Defining core knowledge - M20-MIM-EV1

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8 Δεκ 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 8 μήνες)

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1

Chapter 7


Developing a Core
Knowledge Framework


2

Introduction
(1/2)


Most organizations face a knowledge glut


Many apply a ‘kitchen sink’ approach to
providing access to knowledge


This can prevent useful application of
knowledge


The goal of knowledge management is to
facilitate ready access to critical knowledge
when people need it



3

Introduction
(2/2)

Content management


Vital to effective knowledge management


Identifies and categori
z
es valued knowledge


Manages and maintains the currency and
accessibility of that knowledge

4

Core Knowledge


Strategic or operational knowledge which
contributes to essential organi
z
ational
processes or outcomes


Long
-
term value to the organi
z
ation


Enables high performance on core activities


Justifies the cost of knowledge capture and
management


Minimi
z
es duplication, misinformation and
redundant effort


5

The Three Phases of Managing Core
Knowledge


Knowledge management relies on an
effective content management system
(CMS)


The CMS is developed progressively:


Phase 1: clarify the core knowledge scope


Phase 2: define core knowledge parameters


Phase 3: develop the core knowledge


structure

6

Phase 1:

Clarify
the
Core Knowledge Scope

(1/4)


Explores the types of core knowledge found
in the organi
z
ation and the ways in which
that knowledge is used


Clarifies the nature of the
organization’s
core
business


Determines the knowledge domain to be
supported and encouraged


Ensures staff have the capabilities to use
that knowledge

7

Phase 1:

Clarify
the
Core Knowledge Scope
(
2/4
)

Identifying the core business and its
knowledge requirements



What are the major organi
z
ational activities?


Where is the firm going?


Is there speciali
z
ed or unique knowledge?


Which knowledge needs to be shared?


Can the costs of sharing be recouped through the
use of that knowledge?


What are the benefits of enabling the use of the
knowledge by others?

8

Phase 1:

Clarify
the
Core Knowledge Scope
(
3/4
)

Define the knowledge domain



Areas of knowledge that support the core
business strategy of the organi
z
ation


Each organi
z
ation develops a different
knowledge domain


Knowledge which members need to share
and use as common resources


Knowledge which is strategic and needs to
be developed and cultivated over time

9

Phase 1:

Clarify
the
Core Knowledge Scope
(
4/4
)

Review knowledge capabilities



Identification of desired capabilities, valuable
sources of knowledge, demonstrable
capabilities and knowledge practices


What do our employees really know?


What should they know?


How can they gain this knowledge?

10

Phase 2:

Define Core Knowledge Parameters

(1/6)


Defines and builds policies relating to the
core knowledge domain identified in

phase 1


Provides boundaries for the core knowledge
to be supported in the KMS


Ensures relevant contributions to the
system, and appropriate use of the system


Still accommodates evolving requirements

11

Phase 2:

Define Core Knowledge Parameters

(
2/6
)

Defining core knowledge


Clear definition of what is important


Directs employee attention and
knowledge
management
resources to that knowledge


Should reflect the capacity to manage

and

contribute to the resultant domain


May commence with a very tight focus and
then expand as time progresses

12


Categories of core knowledge:



Basic core knowledge:

essential knowledge
generated, shared and accessed by all staff


Strategic core knowledge:

limited access,
progressive development, needs updating


Developmental core knowledge:

potentially
beneficial, but still under development

Phase 2:

Define Core Knowledge Parameters
(
3/6
)

13


Defining the core


practical considerations:


Absorptive capacity of the individuals


Will there be sufficient return on the
investment costs of capturing, recording and
maintaining knowledge?


Does the increased management add value?


Can the system be maintained?


Will the KMS make the knowledge more
accessible?

Phase 2:

Define Core Knowledge Parameters
(
4/6
)

14

Develop the core knowledge policy


Describes the nature of core knowledge


Clarifies importance and value of knowledge


Outlines the roles of various stakeholders


Provides guidance on the overall principles
to be applied


Policies do not normally include procedures
and practice


these are contained in
guidelines which can change as required

Phase 2:

Define Core Knowledge Parameters
(
5/6
)

15


Some policy considerations


What, how and when will employees share
their core knowledge?


Policy implementation


Relationship with other organi
z
ational
processes and systems?


Confidential, competitive knowledge


Transient

strategic knowledge management

Phase 2:

Define Core Knowledge Parameters
(
6/6
)

16

Phase 3:

Developing the Core Knowledge
Structure

(1/7)


Systems and processes which assist with
mapping and organi
z
ing the organi
z
ation’s
core knowledge


Encompasses mapping, categori
z
ing,
indexing and otherwise labelling core
knowledge to facilitate its management


Enables the ready retrieval of core
knowledge through effective search
processes

17

User
-
driven core knowledge

versus

Systematic core knowledge definition

Phase 3:

Developing the Core Knowledge
Structure

(2/7)

18

Mapping core knowledge



Knowledge maps describe the core
knowledge categories and focal areas


Define the structural breakdown of the
different core knowledge areas


Two types of maps can be developed:
relational knowledge maps or operational
knowledge maps

Phase 3:

Developing the Core Knowledge
Structure

(3/7)

Relational knowledge map

Operational knowledge map

21

Phase 3:

Developing the Core Knowledge
Structure
(
4/7
)

Establishing and promoting the knowledge
repository



Repositories link the different sources by
integrating them into a single united system
which can be searched in many different
ways


Structured or unstructured repository
management strategies?


22


Structured repository management


Integrate the use of common structures,
formally constituted headings and content
descriptors to describe the content


Keyword headings facilitate subsequent
retrieval by providing predictable and reliable
terms which are used by both contributors
and knowledge seekers


Descriptors guide the user as to the defined
content to be found under a keyword

Phase 3:

Developing the Core Knowledge
Structure
(
5/7
)

23


Unstructured knowledge repositories


Knowledge is not structured in terms of
content, but is found using free
-
text
searching


Usage is flexible, and sources can be
accessed in many creative ways


Successful identification of sources relies on
the use of common language and ideas


Phase 3:

Developing the Core Knowledge
Structure
(
6/7
)

24


Repository design principles


Ensure only core knowledge is included


Clarify the level of control over content


Browser design should match the user needs
and capabilities


There should be easy access to the system
and user guidance


Search agents may assist the user

Phase 3:

Developing the Core Knowledge
Structure
(
7/7
)

25

Content Authorship


Knowledge in repositories will be reused,
adapted and generally changed over time


Should people be recogni
z
ed for their
contributions?


The source documentation can recogni
z
e
each individual’s contribution and the date of
the contribution


Recognition and reward systems may also
integrate this information

26

Concluding Points


Content management is a critical factor in
building an effective KMS


Core knowledge should be clearly defined
and agreed before the KMS is implemented


Structured and well controlled systems
provide better overall support to the user


Knowledge repositories rely on effective
knowledge maps to guide their structure and
management

27

Today’s focus questions:


What is core knowledge?


Why is it important to clarify the scope and
nature of core knowledge?


What are some of the likely issues which
may arise when building a content
management system?



Lecture reference: Debowski, Chapter 7