling Service offers a drop
-
in session every day at 3.00pm. The service is loca
ted at 19 Clarendon Place, Leeds, LS2
9JY. You may also contact them by telephone on 0113 343 4107.


Please visit the Counselling Services website for further information at:
http://www.leeds.ac.uk
/studentcounselling/




Student Medical Practice

The University recommends all students register with the Leeds Student Medical Practice on
arrival. This is a modern friendly practice designed to fulfil the health needs of students and
is located close to
the University. The practice offers a range of clinics and surgeries.

The Leeds Student Medical Practice is located at 4 Blenheim Court, Blenheim Walk, Leeds,
LS2 9AE. You may contact them by telephone on 0113 295 4488.


Please visit the Leeds Student Med
ical Practice website for details of how to register and
other information at:
www.leedsstudentmedicalpractice.co.uk



Eating and Drinking

There are various outlets throughout campus where studen
ts may purchase food and drink.
The Refectory is based in the LUU building and there are many cafés and bars located on
and around campus.

Students are very welcome to bring their own food to the School Common Room where
there is a microwave and fridge ava
ilable.
Please remember to leave the Common Room
clean and tidy!



Computer Clusters, Printing

and

Photocopying

Computer clusters are located throughout the University and are available for use by
students. There are clusters in each Library and also dedicated computer clusters such as
the Bragg Cluster, Manton Cluster and Fourman Cluster. Please see the campus map
for
directions and locations. You can find the campus map online at
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/campusmap

Printer credits are available to purchase, however all new users are given 60 free credits
when their user
name is created. There are several ways to

purchase additional printer
credits;

purchasing credits online

with a debit or credit

card, using
payment stations

(also
known as money loaders) or by cash purchase at the
ISS helpdesk
.


Credits cost 1p each.
Details of the current balance and a list of recent transactions can be seen from the Myprint
portal at
https://myprint.leeds.a
c.uk/portal
.


Photocopying facilities are available in the Edward Boyle and Health Sciences libraries.
Copying may also be done at the Print & Copy Bureau (located at the bottom of the Roger
Stevens Building near the pond) and in the Student Union Stationa
ry shop.

19


ROOM NUMBERS

STEAD HOUSE ROOM NUMBERS


Ground Floor

G.11


Professor Janet Cade

G.13


Dr Victoria Burley / Dr Mel Holmes

G.14


Professor Gary Williamson

G.15


Henry Proctor Meeting Room


First Floor

1.17


Dr Nisreen Alwan / Dr Charlotte Evans

1.21


Professor Mike Morgan / Mr Matthew Taylor

1.23


Professor Eric Dickinson

1.24


Professor Brent Murray


FOOD SCIENCE
(
MAIN BUILDING
) ROOM NUMBERS


Ground Floor

G.01


School Support Office

-

Mrs N

Bhuller, Miss D Senior, Miss A Morrison

G.02


Ladies To
ilets (foyer)

G.03


Disabled Toilet (foyer)

G.04


Men’s Toilet (foyer)

G.05


Locker Room

G.06


Radiochemistry Laboratory

G.07


Nutritional Epidemiology Group

Laboratory

G.08


Mass Spec
trometry
/
Food Chemistry

Laboratory


G.09


Food Technology Laboratory

G.09a


Dr Melvin Holmes, Mr Ian Hardy, Miss Susan McCourt


First Floor

1.01


Dr Lisa Marshall

1.01a


Janice Ryley Meeting Room

1.02


Dr Peter Ho

102a


Dr Caroline Orfila

1.04


Food Biochemistry Analytical Laboratory

1.06


Food Analysis Laboratory

1.06a


Mr Paul Kajda, Mr Miles Radcliffe, Dr Joanne Maycock

1.07


Postgraduate Research Students


Computer Cluster

1.08


School Common Room

1.09


Professor Malcolm Povey

1.10


Dr Jianshe Chen

1.11


Dr Rammile Ettelaie

1.12


Dr Santosh Khokhar

1.15


Mrs Catherine
Roberts


School Administrator

1.16


Dr Andrea Day (on corridor between the two buildings)


Second Floor

2.01


Food Biochemistry Cell Culture Unit

2.03


Food Biochemistry Laboratory 1

2.04


Food Biochemistry Annex

2.05


Food Biochemistry Laboratory 2

2.06


Food Colloid Laboratory

2.08


Food Physics Laboratory

2.09d


Mr Paul Kajda (office)

20


Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ’s)


How do I register?

