AC Science planning template

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INSTRUCTIONS: SAVE AS Year Level name of unit odd/even year
(Year 3 & 4

ODD/EVEN

YEARS)
& semester
e.g.
Year
3 & 4
Living Things

Odd
Years

Sem 1
.

NB If it is an updated version of a
previous unit, ad
d the version number e.g. Year 3 & 4 Living Things

Odd Years Sem 1 V2.


KEEP ALL FONT AND SIZE AS IS i.e. Ariel 10 so that it can be cut and pasted straight into work program
template
as a column.

Insert Unit name, select odd/even
/all

ye
ar
s
, insert year level


Lesson Sequence instructions

For each lesson




D
elete
/adapt

skills

or lesson components
not applicable




Select and paste in just one outcome
/elaboration

to focus on
,

from
VELS and Australian Curriculum





Insert resources and where
they are located



Insert what students do/what teacher does



Insert special needs



Delete e5 if not applicable, or insert your own school’s professional development focus if desired.



Learning Focus
, Content descriptors & elaborations

&

Standards instructions

+PoLT

Delete
all
aspects not applicable
in this unit
from VELS and Australian Curriculum

sections

& PoLT.



Formatting

Update Table of Contents (right click to do this & select Update Entire Table) or delete table of contents if
preferred.

Adjust line breaks if printing

Delete all these yellow instructions once done.


INSERT NAME OF SCHOOL


INSERT NAME OF UNIT

Odd
/Even
/All

Years


year level



This unit combines compatible content and skills from the Australian Science Curriculum and the three Priorities with the
Victorian Essential Learning Standards for Science AND relevant interdisciplinary learning from VELS Personal Learning,
Interdisciplin
ary Learning, Thinking Processes. Some aspects of VELS and Australian English curriculum are also included.


This unit was developed by (insert names of contributing teachers and date.)

Contents

LESSON SEQUENCES

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4

Lesson 1

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Lesson 2

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Lesson 3

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Lesson 4

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4

Lesson 5

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5

Lesson 6

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5

Lesson 7

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5

Lesson 8

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5

Lesson 9

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7

Lesson 10

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7

Lesson 11

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7

Key Understandings for Assessment

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8

Focus Questions

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8

LEARNING FOCUS

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9

VICTORIAN ESSENTIAL LEARNING STANDARDS LEARNING FOCUS

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9

VELS Learning Focus Science Level 3

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9

VELS Learning Focus English Level

3

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9

VELS Learning Focus Thinki ng Processes Level 3
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11

VELS Learning Focus Personal Learning Level 3

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11

VELS Learning Focus Interper
sonal Learning Level 3
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11

AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM LEARNING FOCUS


SCIENCE LEVEL DESCRIPTION: Years 3 & 4

12

AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM CONTENT DESCRIPTIONS AND ELABORATIONS


SCIENCE: Years 3 & 4

12

SCIENCE UNDERSTANDING

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12

SCIENC
E AS A HUMAN ENDEAVOUR

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14

SCIENCE ENQUIRY SKILLS

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15

AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM ENGLISH LEVEL DESCRIPTION Years 3 & 4

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16

AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM CONTENT DESCRIPTIONS AND ELABORATIONS


ENGLISH: Years 3 & 4

17

READING AND VIEWING

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17

WRITING

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21

SPEAKING AND LISTENING

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.
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AUSTRALIAN CURRICU
LUM PRIORITIES

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27

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures
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27

Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia
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27

Sustainability

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27

ACHIEVEMENT STANDARDS

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29

VICTORIAN
ESSENTIAL LEARNING STANDARDS (VELS) ACHIEVEMENT STANDARDS

.......
29

VELS Science

StandardsYears 3 & 4

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29

VELS English Standards

Years 3 & 4

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30

VELS Thi nking Processes Standards

Years 3 & 4

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30

VELS Personal Learning Standards

Years 3 & 4

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30

VELS Interpersonal Learni ng
Standards

Years 3 & 4

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31

AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM ACHIEVEMENT STANDARDS


SCIENCE
................................
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31

AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM SCIENCE Years 3 & 4
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31

AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM ACHIEVEMENT STANDARDS


ENGLISH
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32

AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM ENGLISH
Years
3 & 4

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32

PoLT (Pri nciples of Learni
ng and Teaching)
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33

PoLT focus to be embedded in this unit.

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LESSON SEQUENCES


Lesson 1

Lesson 2

Lesson 3

Lesson 4

Activities

Cue in by talking about

Read

Explain

Students listen and contribute
to discussion about...

Review e.g. taking turns &
sharing.

Model task

Table task:

make/build/test/etc

Use thinking tool....

Share Time:




Resources

Insert specific texts &
where
kept


Selected easy
-
reading non
-
fiction texts about





Special
needs



At risk



ESL



Gifted





VELS

stand
ard/s


Level 1

Select from below





Australian
curriculum
standard/s

Y
ear
s 1 & 2


Select from below




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Lesson 1

Lesson 2

Lesson 3

Lesson 4

E5







Lesson 5

Lesson 6

Lesson 7

Lesson 8

Activities

Cue in by talking about

Read

Explain

Students listen and contribute to
discussion about...

Review e.g. taking turns &
sharing.

Model task

Table task: make/build/test/etc

Use thinking tool....

Share Time:




Resources

Insert specific texts & where kept

Selected easy
-
reading non
-
fiction
texts about





Special
needs



At risk



䕓E



Gifted





VELS
standard/s
Level 2

Select from
below




Australian
curriculum
standard/s
Year
s 1 & 2






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Lesson 5

Lesson 6

Lesson 7

Lesson 8

E5








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Lesson 9

Lesson 10

Lesson 11


Activities

Cue in by talking about

Read

Explain

Students listen and contribute to
discussion about...

Review e.g. taking turns &
sharing.

Model task

Table task: make/build/test/etc

Use thinking tool....

Share Time:




Resources

Insert specific texts & where kept

Selected easy
-
reading non
-
fiction
texts about





Special
needs



At risk



ESL



Gifted





VELS
standards
Level 2

Select from below




Australian curriculum
standards year
s 1 & 2


Select from below




E5






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Key Understandings for Assessment

Focus Questions



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LEARNING FOCUS

VICTORIAN ESSENTIAL LEARNING STANDARDS LEARNING FOCUS

VELS
Learning
Focus
Science

Level
3

As students work towards the achievement of Level 3 standards in Science, they begin to design and conduct experiments to exp
lore
contexts drawn from traditional and emerging sciences. They investigate questions and ideas ab
out the natural world and learn to use
scientific vocabulary in place of everyday language to describe and explain their observations and measurements. They begin t
o
understand that the design of experiments is directly related to their questions about thi
ngs and events. They learn to describe evidence
in support of simple scientific ideas.

Students investigate changes they observe; for example, day becoming night, using brakes to stop a bicycle hitting a gate,see
d
germination and plant growth, and the rege
neration of forests after a bushfire. They examine, by referring to energy transformation, the
operation of a range of everyday devices; for example, gates, locks, toasters and hot water systems. They investigate the use

of solar
Energy in cooking or light
ing or transport. Students learn about the actions of forces on objects that affect their motion and shape in
everyday situations such as walking, playing ball games, blowing up balloons, playing with moving toys and riding in cars or
aeroplanes.
They expl
ore the relationship between distance and the apparent size of an observed object. They participate in activities where they
learn to classify a variety of materials using states of matter (solids, liquids, gases) and they learn that some materials a
re dif
ficult to
classify; for example, honey, plaster, jelly and carbonated soft drinks. They explore reversible and non
-
reversible changes to common
substances such as water, vinegar and bicarbonate of soda.

They begin to understand how different parts work tog
ether in plants and animals to produce change and to aid in survival; for example,
growth and movement. They realise that offspring are similar to their parents. They learn to classify things that they find i
n their
environment as living (biotic) or non
-
li
ving (abiotic). They investigate how humans affect the survival of living things and change the
environment, and how interactions between living things in the environment change. They investigate natural processes that ch
ange the
environment over short per
iods of time (tsunami, drought, floods) and long periods of time (weathering and erosion). Students are
introduced to the concept of a sustainable environment and their role in contributing to it; for example, involvement in loca
l litter
programs and recyc
ling at home and at school.

Students relate scientific ideas to their own experiences, interests and concerns, and to a variety of personal and community

uses of
science and links with technology; for example, the location of mobile phone towers or clearin
g local bushland to build new roads. They
examine how scientists work and how science knowledge has developed by visiting scientists at work, listening to guest speake
rs or
conducting research on the Internet. Students discuss safety considerations and a v
ariety of procedures and processes (including fair
tests, variables, ethical considerations relating to observing animals, and selecting and using equipment correctly) that cou
ld be used
when undertaking experiments.

VELS
Learning
Focus

English


Level
3

As students work towards the achievement of Level 3 standards in English, they speak, listen, read and write with some critic
al
awareness, using a growing variety of text types and show some appreciation of the role of formal discourses in English.

