KH 3600 Biomechanics

tickbitewryΜηχανική

30 Οκτ 2013 (πριν από 4 χρόνια και 10 μέρες)

137 εμφανίσεις

Biomechanics and Related Movement Disciplines
KH 3600 Biomechanics

Biomechanics:the physics (mechanics) of 
motion produced by biological systems.

More specifically…a highly integrated field of 
study that examines the forces acting upon, 
within, and produced by a body.

Integrates biological characteristics with 
traditional mechanics.

Mechanics:the branch of physics specifically 
concerned with the effect of forces and energy on 
the motion of bodies.

Mechanics

Statics:  the study of systems in a state of 
equilibrium.
▪At rest or in a constant state of motion.

Dynamics:the study of systems in a state of 
accelerated/changing motion.

Kinematics:study or description of the spatial and 
temporal characteristics of motion without regard 
to the causative forces.  

e.g., displacement and velocity

Kinetics:study of forces that inhibit, cause, 
facilitate, or modify motion of a body.

e.g.,  friction, gravity, and pressure

Example:  A soccer player injures his foot 
while trying to outmaneuver an opponent, 
and possibly because he is too old to be 
playing soccer.
▪Kinematic perspective:How fast was the soccer player 
moving at the moment of injury?
▪Kinetic perspective:How much force was absorbed by 
the body when making a quick change in direction?

Outside of sport, biomechanists also examine 
more common human motions, such as 
walking.

Example:  Walking infant
▪Kinematic perspective:  What is the length of the infant’s 
strides? 
▪Kinetic perspective:  Why does the infant walk in this 
manner?

Describe a movement in kinematic terms

Biomechanics is about movement:

Exercise Physiology:  movement is caused by 
contraction of skeletal muscle.

Motor Control:  mechanics used by the nervous 
system to control and coordinate movements.
▪Motor development
▪Motor learning

Biomechanics is about movement:

Ergonomics: analyzing the work environment and human‐
machine interaction.

Physical therapy and sports medicine:  
prevention/treatment/rehabilitation from acute and 
chronic injuries that result from human motion.

Pedagogy and coaching:  try to modify movement 
behaviors.

Functional anatomy:  no matter the movement‐related 
discipline, an in‐depth knowledge of the human body is a 
must. 

Exercise requires the cooperation of all the 
body systems:

Neurological system initiates muscle contraction 
to move the skeletal system.
▪Increased activity of the muscular system requires a 
large amount of energy (ATP) to be produced by the 
metabolic system.
▪To make ATP, oxygen and food fuel are needed.
Transported within the body by our cardiovascular system.

The link between exercise physiology and 
biomechanics is the neuromuscular system.

Muscles are the metabolic machines that cause 
motion of the skeletal system.
▪Muscles are under the control of the nervous system.
▪Muscles are a kinetic factor that affects kinematic 
values.

For movement, muscles produce force, and 
forces are the realm of kinetic analysis.

As muscular strength changes, so do the 
kinematics of movement.

Motor = movement

Motor behavior is defined by three sub‐
areas:
1.
Motor control:how the nervous system controls 
coordinated skill performance.
2.
Motor development:how motor control changes 
over time.
3.
Motor learning:how humans learn motor skills.

Depending on the movement task, humans are 
believed to rely on one of two control systems:

Open‐loop:  movements that happen so quickly the brain 
doesn’t have time to receive feedback to influence the 
current performance.

Closed‐loop:  movements that can be changed during a 
performance as the brain receives sensory feedback from 
the eyes, ears, and proprioceptors throughout the body.

Coordinated movement must be controlled 
by the nervous system.

In some cases the skills are open‐loop, 
whereas other skills are closed‐loop.

The internal kinetics and resulting kinematics may 
vary.

From birth to advanced age, the body is in a 
state of dynamic state of change.

The primary motor activities are evident at 
birth and are not voluntary.

They are reflexive behaviors that are designed to 
gather information and protect the body.

Voluntary motion begins only when the 
nervous and muscular systems are ready.

Kinematics and kinetics of all skills change 
with motor development:

Until puberty, girls and boys differ very little in 
structure and physiology.

Changes that occur during and after puberty can 
have positive and negative effects on athletic 
performance.
▪i.e., Michael Jordan was cut from his high school 
basketball team as a freshman, but he excelled once he 
adapted to his new size and strength.

The process of learning begins in the early stages of 
infancy.

Early learning in movement is a trial‐and‐error 
process in which infants and toddlers attempt new 
activities.

Motor learning takes into account the structural and 
physiological changes through the lifespan, but 
focuses primarily on neurological aspects of 
attaining and retaining motor skills.

Ergonomics:  a discipline concerned with 
interaction of humans and machines and with 
the factors that influence that interaction.

Ergonomists attempt to improve the human‐
machine system.  

Biomechanics and ergonomics are so closely 
related that ergonomics is sometimes 
referred to as occupational biomechanics.

Many kinetic factors affect work tasks:  muscle 
forces, weight of equipment, vibrations, and 
surface textures.

The kinematics of the work task can be 
analyzed by the ergonomists to estimate the 
effects of kinetic factors upon the human‐
machine interface.

Based upon the findings of biomechanical 
analysis, the ergonomists can then make 
informed decisions to improve the human‐
machine system.

Biomechanical analysis can then be used to 
observe the resulting kinetic and kinematic 
changes to verify the effectiveness of the 
intervention.

Physical therapy:the field dedicated to preventing, 
evaluating, and treating movement abnormalities.

Disordered movement may be caused by injury, 
disease, muscular imbalance, or congenital 
conditions.

Abnormal motion at one joint is often associated 
with abnormal motion at another joint.

This abnormal motion (measured 
kinematically) is likely associated with 
abnormal forces acting upon that structure 
(kinetics), leading to further motion 
abnormality.

Physical therapists must be familiar with 
biomechanical principles to properly 
recognize and diagnose the underlying cause 
of disordered movement. 

Sports medicine:focuses on preventing and 
immediately treating injuries that occur during 
sports and on rehabilitating athletes after such 
injuries.

Preventing injury may require such methods as bracing 
and taping, both of which can affect normal human 
motion.

Biomechanics can help the athletic trainer 
understand the mechanism of injury.

The common objectives of quality teaching 
and coaching are to encourage learning and 
enhance performance.

Pedagogy in physical education and sport 
draws upon several fields to form the basis of 
scientific principles for teaching and 
coaching:  

Psychology, sociology, motor behavior, anatomy 
and physiology, and biomechanics.

Adapted physical education:the process of 
teaching movement activities to children 
with disabilities.

Understanding how the human body moves 
and learns enables the teacher to adapt 
movement activities that can help people 
with a variety of disabilities become 
competent, lifelong movers.

Defined: Biomechanics, Mechanics, Statics, 
Dynamics, Kinematics, Kinetics

Biomechanics in linked with many other 
disciplines, but is the best and most 
important of all of them.