Students can regi
ster either online or in person. During Introduction week computer clusters
will be made available

for students to register online. Once fully registered please remember
to print out your registration certificate as you will need this to obtain your student id card.
Full instructions on how to register will be sent from both the School, and from the St
udent
Services centre before the start of session.


How do I get my student id card?

Students can obtain their id card in Introduction Week by taking their registration certificate
(see above) and a form of photo identification (passport, driving licence)
to the Parkinson
building where support officers will be ready to assist.


How do I change my programme?

If you feel that you have chosen the wrong programme for you please make an appointment
to discuss this with either your personal tutor or the Director

of Student Education.
Depending on whether you wish to transfer to another Food programme or elsewhere in the
University will depend on how the situation can be resolved.


What do I do if I am ill?

If you are ill and are unable to attend University you mu
st inform the School Support Office
as soon as possible. Students may self certify their illness if they are ill for less than five
working days. Forms are available from the School Support Office. A medical note is
required if a student is ill and absent

from University for five or more working days.

If you are ill and unable to attend during an examination you must inform the School Support
Office immediately and a medical note must be produced.

Full guidelines for what to do if you are absent may be found in the Taught Students
Handbook at
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/qmeu/tsg/


What if I need to leave the University during term time?

Occasions may arise

when you need to be away from the University during term time e.g. a
family emergency. If this situation arises you need to discuss this with either your Personal
Tutor or the Director of Student Education. Arrangements will need to be made for you to
cat
ch up on your missed studies.

If any student wishes to leave the University before the published end of session date
they must obtain written permission from the Head of School.




If you have any other questions please visit the School Support Office or

speak to your
Personal Tutor who will be happy to help or direct you to the appropriate resource.

21


Student Education


Attendance,

Coursework &
Assessment,
Examinations,
Degree
Classification


Attendance

Students are expected to attend
all

teaching activities which includes lectures, laboratory
classes, workshops, tutorials (including personal tutorials) and seminars. The University has
issued guidelines for Attendance Monitoring for all taught students which can be found at
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/studentguide/Attendance_Monitoring_studentguide_2011.pdf


The School of Food Science and Nutrition monitors student attendance in each lecture on a
continual basis. Students will be asked to sign the attendance sheet sent round the class by
the lecturer and this is then recorded on the University system. All Laboratory sessions are
monitored by the Laboratory staff. Any student who is absent for a pr
olonged period of time
without authorisation will be asked to see the Director of Student Education in order to
explain this absence. If this problem persists the student will be referred to the Head of
School and further action may be taken.


University p
olicy allows for a School to exclude a student from a particular module after
serving a series of disciplinary warnings, if that student does not comply with attendance
regulations. This exclusion also applies to the examinations for that particular module
. If a
student persists in continued unauthorised absences this may result in the student being
permanently excluded from the University due to unsatisfactory attendance


please see
guidelines at:
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/AAandR/unsatis_stu_proc.htm



For International students, the University has a legal responsibility to report serious cases of
non
-
attendance to the UK government via the UK Border Agency. This may then affect the
student’s
visa provisions. Students must therefore give notification of any non
-
attendance to
the School prior to, or as soon as possible after, the absence.


The School code of practice can be found at the School website www.
food.
leeds.ac.uk




Coursework & Assessm
ent

All MSc programmes are

assessed through written examinations and
course
work produced
throughout the year
-

the latter includes reports on practical work and projects, essays and
class assignments
.
At the commencement of teaching the module coordinator
will ensure
that students are aware of all coursework and assessment requirements for their particular
module. This will include the deadline dates when all work (laboratory and assignments)
should be submitted. The lecturer will advise students of where a
nd how to hand in the
requested piece of work and this should be strictly adhered to. All pieces of coursework
should have the assignment/laboratory cover sheet attached and be date and time stamped
before being handed in. The cover sheets can be found in
the School foyer next to the
reception desk along with the date/time stamping machine. Lecturers will arrange directly
with students for the return of coursework and the submission of feedback.






