Building a J2EE Web Application with Eclipse

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28 Οκτ 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 9 μήνες)

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Eclipse is an open source IDE (Integrated Development Environment)
for developing applications in Java, C/C++, HTML, Cobol, Perl, etc.


The official Eclipse web site (eclipse.org) says, “Eclipse is a kind of
universal tool platform
--

an open extensible IDE for anything and
nothing in particular.”

Building a J2EE Web Application with Eclipse




Provides a consistent feature set on most platforms




Supports more than just Java or any single language




Open source and free, yet fully supported




Truly extensible and configurable




Industrial strength

Building a J2EE Web Application with Eclipse


Eclipse:

Web browser


Web server


HTML

request

Scripted page

database

Recall the typical dynamic web application consists of a web browser,
web server, html pages, server pages, and a database

Eclipse can be used to create the HTML pages, Server Pages,
Database Tables, and test it all using a Web Server and a internal
web browser.

Overview of a Typical Web Application

HTML

Web browser


Web server


HTML

request

Scripted page

database

The following components are used:


Apache Jakarta Tomcat servlet engine


Derby


JavaServer Pages Standard Tag Library (JSTL)


WTP (Web Tools Project Plugin)

Eclipse support for creating an Testing Web Applications

HTML

Web browser


Web server


HTML

request

Scripted page

database

The following components will be used:


Apache Jakarta Tomcat servlet engine


Derby


JavaServer Pages Standard Tag Library (JSTL)


WTP

Apache Jakarta Tomcat servlet engine

Derby

JavaServer Pages
Standard Tag
Library (JSTL)

Eclipse support for creating an Testing Web Applications

Internet Explorer,
Firefox, or internal
browser

HTML

Building J2EE Web Applications with Eclipse


When Eclipse is started, it asks you to choose a workspace. The workspace
is the location on the filesystem (folder, directory) where your files will be
stored. Afterwards you are presented with the Welcome screen if this is your
first time using this workspace.

Building J2EE Web Applications with Eclipse


On the welcome screen there is an Overview…

Building J2EE Web Applications with Eclipse


… Tutorials

Building J2EE Web Applications with Eclipse


… Samples

Building J2EE Web Applications with Eclipse


And a section on What’s New.

Building J2EE Web Applications with Eclipse


Eclipse is divided into Perspectives and Views. A Perspective is the set of screens
and functionality for a particular development scenerio (Java, C++).

To build a Web Application, first set the perspective to J2EE by selecting Window
-
>
Open Perspective
-
> Other

Building J2EE Web Applications with Eclipse


Select J2EE.

Building a J2EE Web Application with Eclipse


Next Create a Dynamic Web Project by selecting New
-
> Dynamic Web Project

Building a J2EE Web Application with Eclipse


Type in a name for the Project. In this case it is FirstWebProject and press
Finish.

(May be asked to configure a Server)

Building a J2EE Web Application with Eclipse


A folder will be created for your Project, appearing under Dynamic Web Projects

Web browser


Web server


HTML

request

Scripted page

database

The following components will be used:


Apache Jakarta Tomcat servlet engine


Derby


JavaServer Pages Standard Tag Library (JSTL)


WTP

Apache Jakarta Tomcat servlet engine

Derby

JavaServer Pages
Standard Tag
Library (JSTL)

Eclipse support for creating an Testing Web Applications

Internet Explorer,
Firefox, or internal
browser

DERBY

http://db.apache.org/derby

-

Relational Database implement in Java

-

Open source version of IBM Cloudscape

-

Small footprint

-

Provides an embedded driver

Using the Derby Database for Persistent Data


Adding the Apache Derby Nature to the project makes the class files and tools for
Derby available to the Project.

Using the Derby Database for Persistent Data


Start the Derby Server by right
-
clicking on the Project and selecting Apache
Derby
-
> Start Derby Network Server. Select Ok when the dialog box appears.

Using the Derby Database for Persistent Data


To create a Database, create a script file and execute it. To create the file, right
-
mouse click on the project and choose New
-
> File

Using the Derby Database for Persistent Data


Type in the name of an sql script file.

Using the Derby Database for Persistent Data


Type the SQL for creating the table and inserting data.

Using the Derby Database for Persistent Data


To execute the script, right
-
mouse click on the script file, choose Apache Derby
-
>
Run SQL Script using ‘ij’

Using the Derby Database for Persistent Data


The console shows the results of executing the script file.

