MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management

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MSc Design Engineering and
Manufacturing Management








School of Engineering and Information Sciences


Programme L
eader:
Dr Dehong Huo


Student Name:




MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
-
11


2


Students with disabilities:

information in
alternative formats


Information in this publication can

be downloaded from the following
website:


http://www.24
-
7.mdx.ac.uk/eis/index.htm#Progr
amme%20Handbooks


If you
have a disability which

makes navigating our website

difficult and you would like to

receive information in an

alternative format, please contact
Eve Sevume Kauma

on 020 8411 4639

or email

E.Sevume
-
Kauma@md
x.ac.uk


Please s
tate your disability and
details of

the specific information
you need.


We can supply sections from this

publication as:




A Word document with
enlarged type


sent by email
or supplied on disc or CD




Printed copy with enlarged
type





As
Braille


Other formats may be possible.
We will do our best to respond

promptly. To help us, please

be as specific as you can and

include details of your disability.











MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
-
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3


CONTENTS


University and Programme Academic Calendar


2010
-
11

................................
............................

4

WELCOME TO THE SCHOOL

................................
................................
................................
.

6

Welcome from the Dean

................................
................................
................................
.................

6

WELCOME
TO YOUR PROGRAMME

................................
................................
.....................

6

Programme Leader’s Welcome

................................
................................
................................
.......

6

Purpose and status of your student handbook

................................
................................
................

8

Bridging Materials

................................
................................
................................
...........................

8

Programme staff list and contact details

................................
................................
.........................

9

Programme Structure Diagram: MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management

.......

17

Module Information

................................
................................
................................
.......................

19

Attendance requirements

................................
................................
................................
..............

19

Assessment schedule

................................
................................
................................
...................

20

Assessment Officer support

................................
................................
................................
..........

21

Pl
acements

................................
................................
................................
................................
...

21

Careers Service

................................
................................
................................
............................

21

LEARNING, TEACHING AND ASSESSMENT

................................
................................
......

22

Learner Development Unit

................................
................................
................................
............

24

Dyslexia Support: 020 8411 6073; email: dystutor@mdx.ac.uk

................................
.................

25

Learning Resources

................................
................................
................................
......................

25

Assessment Feedback

................................
................................
................................
..................

26

Personal Development Planning

................................
................................
................................
...

29

What to expect during your first year

................................
................................
.............................

3
0

Progressing on your programme

................................
................................
................................
...

30

COMMUNICATION

................................
................................
................................
.................

33

Accessing your own records including your timetable and letter requests

................................
....

33

24
-
7

................................
................................
................................
................................
...............

33

Middlesex e
-
mail


your
account for life

................................
................................
........................

34

What is OASISplus?

................................
................................
................................
......................

34

OASISplus (how it is used in relation to the programme)

................................
..............................

35

SUPPORT

................................
................................
................................
...............................

36

Academic Support

................................
................................
................................
.........................

36

Counselling

................................
................................
................................
................................
...

37

International Student Support

................................
................................
................................
.......

38

Disability Support Service

................................
................................
................................
.............

38

Health, Safety and Welfare

................................
................................
................................
...........

38

Mi
ddlesex University Students’ Union


The Student Voice of Middlesex

................................
.....

39

Financial Issues

................................
................................
................................
............................

40

QUALITY OF YOUR PROGRAMME AND EXPERIENCE

................................
.....................

42

Quality assurance and enhancement of your programme

................................
.............................

42

Feedback from you

................................
................................
................................
.......................

42

Campus Forums

................................
................................
................................
............................

43

Student representatives

................................
................................
................................
................

43

Other School committees

................................
................................
................................
..............

44

Programme evaluation forms

................................
................................
................................
........

44

Suggestions and Complaints

................................
................................
................................
........

45

APPENDICES

................................
................................
................................
.........................

46

Appendix A: Accessing University IT systems

................................
................................
.............

47

Appendix B: Programme Specification and Curriculum Map for MSc Design Engineering and
Manufacturing Management

................................
................................
................................
.........

50

Appendix C. Module Narratives

................................
................................
................................
....

59



MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
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University and

Programme Academic Calendar



2010
-
11



October

4


New student induction week commences

11


Teaching starts for autumn term


November

25 (4.30pm)

PDE Board of Study



December

17


Last day of teaching in the autumn term


December/January

18
-
3


University

closed for Christmas vacation

20
-
7


Christmas vacation


January
2011

3


University re
-
opens after Christmas

10


Teaching starts for winter term

21 (4pm)

Winter c
oursework deadline


last coursework deadline to be set no later than
this date


February

22
(4.30pm)

PDE Board of Study



March



April

11
-
25


Easter Vacation

21
-
25


University premises closed during Easter vacation


May

2


Bank holiday


University closed

3
-
24


Spring term examinations

11 (4pm)

Final coursework deadline

-

last coursework deadline to be set no later than
this date


30

Bank holiday


University closed


June

22


Last date for Subject Assessment Boards

27

(
12 noon
)

Publication of module results

29
-
30


Programme Progression Committees


July

7

(5pm)

Publicati
on of progression decisions

18
-
22


G
raduation Ceremonies for
2009
-
10

graduates


August


MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
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5


29


Bank holiday


University closed

30/8
-

9/11

Deferred/rea
s
sessment examinations (all students)


September

5

(4pm)

Final deferred/reassessment coursework deadline
(all students)

20


Last date for Subject Assessment Boards

23

(9am)

Publication of module results

27


Programme Progression
C
ommittee
s

29


Publication of progression decisions

30


School Assessment Boards

(deferred / reassessment students)


October

14


De
adline for dissertation submissions


November

28


Last date for Subject Assessment Boards


December

2
(9am)

Publication of module results

7


School Assessment Board

13

(5pm)

Final qualification results published



Student attendance dates

4 October


17 December
(New students)


11 October


17 December
(Returning students)



1
0

January 20
11



8 April 2011






26

April 20
11



14 October 2011






Learning Framework Term dates

4 October


1
7 December 2010

Autumn term


new stud
ents


(11

week
s)

11 October



1
7 December 2010

Autumn term


continuing students

(10

weeks)

1
0

January


8

April 201
1


Winter term




(13

weeks)

25

April


22
July 20
11


Spring term




(13

weeks)

25

July


7 October 2011


Summer term




(11 weeks)









MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
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WELCOME TO THE

SCHOOL


Welcome from the Dean


Welcome to the University and to the School of
Engineering and Information Sciences.





The School of Engineering and Information Sciences (EIS) formerly known as The School of
Computing Science (CS) is one of the largest
in the UK, having trebled in size since 1994,
with over 4,000 students from a rich diversity of backgrounds, ages and countries. Teaching
is mainly located on the Hendon campus in North London, whilst the Product Design and
Engineering courses are currentl
y located at our Trent Park campus near Enfield. Both
campuses are within 30 minutes by Underground to Central London. The School offers a
range of high quality undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in Business Information
Systems, Computer Communicat
ions, Computing and Multimedia Technology and Product
Design and Engineering.