22


Penalties for Late or Non
-
Submission of Coursework

The l
ate submission of coursework and assignments will be penalised by the deduction of
10% of the maximum available mark for each working day the coursework is late, up to a
maximum of 10 working days.

Failure to attend a class associated with assessed work o
r to submit coursework or
assignments will result in a mark of zero. The coursework will still be required to be
submitted even though a zero mark will be recorded. If the coursework is not submitted the
student may be excluded from the examination in that

module. If the student is allowed to sit
the exam
ination only a maximum mark of 5
0 can be awarded. This may have serious
co
nsequences for your

final degree classification.


Exemptions

A student may be exempt from any penalties for late or non
-
submission o
f coursework if
their circumstances have been discussed with the Module Coordinator prior to the deadline
and adequate alternative provisions have been made. Penalties will not be incurred if there
are medical or other acceptable reasons, however please no
te that certification of absence
does not automatically absolve a student from completing a piece of work.


If you wish to be exempt from an examination due to a conflict with a religious holiday you
must report this to the
central Student Services Centre

by Friday 28
th

October 2011
. If
you present notification after this date you will be charged an administration fee of up to
£100 and may find your request cannot be accommodated.



Mitigating Circumstances

There may be some instances where you believe
mitigating circumstances have affected
your performance either during your course, during the lead up to examinations, or during
the examinations themselves. In any such instance you may make a claim for mitigating
circumstances.

This will then be consider
ed by the School’s Mitigating Circumstances
Committee who meet after the semester one and two examination periods.

Any such claim
must be

made
in writing
(on the University Mitigating Circumstances form)
to the School and
should be supported by evidence (e
.g. medical). Mitigating circumstances forms
must

be
received by the
deadline
dates
which will be published in the School and can also be found
on the academic calendar at the front of this handbook
. Forms can be obtained at the
School Support Office or o
n
-
line at
:

http://www.leeds.ac.uk/qmeu/documents/forms/mitigatingcircumstances.doc

Any forms received after the deadline dates will not be considered and the student wi
ll be
directed to the Office of Academic Appeals & Regulations if they wish to submit a claim after
this time.
If you feel unsure as to whether your circumstances will be considered
PLEASE

talk to your

Personal T
utor
, Module Coordinator

or

School

Support O
fficer

as the problems
arise.
DO NOT LEAVE

any issues until after the examinations as this may be too late!


Cheating & Plagiarism

The University regards cheating, plagiarism and any other instance of academic malpractice
with the utmost seriousness.

Plagiarism is defined by the University as ‘presenting someone else’s work as your own.
‘Work’ means any intellectual output including text, data, images, sound or performance’.

Cheating is treated as an absolute offence by both the School and the Univers
ity. Cheating
in University Examinations will result in penalties being issued against the student found to
be cheating and in certain cases this will mean the student is
permanently

excluded

from
University and can no longer continue their degree programm
e.


The penalties and procedures against any alleged case of cheating and plagiarism are set
out in the Taught Student Guide
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/qmeu/tsg/

23


Examinations

University examinations take place
in January

(semester 1)

and May/June

(semester 2)
.


For the 2011
-
12 Session the examination periods are as follows:


Semester 1

Examination period:
Monday 9
th



Friday 21
st

January 2012


Semester 2

Examination period:
Monday 14
th

May


Wednesday 30
th

May 2012



Examination timetables will be available online via your Portal. Please check your
examination timetable carefully and report any clashes to the Student Support Office
immediately.


The official examination results will be released on the web
which students can access via
their Portal. For

Taught Postgraduate students

the
final
2011
-
12 official results
, along with
degree classifications

will be available online on
Wednesday 21
st

November

2012

after
12noon. The School will also post both semeste
rs’ results in the School foyer after the
School’s Examination Board meetings

which take place in
February (Semester 1) and
September

(Semester 2 and project results)
.