Student
s read an increasing range of texts including imaginative texts such as chapter books, junior novels and poems, as well as
informative texts, in print and electronic form. Texts typically have varied sentence patterns, written language structures a
nd some
specialised topic
-
related or literary vocabulary, and ideas and information extending beyond students’ immediate experience. Students
use a range of strategies to interpret the main ideas and purpose of texts


for example, interpreting figurative language

or linking
information from headings


and explore characters’ qualities, motives and actions. Through discussion, students develop their
understanding of why interpretations of a text may vary, and how the choice of subject matter is influenced by contex
t, the author’s
purpose, and the intended audience. They read more critically and learn about the use of some simple symbolic meanings and
stereotypes in texts.

Students develop confidence in writing a range of imaginative and informative texts, including
simple narratives and descriptions, and
texts that explain, inform and express a point of view. They draw on their knowledge of texts and language and learn to use a

variety of
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sentences in appropriate grammatical order, using suitable vocabulary for the s
ubject matter including nouns, verbs, adjectives and
adverbs, and punctuating appropriately to support meaning including exclamation marks and quotation marks. They learn to spel
l most
one
-

and two
-
syllable words with regular spelling patterns (for example
,
growing
,
found
,
might
), frequently used words which have less
regular spelling patterns (for example,
because
,
there
,
friends
), and some other words of more than one syllable (for example,
yesterday
,
afternoon
,
money
). They make plausible attempts at
spelling new and more difficult words. They experiment with combining
verbal and visual elements to enhance the texts they produce.

Students develop strategies for writing to assist in planning and organising ideas prior to writing, and adapt their writing

to suit their
audience and purpose. They learn to use a range of resources, including information and communications technology, to revise
written
work and check spelling.

Students recognise that speaking and listening provide opportunities to exchange in
formation, to share and explore ideas, and to
express opinions and listen to the opinions of others. They participate in discussions, conversations and presentations in sm
all and large
groups, learning to vary their speaking and listening to suit the conte
xt, purpose and audience. In spontaneous, planned and rehearsed
situations they learn how to project their voice adequately for an audience and to use appropriate spoken language features s
uch as
sequence and past tense when recounting an event. When speak
ing, they recognise the need to rephrase statements to clarify meaning
and information.

Students develop skills in listening attentively during class and group discussions, and to factual spoken texts such as audi
o, film and
invited presentations. They pra
ctise identifying the topic, retelling information accurately, asking clarifying questions, volunteering
information and justifying opinions.

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VELS
Learning
Focus

Thinking
Processes
Level
3

As students work towards the achievement of Level 3 standards in T
hinking Processes, they explore aspects of their natural,
constructed and social world, wondering and developing questions about it. They use a range of sources of information includi
ng
observations and findings from their own investigations to answer thes
e questions. Students develop strategies for organising and
summarising information and reflecting on their thinking. They begin to categorise knowledge and ideas, identify patterns, an
d form
generalisations. They learn to make connections between both new

and established ideas and their own knowledge.

With thinking tools to assist them, students begin to ask more focused and clarifying questions. They develop skills in colle
cting and
organising ideas from a range of sources to construct knowledge. They lea
rn to question the validity of sources, communicate and
record their questions, responses and thoughts, and give reasons for conclusions.

Students participate in a variety of investigations and activities involving problem solving that encourage them to ex
periment with a range
of creative solutions. They begin to reflect on the approaches they use to assist them to form their solutions. They explore
ideas
creatively; for example, by engaging with new ideas and other perspectives.

Students give reasons for
changes that may occur in their thinking. They begin to recognise that others may have different opinions and
understand that reasoning can be influenced by strong feelings. They begin to question arguments presented to them; for examp
le,
those based on th
e assertion that ‘everybody knows’ or ‘I just know’.

Students develop language to describe specific thinking processes and, with support, use thinking tools to assist them to com
plete a
given task. They continue to reflect regularly on their thinking, lear
ning to describe their thinking processes verbally.

VELS
Learning
Focus

Personal
Learning
Level
3

As students work towards the achievement of Level 3 standards in Personal Learning, they begin to build on personal strengths

by
recognising strategies for
learning which help them learn most effectively. With support, they use their past learning to inform their future
learning, and begin to set learning improvement goals.

Students participate in a diverse range of learning activities that allow them to ackn
owledge their development as learners. They monitor
their learning through strategies such as share time and seeking feedback from the teacher and, where appropriate, their peer
s.

Students learn to recognise the various positive and negative emotions that
may be associated with their learning, and that feelings of
uncertainty do not equate with an inability to complete a task. They explore the implications of impulsive behaviour and iden
tify
strategies they can use to manage impulsiveness, such as taking ti
me to think about their opinions before giving them and considering
alternative viewpoints before making a value judgment about an idea. They develop an awareness of their emotions and the capa
city to
use positive self
-
talk; for example, by compiling a lis
t of strategies they can implement when they are feeling uncertain. Through
reflection on their achievements across a range of tasks, they begin to understand the roles of persistence and effort in com
pleting
tasks. Students reflect on their own behaviour
in the classroom and the personal values that inform those behaviours. They develop and
respect protocols, such as codes of cooperation, that promote learning with peers. They begin to compare their own values wit
h those
agreed to by the class.

Students re
flect on their contribution to the creation of a positive learning culture in the classroom and recognise that they may learn

with
and from peers.

With support, students develop strategies for managing their own learning, and identify the need for resource

and time management in
completing short tasks. They begin to use various tools, such as personal diaries and portfolios, to help them reflect on the

effectiveness
of the strategies they use in learning and in recording and commenting on task outcomes. The
y learn to set simple goals for future
learning such as ‘to practise a specific skill’. They begin to review their work to check for accuracy.

VELS
Learning
Focus
Interpersonal
Learning

Level
3

As students work towards the achievement of Level 3 standards

in Interpersonal Development, they interact with their peers, older and
younger students, and adults in both informal and formal contexts. They develop their skills and strategies for getting to kn
ow and
understand others within increasingly complex situa
tions. With teacher support, they identify different types of friendships and
relationships. They discuss the expectations they have of friendship and relationship groups and acknowledge the expectations

that
others have of them. They recognise that relati
onships change and that positive relationships do not depend on always agreeing with
one another.

Students are encouraged to think about their values and how these affect their feelings and behaviour. They are supported to
develop
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relationships based on
respect and the valuing of individual differences; for example, speaking respectfully about others, listening and
responding appropriately and encouraging others’ contributions. They learn to respect other students’ belongings and, when ap
propriate,
to sha
re their own.

Students begin to explore the link between their feelings and their behaviour. They learn about empathy and use this to begin

to respond
to the needs of others. Using prompts and questions, they develop skills in giving and accepting construc
tive feedback; for example,
praising or making suggestions for improvement.

Students are introduced to a variety of strategies for dealing with conflict and bullying. By articulating the conflict to be

resolved, they
discuss options and outcomes and work w
ith others to develop plans and procedures to reduce the possibility of conflict, avoid or
resolve conflict.

In teams, students work towards the achievement of agreed goals within a set timeframe. With teacher assistance, they develop

awareness of their ro
le in the team and responsibilities in various situations, and interact with others accordingly. Students begin to be
aware that different points of view may be valid. Using provided criteria, they reflect on the effectiveness of the teams in
which they
pa
rticipate.


AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM LEARNING FOCUS


SCIENCE

LEVEL DESCRIPTION
: Years
3 & 4

The
Science Inquiry Skills
and
Science as a Human Endeavour
strands are described across a two
-
level band. In their planning, schools and teachers
refer to the expec
tations outlined in the Achievement Standard and also to the content of the
Science Understanding
strand for the relevant level to
ensure that these two strands are addressed over the two
-
level period. The three strands of the curriculum are interrelated a
nd their content is taught in
an integrated way. The order and detail in which the content descriptions are organised into teaching/learning programs are d
ecisions to be made by the
teacher.

Over Levels 3 to 6, students develop their understanding of a
range of systems operating at different time and geographic scales.

In Level 3, students observe heat and its effects on solids and liquids and
begin to develop an understanding of energy flows through simple
systems. In observing day and night, they deve
lop an appreciation of
regular and predictable cycles. Students order their observations by
grouping and classifying; in classifying things as living or non
-
living they
begin to recognise that classifications are not always easy to define or
apply. They be
gin to quantify their observations to enable comparison, and
learn more sophisticated ways of identifying and representing relationships,
including the use of tables and graphs to identify trends. They use their
understanding of relationships between compo
nents of simple systems to
make predictions.

In Level 4, students broaden their understanding of classification and form
and function through an exploration of the properties of natural and
processed materials. They learn that forces include non
-
contact fo
rces and
begin to appreciate that some interactions result from phenomena that
can’t be seen with the naked eye. They begin to appreciate that current
systems, such as Earth’s surface, have characteristics that have resulted
from past changes and that livi
ng things form part of systems. They
understand that some systems change in predictable ways, such as
through cycles. They apply their knowledge to make predictions based on
interactions within systems, including those involving the actions of
humans.