The dynamic team of academic staff focuses jointly on innovative teaching and learning
techniques and research. Research in the School is conducted in many areas but in
particul
ar in multimedia, networks, graphics, databases, systems analysis and human
computer interaction, with a large number of doctoral and post doctoral researchers.


The School has strong working relationships with all areas of the University, since
engineerin
g and computing underpin many academic disciplines. The School has also been
successful in collaborating with other institutions within the UK and abroad.


Computer equipment is extensive, ranging from specialist equipment, to workstations, PCs
and Macs. E
ach campus has a library providing areas for private and group study.


Engineering and Information Sciences students are encouraged to take responsibility for
their own learning and to develop an ability to argue critique and to think independently.
Group
projects help to provide invaluable experience for the workplace.


After graduation our students usually pursue engineering and computer related careers in the
business, industry and financial sectors with many joining software houses, engineering
firms, d
esign companies, or IT departments in large organisations.


Further details of the School of Engineering and Information Sciences may be found at
http://www.mdx.ac.uk/schools/eis/index.asp




WELCOME TO YOUR PROG
RAMME


Programme Leader’s Welcome


Welcome to Middlesex University!


Congratulations on gaining a place within the Product Design and Engineering (PDE)
programme area at Middlesex University. When your studies begin you will quickly o
bserve
the high levels of commitment and professionalism that the staff and students in our subject

MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
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7


display. I am sure that you will soon feel part of this team yourself and will be confident in
contributing your best efforts to your chosen programme of s
tudy.


If you are committed to your studies then I know that your experience will be both interesting
and enjoyable and that you will be successful in gaining the qualification that you are
seeking.


This programme handbook aims to provide you with useful

information concerning the
structure, organisation and regulations of the programme area and its specialised
programmes and modules. In addition there are on
-
line versions of the University
Regulations (
w
ww.mdx.ac.uk/regulations/
) , and Curriculum details (on MISIS


Programme
and Module Information). Please read this programme handbook in conjunction with these
University
-
wide documents. At appropriate times you will receive handbooks for certain
modules

such as the thesis modules, etc. Every attempt has been made to ensure that these
documents are as accurate as possible at the time of printing. I must stress that while the
basic objectives and structure of the modules and programmes will remain unchange
d,
certain features may need occasional modification. The University reserves the right to
change, discontinue or suspend modules without notice.


Your programme will offer you the opportunity to excel and push the boundaries of your
discipline; however,
you will need to embrace this challenge with diligence and good
studentship.


As Programme Leader, I am responsible for the leadership, development and satisfactory
running of the programme. If you have any problems or wish to discuss any aspect of the
pro
gramme then please contact either me or the Director of Programmes, Andy Bardill.


I look forward to working with you during your time at Middlesex University.


Best wishes and good luck for your studies,





Dehong Huo
, PhD

Programme Leader: MSc Design
Engineering and Manufacturing Management




MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
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8



Purpose and status of your student handbook


This programme handbook contains an overview of your programme and the content of its
modules, and gives key contacts and information you need to progress your studies

and to
get the most out of student life. Read it through and keep it safely so that you may refer to it
throughout your time here at Middlesex.


You should also read the University Regulations
http://ww
w.mdx.ac.uk/regulations

, in
particular ‘University Membership’, and if you have not already done so, explore
http://www.24
-
7.mdx.ac.uk
, the student portal which contains detailed advice and support to
assist you
further.


The material in this handbook is as accurate as possible at the date of production.


Your comments on any improvements to this handbook are welcome
-

please put them in
wri
ting (with name of handbook) to:


Dr Dehong Huo

Programme Leader


MSc Des
ign Engineering and Manufacturing Management

Room W3, Wisteria Building

Trent Park

Bramley Road

London

N14 4YZ

Telephone:

020 8411
5324/5

Fax:


020 8411
5328



We know it takes time to settle in to University life. If you still have questions to ask, your
first port of call should be your Student Office. Staff there will be pleased to help and direct
you.




Bridging Materials


Prior to entry you will have r
eceived access to the ‘My Middlesex/getting started’ and ‘My
Pr
ogramme’ materials on OASISPlus.
The ‘My Middlesex/getting started’ materials will have
given you an insight into studying at Middlesex University, what is expected of you as a
student of Middl
esex and also what to expect from the university. Information on the
services and facilities to support your studies and transition to student life can also be found
here.


The My Programme materials provide an introduction to many aspects of your progr
amme
including; your programme team, the first year modules you will be studying, assessments
methods in year 1 and also hints and tips from previous students studying on that
programme.





MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
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Programme s
taff list and contact details


Programme Leader:


MSc

Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management

Dr Dehong Huo



Base Campus TP


Room W12


ext 532
4/5



email:
d.huo@mdx.ac.uk


Research expertise

on the area of precision engineering, particularly on precision mac
hine design,
precision multi
-
axis motion control, micro/nano
-
manufacturing, and finite element analysis.



Head of Department

Professor Mehmet Karamanoglu


Base Campus TP


Room W3


ext 6132


email:
m.kara
manoglu@mdx.ac.uk



Expertise

in engineering design, manufacturing systems, industrial control and automation,
mechatronics, CAD/CAM, finite/boundary element analysis, process modelling and simulation.

Research interests

include mass customisation, robotics and mechatronics, design education,
manufacturing automation and the use of robotics in the creative industries.



Director of Programmes

Dr Andy Bardill
-

Base Campus TP
-

Room W1
-

ext 5135
-

email:
a.bardill@mdx.ac.uk



Research interests:

Information Spaces for Creative Conversations in Design Education and
Practice, Open Innovation, mass customisation, affective and user centric design, tangible user
interfaces.

Teaching

interests:

interaction design, experience prototyping, product/service/system design.

Other interests:

Director of Red Loop: the
Middlesex Uni
design and innovation Centre



Other PDE Postgraduate Programme Leaders:



MSc Design Engineering

Dr Stephen
Prior

-

Base Campus TP
-

Room W6
-

ext 5275


email:
s.prior@mdx.ac.uk



Research:
Director of Unmanned Systems Lab: directing research team to
develop mechatronic and
robotic systems within the broad areas of Def
ence and Security e.g. Unmanned aerial and ground
vehicles, robotic climbing systems. The developments are presented at events such as
the
MoD
Grand Challenge

2008
,
Digital Futures, Enfield Mayors Award, WorldSkills UK and Eurobot
.



MSc Interaction
Design

Dr Bob Fields



Base Campus Hendon
-

Room R111
-

ext 2272
-

email:
b.fields@mdx.ac.uk



MSc Engineering Management
and

MSc Engineering Project Management

Dr Michael Censlive



Base Campus Hendon


Room TG0
3
-

ext 5215
-

email:
mailto:m.censlive@mdx.ac.uk


Expertise and research interest
: system dynamics , modelling systems, electronics, integrated
circuit and thick film hybrid systems, production engineering,
electron microscopy.