Attendance at Examinations and Resit Opportunities

All students are expected to atte
nd and sit all scheduled examinations according to the
published examination timetable. You should endeavour to be at the examination before the
scheduled start time. If you are more than 60 minutes late you should report to the central
Examinations Office

in the Marjorie and Arnold Ziff building.


Any absence from an examination must be authorised and certification (e.g. medical note)
must be received by the School Support Officer. These circumstances will then be discussed
at the School’s Mitigating Circ
umstances meeting. If acceptable documentation is not
received then a mark of zero will

be recorded and a resit at the next sitting
may be provided
only at the School’s discretion.


For Taught Post Graduate (MSc) students only one resit opportunity is allo
wed and an
August resit is not offered. A maximu
m mark of 50 is available. The resit

will take place the
following year in either January or May/June depending whether it is a semester one or two
module. Any unauthorised absence from a resit

examination will automatically mean that a
resit opportunity has been lost

and a mark of zero will be recorded against that module
.


All students must register for resit examinations and a fee is applicable. Details of how to
apply for resit examinations

will appear on your Portal after the
semester two examinations
.
If you have any questions please refer these to either the School Support Office or the
central Student Services Centre.








24


During an Examination

Students are usually admitted to the exa
mination room a few minutes before the scheduled
start although this does depend on the venue. If your name does not appear on the seating
list located outside the examination room you must inform the invigilator immediately. They
will then add your name,
find you a seat and provide you with a question paper. Students will
be given instructions by the invigilator and often the module coordinator will be present to
advise of any specific instructions. International students may take a paper dictionary into
t
he examination but this must have first been stamped by the Student Services Centre. All
dictionaries will be checked by the invigilator and if found not to have been stamped may be
removed. In certain examinations calculators may be used but your module c
oordinator will
advise you of this before the examination.
Please note: bags, coats, mobile phones and
other electronic devices are not allowed in the examination room
.



Leaving the Examination

Students may only leave an examination early after seeking pe
rmission from the invigilator.
You may not leave the examination during the first hour or the last ten minutes. Students
are advised to check their examination paper before leaving early to ensure they have not
missed any question or section.



Examinati
on Hints and Tips



Check and double check the date, time and venue of your examination. If you do not
know where the room is make sure you find out beforehand and visit the venue. Not
knowing where the examination room is will not count as an excuse if you
do not get
there on time!



Revise!


Make sure you don’t question spot and that you have fully revised a good
range of topics. Attended all revision workshops and seminars given by lecturers
beforehand. They often provide hints and tips for the examination
that those who do
not attend miss out on!



Read around your topics! That extra bit of information may add those extra marks!



Reading past examination papers can be useful but do not solely rely on these.
Answering last year’s question will only lose you mar
ks.



Read the question paper fully and thoroughly before you even begin to write!
Obvious we know!



Pay particular attention to the instructions at the start of the paper especially how
many questions to answer from which section


students have been known

to
complete all questions when the examiner is only looking for two questions to be
answered! This will save you time in the long run and may gain you marks. If a
student does answer all questions when only two have been asked for the examiner
will only m
ark the first two questions, so if these are not your best answers you will
miss out!



Watch the time! Make sure you give yourself enough time to answer each question.
Plan your answers. Usually the instructions will give an idea of how long to spend on
spe
cific sections or questions. This is there for a reason so make use of it!



Answer in the correct booklets. If there is a multiple choice section make sure you
use the answer sheets provided. If the instructions say answer each question in a
separate bookle
t please do so!







25


How to Calculate Your Degree Classification

Individual modules are marked
,

and the final degree classified
,

according to the following
integer scale:





Distinction

70
-
100




Merit


60
-
69




Pass


50
-
59




Fail


00
-
50


Students

are
deemed to have passed a module and
will
gain the credits for that module if
they obtain

a mark of 50% or more. An average mark (over all modules studied) of 50% is
required to achieve the MSc degree. Additionally
all compulsory to pass modules must
be pa
ssed

and a minimum of 150 credits achieved in order to be awarded the MSc

title
.