There is a Database Explorer for further manipulating the database.

Web browser


Web server


HTML

request

Scripted page

database

The following components will be used:


Apache Jakarta Tomcat servlet engine


Derby


JavaServer Pages Standard Tag Library (JSTL)


WTP

Apache Jakarta Tomcat servlet engine

Derby

JavaServer Pages
Standard Tag
Library (JSTL)

Eclipse support for creating an Testing Web Applications

Internet Explorer,
Firefox, or internal
browser

HTML

UML Class Diagram

<< link >>

<< link >>

main

addaccount

showaccounts

<<submits>>

<<builds>>

UML Class Diagram

addaccount


addaccountToDB


confirmanAdd

accountInfo

Creating HTML Pages / Server Pages

To create a HTML page, right
-
click on the project and select New
-
> HTML

Type a filename and press Finish.

Creating HTML Pages / Server Pages

Type a filename and press Finish.

Creating HTML Pages / Server Pages

Enter HTML for the main menu page.

Creating HTML Pages / Server Pages

Enter HTML for the main menu page.

Creating HTML Pages / Server Pages

To view the page in a web browser, choose right
-
mouse click on the editor and
choose Run As
-
> Run on Server. This will start Tomcat (if it is not started) and
open the file in the browser.

Creating HTML Pages / Server Pages

(May have to choose Server and select Projects to add to the Server)

Creating HTML Pages / Server Pages

The page displays in Eclipse’s internal Web browser.

Creating HTML Pages / Server Pages

To change the web browser Eclipse uses, choose Window
-
> Preferences
-
>
General
-
> Web Browser
-
> Use External browser, and choose the browser you
would like used to display the pages (IE, Firefox, etc).

Creating HTML Pages / Server Pages

Let’s create the addaccount.html

Creating HTML Pages / Server Pages

Creating HTML Pages / Server Pages

Creating HTML Pages / Server Pages

Creating HTML Pages / Server Pages

Here’s what we have so far, viewed with the internal web
browser. Selecting the Add Account hyperlink takes us to
the addaccount.html page.

Creating HTML Pages / Server Pages

Here it is viewed with Internet Explorer.

<<submits>>

<<builds>>

UML Class Diagram

addaccount


addaccountToDB


confirmanAdd

accountInfo

<<submits>>

<<builds>>


addaccountToDB


confirmanAdd

accounts

Web browser


Web server


HTML

request

Scripted page

database

The following components will be used:


Apache Jakarta Tomcat servlet engine


Derby


JavaServer Pages Standard Tag Library (JSTL)


WTP

Apache Jakarta Tomcat servlet engine

Derby

JavaServer Pages
Standard Tag
Library (JSTL)

Eclipse support for creating an Testing Web Applications

Internet Explorer,
Firefox, or internal
browser

HTML

JSTL (JavaServerPages Standard Tag Library)

The JSP Standard Tag Library (JSTL) is a collection of custom tag libraries that
implement general
-
purpose functionality common to Web applications, including
iteration and conditionalization, data management formatting, manipulation of XML,
and database access
.



Core Tag Library


looping, expression evaluation, basic input/output



Formatting/Internationalization Tag Library


parsing data, such as dates.



Database Tag Library


tags that can be used to access SQL databases



XML Tag Library


tags can be used to access XML elements


JSTL (JavaServerPages Standard Tag Library)

<%@ taglib uri="http://java.sun.com/jstl/core" prefix="c" %>


<html>


<head>


<title>Count to 10 Example (using JSTL)</title>


</head>


<body> <c:forEach var="i" begin="1" end="10" step="1">


<c:out value="${i}" />


<br />


</c:forEach>


</body>

</html>


Core Tag Library Example


JSTL (JavaServerPages Standard Tag Library)

<%@taglib uri="http://java.sun.com/jsp/jstl/sql" prefix="sql"%>


<sql:query var="cities">


SELECT CITY_NAME, COUNTRY, AIRPORT FROM APP.CITIES ORDER BY
\



CITY_NAME, COUNTRY

</sql:query>


<c:forEach var="city" items="${cities.rows}">


<c:out value="${city.airport}” />


<c:out value=“${city.city_name}” />


<br/>


</c:forEach>


Database Tag Library


Let’s create the addAccountToDB page. Select New
-
> JSP

Type in a name

Default page

Type JSTL

Here’s what we have when
viewed with the internal
web browser

. . . And with Internet Explorer