Teaching areas:

Project management, Engineering projects



Other PDE Specialist Tutors


Mike Bradley



Base Campus TP


Room W6


ext 5694


email:
m.d.bradley@mdx.ac.uk




MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
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10


Research interests:
Human Factors and usability relating to older users in transport and digital
technology. Currently, a co
-
investigator for the Digital Economy
-
funded BRIDGE project; started a
PhD in Digital Inclusion.

Background:

Previously head of human factors at Ford.


Programme Leader
-

BA/BSc Product Design, BA Digital Product Design

Wyn Griffiths

-

Base Campus TP


Room W14


ext 6185


email:
w.griffiths@mdx.ac.uk



Research In
terests:

Information Spaces for Creative Conversations in Design Education and
Practice
,
Project Leader of 'Jua Kali
-

Informal Manufacture Sector' Research Project
,
Social Design
and Enterprise, Appropriate Technology,
Open Innovation
.

Teaching Interests:

Product Design, Strategic Design. Creative Design Process, Ideas.
Social/Responsible Design, Open Innovation. Service Design, Systems Design. Design Semiotics,
Product Semantics. Design Management, Design for Manufacture/Assembly/Environment

Other interes
ts:

Associat
e Director of Red Loop, the Middlesex Uni
design and innovation centre


Kate Herd



Base Campus TP


Room W13


ext 6380
-

Email:
k.herd@mdx.ac.uk


Research interests:

mass customisation
,

design probes and other user
-
centric design research
meth
ods, touch points, product
-
user
relationships and the customer corridor

Teaching interests:

creativity and ideas generation, creative design process, prototyping, design
communication skills

Othe
r interests:

Associate Director of Red Loop, the Middlesex Uni

design and innovation centre


Debbie Jedwab

-

Base Campus TP
-

Room W14


ext 4725


email:
d.jedwab@mdx.ac.uk



Expertise

in visual communication us
ing Adobe Creative Suite, hand sketching and layout, 3D design,
ergonomics and aesthetics, Design trends.

Other interests
: Runs a 3D design consultancy which benefits student experience; links with industry
-

both manufacturers and individual designers;
freelance journalist for Xymara.com, an online design
magazine


Sid Odedra

(Research Student Tutor)


Base Campus TP


Room W17


ext 4312
-

email:
s.odedra@mdx.ac.uk



Research interests
: Robotics


Dr Andrew
Tizzard



Base Campus Hendon


Room H133


ext 5193


email:
a.tizzard@mdx.ac.uk



Research Interests:
Geometric modelling, CAD, Finite Element Modelling, Biomedical
engineering, Engineering Design, Electrical I
mpedance Tomography, Bioimpedance.

External Activities:

Chair of the Education and Training Committee and Councillor for the
Institution of Engineering Designers (IED)
,

member of the Engineering Accreditation Board
(EAB)


Dr Aleksandar Zivanovic



Base Campus TP


Room W4


ext 5324


email:
a.zivanovic@mdx.ac.uk


Research Interests:

Mechatronics in healthcare and medicine, human
-
robot interaction

Teaching expertise:

Design and Engineering Practice, De
sign projects, Engineering Innovation



Technical Staff:


Wally Scott (Chief Technician TP)
-

Base Campus TP
-

ext 6558


email:
w.scott@mdx.ac.uk




MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
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Peter Burn
-

Base Campus TP


email:
p.burn@mdx.ac.uk



Cecil Cardozo
-

Base Campus TP


email:
c.cardoza@mdx.ac.uk



Mick Carroll
-

Base Campus TP


email:
m.carroll@mdx.ac.uk



John Sweeny
-

Base Campus TP


email:
j.sweeny@mdx.ac.uk



Dr Philip Tetlow
-

Base Campus TP


email:
p.tetlow@mdx.ac.uk





Administrative staff:


Michelle Rosenberg
-

Ba
se Campus TP


Room W8
-

tel/fax ext 5683

email:
m.rosenberg@mdx.ac.uk



Office hours:

9.15


17.15 Monday to Thursday



9.15


13.45

F
riday



If you wish to meet with a tutor and they are not in their office
, please email them. If you are
unable to make contact, inform Michelle Rosenberg who will pass on a message.





MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
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12


Introduction to the
Department of Product Design and Engineering


Product Design and Engineering
(PDE)
at Middlesex University is
fundamentally concerned
with designing, prototyping and manufacturing innovative products for a wide range of
purposes. These are the common themes and binding features of a subject which spans the
intellectual and practical space between Art and Science.


Product Design and Engineering encompasses the spectrum of activities concerned with
progressing products from concept to market and, as such, provides a rare opportunity to
students, as it enables them to work with a broad range of individual subject spe
cialists who
share this common aim. This innovative approach is typified by the degree programmes and
pathways available within the group, all of which aim to produce individuals who can think
creatively, work independently or as part of a team, who have t
he intellectual and practical
capability to make informed design decisions and who are flexible and positive in their
approaches to design problems.


The programme group offers a wide range of modules to achieve its aims. They maintain a
balance between t
heory and practice, and cutting
-
edge technology and more traditional
skills.


Success in Product Design and Engineering is characterised by the successful marriage of,
and interplay between, design and engineering to bring into being the products and serv
ices
of the future.


The programmes within PDE are designed to enable you to achieve your maximum potential
and attain professional levels of practice in your work.


The subject currently offers two undergraduate and

five

postgraduate programmes. These
are:




BA
(
Honours
)

Product Design



BSc
(
Honours
)

Product Design





MSc Interaction Design



MSc Design Engineering



MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management



MSc Engineering Management
-

new



MSc Engineering Project Mana
gement
-

new


Some of the programmes offered are accredited by the Institute of Engineering Designers
and it is also the intention to accredit this programme by the relevant Professional Bodies. In
the past few years our postgraduate students have won the
IED Best Thesis prize and in
2007 and 2009 also won the UK Group Project prize.


The subject has a rapidly developing research culture and has recently made an entry into
the R
esearch
A
ssessment
E
xercise

2008.

The research activity
in the subject
is coordinated
through
the
Product Design Research Centre (PDRC). PDRC was formed in 2003, and has a
specific focus that develops new knowledge to provide emotionally and psychologically
considered, people
-
focused product solutions where 'product' is inter
preted broadly.
Some of
the developing research work involves industrial robotics and unmanned vehicles, both
ground and air. The Centre has also been chosen by the Ministry of Defence to enter their
national competition Grand Challenge.
PDRC's work also
applies to other disciplines, and it
has formed strong alliances with other university researchers such as the Interaction Design

MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
-
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13


Centre and Biomedical Sciences Group.

The group also manages the University’s EPSRC
Collaborative Training Account that funds
its postgraduate programmes.


The subject is extremely active in engaging industry with the taught provision through
sponsored projects and regular placement opportunities. Over the years these have
developed into strong partnerships and repeat business o
pportunities. These include: Ford
Motor Company Ltd, Jaguar, Axon Motors, Festo, Smiths Medical, Jeld Wen, Dezac to name
a few.