AU
STRALIAN CURRICULUM CONTENT DESCRIPTIONS AND ELABORATIONS


SCIENCE:
Years 3 & 4


SCIENCE UNDERSTANDI NG

Year 3

Content


Year 4

Content


Biological Science

Elaborations

Biological Science

Elaborations

Living things can be
grouped on the basis
of observable
features and can be


recognising characteristics of living things such
as growing, moving, sensitivity and reproducing



recognising the range of different living things



sorting living and non
-
living things based on
Living things have life
cycles
(ACSSU072)



making and recording
observations of living
things as they develop through their life cycles



describing the stages of life cycles of different
living things such as insects, birds, frogs and
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distinguished from
non
-
living things
(ACSSU044)

characteristics



exploring differences between livin
g, once
living and products of living things

flowering plants



comparing life cycles of animals and plants



recognising that
environmental factors can
affect life cycles such as fire and seed
germination



Living things,
including plants and
animals, depend on
each other and the
environment to
survive
(ACSSU073)



investigating how plants provide shelter for
animals



investigating the roles of living things in a
habitat, for instance producers, consumers or
decomposers



observing and
describing predator
-
prey
relationships



predicting the effects when living things in
feeding relationships are removed or die out in
an area



recognising that interactions between living
things may be competitive or mutually
beneficial

Chemical Science

Elab
orations

Chemical Science

Elaborations

A change of state
between solid and
liquid can be caused
by adding or
removing heat
(ACSSU046)



investigating how liquids and solids respond to
changes in temperature, for example water
changing to i
ce, or melting chocolate



exploring how changes from solid to liquid and
liquid to solid can help us recycle materials



predicting the effect of heat on different
materials

Natural and
processed materials
have a range of
physical properties;
These properties

can
influence their use
(ACSSU074)



describing a range of common materials, such
as metals or plastics, and
their uses



investigating a particular property across a
range of materials



selecting materials for uses based on their
properties



considering how the properties of materials
affect the management of waste or can lead to
pollution

Earth and space
sciences

Elaborations

Earth and space
sciences

Elaborations

Earth’s rotation on
its axis causes
regular changes,
including night and
day
(ACSSU048)



recognising the sun as a source of light



constructing sundials and investigating how
they work



describi
ng timescales for the rotation of the
Earth



modelling the relative sizes and movement of
the sun, Earth and moon

Earth’s surface
changes over time as
a result of natural
processes and
human activity
(ACSSU075)



collecting evidence of change from local
landforms, rocks or fossils



exploring a local area that has changed as a
result of natural processes, such as an
eroded
gully, sand dunes or river banks



investigating the characteristics of soils



considering how different human activities
cause erosion of the Earth’s surface



considering the effect of events such as floods
and extreme weather on the landscape, both in

Australia and in the Asia region

Physical sciences

Elaborations

Physical sciences

Elaborations

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Heat can be
produced in many
ways and can move
from one object to
another
(ACSSU049)



describing how heat can be produced such as
through friction or motion, electricity or
chemically (burn
ing)



identifying changes that occur in everyday
situations due to heating and cooling



exploring how heat can be transferred through
conduction



recognising that we can feel heat and measure
its effects using a thermometer

Forces can be
exerted by one object

on another through
direct contact or from
a distance
(ACSSU076)



observing qualitatively how speed is affected
b
y the size of a force



exploring how non
-
contact forces are similar to
contact forces in terms of objects pushing and
pulling another object



comparing and contrasting the effect of friction
on different surfaces, such as tyres and shoes
on a range of
surfaces



investigating the effect of forces on the
behaviour of an object through actions such as
throwing, dropping, bouncing and rolling



exploring the forces of attraction and repulsion
between magnets


SCIENCE AS A HUMAN ENDEAVOUR

Year 3

Content


Year
4

Content


Nature and
development of
science

Elaborations

Nature and
development of
science

Elaborations

Science involves
making predictions
and describing
patterns and
relationships
(ACSHE050)



making predictions about change and events in
our environment



researching how knowledge of astronomy ha
s
been used by some Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander people



considering how posing questions helps us plan
for the future

Science involves
making predictions
and describing
patterns and
relationships
(ACSHE061)



exploring ways in which scientists gather
evidence for their ideas and develop
explanations



considering how scientific practices such as
sorting,
classification and estimation are used by
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in
everyday life

Use and influence
of science

Elaborations

Use and influence
of science

Elaborations

Science knowledge
helps people to
understand the
effect of their
actions
(ACSHE051)



considering how heating
affects materials used
in everyday life



investigating how science helps people such as
nurses, doctors, dentists, mechanics and
gardeners



considering how materials including solids and
liquids affect the environment in different ways



deciding what characte
ristics make a material a
pollutant



researching Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
people’s knowledge of the local natural
environment, such as the characteristics of
plants and animals

Science knowledge
helps people to
understand the
effect of their
ac
tions
(ACSHE062)



investigating how a range of people, such as
clothing designers, builders or engineers use
science to select appropriate materials for their
work



considering methods of waste management and
how they can affect the environment



exploring how science has contributed to a
discussion about an issue such as loss of
habitat for living things or how hum
an activity
has changed the local environment



considering how to minimise the effects of
erosion caused by human activity

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SCIENCE ENQUIRY SKILLS

Year 3

Content


Year 4

Content


Questioning and
predicting

Elaborations

Questioning and
predicting

Elaborations

With guidance,
identify questions
in familiar contexts
that can be
investigated
scientifically and
predict what might
happen based on
prior knowledge
(ACSIS053)



choosing questions to investigate from a list of
possibilities



jointly constructing questions that may
form the
basis for investigation



listing shared experiences as a whole class and
identifying possible investigations



working in groups to discuss things that might
happen during an investigation

With guidance,
identify questions in
familiar contexts
that c
an be
investigated
scientifically and
predict what might
happen based on
prior knowledge
(ACSIS064)



considering
familiar situations in order to think
about possible areas for investigation



reflecting on familiar situations to make
predictions with teacher guidance



choosing questions to investigate from a list of
possibilities

Planning and
conducting

Elaborations

Planning and
conducting

Elaborations

Suggest ways to
plan and conduct
investigations to
find answers to
questions
(ACSIS054)



working with teacher guidance to plan
investigations to test simple cause
-
and
-
effect
relationships



discussing as a whole class ways to investigate
questions and evaluating which ways might be
most successful

Suggest ways to
plan and conduct
investigations to
find answers to
questions
(ACSIS065)



exploring different ways

to conduct
investigations and connecting these to the types
of questions asked with teacher guidance



working in groups, with teacher guidance, to
plan ways to investigate questions

Safely use
appropriate
materials, tools or
equipment to make
and record
observations, using
formal
measurements and
digital technologies
as appropriate
(ACSIS055)



recording measurements using familiar formal
units and appropriate abbreviations, such as
seconds (s), grams (g), centimetres (cm)



using a variety of tools to make observations,
such as digital cameras,
thermometers, rulers
and scales



discussing safety rules for equipment and
procedures

Safely use
appropriate
materials, tools or
equipment to make
and record
observations, using
formal
measurements and
digital technologies
as appropriate
(ACSIS066)



d
iscussing and recording safety rules for
equipment as a whole class



making and recording measurements using
familiar
formal units and appropriate
abbreviations, such as seconds (s), grams (g),
centimetres (cm) and millilitres (mL)

Processing and
analysing data
and information

Elaborations

Processing and
analysing data
and information

Elaborations

Use a range of
methods including
tables and simple
column graphs to
represent data and


using provided tables to organise materials and
objects based on observable properties



discussing how to graph data presented in a
table



identifying and discussing numerical and visual
Use a range of
methods including
tables and simple
column graphs to
represent data and


identifying and discussing numerical and visual
patterns in data collected from students'
investigations and from other sources



using provided graphic organisers to sort and
represent information

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33

to identify patterns
and trends
(ACSIS057)

patterns in data collected from students' own
investi
gations and from secondary sources

to identify patterns
and trends
(ACSIS068)



discussing with teacher guidance which graphic
organisers will be most useful in sorting or
organising data arising from investigations

Compare results
with predictions,
suggesting
possible reasons
for findings
(ACSIS215)



discussing how well predictions matched results
from an investigation and sharing ideas about
what was learnt

Compare results
with predictions,
s
uggesting possible
reasons for findings
(ACSIS216)



discussing how well predictions matched results
from an
investigation and proposing reasons for
findings



comparing, in small groups, proposed reasons
for findings and explaining their reasoning

Evaluating

Elaborations

Evaluating

Elaborations

Reflect on the
investigation,
including whether a
test was fair or not
(ACSIS058)



describing experiences of carr
ying out
investigations to the teacher, small group or
whole class



discussing as a whole class the idea of fairness
in testing

Reflect on the
investigation;
including whether a
test was fair or not
(ACSIS069)



reflecting on investigations, identifying what
went well, what was difficult or didn't work so
well, and how well the investigation helped
answer the question



discussing which aspects of the investigation
helped improve fairness, and any aspects that
weren't fair

Communicating

Elaborations

Communicating

Elaborations

Represent and
communicate ideas
and findings in a
variety of ways
such as diagrams,
physical
representations
and simple reports
(ACSIS060)



communicating with other students carrying out
similar investigations to share experiences and
improve investigation skill



exploring different ways to show processes and
relationships through diagrams, models and role
play



using
simple explanations and arguments,
reports or graphical representations to
communicate ideas to other students

Represent and
communicate ideas
and findings in a
variety of ways
such as diagrams,
physical
representations and
simple reports
(ACSIS071)



communicating with other students carrying out
similar investigations to share experiences and
improve investigation s
kills



using simple explanations and arguments,
reports or graphical representations to
communicate ideas to other students


AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM
ENGLISH LEVEL DESCRIPTION

Years 3 & 4

The English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of Language, Literature and Literacy. Teaching and lear
ning programs should
balance and integrate all three strands. Together the strands focus on developing students’ knowledge, underst
anding and skills in listening, reading,
viewing, speaking, writing and creating. Learning in English builds on concepts, skills and processes developed in earlier le
vels, and teachers will revisit
and strengthen these as needed.