Although only 150 credits are required, the marks from all 180 credits studied are
included in the final classification mark.


The mark obtained for a module is calculated f
rom the marks for each component of the
assessment, weighted according to their % contributions. For certain modules the
completion of coursework constitutes a course requirement
.
Any student who has passed
the examination but

fails

to submit the assignments

or coursework

will not be awarded the
credits for such modules until a satisfactory assignment has been submitted in accordance
with current University and

School

procedure. You will not normally be allowed to submit
outstanding

coursework to improve your mark


only under exceptional circumstances and
with the permission of the examiners would this be allowed.



For further details of degree awards and classifications please see the Taught Student
Handbook:
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/qmeu/tsg/



For full explanation of the rules for degree classification please see:

http://www.leeds.ac.uk/secretariat/docu
ments/rules_for_award.pdf





















26


Taught Postgraduate (MSc) Programmes of Study


The School of Food Science and Nutrition currently offers five
T
aught Postgraduate (MSc)
degree programmes: MSc Food Science, MSc Food Science (Food
Biotechnology), MSc
Food Science and Nutrition, MSc Food Q
uality &

Innovation and MSc Nutrition.


The MSc programmes are
taught
at a postgraduate level


this means that a high degree of
autonomous learning is expected from MSc students. It is also expect
ed that MSc students
will develop good communication and other transferable skills and exhibit high levels of
understanding of subject matter. There is a requirement for a considerable amount of
‘reading around’ the subject area in addition to some direct
ed reading.


The MSc Food Science
programmes
, as with others in the University, are arranged in
modules
.

S
ingle modules

(10 credits) normally require

around

100 hours of study,
preparat
ion and revision, and attract

a final weighting of 100 marks. All modu
les are
weighted according to the number of credits. The research project module (60 credits)
normally requires 600 hours. The research project module is taken at the end of semester 2
and extends to early August. There may be opportunities for research
projects to be carried
out in collaboration with industry, or at approved institutions overseas.


Students are advised to attend the library study skills lectures and seminars which will help
to get the most out of lectures, workshops and tutorials and wil
l also provide a skills base
students will find useful.
http://skills.library.leeds.ac.uk/


All our MSc programmes comprise a set of c
ompulsory modules
which have been carefully

designed to cover the mater
ial fundamental to
an understanding of your programme.




The remainder of this handbook contains the Programme descriptions for each Taught
Postgraduate (MSc) course offered in the School of Food Science and Nutrition and
information relating to each modu
le offered within the School.























27


MSc Food Science

Programme code:

MSC
-
FOOD


Duration:

12 Months

Method of Attendance:

Full Time

Programme manager:

Mr Paul Kajda

Contact address:

p.k.kajda@food.leeds.ac.uk


Total credits:

180

Entry requirements:



A minimum of a 2.2 or equivalent (certain advanced diplomas awarded by overseas
institutions fulfil this requirement) in a suitable first degree programme.




English requirement for interna
tional students is IE
LTS 6.0 or above, with at least 5.5
in listening and reading, and at least 5.0 in speaking and writing; or TOEFL (internet
based test) of at least 83 with at least 18 in listening, 20 in reading, 20 in speaking
and 21 in writing.


School/Unit responsible for the parenting of students and programme:

School of Food Science and Nutrition


Examination board through which the programme will be considered:

School of Food Science and Nutrition Examiners Board


Programme specification:

The programme will extend scientific knowledge to areas outside of the first degree
discipline, and enable application of first degree knowledge appropriate to a future career in
the food industry.


The programme will deliver a broad knowledge of food sci
ence with an emphasis on
chemistry and biochemistry and the necessary background understanding of physics,
mathematics, nutrition and biology and the ability to apply fundamental scientific concepts to
understand and manipulate the complex characteristics
of foods. Students should gain the
ability to integrate this scientific knowledge with an understanding of food technology and
particular student interests and skills developed through specialised options and projects
with content influenced by current res
earch thinking in the field.