At the undergraduate level, PDE coordinates the UK entry to EU
-
Robot competition and host
the UK heats. Our students have repr
esented UK in the past four years at this Europe
-
wide
mobile robotics competition.


This year, as in the past two years, PDE has also successfully won the UK Skills contract to
organise and host the UK Skills competitions in Mechatronics and Mobile Robotic
s
categories. PDE will be designing and hosting these competitions to select the UK teams to
represent United Kingdom at the 20
11

World Skills Competition
which is being hosted

in
London.


Staff Expertise


The formation of Product Design and Engineering in

2000 brought together a unique set of
academic and technical staff specialising in design engineering, manufacturing, design and
technology and product design. At present there are
8
.6

FTE

academic staff, 6 full
-
time
technical staff,
1

research student t
utor (PhD student with teaching commitments) and a
number of part
-
time staff involved in delivering the programmes. As this group grows, as a
consequence of new provision, further academic staff will be appointed to strengthen existing
expertise and provid
e extra individual specialism where required.


Facilities Available


Product Design and Engineering is a well equipped and resourced unit. Three dedicated
CAD suites with a capacity of 84 high spec workstations are provided. These workstations
are on a 3
-
y
ear rolling leasehold agreement and have recently been renewed. A specialist
CAD/CAM suite has been set up, providing a 4
-
axis CNC mill, a CNC turning machine, a
Coordinate Measuring Machine, two laser cutters and two Rapid Prototyping machines. The
group
also benefits form a 3D laser scanner, a CNC Waterjet cutter and a number of other
specialist equipment

such as a variety of welding equipment.


The subject also benefits from a dedicated Mechatronics facility that is equipped with Festo
electro
-
pneumatic
control equipment, a six
-
station modular production system and a set of
10 National Instruments ELVIS Workstations offering electronic circuit design, simulation and
data acquisition facility.


A

dedicated mat
erials testing and analysis laboratory, a digit
al photography studio, a number
of workshops for working with metal, timber and polymer material provide an essential
resource that complements the above facilities.


PDE facilities have been receiving capital investment on an annual base which averages
a
round £150k. In addition to the investment to support taught provision, there is also
investment in research infrastructure that has provided facilities in a joint e
-
science
laboratory offering GRID computing and an articulated industrial robot with a 3
-
me
tre track.


MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
-
11


14




Introduction to Masters Level Study



Much of the study undertaken at master's level will have been at, or informed by, the
forefront of an academic or professional discipline. Students will have shown originality in the
application of
knowledge, and they will understand how the boundaries of knowledge are
advanced through research. They will be able to deal with complex issues both systematically
and creatively, and they will show originality in tackling and solving problems. They will
have
the qualities needed for employment in circumstances requiring sound judgement, personal
responsibility and initiative, in complex and unpredict
able professional environments.”

(Source: QAA Benchmark Statements
,

2004)


Product Design and Engineering

Postgraduate Programmes


“Shaping the modern world and achieving personal goals


that’s what postgraduate life is all
about at Middlesex.”

(Professor Michael Driscoll, Vice Chancellor
, Middlesex University
)


The modules and study strands within the post
-
graduate programme are designed to enable
you to achieve your maximum potential and attain professional levels of practice in your
career at a senior level. We encourage a reflective and considered approach to the design
process and an explorative review o
f technology.


We encourage individual thinking and discourse at all levels of postgraduate study through
lectures, seminars, tutorials and written work. Project work provides students with an
opportunity to develop their practical design skills, demonstra
te an effective innovation
process and a personal design philosophy. At the end of their programme all students are
expected to undertake a major piece of research and undertake a significant piece of written
work (the Thesis) in which they can explore per
sonal interests and enthusiasms relating to
the subject.


The postgraduate programmes in PDE provide an opportunity for students to engage with a
wide variety of design issues relating to new product development that are of vital importance
to you as a pro
fessional, to industry and commerce. Throughout your time in the
postgraduate programme in PDE you will be encouraged to:




Operate proactively, challenging established thinking, while offering reasoned
alternatives.



Examine the changes occurring in design
and technology and the implications for society
and business.



Identify opportunities for innovation.



Examine the strategies, operations and processes utilised in new product development.



Critically evaluate the processes of research, innovation, design
and development.



Develop your management and leadership skills.



Function as a professional at a senior level in a commercial context.



Formulate a personal design philosophy.


As a programme group PDE recognises the value of industrial relevance and commer
cial
links in the development of your understanding and personal qualities. PDE encourages

MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
-
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15


close collaboration with industry and business to enable you to gain valuable insight into a
relevant professional context that relates to your area of special inter
est and intended future
career path. Students are encouraged to work collaboratively with companies.



MSc Design Engineering

and Manufacturing Management

12 Months

F
ull
-
t
ime

2
years

(minimum)

Part
-
time


The aim of this programme is to produce commercially

focussed design & development
engineers with advanced level of specialism in manufacturing management.


The programme consists of two phases over a 12
-
month period. In phase one the students
will embark on a 24
-
week long study to gain specialist knowledg
e with industrial focus that
will lead to 120 credits at level 4. The second phase of the study involves a thesis which
carries 60 credits completing the postgraduate award to 180 credits. Only passing 180
credits will qualify you for the MSc award.


The o
utline structure of the programme is shown below:


One week Induction


Compulsory for all students


All new students will take part in a week long induction that will serve as introduction to the
programme, department and the University. Induction will
also include a specific health and
safety training for safe use of the facilities in the department.


Phas
e One (September


May)

This phase will involve the following modules:

PDE 4220


Principles of Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management (30 cr
edits)

PDE 4221


Advanced Manufacturing Engineering and Management Practice (60 credits)

PDE 4222


Engineering Project (30 credits)


Following the induction and orientation week, the programme simultaneously starts with
three modules. PDE 4220
-

Principl
es of Design Engineering and Manufacturing
Management is a lecture and seminar based introducing wide ranging portfolio of topics by
subject specialists. Some of the lectures will be given by external specialists and
practitioners. The subject covered will

be further supported by discussions groups lead by
academic staff. The aim is to provide a forum for in
-
depth discussions to take place within the
cohort. The students will be expected to be inspired by the topics and prepare an article in
the form of a c
onference paper that will be presented at an internal postgraduate conference.
This will form the assessment component for the module as well as provide a taster
experience for research and build self
-
confidence.


PDE 4221
-

Advanced Manufacturing Engineer
ing and Management Practice will be dealing
with the practical aspect of the programme. The students will be able to develop high level of
specialism in key technologies available within the department. The content will be focused
to industrial needs and w
ill be supported by industrial partners. It is expected that the mini
projects carried out in the module will be sponsored by industry alongside incremental tasks
to build students’ technological confidence.