The range of literary tex
ts for Foundation to Level 10 comprises Australian literature, including the oral narrative traditions of Aboriginal and Torr
es Strait
Islander peoples, as well as the contemporary literature of these two cultural groups, and classic and contemporary world

literature, including texts from
and about Asia.

Students create a range of imaginative, informative and persuasive types of texts including narratives, procedures, performan
ces, reports, reviews,
poetry and expositions.

Australian Curriculum English
Le
vel Description
Year
3

Australian Curriculum
English Level Description
Year
4

In Levels 3 and 4, students communicate with peers and teachers from
other classes and schools in a range of face
-
to
-
face and online/virtual
In Levels 3 and 4, students experience learning in familiar contexts and a
range of contexts that relate to study in other areas of the curriculum. They
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17

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33

environments.


Students engage with

a variety of texts for enjoyment. They listen to, read,
view and interpret spoken, written and multimodal texts in which the
primary purpose is to entertain, as well as texts designed to inform and
persuade. These encompass traditional oral texts includin
g picture books,
various types of print and digital texts, simple chapter books, rhyming
verse, poetry, non
-
fiction film, multimodal texts, dramatic performances,
and texts used by students as models for constructing their own work.


Literary texts that s
upport and extend students in Levels 3 and 4 as
independent readers describe complex sequences of events that extend
over several pages and involve unusual happenings within a framework of
familiar experiences. Informative texts present new content about t
opics of
interest and topics being studied in other areas of the curriculum. These
texts use complex language features, including varied sentence structures,
some unfamiliar vocabulary, a significant number of high
-
frequency sight
words and words that need

to be decoded phonically, and a range of
punctuation conventions, as well as illustrations and diagrams that both
support and extend the printed text.

interact with peers and teachers from other classes and schools in a range
of face
-
to
-
face and online/v
irtual environments.

Students engage with a variety of texts for enjoyment. They listen to, read,
view and interpret spoken, written and multimodal texts in which the
primary purpose is aesthetic, as well as texts designed to inform and
persuade. These encompass traditional or
al texts including Aboriginal
stories, picture books, various types of print and digital texts, simple
chapter books, rhyming verse, poetry, non
-
fiction, film, multimodal texts,
dramatic performances, and texts used by students as models for
constructing t
heir own work.

Literary texts that support and extend students in Levels 3 and 4 as
independent readers describe complex sequences of events that extend
over several pages and involve unusual happenings within a framework of
familiar experiences. Informat
ive texts present new content about topics of
interest and topics being studied in other areas of the curriculum. These
texts use complex language features, including varied sentence structures,
some unfamiliar vocabulary, a significant number of high
-
freq
uency sight
words and words that need to be decoded phonically, and a variety of
punctuation conventions, as well as illustrations and diagrams that both
support and extend the printed text.



AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM CONTENT DESCRIPTIONS AND ELABORATIONS


ENGLISH: Years
3 & 4


READING AND VIEWING

NB In AusVELS, some content and its elaborations have been moved out of the Literature strand in the AC where it belongs and
into Language or
Literacy. Where a school supports Literacy development by staffing a L
ibrary with a specialist teacher
-
librarian, these aspects should be taught as part of
a sequential Literature program within Library lessons.

Year 3

Content


Year 4

Content


Language

Elaborations

Language

Elaborations

Understand how
different types of
texts vary in use of
language choices,
depending on their
function and
purpose, for
example tense,
mood, and types of
sentences
(ACELA1478)



becoming familiar with typical structural stages
and language features of various types of text,
for example narratives, procedures, reports,
reviews and expositions

Understand how
texts vary
in
complexity and
technicality
depending on the
approach to the
topic, the purpose
and the intended
audience
(
ACELA1490)



becoming familiar with the typical stages and
language features of such text types as: simple
narrative, procedure, simple persuasion texts
and information reports

Identify the features


becoming familiar with the typical features of
Identify features of


participating in online searches for information
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33

of online texts that
enhance navigation
(ACELA1790)

online texts, for example navigation bars and
buttons
, hyperlinks and sitemaps

online texts that
enhance readability
including text,
navigation, links,
graphics and layout
(ACELA1793)

using navigation tools and discussing similarities
and differences between print and digital
information

Identify the effect on
audiences of
techniques, for
example

shot size,
vertical camera
angle and layout in
picture books,
advertisements and
film segments
(ACELA1483)



noting how the relationship between characters
can be depicted in illustrations through: the
positioning of the characters (for example facing
each other or facing away from each other); the
distance between them; the relative size; one
character looking u
p (or down) at the other
(power relationships); facial expressions and
body gesture



observing how images construct a relationship
with the viewer through such strategies as:
direct gaze into the viewer's eyes, inviting
involvement and how close ups are mor
e
engaging than distanced images, which can
suggest alienation or loneliness

Explore the effect
of choices when
framing an image,
placement of
elements in the
image, and
salience on
composition of still
and moving images
in a range of types
of texts
(ACELA1496)



examining visual and multimodal texts, building
a vocabulary to describe visual elements and
techniques
such as framing, composition and
visual point of view and beginning to understand
how these choices impact on viewer response

Recognise high
frequency sight
words
(ACELA1486)



becoming familiar with most high
-
frequency
sight words

Understand how
adverbials (adverbs
and prepos
itional
phrases) work in
different ways to
provide
circumstantial
details about an
activity
(ACELA1495)



investigating in texts how adverbial phrases and
clauses can add significance to an action, for
example ‘more desperately’, ‘he rose quietly and
gingerly moved’



Investigate how
quoted (direct) and
reported (indirect)
speech work in
different types of
text
(ACELA1494)



inv
estigating examples of quoted (direct) speech
(‘He said, “I’ll go to the park today”’) and
reported (indirect) speech (‘He told me he was
going to the park today’) and comparing
similarities and differences

Literature

Elaborations

Literature

Elaborations

Draw connections
between personal
experiences and the
worlds of texts, and
share responses


discussing relevant prior knowledge and past
experiences to make meaningful connections to
the people, places, events, issues and ideas in
the text



exploring texts that highlight issues and
Discuss how
authors and
illustrators make
stories exciting,
moving and


examining the author’s description of a
character’s appearance, behaviour and speech
and noting how the character’s development is
evident through his or her dialogue

and
changing relationships and the reactions of other
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with others
(ACELT
1596)

problems in making moral decisions and
discussing these with

others



drawing on literature from Aboriginal, Torres
Strait Islander or Asian cultures, to explore
commonalities of experience and ideas as well
as recognising difference in lifestyle and world
view

absorbing and hold
readers’ interest by
using various
techniques, for
example character
development and
plot tension
(ACELT1605)

characters to him or her



identifying pivotal points in the plot where
characters are faced with choices and
commenting on how the author makes us care
about their decisions and consequences

Develop cr
iteria for
establishing
personal
preferences for
literature
(ACELT1598)



building a conscious understanding of
preference regarding topics and genres of
personal interest (for example humorous short
stories, school and family stories, mysteries,
fantasy and quest, series books)



selecting and discussing favourite texts and
explaining their reasons for assigning grea
ter or
lesser merit to particular texts or types of texts

Make connections
between the ways
different authors
may represent
similar storylines,
ideas and
relationships
(ACELT1602)



commenting on how authors have established
setting and period in different cultures and times
and the relevance of characters, actions and
beliefs to their own time



comparing different a
uthors’ treatment of similar
themes and text patterns, for example
comparing fables and allegories from different
cultures and quest novels by different authors

Discuss how
language is used to
describe the settings
in texts, and explore
how the settings
shape the events
and influence the
mood of the
narrative
(ACELT1599)



identifying and discussing the use of descriptive
adjectives (‘in the middle of a vast, bare plain’)
to establish setting and atmosphere (‘the castle
loomed dark and forbidding’) and to draw
readers into
events that follow



discussing the language used to describe the
traits of characters in stories, their actions and
motivations: ‘Claire was so lonely; she
desperately wanted a pet and she was afraid
she would do anything, just anything, to have
one to care

for’