The programme will give an understanding of the methodology of research investigations by
experimental project and the necessary personal skills to communicate effectively in future
professional activities. The programme will

also deliver the ability to appraise critically the
complex factors, including sociological and ethical issues that influence the range, quality
and acceptability of foods produced in an industrialised society.


Assessment is by a range of methods, includ
ing formal examination, in
-
class tests,
laboratory practical reports, example sheets, problem solving, project work and verbal
presentations.


The programme is offered as a full time course of twelve months duration with standard
Schoo
l and Faculty norms o
f progression and assessment being applied. The pass mark for
each module is 50%. To pass the programme, modules totalling 150 credits must be passed
and these must include 140 compulsory modules. All marks from all modules (passed and
failed) are included

in the final classification mark, which must be at least a 50% weighted
average. Classification is based on pass (50
-

59%), merit (60
-
60%) and distinction (70%
and above).

28




Learning outcomes

On completion of the programme students should have shown evid
ence of being able:




to demonstrate an understanding of concepts, information and techniques in the field
of food science as informed by research/scholarship in the discipline, including
knowledge of:



the techniques and role of food preserv
ation and proce
ssing operations



the biochemical and chemical attributes and reactio
ns of the major food components



the role of

food colloids in dairy science



the effects of texture and structure on sensory properties



the f
actors impacting on food safety



the effect of foo
d processing on nutritional quality and understanding of the role

of
processed foods in the diet



physical chemical aspects of foods and the food matrix. The chemistry of food
flav
ours and colourings.





to exhibit competence in the exercise of generic and s
ubject
-
specific intellectual
abil
ities, including the ability to



critically evaluate current research, research and advanced scholarship relevant to
food science using concepts from scholarly reviews and

primary sources of
information



demonstrate an unders
tanding of the provisional nature of information and allow for
competi
ng and alternative explanations



demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method of enquiry and understand the
principl
es of hypothesis
-
lead research



apply this understanding to the

planning and implementation of an individual
research proj
ect in a relevant research area



apply their knowledge and understanding to solving complex problems by collecting
and evaluating appropriate information, and use it creatively to suggest innovation
s
or make decisions.

To

demonstrate ability in the use and evaluation of research methods and techniques
standard to the food science discipline, including a theoretical and practical
understanding of
:



l
aboratory methods used in understanding nutrient
content of foods, and the effect of

processing on nutrient content



laboratory methods used in underst
anding the composition of foods



Health and Safety practices, including risk as
sessment in laboratory settings



to apply research skills to generate complex
primary data as part of

an individual
research project



to take a proactive and self
-
reflective role in working and to develop professional
relation
ships with others, including



self
-
evaluation of skills and competences leading to a personal development plan

in
t
erms of Generic graduate skills.


Additional specialist knowledge and skills will be directed by option choices.


29




Transferable (key) skills

S
tudents will have had the opportunity to acquire the following abilities as defined in the
modules specified

for the programme:


the skills necessary to undertake a higher research degree in aspects of Food Science or
relevant
discipline

and/or for employment in a higher capacity in the food indust
ry

including
demonstration of:



autonomy, self direction, initiati
ve and effective decision making in compl
ex and
unpredictable situations



effective self
-
planning in order to prioritise and manage time and resources



effective team work
and leadership where applicable



effective communication with individuals or groups us
i
ng a range of methods and
media



effective use of ICT methods for gathering, evaluating, analysing and
presenting
information and data



e
ffective dissemination of research findings though an individual dissertation thesis,
an oral prese
ntation and an oral e
xamination



evaluating their own achievement usi
ng reflective practice



independent learning and the ability to work in a way which ensures cont
inuing
professional development



critical engagement in the development of professional/disciplinary boundaries and

norms.

Assessment

Achievement for the degree of Master (taught programme) will be assessed by a variety of
methods in accordance with the learning outcomes of the modules specified for the
year/programme and will involve the achievement of the students in evidencing an abil
ity to
conduct independent in
-
depth enquiry within the discipline.