The Engineering Project module PDE 4222 will se
rve as an integrator module which will
contextualise the topics covered in the other two modules and lead to a substantial piece of
practical work, at a level expected from a graduate engineer.


MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
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16



Prior to Phase One of the programme being completed, all stud
ents will be required to
register their thesis topics. This will take place in May and the proposals will be vetted by
academic staff for relevance and allocation of supervisors.



Phase Two (June


August)

PDE 4602


Thesis (60 credits)


This is the final

stage of the programme and involves a submission of a thesis. In order to
progress to onto the Thesis module, students will need to have successfully completed their
Phase One of the programme. If any of the modules in Phase One is outstanding then this
w
ill need to be passed before they can be allowed to progress to Phase Two.


A
ll students will complet
e a 15,000 word Thesis (PDE 4602
) to enable in
-
depth study,
discourse and critique in an area that relates to their developed specialty. The students will
submit the Thesis o
n or before the 24 August 2009

deadline, and defend the thesis in a viva
voce oral presentation, aro
und the end of August/beginning of September 2009
.


Part
-
Time Study Mode

Part
-
time study mode is available and would normally take two years to complete.
A part
-
time student will normally take up to 90 credits per academic year.

Students who wish to
study the MSc in PT mode will need to select the following programme structure:


Year 1:

Autumn/Spring Term:

PDE 4220


Principles of Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management (30 credits)

PDE 4221


Advanced Manufacturing Engineering and Management Practice (60 credits)


Year 2:

Autumn/Spring Term:

PDE 4222


Engineering
Project (30 credits)

Summer Term:

PDE 4602


Thesis (60 credits)


Please see programme diagram below.




MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
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17


Programme Structure Diagram
:
MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management


Full
-
Time Mode:

Autumn & Spring Term

























Summer Term:

Principles of
Design
Engineering
and
Manufacturing
Management



PDE4220


30 Credits


Advanced
Manufacturing
Engineering
and
Management
Practice



PDE4221


60 Credits

Engineering
Project







PDE4222


30 Credits

Thesis


PDE 4602


60 Credits


Part
-
Time Mode: YEAR 1

Autumn & Spring Term















Part
-
Time Mode: YEAR 2

Autumn & Spring Term:










Summer Term:

Engineering Project


PDE422
2


3
0 Credits

Principles of
Design
Engineering
and
Manufa
cturing
Management


PDE4220


30 Credits


Advanced
Manufacturing
Engineering
and
Management
Practice


PDE4221


6
0 Credits

Thesis


PDE 4602


60 Credits



MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
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18


Awards and Classification


Awards and classifications are determined according to the University regulation E4.6 and can be
found at
http://www.mdx.ac.uk/regulations/postgraduate/sectione.htm
.


Awards


Successful completion of the programme will result in 180 credits being achieved. This will lead to
the award of MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management. The award
classification
will also be calculated according to the University Regulations and be assigned as Pass, Merit or
Distinction. The classification will be based on the Level 4 modules and the grades achieved in
those.


An award of Postgraduate Diploma will
be awarded to students who complete 120 credits. This
award will not have a classification.


Similarly, exiting the programme with 60 credits will result in an award of Postgraduate Certificate
classification.


C
l
a
ssification


Masters degrees are classifie
d as Pass, Merit and Distinction based on the profile of grades at
level 4 (or above), and the grade of the dissertation. A minimum of 60 graded credit points at level
4 (or above) are required for classification and this must include a dissertation/indepe
ndent projec
t
of 60 level 4 graded credits.


Requirements for Distinction

The 60
-
credit dissertation must be at grade 3 or better, and 50 per cent or more of the remaining
graded credit at level 4 (or above) must be at grade 4 or better, with no more than

20 per cent of
the total graded credit at level 4 (or above) more than one class below (9 or worse).


Where the dissertation/independent project is at grade 3 or better, but more than 50 per cent of the
remaining credit at level 4 (or above) is grade 5 or worse, or more than 20 per cent of the total
graded credit at level 4 (or above) is grade 9 or worse,
then the candidate will be considered as
borderline Distinction and the Assessment Board shall consider whether the classification should
be based on the dissertation alone.


Requirements for Merit

The 60
-
credit dissertation must be at grade 7 or better,

and 50 per cent or more of the remaining
graded credit at level 4 (or above) must be at grade 8 or better, with no more than 25 per cent of
the total graded credit at level 4 (or above) more than one class below (13 or worse).


Where the dissertation/inde
pendent project is at grade 7 or better, but more than 50 per cent of the
remaining credit at level 4 or above is grade 9 or worse, or more than 25 per cent of the total
graded credit at level 4 or above is grade 13 or worse, then the candidate will be con
sidered as
borderline Merit and the Assessment Board shall consider whether the classification should be
based on the dissertation alone.


Association with Professional Body

All programmes
undergraduate programmes and the MSc Design Engineering programme
a
re
accredited by the Institution of Engineering Designers (IED).
The programme team is working

MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
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11


19


towards accrediting this programme as well.
This is external recognition of the quality of the

programmes that we offer.
PDE students
studying on accredited pro
grammes
automatically qualify
for student membership and we recommend that you take up this opportunity. Please visit
http://www.ied.org.uk

for more information.
All g
raduates
of accredited programmes
qualify for
membership of the IED.
It is expected that the programme will be accredited with the description
of “further learning towards Chartered Engineer” in association with the Engineering Council (UK).
This will mean that graduates of this programm
e will be eligible to apply to the Engineering Council
for registration as a Chartered Engineer following the necessary industrial training after graduation.


The IED offers prizes to students for good thesis and project work. PDE students have won the
ind
ividual thesis prize for 2005
-
6, 2006
-
7, 2007
-
8

and
2008
-
9. PDE students also won the group
prize for 2006
-
7 and 2008
-
9.



Module Information



Change to levels of modules and programmes

Middlesex University will change the way it describes the levels of
its modules and programmes.
The university will adopt the widely used Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ)
levels, as defined in the table below. The new level structure will be fully adopted across the
university by September 2011.
Unti
l then you may experience some inconsistency in the
description of module levels.



Description

New Middlesex University
/ FHEQ levels

(from Sep 2011)

Current Middlesex
University levels


Foundation level

3

0

Certificate level

4

1

Intermediate level

5

2

Honours level

6

3

Masters level

7

4

Doctoral level

8

5



Attendance requirements


You should attend all scheduled classes. If you do not do so, you may not be able to demonstrate
that you have achieved the Learning Outcomes for the module, and you are at risk of being graded
“X” in the module. The definition of the X grade is: “Fail



incomplete without good reason: may
not be reassessed.” As a general guide, you need to attend at least 75% of scheduled classes
in

order to be able to demonstrate achievement of all Learning Outcomes. On some modules, there
may be more specific atten
dance requirements.


The X grade is applied if you fail to participate in the learning processes of a module for which you
are registered. It is not a “punishment” for poor attendance but a recognition that you have not
been able to prepare yourself for a
ssessment in the content of the module. It is also given when
you drop a module without formally removing it from your registered programme of study.