Understand,
interpret and
experiment with a
range of devices
and deliberate word
play in poetry and
other literary texts,
for example
nonsense words,
spoonerisms,
neologisms and
puns
(ACELT1606)



defining spoonerisms, neologisms and puns and
exploring how they are used by authors to
create a sense of freshness, originality and
playfulness



discussing poetic la
nguage, including unusual
adjectival use and how it engages us
emotionally and brings to life the poet’s subject
matter (for example ‘He grasps the crag with
crooked hands’/wee timorous beastie)

Discuss the nature
and effects of some
language devices
used to enhance
meaning and shape
the reader’s
reaction, including
rhythm and
onomatopoeia in
poetry and prose
(ACELT1600)



identifying the effect of imagery in texts, for
example the use of imagery related to nature in
haiku poems



exploring how rhythm, onomatopoeia and
alliteration give momentum to poetry and

prose
read aloud, and enhance enjoyment


Use metalanguage
to describe the
effects of ideas,
text structures and
language features
of literary texts
(ACELT1604)



examining the author’s description of a
character’s appearance, behaviour and speech
and noting how the character’s development is
evident through his or her dialogue and
changing relationships and the rea
ctions of other
characters to him or her



sharing views using appropriate metalanguage
(for example ‘The use of the adjectives in
describing the character really helps to create
images for the reader’)

Literacy

Elaborations

Literacy

Elaborations

Identify the point of
view in a text and


d
iscussing how a text
presents the point of view
of the main character, and speculating on what
Identify and explain
language features


viewing documentaries and news footage from
different periods, comparing the style of
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33

suggest alternative
points of view
(ACELY1675)

other characters might think or feel



recognising that there is more than one way of
looking at the same event and that stories seen
through the eyes of one character privileges
some
aspects of the story over others



speculating about what other characters might
think or feel and retelling the story from other
perspectives (for example ‘Cinderella’ from the
view of the ‘Ugly Sisters’)


of texts fro
m earlier
times and compare
with the vocabulary,
images, layout and
content of
contemporary texts
(ACELY1686)

presentation, including costumes and
iconography with contemporary texts on similar
topics and tracking changing views on issues,
for example war, race, gender

Identify
the
audience and
purpose of
imaginative,
informative and
persuasive texts
(ACELY1678)



identifying the author’s

point of view on a topic
and key words and images that seem intended
to persuade listeners, viewers or readers to
agree with the view presented

Identify
characteristic
features used in
imaginative,
informative and
persuasive texts to
meet the purpose
of t
he text
(ACELY1690)



describing the language which authors use to
create imaginary worlds; how textual features

such as headings, subheadings, bold type and
graphic organisers are used to order and
present information, and how visual codes are
used, for example those used in advertising to
represent children and families so that viewers
identify with them

Read an increasing
range of different
types of texts by
combining
contextual,
semantic,
grammatical and
phonic knowledge,
using text
processing
strategies, for
example monitoring,
predicting,
confirming,
rereading, reading
on and self
-
correcting
(ACELY1679)



combining different types of knowledge (for
example world knowledge, vocabulary,
grammar, phonics) to make d
ecisions about
unknown words, reading on, reviewing and
summarising meaning



analysing the way illustrations help to construct
meaning and interpreting different types of
illustrations and graphics



reading text types from a student’s culture to
enhance
confidence in building reading
strategies



reading aloud with fluency and intonation



reading a wider range of texts, including chapter
books and informative texts, for pleasure

Read different
types of texts by
combining
contextual ,
semantic,
grammatical an
d
phonic knowledge
using text
processing
strategies for
example monitoring
meaning, cross
checking and
reviewing
(ACELY1691)



reading new and different kinds of texts with the
use of established word identification strategies,
including knowledge of the topic and of text type
together with self monitoring strategies;
including rereading, self questioning and
pausin
g, and including self correction strategies
such confirming and cross
-
checking



reading aloud with fluency and expression



reading a wide range of different types of texts
for pleasure

Use comprehension
strategies to build
literal and inferred
meaning and b
egin
to evaluate texts by
drawing on a


making connections between the text and
students own experience and other texts



making connections between the information in
print and images



making predictions and asking and answering
Use
comprehension
strategies to build
literal and inferred
meanin
g to expand
content knowledge,


making connections between the text and
students’ own experience and other texts



making connections between information in print
and images



building and using prior knowledge and
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33

growing knowledge
of context, text
structures and
language features
(AC
ELY1680)

questions about the text drawing on knowledge
of the topic,
subject
-
specific vocabulary and
experience of texts on the same topic



using text features and search tools to locate
information in written and digital texts efficiently



determining important ideas, events or details in
texts commenting on things learned o
r
questions raised by reading, referring explicitly
to the text for verification



making considered inferences taking into
account topic knowledge or a character’s likely
actions and feelings

integrating and
linking ideas and
analysing and
evaluating texts
(ACELY1692)

vocabulary



finding specific literal information



asking and answering question
s



creating mental images



finding the main idea of a text



inferring meaning from the ways communication
occurs in digital environments including the
interplay between words, images, and sounds



bringing subject and technical vocabulary and
concept knowledge
to new reading tasks,
selecting and using texts for their pertinence to
the task and the accuracy of their information


WRITING


Year 3

Content


Year 4

Content


Language

Elaborations

Language

Elaborations

Understand that
paragraphs are a
key organisational
feature of written
texts
(ACELA1479)



noticing how longer t
exts are organised into
paragraphs, each beginning with a topic
sentence/paragraph opener which predicts how
the paragraph will develop and is then
elaborated in various ways

Understand how
texts are made
cohesive through
the use of linking
devices includi
ng
pronoun reference
and text
connectives
(ACELA1491)



knowing how authors construct texts that are
cohesive an
d coherent through the use of:
pronouns that link back to something previously
mentioned; determiners (for example ‘this’, ‘that’,
‘these’, ‘those’, ‘the’, ‘his’, ‘their’); text
connectives that create links between sentences
(for example ‘however’, ‘there
fore’,
‘nevertheless’, ‘in addition’, ‘by contrast’, ‘in
summary’)



identifying how a topic is described throughout a
text by tracking noun groups and pronouns



describing how texts connectives link sections of
a text providing sequences through time, for
ex
ample ‘firstly’, ‘then’, ‘next’, and ‘finally’

Understand that a
clause is a unit of
meaning usually
containing a subject
and a verb and that
these need to be in
agreement
(ACELA1481)



knowing that a clause is basically a group of
words that contains a verb



knowing that, in terms of m
eaning, a basic
clause represents: what is happening; who or
what is participating, and the surrounding
circumstances

Understand that the
meaning of
sentences can be
enriched through
the use of noun and
verb groups and
prepositional
phrases
(ACELA1493)



creating richer, more specific descriptions
through the use of noun groups (for example in
narrative texts,
'Their very old Siamese cat'; in
reports, 'Its extremely high mountain ranges'

Understand that
verbs represent


identifying different types of verbs and the way
they add meaning to a sentence

Incorporate new
vocabulary from a


building etymological knowledge about word
origins (for example 'thermometer') and building
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different processes
(doing, thinking,
saying, and relating)
and that these
processes are
anchored in time
through tense
(ACELA1482)



exploring action and saying verbs in narra
tive
texts to show how they give information about
what characters do and say



exploring the use of sensing verbs and how
they allow readers to know what characters
think and feel



exploring the use of relating verbs in
constructing definitions and descripti
ons



learning how time is represented through the
tense of a verb and other structural, language
and visual features

range of sources
into students’ own
texts including
vocabulary
encountered in
research
(ACELA1498)

vocabula
ry from research about technical and
subject specific topics

Understand how to
use sound

letter
relationships and
knowledge of
spelling rules,
compound words,
prefixes, suffixes,
morphemes and
less common letter
combinations, for
example ‘tion’
(ACELA1485)



using spelling strategies such as: phonological
knowledge (for example diphthongs and other
ambiguou
s vowel sounds in more complex
words); three
-
letter clusters (for example 'thr',
'shr', 'squ'); visual knowledge (for example more
complex single syllable homophones such as
'break/brake', 'ate/eight'); morphemic knowledge
(for example inflectional endings

in single
syllable words, plural and past tense);
generalisations (for example to make a word
plural when it ends in 's', 'sh', 'ch', or 'z' add 'es')

Understand how to
use strategies for
spelling words,
including spelling
rules, knowledge of
morphemic wo
rd
families, spelling
generalisations,
and letter
combinations
including double
letters
(ACELA1779)



using phon
ological knowledge (for example long
vowel patterns in multi
-
syllabic words);
consonant clusters (for example 'straight',
'throat', 'screen', 'squawk')



using visual knowledge (for example diphthongs
in more complex words and other ambiguous
vowel sounds, a
s in 'oy', 'oi', 'ou', 'ow', 'ould', 'u',
'ough', 'au', 'aw'); silent beginning consonant
patterns (for example 'gn' and 'kn')



applying generalisations, for example doubling
(for example 'running'); 'e'
-
drop (for example
'hoping')