This will be evidenced through:

the undertaking of an independent research project;

demonstrating the ability to apply breadth and/or depth of knowledge to a complex specialist
area;

draw
ing on a range of perspectives on an area of study;

evaluating and criticising received opinion;

making reasoned judgements whilst understanding the limitations on judgements made in
the absence of complete data;

generation, analysis and evaluation of comp
lex research primary data, assessed though the
writing of an individual research thesis, an oral presentation and an oral examination.

Learning context

The
learning context will include the analysis of, and decision making in, complex and
unpredictable situations. The structure of the programme will provide breadth and/or depth of
study and opportunities for drawing upon appropriate resources and techniques.


Opportunities will be provided for students to develop:



interests and informed opinions



t
heir involvement in the design and management

of their learning activities



t
heir communication of their conclusions

30



Students will be expected to progress to fully
autonomous study and work.

Candidates will be required to study 180 credits.

Candidates are required to pass 150 credits
to include the compulsory to pass modules.

Compulsory modules:

Candidates are expected to study
the following
180 credits of compulsory

modules and need
to pass 150 credits to include the compulsory to pass modules

(PFP).

FOOD5016M

Physical Aspects of Food

Co
-
requisite for: FOOD 5115M

10
credits

Semester 1


FOOD5045M

Microbiological and Chemical Food Safety

20
credits

Semesters 1
& 2

PFP

FOOD5055M

Food Processing

20
credits

Semesters 1
& 2

PFP

FOOD5071M

Research Project

60
credits

Semester 2

PFP

FOOD5115M

Colloid and Dairy Science

10
credits

Semester 2


FOOD5241M

Structure and Function of Food Components

20
credits

Semesters 1
& 2

PFP

FOOD5270M

Food Analysis

10
credits

Semester 2


FOOD5405M

Professional Development for Employment and
Research

20
credits

Semester 1


FOOD5470M

Sensory Properties, Food Texture and Structure

10
credits

Semester 2

PFP












31


M
Sc Food Science (Food
Biotechnology)

Programme code:

MSC
-
FOOD/BIO


Duration:

12 Months

Method of Attendance:

Full Time

Programme manager:

Mr Paul Kajda

Contact address:

p.kajda@food.leeds.ac.uk


Total credits:

180

Entry require
ments:



A minimum of a 2.2 or equivalent (certain advanced diplomas awarded by overseas
institutions fulfil this requirement) in a suitable first degree programme.



English requirement for international students is IE
LTS 6.0 or above, with at least 5.5
in
listening and reading, and at least 5.0 in speaking and writing; or TOEFL (internet
based test) of at least 83 with at least 18 in listening, 20 in reading, 20 in speaking
and 21 in writing.


School/Unit responsible for the parenting of students and
programme:

School of Food Science and Nutrition


Examination board through which the programme will be considered:

School of Food Science and Nutrition Examiners Committee


Programme specification:

The programme will extend scientific knowledge to areas ou
tside of the first degree
discipline, and enable application of first degree knowledge appropriate to a future career in
the food industry.


The programme will deliver a broad knowledge of food science with the necessary
background understanding of chemis
try, biochemistry, physics, mathematics and Biology
with a main emphasis on its application to food biotechnology. Students will develop the
ability to apply fundamental scientific concepts to understand and manipulate the complex
characteristics of foods.

Students should gain the ability to integrate this scientific knowledge
with an understanding of food technology and particular student interests and skills
developed through specialised options and projects with content influenced by current
research thi
nking in the field.


The programme will give an understanding of the methodology of research investigations by
experimental project and the necessary personal skills to communicate effectively in future
professional activities. The programme will also del
iver the ability to appraise critically the
complex factors, including sociological and ethical issues that influence the range, quality
and acceptability of foods produced in an industrialised society.


Assessment is by a range of methods, including forma
l examination, in
-
class tests,
laboratory practical reports, example sheets, problem solving, project work and verbal
presentations.


The programme is offered as a full time course of twelve months duration with standard