If you receive an X grade you may have the opportunity of taking the whole module again with
permission
from the Programme Leader, without grade penalty, though you will have to pay the

MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
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20


module registration fee.
You may only do this at Summer School (if available) or at the end of your
programme.


For further guidance on attendance requirements, refer to the section entitled “Attendance &
Withdrawal” which is also available at
www.
24
-
7.mdx.ac.uk/admin/attend.htm
. The formal
regulations abou
t attendance can be found in Section C2 of the University Regulations and at
www.mdx.ac.uk/regulations/

.


Policy on late arrival



1.

The purpose of this policy is to ensure that we, the lecturers and stud
ents of
the
School of
Engineering and Information Sciences, use the time we spend together as effectively as
possible to
promote

student learning.


2.

It is the policy of the lecturers that all formally scheduled classes (lectures, seminars,
laboratories,
workshops etc.) will start and finish promptly.


3.

Students are asked to be ready to participate in the class no later than 5 minutes after the
timetabled class start time. This means that students will have any notes, papers, pens or
other materials read
y by that time, will be settled and ready to listen or to contribute to the
session. Please be ready, so that there is no disturbance to fellow students at the start of the
session.


4.

Students are asked not to cease participation in the class until the l
ecturer makes it clear that
the session is formally over. Please do not disturb others towards the end of the session by
beginning to clear away notes, by putting on coats, or in any other way.


5.

There may be occasions when, through no fault of students’

own (e.g. failure of public
transport), they are unable to get to a formally scheduled class within 5 minutes of the
timetabled start. Under these circumstances, if the room has a back entrance, then please
use this entrance, and join the class session as

quietly as possible. If the room has no back
entrance then students may either decide to enter the room as quietly as possible, or
-

if
there is normally a break during the teaching session
-

students may choose to wait until the
break and join the class
at that point. It would be considered polite to apologise to the
lecturer for lateness, even if it was not the fault of the student
-

do this during the break or at
the end of the session.


6.

Where a formal class extends beyond one hour, the lecturer may
use his/her discretion, to
allow students a short break at a convenient point in the session. Please listen carefully to
the lecturer

s instructions and return to the classroom in time for the restart time specified by
the lecturer.


7.

There may be occasi
ons when the lecturer, through no fault of their own, is late for a formally
scheduled class
-

in which case students can expect an apology. If any of your lecturers is
persistently late for formal classes, please let the Programme Leader know.


Assessment

schedule




Please refer to the Programme Specification in Appendix B for an overview of the assessment
schedule for your programme and to the Module Handbooks for detailed information about the
assessment s
trategy

for each module.


MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
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21



Assessment O
fficer sup
port


Assessment is an important aspect to your programme but you may find that at times personal
circumstances

can impact on your studies. Should you have circumstances which mean you need
to defer

your assessment you will find valuable guidance on 24
-
7,
but you can also contact
Catherine Riley

(
c.riley@mdx.ac.uk
; 020 8411 2623)
or
Kathryn McAnulty

(
k.mcanulty@mdx.ac.uk
; 020 8411 5766)
, who will guide you through the process.
The full Deferral
Policy is available at
http://www.24
-
7.mdx.ac.uk/assess/defer.htm
.



In addition, your Module Leaders will be more than happy to assist
you with any queries you may
have about assessment of a particular module.




Placements


This programme does not offer a formal placement opportunity, however, this is compensated by
the close working relationships we have with our industrial partners.
Some of our partners include
IBM, Ford, Mo
D, IKEA, Jaguar Land Rover, TATA,
Festo, National Instruments, Siemens, Smiths
Medical etc. The programme will provide ample opportunity for our industrial partners to engage
with the programme through guest lectur
es, visits to partners’ premises and more significantly,
sponsored projects where the industrial partner plays an active role in its coordination and
execution.


To ensure success this programme must lead towards new employment opportunities for students.
As such, it is imperative that this programme has an industrial and commercial relevance, and that
students develop new skills and competencies in a professional setting. These imperatives have
been the principal guiding influence in the design of the prog
ramme. Furthermore, this programme
has been discussed and agreed with the PDE Advisory Board and with a group of industrial
partners.


Employers want people who have developed the ability to be flexible and adaptable, work in
teams, communicate with fellow

employees and customers, take initiatives and responsibility and,
when necessary, take the lead. Many of these qualities can be learned and developed through this
programme.



Careers Service


The Careers Service provides impartial and confidential guida
nce and information to Middlesex
University students and alumni (for up to two years after graduation) to help them in their career
planning and job seeking.


The careers advisers can assist you with planning your academic programme and personal
developme
nt in relation to your career goals from your first year to final year. This includes
exploring career and study options, self awareness and decision making. The advisers can also
help you to
:

find full and part
-
time employment, write CVs, covering letters

and application forms,
prepare for interviews, psychometric tests and assessment centres, identify voluntary and work
experience opportunities and research postgraduate/further study and funding
.


You

have access to careers information, individual guidanc
e appointments,


MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
-
11


22


drop
-
in advice sessions, careers seminars and workshops, employer
presentations, Careers Fairs,

other campus based careers events and alumni links to support students with their career
development. The careers advisers also work with tutor
s to deliver and support careers related
activities

on course programmes, such as

career opportunities for graduates, job study research,
the graduate employment market, developing employability skills, sector specific information, pre
-
placement preparatio
n, job search skills and strategies and post graduate study options.


The main careers library is based at Hendon and careers advisers are available on most
campuses offering a flexible service to support the needs and any specific requirements of all
stud
ents. To check opening times and availability of careers advisers on your campus or to book
an appointment please see the website
http://www.24
-
7.mdx.ac.uk/careers/careers.html
, telephone
020
8411 5523.


The Careers Service’s website as above (or accessible through the 24
-
7 website) offers a wide
range of information and links to other graduate careers websites. The website contains an on
-
line
job vacancy service, JobsPlus, where opportunities

notified by employers for full time, part time,
voluntary work or work experience are posted.
If you are

unable to
visit

on campus there is also a
link to ‘MeG’, an e
-
guidance service, through which you can email your queries to a careers
adviser.


Today
’s job market is full of opportunities but is also rapidly changing and developing to meet the
needs of employers in the 21
st

Century. Gaining work experience and developing the employability
skills that employers look for is an important part of your car
eer planning and development and will
help towards your future career success. In addition to the help and support available from the
Careers Service, you may also want to consider the option of undertaking a work experience
placement as part of your degre
e, a student exchange in another country or undertaking some
voluntary work and gaining accreditation for this through the university. Further advice on
placements is available from the placement staff in your school, or speak to your tutors about this.
I
nformation links to student exchanges and volunteering opportunities can be found on the 24
-
7
student portal at

http://www.24
-
7.mdx.ac.uk
.



LEARNING, TEACHING A
ND ASSESSMENT


Learning, Teaching and Assessment approaches will encourage
your active participation in
learning activities
and to

co
-
operate with other students

both individually and collaboratively
.