K
now that word
contractions are a
feature of informal
language and that
apostrophes of
contraction are used
to signal missing
letters
(ACELA1480)



recognising both grammatically accurate and
inaccurate usage of the apostrophe in everyday
texts such as signs in the community and
newspaper advertisements

Recognise
homophones and
know how to use
context to identify
cor
rect spelling
(ACELA1780)



using meaning and context when spelling words
(for example when differentiating
between
homophones such as ‘to’, ‘too’, ‘two’





Recognise how
quotation marks are
used in texts to
signal dialogue,
titles and reported
speech
(ACELA1492)



exploring texts to identify the use of quotation
marks



experimenting with the use of quotation marks

in
students’ own writing

Literature

Elaborations

Literature

Elaborations

Create imaginative
texts based on


drawing on literary texts read, viewed and
listened to for inspiration and ideas,
Create literary texts
by developing


collaboratively plan, compose, sequence and
prepare a literary text along a familiar storyline,
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23

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33

characters, settings
and events from
students’ own and
other cultures using
visual features, for
example
perspective,
distance and angle
(ACELT1601)

appropriating
language to create mood and
characterisation



innovating on texts read, viewed and listened to
by changing the point of view, revising an
ending or creating a sequel

storylines,
characters and
settings
(ACELT1794)

using film, sound and

images to convey setting,
characters and points of drama in the plot

Create texts that
adapt language
features and
patterns
encountered in
literary texts, for
example
characterisation,
rhyme, rhythm,
mood, music, sound
effects and dialogue
(ACELT1791)



creating visual and multimodal texts based on
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander or Asian
literature, applyin
g one or more visual elements
to convey the intent of the original text



creating multimodal texts that combine visual
images, sound effects, music and voice overs to
convey settings and events in a fantasy world

Create literary texts
that explore
students’

own
experiences and
imagining
(ACELT1607)



drawing upon literary texts students have
encountered and
experimenting with changing
particular aspects, for example the time or place
of the setting, adding characters or changing
their personalities, or offering an alternative
point of view on key ideas

Literacy

Elaborations

Literacy

Elaborations

Plan, draft and
publish imaginative,
informative and
persuasive texts
demonstrating
increasing control
over text structures
and language
features and
selecting print,and
multimodal elements
appropriate to the
audience and
purpose
(ACELY1682)



using print and digital resources to gather
information about a topic



selecting appropriate text structure for a writing
pur
pose and sequencing content for clarity and
audience impact



using appropriate simple, compound and
complex sentences to express and combine
ideas



using vocabulary, including technical
vocabulary, relevant to the text type and
purpose, and appropriate sente
nce structures to
express and combine idea
s

Plan, draft and
publish imaginative,
informative and
persuasive texts
containing key
information and
supporting details
for a widening
range of audiences,
demonstrating
increasing control
over text structures
and

language
features
(ACELY1694)



using research from print and digital resources
to gather ideas, integrating
information from a
range of sources; selecting text structure and
planning how to group ideas into paragraphs to
sequence content, and choosing vocabulary to
suit topic and communication purpose



using appropriate simple, compound and
complex sentences to e
xpress and combine
ideas



using grammatical features effectively including
different types of verbs, adverbials and noun
groups for lengthier descriptions

Reread and edit
texts for meaning,
appropriate
structure,
grammatical choices
and punctuation


using glossaries, print and digital dictionaries
and spell check to edit spelling, realising that
spell c
heck accuracy depends on understanding
the word function, for example there/their;
rain/reign

Reread and edit for
meaning by adding,
deleting or moving
words or word
groups to improve
content and


revising written texts: editing for grammatical
and spelling accuracy and clarity of the text, to
improve the connection between ideas and the
overa
ll flow of the piece

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(ACELY1683)

structure
(ACELY1695)

Write using joined
letters that are
clearly formed and
consistent in size
(ACELY1684)



practising how to join letters to construct a fluent
handwriting style

Write using clearly
-
formed joined
letters, and develop
increased fluency
and automaticity
(ACELY1696)



using handwriting fluency with speed for a wide
range of tasks

Use software
including word
processing
programs with
growing speed and
efficiency to
construct and edit
texts featuring
visual, p
rint and
audio elements
(ACELY1685)



using features of relevant technologies to plan,
sequence, compose and edi
t multimodal texts

Use a range of
software including
word processing
programs to
construct, edit and
publish written text,
and select, edit and
place visual, print
and audio elements
(ACELY1697)



identifying and selecting appropriate software
programs for constructing text


SPEAKING AND LISTENING


Year 3
Content


Year 4

Content


Language

Elaborations

Language

Elaborations

Understand that
languages have
different written and
visual
communication
systems, different
oral traditions and
different ways of
constructing
meaning
(ACELA1475)



learning that a word or sign can carry different
weight in different cultural contexts, for example
that particular respect is due to some people
and creatures and that stories can be
passed
on to teach us how to live appropriately

Understand that
Standard Australian
English is one of
many social
dialects used in
Australia, and that
while it originated in
England it has been
influenced by many
other languages
(ACELA1487)



identifying words used in Standard Australian
English that are derived from other languages,
including Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander
languages, and determining if the original
meaning is reflected in English usage, for
example kangaroo, tsunami, typhoon, amok,
orang
-
utan



identifying commonly used words derived from
other cultures

Understand that
successful
cooperation with
others depends on
shared use of social
conventions,
including turn
-
taking


identifying roles and collaborative patterns in
students’ own groups and pair work (for
example init
iating a topic, changing a topic
through negotiation, affirming other speakers
and building on their comments, asking relevant
questions, providing useful feedback, prompting
and checking individual and group
Understand that
social interacti
ons
influence the way
people engage with
ideas and respond
to others for
example when


recognising that we can use language differently
with our friends and families, but that Standard
Australian English is typically used in written
school
texts and more formal contexts



recognising that language is adjusted in different
contexts, for example in degree of formality
when moving between group discussions and
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patterns, and forms
of address that vary
according to the
degree of formality
in social situations
(ACELA1476)

understanding)

exploring and
clarifying the ideas
of others,
summarising
students' own
views and reporting
them to a larger
group
(ACELA1488)

presenting a group report



understanding how age, status, expertise and
familiarity infl
uence the ways in which we
interact with people and how these codes and
conventions vary across cultures



recognising the importance of using inclusive
language

Examine how
evaluative language
can be varied to be
more or less forceful
(ACELA1477)



exploring how modal verbs, for example ‘must’,
‘might’,’ or ‘could’ indicate degrees of certainty,
c
ommand or obligation



distinguishing how choice of adverbs, nouns
and verbs present different evaluations of
characters in texts

Understand
differences
between the
language of opinion
and feeling and the
language of factual
reporting or
recording
(ACELA1489)



identifying ways thinking verbs are used to
express opinion, for example ‘I think’, ‘I believe’,
and

ways summary verbs are used to report
findings, for example ‘we concluded’

Learn extended and
technical vocabulary
and ways of
expressing opinion
including modal
verbs and adverbs
(ACELA1484)



exploring examples of language which
demonstrate a range of feelings and positions,
and building a v
ocabulary to express judgments
about characters or events, acknowledging that
language and judgments might differ depending
on the cultural context



Literature

Elaborations

Literature

Elaborations

Discuss texts in
which characters,
events and settings
are portrayed in
different ways, and
speculate on the
authors’ reasons
(ACELT1594)



reading texts in which Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander children/ young people are the
central characters/protagonists and making
links to students’ own lives, noting similarities



exploring the ways that the same story can
be
told in many cultures, identifying variations in
the storyline and in music (for example ‘The
Ramayana’ story which is told to children in
India, Indonesia, Thailand, Cambodia, Burma,
Laos, Tibet and Malaysia)

Discuss literary
experiences with
others, s
haring
responses and
expressing a point
of view
(ACELT1603)



sharing and discussing students’ own and
others’ u
nderstanding of the effects of particular
literary techniques on their appreciation of texts



drawing comparisons between multiple texts and
students’ own experiences. Commenting orally,
in written form and in digital reviews on aspects
such as: 'Do I
recognise this in my own world?';
'How is this text similar to or different from other
texts I’ve read?'; 'How common is it to human
experience in the real world?'; 'What new ideas
does it bring?'; ’How do they fit with what I
believe?'

Literacy

Elaborati
ons

Literacy

Elaborations

Listen to and
contribute to
conversations and


participating in collaborative discussions,
building on and connecting ideas and opinions
expressed by others, and checking students’
Interpret ideas and
info
rmation in
spoken texts and


making notes about a task, asking questions to
clarify or follow up information, and seeking
assistance if required

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discussions to share
information and
ideas and negotiate
in collaborative
situations
(ACELY1676)

own understanding against group views

listen for key points
in order to carry out
tasks and use
information to share
and extend ideas
and information
(ACELY1687)



discussing levels of language


slang,
colloquial (everyday) and formal language


and how their appropriateness changes with the
situation and audience. Presenting ideas and
opinions at levels of formality appropriate to the
context

and audience

Use interaction
skills, including
active listening
behaviours and
communicate in a
clear, coherent
manner using a
variety of everyday
and learned
vocabulary and
appropriate tone,
pace, pitch and
volume
(ACELY1792)



participating in pair, group and class speaking
and listening situations, including informal
conversations, class discussions and
present
ations



listening actively including listening for specific
information, recognising the value of others’
contributions and responding through
comments, recounts and summaries of
information



learning the specific speaking or listening skills
of different
group roles, for example group
leader, note taker and reporter



acquiring new vocabulary in all curriculum areas
through listening, reading, viewing and
discussion and using this vocabulary in specific
ways such as describing people, places, things
and proc
esses



using language appropriately in different
situations such as making a request of a
teacher, explaining a procedure to a classmate,
engaging in a game with friends



experimenting with voice effects in formal
presentations such as tone, volume and pace

Use interaction
skills such as
acknowledging
another’s point of
view and linking
students’ response
to the topic, using
familiar and new
vocabulary and a
range of vocal
effects such as
tone, pace, pitch
and volume to
speak clearly and
coherently
(ACELY1688)



participating in pair, group, class and school
speaking and listening situations, including
informal convers
ations, class discussions and
presentations



developing appropriate speaking and listening
behaviours including acknowledging and
extending others’ contributions, presenting ideas
and opinions clearly and coherently



choosing a variety of appropriate words a
nd
prepositional phrases, including descriptive
words and some technical vocabulary, to
communicate meaning accurately



exploring the effects of changing voice tone,
volume, pitch and pace in formal and informal
contexts

Plan and deliver
short presentations,
providing some key
details in logical
sequence
(ACELY1677)



drawing on re
levant research into a topic to
prepare an oral or multimodal presentation,
using devices such as storyboards to plan the
sequence of ideas and information

Plan, rehearse and
deliver
presentations
incorporating
learned content and
taking into account
the p
articular
purposes and
audiences
(ACELY1689)



reporting on a topic in an organised manner,
providing relevant
facts and descriptive detail to
enhance audience understanding, and
beginning to refer to reliable sources to support
claims


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AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM PRIORITIES

Aboriginal
and Torres
Strait
Islander
histories and
cultures

Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander communities are strong, rich and diverse. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Identity is central to
this priority and is intrinsically linked to living, learning Aboriginal and Torres Strait I slander communities, deep knowle
dge traditions and
holistic world view.

A conceptual framework based on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ unique sense of Identity has been developed as

a
structural tool for the embedding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures within th
e Australian curriculum. This
sense of Identity is approached through the interconnected aspects of Country/Place, People and Culture. Embracing these elem
ents
enhances all areas of the curriculum.

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander priority provide
s opportunities for all learners to deepen their knowledge of Australia by
engaging with the world’s oldest continuous living cultures. This knowledge and understanding will enrich their ability to pa
rticipate
positively in the ongoing development of Austr
alia.

The Australian Curriculum: mathematics values Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures. It provides oppor
tunities for
students to appreciate that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander societies have sophisticated applications of m
athematical concepts.

Students will explore connections between representations of number and pattern and how they relate to aspects of Aboriginal
and
Torres Strait Islander cultures. They will investigate time, place, relationships and measurement concep
ts in Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander contexts. Students will deepen their understanding of the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples thr
ough the
application and evaluation of statistical data.

Asia and
Australia’s
Engagement
with
Asia

The Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia priority provides a regional context for learning in all areas of the curriculu
m. China,
India and other Asian nations are growing rapidly and the power and influence they have in all areas of global endea
vour is extensive.
An understanding of Asia underpins the capacity of Australian students to be active and informed citizens working together to

build
harmonious local, regional and global communities, and build Australia’s social, intellectual and creativ
e capital.

This priority is concerned with Asia literacy for all Australian students. Asia literacy develops knowledge, skills and under
standing about
the histories, geographies, cultures, arts, literatures and languages of the diverse countries of our reg
ion. It fosters social inclusion in the
Australian community. It enables students to communicate and engage with the peoples of Asia so they can effectively live, wo
rk and
learn in the region.

Australia now has extensive engagement with Asia in areas such
as trade, investment, immigration, tourism, education and
humanitarian assistance and this engagement is vital to the prosperity of all Australians.

The Australian Curriculum: mathematics provides opportunities for students to learn about the understanding
s and applications of
mathematics in Asia. In the past, mathematicians from the Asia region have made significant contributions to the development
of the
human understanding of number, algebra and trigonometry.

Mathematicians from Asia continue to contribu
te to the ongoing development of mathematical understanding. In this learning area,
students investigate the concept of chance using Asian games. They explore the way Asian societies apply other mathematical
concepts such as patterns and symmetry in art an
d architecture. Investigations involving data collection and representation can be used
to examine issues pertinent to the Asia region.

Sustainability

Sustainability addresses the ongoing capacity of Earth to maintain all life.

Sustainable patterns of liv
ing meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs.
Actions to improve sustainability are both individual and collective endeavours shared across local and global communities. T
hey
necessitate a ren
ewed and balanced approach to the way humans interact with each other and the environment.

Education for sustainability develops the knowledge, skills and values necessary for people to act in ways that contribute to

more
sustainable patterns of living. It

is futures
-
oriented, focusing on protecting environments and creating a more ecologically and socially
just world through action that recognises the relevance and interdependence of environmental, social, cultural and economic
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33

considerations.

The Australi
an Curriculum: mathematics provides the foundation for the exploration of issues of sustainability. It equips students with t
he
skills of measurement, mathematical modelling, and data collection, representation and analysis. These skills are needed to i
nve
stigate
data, evaluate and communicate findings and to make predictions based on those findings.

Mathematical understandings and skills are necessary to monitor and quantify both the impact of human activity on ecosystems
and
changes to conditions in the b
iosphere. Actions to improve sustainability involve students in processes such as auditing, reading
measures and gauges, and interpreting data on invoices and accounts. Mathematical and statistical analysis enables informed d
ecision
making about present an
d future action.

Learning in mathematics involves the use of knowledge and skills learnt in other areas, particularly in English, science and
history.

The Australian National Numeracy Review Report (2008) identified numeracy as requiring an across
-
the
-
scho
ol commitment, including
mathematical, strategic and contextual aspects. This across
-
the
-
school commitment can be managed by including specific references to
other curriculum areas in the mathematics curriculum, and the identification of key numeracy capac
ities in the descriptions of other
curriculum areas being developed. For example, the following are some of the numeracy perspectives that could be relevant to
English,
science and history.



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ACHIEVEMENT STANDARDS


VICTORIAN ESSENTIAL LEARNING STANDARDS

(
VELS
)

ACHIEVEMENT STANDARDS



VELS Science

Standards
Year
s
3 & 4


Science knowledge and understanding

At Level 3, students classify a range of materials such as solids, liquids and gases according to observable properties, and
demonstrate understanding
that this system of classification of substances is sometimes problematic. Students describe examples of reversible and non
-
reversible changes in
substances.

Students identify the actions of forces in everyday situations. They use the words
push

and
pull

i
n discussing how things can be moved and stopped.
They identify forms of energy and energy transformations in the everyday world. They use appropriate scientific vocabulary to

describe and explain their
observations and investigations.

Students identify an
d describe the structural features of living things, including plants and animals. They identify how these features operate t
ogether to
form systems which support living things to survive in their environments. They distinguish between biotic and abiotic f
actors in their environment and
describe interactions that occur between them. They describe natural physical and biological conditions, and human influences

in the environment,
which affect the survival of living things. They describe the relationship bet
ween day and night and the rotation of the Earth. Students explain how
features of the landscape are altered by processes of weathering and erosion.

Science at work

At Level 3, students plan, design, conduct and report collaboratively on experiments relate
d to their questions about living and non
-
living things and
events. They select and use simple measuring equipment, use a range of appropriate methods to record observations, and commen
t on trends. They
describe the concept of a fair test and identify the
variables associated with an experiment. They develop fair tests to make comparisons and explain
how they have controlled experimental variables.

Students describe safety requirements and procedures associated with experiments. They explain how scientific
knowledge is used, or could be used, to
solve a social issue or problem. They describe aspects of the work of scientists and how this has contributed to science know
ledge.

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VELS English
Standards

Years 3 & 4

Speakin
g and listening Standard Level 3

At
Level 3, students vary their speaking and listening for a small range of contexts, purposes and audiences. They project their

voice adequately for an
audience, use appropriate spoken language features, and modify spoken texts to clarify meaning and informa
tion.

They listen attentively to spoken texts, including factual texts, and identify the topic, retell information accurately, ask
clarifying questions, volunteer
information and justify opinions.

Reading Standard Level 3

At Level 3, students read and res
pond to an increasing range of imaginative and informative texts with some unfamiliar ideas and information, vocabulary
and textual features. They interpret the main ideas and purpose of texts. They make inferences from imaginative text about pl
ot and sett
ing and about
characters’ qualities, motives and actions. They infer meaning from material presented in informative texts. They identify ho
w language is used to
represent information, characters, people, places and events in different ways including identi
fication of some simple symbolic meanings and
stereotypes. They use several strategies to locate, select and record key information from texts.

Writing
Standard Level
3

At Level 3, students write texts containing several logically ordered paragraphs that
express opinions and include ideas and information about familiar
topics. They write narratives which include characters, setting and plot. They order information and sequence events using so
me detail or illustrative
evidence, and they express a point of v
iew providing some information and supporting detail. They combine verbal and visual elements in the texts they
produce. They meet the needs of audiences by including appropriate background information.

They write a variety of simple and compound sentences

and use verb tenses correctly. They use punctuation to support meaning, including exclamation
marks and quotation marks, and accurately use full stops, commas and question marks. They use vocabulary appropriate to conte
xt and spell most one
-

and two
-
sylla
ble words with regular spelling patterns, and frequently used words which have less regular spelling patterns. They use sound

and visual
patterns when attempting to spell unfamiliar words.



VELS Thinking Processes Standards

Year
s
3 & 4

Reasoning, process
ing and inquiry

At Level 3, students collect information from a range of sources to answer their own and others’ questions. They question the

validity of sources when
appropriate. qhey apply thinking strategies to organise information and concepts in a
variety of contextsI including problem solving activities. qhey
provide reasons for their conclusions.

Creativity

At Level 3, students apply creative ideas in practical ways and test the possibilities of ideas they generate. They use open
-
ended questioning

and
integrate available information to explore ideas.

Reflection, evaluation and metacognition

At Level 3, students identify strategies they use to organise their ideas, and use appropriate language to explain their thin
king. They identify and provide
reasons for their point of view, and justify changes in their thinking.

VELS Personal
Learning
Standards

Years 3 & 4

The individual learner

At Level 3, students describe the factors that affect learning and identify strategies that will enhance their
own learning. With support, they identify their
learning strengths and weaknesses and learning habits that improve learning outcomes. They seek teacher feedback to develop t
heir content knowledge
and understanding. They make and justify some decisions abou
t their learning and, with support, set learning improvement goals. They contribute to the
development of protocols that create a positive learning environment in the classroom.

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VELS Interpersonal Learning
Standards

Years 3 & 4

Building social relationships

At Level 3, students demonstrate respect for others and exhibit appropriate behaviour for
maintaining friendships with other people. They support each
other by sharing ideas and materials, offering assistance, giving appropriate feedback and acknowledging individual differenc
es. They work with others to
reduce, avoid and resolve conflict.

Worki
ng in teams

At Level 3, students cooperate with others in teams for agreed purposes, taking roles and following guidelines established wi
thin the task. They describe
and evaluate their own contribution and the team’s progress towards the achievement of agr
eed goals.


AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM ACHIEVEMENT STANDARDS


SCIENCE

AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM SCIENCE
Years
3 & 4



Year
3

Science achievement standard

By the end of Level 3, students use their understanding of the movement of
the Earth, materials and the
behaviour of heat to suggest explanations for
everyday observations They describe features common to living things.
They describe how they can use science investigations to respond to
questions and identify where people use science knowledge in their lives
.

Students use their experiences to pose questions and predict the outcomes
of investigations. They make formal measurements and follow procedures
to collect and present observations in a way that helps to answer the
investigation questions. Students sugge
st possible reasons for their
findings. They describe how safety and fairness were considered in their
investigations. They use diagrams and other representations to
communicate their ideas.

Year
4

Science achievement standard

By the end of Level 4, studen
ts apply the observable properties of
materials to explain how objects and materials can be used. They use
contact and non
-
contact forces to describe interactions between objects.
They discuss how natural and human processes cause changes to the
Earth’s su
rface. They describe relationships that assist the survival of living
things and sequence key stages in the life cycle of a plant or animal. They
identify when science is used to ask questions and make predictions. They
describe situations where science un
derstanding can influence their own
and others’ actions.

Students follow instructions to identify investigable questions about familiar
contexts and predict likely outcomes from investigations. They discuss
ways to conduct investigations and safely use equ
ipment to make and
record observations. They use provided tables and simple column graphs
to organise their data and identify patterns in data. Students suggest
explanations for observations and compare their findings with their
predictions. They suggest r
easons why their methods were fair or not. They
complete simple reports to communicate their methods and findings.



Managing personal learning

At Level 3, students set short
-
term, achievable goa
ls in relation to specific tasks. They complete short tasks by planning and allocating appropriate time
and resources. They undertake some multi
-
step, extended tasks independently. They comment on task progress and achievements. They manage their
feelings
in pursuit of goals and demonstrate a positive attitude towards their learning.

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AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM ACHIEVEMENT STANDARDS



ENGLISH

AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM ENGLISH
Years
3 & 4

Year
3

Reading and viewing achievement

standard

By the end of Level 3, students understand how content can be organised
using different text structures depending on the purpose of the text. They
understand how language features, images and vocabulary choices are
used for different effects. The
y read texts that contain varied sentence
structures, a range of punctuation conventions, and images that provide
additional information. They identify literal and implied meaning connecting
ideas in different parts of a text. They select information, idea
s and events
in texts that relate to their own lives and to other texts.

Year 4

Reading and viewing achievement standard

By the end of Level 4, students understand that texts have different
structures depending on the purpose and audience. They explain how

language features, images and vocabulary are used to engage the interest
of audiences. They describe literal and implied meaning connecting ideas
in different texts. They express preferences for particular texts, and
respond to others’ viewpoints.

Year 3

Writing achievement standard

Their texts include writing and images to express and develop in some
detail experiences, events, information, ideas and characters. They
demonstrate understanding of grammar and choose vocabulary and
punctuation appropriate t
o the purpose and context of their writing. They
use knowledge of sounds and high frequency words to spell words
accurately, checking their work for meaning. They legibly write using
consistently sized joined letters
.

Year 4

Writing achievement standard

St
udents use language features to create coherence and add detail to their
texts. They understand how to express an opinion based on information in
a text. They create texts that show understanding of how images and detail
can be used to extend key ideas. St
udents create structured texts to
explain ideas for different audiences. They demonstrate understanding of
grammar, select vocabulary from a range of resources and use accurate
spelling and punctuation, editing their work to improve meaning.

Year 3

Speaki
ng and listening achievement standard

Students listen to others’ views and respond appropriately. They
understand how language features are used to link and sequence ideas.
They understand how language can be used to express feelings and
opinions on
topics. They create a range of texts for familiar and unfamiliar
audiences. They contribute actively to class and group discussions, asking
questions, providing useful feedback and making presentations.

Year 4

Speaking and Listening

achievement standard

St
udents listen for key points in discussions. They use language features to
create coherence and add detail to their texts. They understand how to
express an opinion based on information in a text. They create texts that
show understanding of how images and

detail can be used to extend key
ideas. Students create structured texts to explain ideas for different
audiences. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and
group discussions, varying language according to context.


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PoLT (Principles of

Learning and Teaching)

PoLT f
ocus
to be
embedded
in this unit.

Students learn best when these Principles of Learning and Teaching are embedded in classroom practice:

The learning environment is supportive and productive.

In learning environments that
reflect this principle the teacher:


1.1 builds positive relationships through knowing and valuing each student

1.2 promotes a culture of value and respect for individuals and their communities

1.3 uses strategies that promote students’ self
-
confidence a
nd willingness to take risks with their learning

1.4 ensures each student experiences success through structured support, the valuing of effort, and recognition of their work
.

The learning environment promotes independence, interdependence and self motiv
ation.

In learning environments that reflect this principle the teacher:


2.1 encourages and supports students to take responsibility for their learning

2.2 uses strategies that build skills of productive collaboration.

Students' needs, backgrounds,
perspectives and interests are reflected in the learning program.

In learning environments that reflect this principle the teacher:


3.1 uses strategies that are flexible and responsive to the values, needs and interests of individual students

3.2 uses a
range of strategies that support the different ways of thinking and learning

3.3 builds on students’ prior experiences, knowledge and skills

3.4 capitalises on students’ experience of a technology rich world.

Students are challenged and supported to dev
elop deep levels of thinking and application.

In learning environments that reflect this principle the teacher:


4.1 plans sequences to promote sustained learning that builds over time and emphasises connections between ideas

4.2 promotes substantive disc
ussion of ideas

4.3 emphasises the quality of learning with high expectations of achievement

4.4 uses strategies that challenge and support students to question and reflect

4.5 uses strategies to develop investigating and problem solving skills

4.6 use
s strategies to foster imagination and creativity.

Assessment practices are an integral part of teaching and learning.

In learning environments that reflect this principle the teacher:


5.1 designs assessment practices that reflect the full range of learn
ing program objectives

5.2 ensures that students receive frequent constructive feedback that supports further learning

5.3 makes assessment criteria explicit

5.4 uses assessment practices that encourage reflection and self assessment

5.5 uses evidence
from assessment to inform planning and teaching.

Learning connects strongly with communities and practice beyond the classroom.

In learning environments that reflect this principle the teacher:


6.1 supports students to engage with contemporary knowledge
and practice

6.2 plans for students to interact with local and broader communities

6.3 uses technologies in ways that reflect professional and community practices.