We
aim to give you prompt feedback on your learning and opportunities
to reflect upon and learn from
that feedback.

Learning activities may also occur outside the classroom.


Your learning will also be supported by technology.

Increasingly your tutors will be using existing
and emerging learning technologies to engage you
in e
-
learning activities. Your programme will be
facilitated using a variety of media and online tools (OASISplus



see page 34
, podcasts, wikis,
etc) which will allow you flexible access to a diverse range of online resources, quizzes and
learning materi
als as well as collaborative tools with which you can engage and learn with your
peers. Not confined by time and space
,

you will be able to take part in online discussions and
learning activities from wherever you are studying.


O
ur tutors and the Web Help
desk will provide any support you may need whilst learning online.


By engaging with e
-

learning you will also be developing skills which are essential for your learning
and are also highly valued by employers. These include but are not limited to: working

flexibly,

MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
-
11


23


communication, understanding of IT, team working and creating shared understandings based on
quality resources and access to global expertise.


Assessment is an integral part of learning, and you may hear it referred to a
s

formative or
summati
ve
.



F
ormative assessment is primarily developmental in nature, and is designed to give feedback to
learners on their performance and how it can be improved. Formative assessment is a key part of
the learning process, and has been shown to contribute to
enhancement of learning and raising of
standards.


Summative assessment is designed to measure the extent to which a learner has achieved the
intended learning outcomes of a module. The summative component of an assessment task is
designed solely to provi
de a measure of the achievement of a learning outcome by a learner.
Summative assessment should assess achievement of all learning outcomes in a secure, fair and
accurate manner.


Assessment may involve self, peer o
r

group approaches. For example, you may

be asked to self
-
assess your own work, indicating where you feel you have clearly demonstrated your
understanding, and also identifying areas where
you
can see you have room to improve.
Peer
a
ssessment
is a
process where peers individ
u
ally, or as groups,
offer feedback on one another’s
work. Group assessment
may occur if

part of the assessment process requires you to demonstrate
your ability to work as part of a group or team, and possibly receive a group mark.


In each of the modules, there will be a modu
le delivery plan issued in the first week of that module.
The indicative delivery plan will also give the dates for formative and summative assessment. In
certain circumstances, the formative feedback will be provided verbally. It is therefore critical tha
t
you are available for all feedback sessions. In the case of sponsored projects, the feedback is
provided on a weekly basis and often by the industrial partner.


Additional information on learning, teaching and assessment is given in Section 11 of the
Pro
gramme Specification in Appendix B.


All coursework must be submitted by the deadline stated on it. In certain circumstances, late
coursework may be accepted, at the discretion of the Module Leader.


Submission of Coursework


Written assessed coursework must be submitted to the
Trent Park Student Office in the Richard
Jebb building next to the Mansion
.

You
will

obtain a receipt from the Student Office

which will
be dated.

Yo
u should
keep your receipt



it
is for your own prot
ection.

Do not hand written
assessed coursework directly to your tutor.


Written work should normally be handed in
at

the campus
where

the module is being taught; if for
any reason you have to hand it in at another campus please point this out to the Stud
ent Office so
that it can be sent to the correct campus. If, in an emergency, you have to send in written
assessed work by post you must send it by recorded delivery to the
Student Office, Middlesex
University, Bramley Road, London N14 4YZ

and
keep the P
ost Office receipt
. It will be
deemed to have been submitted on the date of the postmar
k.


Coursework may
not

be submitted in electronic form

except

where this is an explicit
requirement of that assessment in the module in question.


When electronic submission is a
requirement, you must always submit via OASISplus and never by email directly to your lecturer.


MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
-
11


24



When a module requires to you to submit more than one piece of coursework, then the weighting
for each assessed component will

depend on the nature of the module content.
It is important
that you are aware of all of the required components of the assessed work for a module.

At
the commencement of a module the module tutor will give you written information about the
coursework com
ponents that will be assessed and the associated assessment weightings for the
module.


Your module tutor will also inform you of the hand
-
in arrangements for the module coursework.
Again
make sure that you are clear about these arrangements
. Many hours g
o into the
completion of your coursework
-

it is priceless!


General guidance for handing in coursework:




Always follow the guidance from your module tutor about where and when to hand in your
work.



Make sure that your work is clearly labelled with your na
me, your student number, the
module name and code and the module tutor.



Always obtain an official receipt for your work from the tutor or student office.



Where possible (e.g. written work) always
keep a spare copy
.



When using computers keep regular
backups. A corrupted or lost disc should not prevent
you from submitting your work for assessment and will not normally be accepted as an
excuse.


Learner Development

Unit


The Learner Development Unit (LDU) is a team of specialists in academic writing and

English
language development, Numeracy and Dyslexia Support.
You will see
staff from the team

at
different times throughout your academic career.


During induction week
the Unit

generate
s

a Learning Development Profile for each new Middlesex
student. This

is designed to give information about your academic English and numeracy skills,
and it will help you identify your strengths and also areas for improvement. And it will help
the Unit

to make sure you get effective and timely support during your studies.


Often
staff from the LDU

will be in your School working alongside your subject lecturers to help you
understand what’s expected of you on your programme.
The staff

are likely to work with you in this
way on the writing process, preparing for presentations
, making the most of feedback, etc..



If necessary,
the LDU

can provide you with an individual programme of support, which could
involve intensive courses, self
-
study materials and close monitoring of your progress.


Help with maths is available from
th
e
Numeracy Support team, in the form of embedded, small
group, online and individual provision.


If you are dyslexic, you can receive specialist help from
the

Dyslexia Support team, who work
closely with the Disability Support Service. You will also find s
upport at the University’s Learning
Resources Centres, which are equipped with assistive technologies and services, and have
disability support representatives.


The LDU

also coordinate
s

the University’s Student Learning Assistants (SLAs), a group of highly
motivated peer
-
mentors, from the 2
nd

and 3
rd

years, who
are here to help 1
st

year students in their

MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
-
11


25


studies. You may see them helping out in tutorials or seminars, or you may see them
offering help
with academic writing. You can read more about SLAs at
www.sla.mdx.ac.uk
.


Contact details

Information on what we do can be found on our 24
-
7 pages at
http://www.24
-
7.mdx.ac.uk/ldu

or by
contacting us on

020 8411 5116 or at
LDU@mdx.ac.uk
.


If you have questions about specific teams within LDU, please contact:


Academic writing and English language
:
020 8411 4609
; e
mail:
english@mdx.ac.uk


Numeracy support: 020 8411 6280; email:
numeracy@mdx.ac.uk


Dyslexia Support:
020 8411 6073; email:
dystutor@mdx.ac.uk




Learning Resources


Learning Resources
(LR)
provides
library and academic computing services to support

student
learning.

Middlesex University has a Learning Resource Centre (library) on each campus.

The
Museum of Design and Domestic

Architecture (MODA) is also part of Learning Resources. D
etails
of all our opening hours, services, facilities and resources
can be found at
http://www.lr.mdx.ac.uk
.


Learning materials and resources

LR provides e
lectronic and print books and journals, DVDs, CDs, etc to support you in your
studies. We also provide materials listed in your module handbooks. You can access these
resources via the LR website and you can also find specialist resources from the Library

Subject
Guides at
http://libguides.mdx.ac.uk
. Many of our resources are web
-
based so you can access
them from wherever you are.


Equipment and facilities

The libraries (Learning Resources Centres) supply the com
puters and other equipment you will
need for study on the programmes at that site. This could
include

video cameras, Mac computers,
and
DVD players
;

printing and copying
facilities; small

study rooms with projectors so you can
practice presentations
;

or space to cut, paste and cover your project report.


Help and support

Learning Resources staff are here to help

and support you throughout your studies providing IT,
and media support, and help with your information/research needs. We provide one
-
to
-
on support
at the Enquiry Desk, group training in library workshops and online help through the Web Helpdesk
(
http://webhelpdesk.mdx.ac.uk
)
and
Ask a Librarian

http://askalibrarian.mdx.ac.uk



You can get specialist subject support from your Liaison Librarian (
http://libguides.mdx.ac.uk
) who
also provides information and research skills workshops relevant to your subject. Librarians work
closely with your lecturers to ensure that the resources and support that you need are available.
C
ontact your librarian if you require individual support or if you would like to suggest a book/DVD
etc for the library etc.




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26


Assessment Feedback


Assessment feedback provides the opportunity for you to engage with feedback on your assessed
work, to reflec
t on it, and to use this feedback as the basis for learning and to improve your work.
Feedback can take many forms, and may be informal, for example, it may be offered and
discusse
d in classroom sessions either
collectively or individually. It may also be
more formal and
delivered for example in written or audio form from peers or academic staff. Understanding your
feedback is very important, to achieve this you are encouraged to discuss feedback wit
h your
peers and academic staff.



All forms of assessmen
t are part of the learning process,

both formative and summative.

Receiving feedback on your work is an essential and important part of
your learning, and all
p
rogrammes will therefore provide regular opportunities to assess
your
work formatively and
provide feedback on it. The nature of the formative assessment and the feedback will vary from
Programme to Programme
.

You will find further information in the University Regulations detailed
under the Code of Assessment Pra
c
tice.

Arrangements for the prov
ision of feedback shall include
the minimum provision detailed in section M of the University Regulations and shall be included in
the relevant Module Handbook.


You

will normally be provided
with feedback
within 15 working days of the published coursewo
rk
component submission date.


For each module,
information about the dates of coursework submission, the nature and form of
feedback to be provided and when feedback will be given is provided with the module information
on the relevant page of OASISPlus.


Feedback on Assessed work will be offered in a variety of forms and all work will be marked
and
moderated in line with the University Regulations Code of Assessment P
ractice:
http
://www.web.mdx.ac.uk/regulations/allprogs/sectionm.htm


Module Leaders complete a review of their module which covers:




Module management and delivery



Student performance and the outcome of assessment



Development of the module


The completed reviews are
published on the OasisPlus web
-
site for each module.


Return of coursework

You

are expected to keep a copy of
your

coursework. As the marked co
py is not normally returned
to you
, retention of a copy is important so that
you

can relate feedback to
your

work. Where work is
returned to a student this should be clearly indicated in Programme handbooks along with
deadlines after which it is disposed of if not collected (normally six months).


Feedback on Coursework

Assessment feedback from most coursework
-
b
ased PDE modules is provided by the general
module assessment proforma (shown at the end of this section). Where modules have a large
number of individual projects, or where particular assessment criteria have been applied, the
module tutor may develop an
expanded assessment form that details the assessment breakdown.


Some PDE modules, principally those which are supported by individual supervision, e.g.
placement, proposition etc., have their own module assessment proforma which are contained

MSc Design Engineering and Manufacturing Management Programme Handbook 2010
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27


within the m
odule documentation that is supplied to the students prior to the commencement of the
module.


Marking, second marking and marking moderation

There is a University
-
wide policy for the anonymous marking of
all
assessed work

wherever
practical
. All work is
assessed according to the University code of assessment practice. Full
information can be gained from the University Regulations (see
www.mdx.ac.uk/regulations

). As a
general principle the following process

applies:


All coursework assignments are moderated internally. The moderated sample of coursework is
available for moderation by the external examiner(s). All projects and theses are double marked.
As a final check, the overall profile of marks for the mo
dule are examined internally and externally
to ensure consistency of standards both within and between programmes, and against national
higher education standards.


General Level 4 work is assessed by the module tutor and given a provisional grade. The tea
m of
tutors responsible for teaching the module will then convene a moderation meeting. The team will
review a representative sample of work (min 10%) and agree how the provisional grades will be
adjusted if necessary. The Director of Programmes will media
te if no satisfactory conclusion can
be reached by the moderation team. If only one tutor has been responsible for teaching a module
then a second tutor, with the appropriate subject expertise, will be co
-
opted to form a moderation
‘team’. A representative

sample of this work is reviewed by an external examiner who will make
recommendations about the grades awarded and the comparability of standards with similar
programmes in other institutions.


Any work that does not achieve a pass grade is automatically
reviewed by a second tutor.


PDE 4602 Thesis Module
: This is marked by two tutors on the basis of a review of the submitted
work. The work is then reviewed by an external examiner who examines a representative sample
of students by viva voce and then mak
es general moderation recommendations. The module
leader then moderates the grades after a review of the work and in light of any moderation
recommendations.


Obtaining Ethical
Approval
and
Permission/
Consent


If you are undertaking a dissertation, work based project, thesis, design project or any work that
entails gathering primary data for your research, you must obtain ethical
approval from your
programme area. You must also obtain

permission/
consent

from th
e organisation/s where your
research will take place, including

the individuals who will be the subjects of the research, for the
duration of your study.

An important part of your research design is the
consideration of ethical
issues

and the steps you wi
ll take to protect the rights of
anyone from whom you obtain
information
.


In the first instance you should seek permission from a Senior Manager
to provide not only
access/permission
, but also the name of an appropriate individual with whom you should li
a
i
se
(often the manager of the unit/department in which you propose to carry out your study).


Details of the process of applying for ethical approval should be obtained from
your Programme
Leader.


The timing for doing this is important because if there
is a query about your proposal
receiving ethical

approval
, the process is likely to take longer.
Y
our
application

may need to be
sent to the School’s Ethical Approval Committee.


You should read the University’s
Code of Practice for Research

for
its studen
ts and staff
:
http://www.mdx.ac.uk/aboutus/Strategy/policy/index.aspx




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28



General Module Assessment Feedback



Student Name:

Module Code:


Marks are awarded for the quality of the design and manufacture of the finished product/outcome referenced
against the design briefs and assignments set.



Assessment Comments: