Program Proposal - Gordon College

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1


University System of Georgia


New Program Proposal



Institution:
Gordon College





Date:
July 1, 2009


School/Division:
Division of Mathematics and Natural Science


Name of Proposed Program:
Biology


Degree:
Bachelor of Science


Major:
Biology

CIP Code:
26.0101



Program Description and Objectives
:


In Fall
,

2006
,

Gordon College was designated as a state college and charged with developing a
limited set of baccalaureate programs that would serve special work force needs in the region it
serves.

With that purpose in mind we graduated our first cohort of
baccalaureate studen
ts
prepared to be K
-
5

teachers

in May, 2009
,

and
,

in Summer, 2010
,

we will welcome our first
class of BSN students. With this proposal we hope to continue our efforts to help the
State of
Georgia

solve workforce needs by creati
ng a major in biology that includes a track that prepares

secondary teachers. As we argue in
the next section, a biology

major would address the
statewide and regional

needs for additional graduates in STEM (Science, Technology,
Engineering, and

Mathematics) areas and statewide and regional

needs for well prepared
teachers in STEM areas.


Gordon
College is well positioned to offer such a major due to its policy of hiring Ph.D. faculty in
tenure track positions. Hence we will be able to direct the talents of nine Ph.D. biologists to the
creation of the major. We are in the process of upgrading la
boratories and library holdings to
serve a biology baccalaur
eate program. W
e spent a down payment of $160,000 this summer
on laboratory equipment and intend to repeat that step
multiple years. Similarly, we spent
$8
,000 on biology library holdings.


I
n this proposal we note that the rapidly growing South Metro region of Atlanta is

among the
areas we serve
. Since we serve this region along with West Georgia State University, Clayton
State University, a
nd the University of Georgia (through the

Georgia
Agricultural Experimental
Station

in Griffin, Georgia
), we spent Spring 2009 in consultation with these institutions. This
group, known informally as the t
he South Metro Planning Group, developed and endorsed a
plan to provide
educational
services to thi
s r
egion as its population continues its rapid growth
.
This biology major was one

of the first steps in the
five
-
year
plan endorsed by this group.





2



Justification and Need for the Program:


Societal Need:
With this proposal we hope to address two pressing needs of the State of
Georgia, the need for more persons with STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering,
Mathematics) preparation and the need for more teachers in the K
-
12 education system.


The need for S
TEM prepared citizens in
the United State and in
Georgia has

been documented
in many places. At the national level we have many extensive studies and recommendations
indicating that the nation is at risk unless it increases its STEM workforce. Consider t
his
“National Imperative” drawn from
The Science and Engineering Workforce

Realizing America's
Potential
,National Science Board, (Arlington, VA: National Science Foundation, NSB 03
-
69, 2003).


The Federal Government and its agencies must step forward to
ensure the adequacy of the US science
and engineering workforce. All stakeholders must mobilize and initiate efforts that increase the number
of US citizens pursuing science and engineering studies and careers.


A similar sense of urgency was thematic in P
resident Obama’s April 27, 2009 address to the
National Academy of Sciences. Among his points are found this one:


Since we know that the progress and prosperity of future generations will depend on what we do now to
educate the next generation, today I a
m announcing a renewed commitment to education in
mathematics and science.


The thrust of similar studies and reports at the state level is captured
in one of the Challenges
of Strategic Goal 4 of the University System of Georgia:


USG needs to increase
the number of baccalaureate degrees in STEM disciplines to contribute to
international competitiveness of the nation.


Similarly, the need for well
-
prepared teachers in our classrooms, particularly our mathematics

and natural science classrooms,
has been
extensively documented. In the paragraphs that
follow, we combine some of the extensive data that is available through work done

by the P
-
16
office of the University System of Georgia

with reports we have generated in conversation with
local K
-
12 educatio
n partners.


The P
-
16 office of the University System of Georgia has documented carefully a growing crisis in
the availability of science and mathematics teachers in Georgia. Table 1 shows the extent of
the very large unmet need. This proposal only addre
sses the need in Life Sciences.


Table 1

Middle and High School Science and Mathematics Teacher Shortages in the Georgia Public
Schools, Compared to USG Current and Projected Teacher Production

Teaching Field

Estimate of New
Teacher Need by
2010*

USG
Current Teacher
Production (2006)

USG Proposed
Teacher Production
(2013)

3


MS Mathematics

745

276

480

MS Science

605

200

350

HS Mathematics

1,740

135

270

HS Life Sciences

590

54

160

HS Chemistry

415

9

45

HS Earth Science

240

1

20

HS Physics

210

3

15

Totals

4,545

678

1,340

*
Georgia Professional Standards Commission Workforce Report
2006: Estimates determined from current vacancies, increased
number of new teachers needed for the projected 13.4% growth
in
student enrollment, and projected teacher attrition.


No part of the state is more seriously affected by this teacher shortage than the metropolitan
area of Atlanta and the ring

of counties that surround Atlanta. The southern crescent of that
ring is c
omprised of the counties of
Henry, Fayette, Clayton, and Spalding. Over the last 10
years (1997
-
2007) the area comprised of these four counties grew at a
27 percent

rate.
Approximately
50 percent

of the students of Gordon College come from these four cou
nties,
and we can expect teachers prepared at Gordon College
will

return to serve in this rapidly
growing area.



In addition to rapid population growth, there are other indicators that predict teacher
shortages in the Gordon service area in

the near futu
re. In Appendix A is

found
a map

in which
counties with large numbers of teachers over the age of 55 (and hence likely to retire soon) are
indicated in red, yellow, and orange. Note that three of the four counties in the southern
crescent are yellow and
orange counties. Immediately t
o the north of these four counties are a
host of red and orange counties, counties from which 11% of the Gordon student population is
drawn.


We also can expect increased student needs from the counties that immediately surround
Gordon College.
35 percent

of Gordon students in

Fall

2007
came

from Lamar (the home
county of Gordon) or the surrounding counties (Butts, Spalding, Pike, Upson, and Mo
nroe).


The population of these counties grew at a rate of
16

percent from
1997 to 2007
.


If the growth
of Atlanta and Macon continues, we can expect this six county area to
grow as fast as

the
Henry, Fayette, Clayton, Spalding area within the next two de
cades.


Beyond the demographic data and the data showing that
the
need for teachers will increase
due to
upcoming

teacher retirements, we have specific data from school systems in ou
r service
area. (See Appendix B
). Summarizing what is found

in Appendix B
, of the nine school systems
surveyed in late June

of 2008
, six responded and all six indicated that hiring biology teachers
was among their most difficult tasks of the summer as they prepared for Fall 2008.


Student Demand:
In Appendix C

we predict that

by the third year of this program we will have
70 junior
-
senior students majoring in biology at Gordon College, and that in the fourth year of
4


the program we will graduate 22
students

with a major in biology. Some of these students will
be students who are currently at Gordon completing
two
-
year

degrees. In both Fall 2008

and
Fall 2009 approximately 120 Gordon students declared a biology major. In Spring 2008, 14
stu
dents graduated

from Gordon prepared to major in biology in their junior year, and
in Spring
2009 the number was 18
. Many other highly qualified students studied biology for a year at
Gordon College and then left without graduating to pursue degrees in biology at other
institutions.
If there is a four
-
year baccalaureate degree, t
he number of student
s remaining at
Gordon College
will likely be higher than current graduation numbers

and current numbers of
declared majors

indicate. Many students will be students who arrive
d at Gordon majoring in an
allied health field like pre
-
pharmacy or physical therapy [In Fall 2008, there were approximately
200 such students, and in Fall 2009 there were 250 of these students.] Some of these fields
now require a baccalaureate degree bef
ore acceptance into graduate level programs, and, with
a baccalaureate degree available, many of these students will choose to major in biology
because this allows for the required courses needed for these program. Finally, some of these
students will be
students who transfer to the program because of the efficient design of this
new major.


Strong faculty:
Unlike many two year colleges working to add baccalaureate majors, Gordon
College has hired only Ph.D. faculty in tenure track positions. Hence we
have 9 biology faculty
members who have an earne
d doctorate in biology. In addition

these biolog
y majors will be
taught by four

Ph.D. chemists and a Ph.D. in physics as they complete their programs.


Other Programs in State:
In Appendix D

are found the four year programs in biology or
biological sciences in the state of Georgia. We note that biology majors are found at most four
-
year institutions in the University System of Georgia and senior private liberal arts colleges.

However, the ne
ed for STEM professionals in general and biology teachers in specific suggests
that additional programs are needed.


Procedures Used to Develop the P
rogram


The development of the proposed Gordon College major in biology has been in process for
several
years. In June of 2008, the current Dean of the Faculty arrived on campus and found a
draft proposal on his desk that had been crafte
d by a faculty workgroup in
previous year
s
.
During Summer
,

2008
,

the D
ean met with members of the biology faculty and the

division chair
of mathematics and natural science to refine this proposal. In the refinements, care was taken
to create a
major

that would both educate quality biology majors and allow those majors

to

complete

teaching certification under the 129

semeste
r
-
hour cap imposed by the University
System of Georgia. With these goals of both quality and

efficiency

in mind, we compared our
efforts to programs at other institutions that appeared to accomplish both.




In September, 2008, Gordon College submitted a

Letter of Intent to launch a biology major.
During most of the 2008
-
2009 academic year, this Letter was “on hold” as we joined several
sister institutions in conversation about the Letter of Intent. After review by the Academic
Advisory Committee on Bi
ological Sciences and subsequent request for a Formal Proposal, a
5


team of

biology faculty are preparing the documents that will be submitted to the Gordon
College curricular process
in

August, 2009.


Curriculum


Curriculum for BS in Biology (Courses
marked with an asterisk * are new
courses for the Gordon curriculum)

Area D

MATH 2101 Statistics


Area F

BIOL 1107K

BIOL 1108K

CHEM 1211K

CHEM 1212K

Electives 2 semester hours



Track 1: Biology

Track 2: Biology with Teaching
Certification

Biology
Common
Requirements

BIOL 3200K* Genetics (4 sh)

BIOL 3300K Molecular and
Cellular Biology* (4 sh)

BIOL 3500K Ecology* (4 sh)

BIOL 4200 Evolution* (3 sh)

BIOL 4000 Senior Seminar* (2 sh)

Seven additional semester hours
in biology courses numbere
d
3000 and above


(24 semester hours)

BIOL 3200K* Genetics (4 sh)

BIOL 3300K Molecular and
Cellular Biology* (4 sh)

BIOL 3500K Ecology* (4 sh)

BIOL 4200 Evolution* (3 sh)

BIOL 4000 Senior Seminar* (2
sh)

Seven additional semester hours
in biology cou
rses numbered
3000 and above

(24 semester hours)

Additional
Requirements

CHEM 2401K Organic Chemistry
I(4 sh)

PHYS 1111K (or 2211K) (4 sh)

15 additional hours from courses
numbered 3000 and above from
biology and other disciplines








(23 semester
hours)

CHEM 2401 Organic Chemistry I
(4 sh)

PHYS 1111K (or 2211K) (4 sh)

BIOL 4800*

Science Curriculum
and Instruction in

Secondary
Schools (3 sh)

EDUC 2110 (3 sh)

EDUC 2120 (3 sh)

EDUC 2130 (3 sh)

EDUC 4005
*
Secondary
Curriculum, Instruction, and

Assessm
ent (3 sh)

EDUC 3003

Classroom
Management (3 sh)

SPED 3105
* The Exceptional
Learner in the Secondary
Classroom (3 sh)

EDUC 3505
* Internship I (3 sh)

EDUC 4505
* Internship II (12 sh)


(44 semester hours)

Electives

13 semester hours

Note: Biology majors are strongly
urged to complete as many
courses as possible from this list:
CHEM 2402K, MATH 1501, MATH

6


1502, PHYS 1112K


Consistency with National Standards:
Although there is no single set of national or regional
standards that de
fines all majors in the biological sciences, we are able to compare our
program to the

2003 National Research Council r
eport
entitled: "BIO 2010: Transforming
Undergraduate Education for Future Research Biologists." Although the report is written with the

aim of training future research scientists and our major has broader aspirations, nonetheless the
two curricula are remarkable similar:


BIO

2010






Gordon BS in
Biology


Intro Biology I
&
II




Intro Biology I
&
II

Faculty Research Seminar








Genetics





Genetics

EcologylEvolution




Ecology

Biology Electives (15 hrs)



Biology Electives (8

hrs)







Molecular and Cellular

biology (3 hrs)







Evolution

(3 hrs)

Science Elective (6 hrs)



Physics I and II


General Chemistry I




General Chemistry I
&
II
and Organic







Chemistry 1

Math I
&
II





Math I & Math II

Senior Yr Faculty Seminar Senior Seminar

Senior Seminar



In addition, since in one track of this major we will prepare pre
-
service teachers for secondary
classrooms in Georgia, in Appendix
E

we compare our curriculum to the Georgia Performance
Standards in Biology.



Course Descriptions and Prerequisites:
Cours
e descriptions for the new courses are found in
Appendix
F
. In the course descr
iptions, we list the

prerequisite
s

for each course.


Student Outcomes for the major in biology:
In t
he biology major at Gordon College

we

aspire
to educate

biological scientists who know and are able to reference
a wide range of information

and
who also
possess the intellectual skills and habits of the mind to use that knowledge in
diverse problem solving contexts. W
e summarize our goals for the students w
ho complete our
major with these three outcomes.


Outcome 1: Students will acquire and be able to

use

a broad range of knowledge of the
biological sciences
across the major subfields of the biological sciences.



Outcome 2: Students will
learn and demo
nstrate

the laboratory skills and “habits of the
mind” that characterize successful scientific inquiry and analysis.


7


Outcome 3: Students will learn to communicate scientific knowledge in both written
and oral
modalities.


Inventory of Faculty Directly I
n
volved


In this table are found the faculty who will be primarily responsible for delivering this
major

together with their academic credentials. In Appendix H are found the scholarship
and publication records of the biology faculty as well as

records of p
ublic service. Also
in Appendix H are found tables that identify

current course assignments and
assignments after the initiation of the major.

Name

Rank

Academic
Discipline

Institutions
Attended

Degrees Earned

Mark Brinkman

Assoc.
Prof.

Biology

Sioux
City College

South Dakota State

B.S

M.S., PhD

Mustapha Durojaiye

Assoc.
Prof.

Biology

Catholic University of
America

Clark Atlanta Univ.


B.S.

M.S., PhD

Gregory Hartman

Assoc.
Prof.

Biology

Univ. of Cincinnati

Univ. of New Mexico

B.S., M.S.

PhD

Linda

Hyde

Professor

Biology

Univ. Of Delaware

North Carolina State
Univ.

B.A.


PhD

Phillip Jen

Assoc.
Prof.

Biology

Univ. of North
Carolina, Charlotte

The Chinese Univ. of
Hong Kong


BSc


M.S., PhD

Cathy Lee

Asst.
Prof.

Biology

Korea Univ.

Univ. of
Tennessee

Harvard Medical
School

B.S.

M.S., PhD


Post Doc

Lynn Rumfelt

Asst. Prof

Biology

Florida Inter. Univ.

Univ. of Miami

B.S.

PhD

Theresa Stanley

Professor

Biology

Univ. of California

Univ. of Illinois

B.S.

M.S., PhD

Richard Tsou

Assoc.
Prof.

Biology

Tunghai Univ.

Univ. of Tennessee

B.S.

M.S., PhD






Cristina Fermin
-
Ennis

Assoc.
Prof.

Chemistry

Ateno De Manila
Univ.

Wesleyan Univ.


B.S.

PhD

Allan Gahr

Professor

Chemistry

SUNY Oneonta

Clarkson Univ.

B.S.

PhD

Beike Jia

Asst.
Prof.

Chemistry

Beijing Normal Univ.

Rice University


B.S.

M.A., PhD

Andrew Osborne

Assoc.
Prof.

Chemistry

UGA

B.S., PhD

Richard Schmude

Professor

Chemistry

Texas A & M

B.S., M.S, PhD






Chad Davies

Assoc.
Prof.

Physics

Southern Oregon
State College

Univ. of Florida


B.S.

PhD

8



Outstanding programs of this Nature in Other I
nstitutions


Choosing three outstanding national programs in biology appears to be an easy task. We could
list Harvard, M.I.T., and Stanford and feel safe in our choices. However,
the missions of

these
and other nationally prominent
programs are

so different from the mission of the program we
propose that we decided to

use different strategies in making our choices.

Because we desire
to create a biology major in which student engag
ement and student
community is at the heart
of what

we do, we wished our comparator institutions to be institutions that are participating
in Project
Kaleidoscope
, a national community of institutions who seek quality and excellence in
college/university s
cience education. Because we are designing a biology major in which
students have the opportunity to seek secondary teaching certification as undergraduates, we
wished our comparator institutions to have the same opportunity within their programs. Along
the same vein, we desired that the teacher education programs at those institutions be NCATE
accredited. The following institutions boast biology programs and education programs meeting
these criteria.




Vanderbilt University

Charles K. Singleton , Ph.D.


Chair, Professor

Professor an
d Chair of Biological Sciences

Phone Number: 615
-
322
-
2008

Email Address:
Charles K.Singleton@vanderbilt.edu





University of North Carolina, Asheville




Dr. Bets
y Wilson




Chair, Department of Biology




828
-
232
-
5156




Email Address:
bwilson@unca.edu



Mercer University


Dr. Mary Kot


Associate Professor and Chair of Biology


Knoxville

(478) 301
-
2709

Email Address:
kot_mc@mercer.edu


Inventory of Pertinent Library R
esources


GORDON COLLEGE


HIGHTOWER LIBRARY 7
-
6
-
2009

Print Title Counts as of July 2009

Subject

Call Number Range

Title
Count

Volume
Count

Natural History

QH

先㈷8⸵† ††††† ††††


423


428

䉩B汯gy⡇敮敲慬e

先㌰1
-
先Q05⸵


879


984

䉯瑡Wy

克Q
-
Q䬹89


386


435

9


Zoology

QL1
-
QL991

1,016

1,131

Human Anatomy

QM1
-
QM695.99


93


97

Physiology

QP1
-
QP981


588


625

Microbiology

QR1
-
QR502.9


201


225





Totals


3,586

3,922



Electronic Book Counts as of July 2009

Subject

Call Number Range

NetLibrary
Titles

Volume
Count

Natural History

QH
-
QH278.5


86


86

Biology (General)

QH301
-
QH705.5

136

136

Botany

QK1
-
QK989


49


49

Zoology

QL
-
1
-
QL991

106

106

Human Anatomy

QM1
-
QM695.99


2


2

Physiology

QP1
-
QP981

175

175

Microbiology

QR1
-
QR5029


34


34





Totals


588

588


Gordon College Library
-

Biology Related Databases


7
-
1
-
2009


Database Name

Producer

Source

Academic Search Complete

EBSCO

GALILEO

Agricola

EBSCO

GALILEO

Alt Health Watch

EBSCO

GALILEO

ArticleFirst

EBSCO

GALILEO

Consumer Health Complete

EBSCO

GALILEO

Dissertation Abstracts

EBSCO

GALILEO

Environment Complete

EBSCO

GALILEO

Garden, Landscape & Horticulture Index

EBSCO

GALILEO

GreenFile

EBSCO

GALILEO

JSTOR (Life Sciences Collection
-

includes
Biological Sciences Collection)

JSTOR

Gordon College

Medline with Full Text

EBSCO

GALILEO

PapersFirst

OCLC

GALILEO

ProceedingsFirst (conference proceedings)

OCLC

GALILEO

Research Library

ProQuest

Gordon College

Science & Technology Collection

EBSCO

GALILEO

SKS WebSelect (SIRS Knowledge Source)

ProQuest

GALILEO


10


Biology Journals


All Subcategories (1026)


Journal Subject Area

Number of Titles

Anatomy & Physiology

140

Animal Behavior

12

Biochemistry

16

Biology

248

Biophysics

2

Botany

105

Cytology, Cell Biology

27

Ecology

32

Embryology

1

Entomology

27

Environmental
Sciences

1

Evolution

4

Genetics

46

Genomics

6

Immunology

17

Micro and Molecular Biology

73

Morphology

2

Natural History

62

Ornithology

11

Science
-

General

46

Systematics

2

Virology

3

Zoology

143




D
esired Qualifications
o
f the Students who
will be Recruited and A
dmitted


Gordon College serves as an access institution for the University System of Georgia, so our
students come to us with a wide range of abilities. We have students who must attend an
access institution bec
ause of academic def
iciencies,
and we have students who have performed
well throughout high school and come to Gordon College because of proximity and/or the
reputation of our student
-
centered campus. We will recruit from both of these student pools in
this program. We wil
l attract and retain many well
-
prepared students who have enjoyed their
first two years and wish to continue in the same environment. We will also hope to attract
some students who came to Gordon College with deficiencies, overcame those deficiencies,
and

are ready for new challenges.


Because Gordon College has a substantial minority student population (
40% of all students;
75% of
1000 residential students), we will
make intensive efforts
to recruit

minority
students
for this program
. This will not only provide those students with new and important
11


opportunities but will
address a national priority, the goal

to increase the number of minority
college graduates who have credentials in science.


Facilities


The biology program is
housed in the

newest
classroom building
on the Gordon campus, the

Instructional Complex.

In this building are found four laboratories that support the biology
program. A new nursing classr
oom building will be occupied in January 2011

and a laboratory
to
support biology will be included in that building, freeing at least two of the laboratories in
the Instructional Complex to be renovated to support courses for biology majors. In our initial
planning for the program, we identified $500,000 of equipment th
at we need to purchase to
launch the major that is described in this proposal. We are purchasing $170,000 of this
equipment in summer of 2009 and will complete the purch
ases over the next three

years

as
various courses
are taught for the first time. In
Appendix
G

is found a list of the equipment
that either h
as been or will be purchased to support

this major. Four laboratories within that
building serve the program.


Administration


B
iology faculty

members
are

currently

located in the Division of Mathe
matics and Natural
Science. Scheduling and equipment decisions are made by a Coordinator of Biology.

For

the
near future we will continue this organization, but we will provide the Coordinator of Biology
with reassigned time to play a larger role in advi
sing, student recruitment, program planning
,

and program assessment. In the longer term we will either move to a department
al

structure
with a Department of Biology or we will redo our division structure to give more attention to
biology.


Assessment


Three overarching educational outcomes are described in the section on curriculum:


Outcome 1: Students will acquire and be able to use a broad range of knowledge of the
biological sciences including knowledge of cell biology; molecular biology and geneti
cs;
organismal biology; and population biology, evolution, and ecology.


Outcome 2: Students will learn and demonstrate the laboratory skills and “habits of the
mind” that characterize successful scientific inquiry and analysis.


Outcome 3: Students wil
l learn to communicate scientific knowledge in both written
and oral modalities.


We will assess the program’s competence in producing students with these characteristics in at
least
three

ways.
(1)
Each senior will be required to take the ETS Major Fiel
d Test in Biology.
12


We note that
when

ETS reports the result of this test to institutions, the

results include

sub
-
ranges that will facilit
ate

assessment of both Outcome 1 and Outcome 2. (2)
Designated faculty
will have an interview with each graduating s
enior. Part of the interview will be scripted to
address the three learning outcomes.
(3)
Each student will complete a capstone, senior
seminar
,

and several activit
i
es in that seminar will be designed to allow observations that will
either confirm or qu
estion whether the outcomes have been achieved. Activities will include
an
oral
presentation
and
a
written presentation
,


and both will be evaluated with
a rubric.
Each
year,
as the results of the assessment are known, the results will be distributed to
the faculty in
the program and to the

academic dean. Careful records

will be maintained of
changes in the
program and
its
delivery that are made in response to what is learned in the assessment.


Accreditation


There is not a nat
ional

agency that accredits biology programs. All programs at Gordon College
are accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. Our accreditation status
has already been changed to allow

us to offer four year degrees and our first students
gr
aduated with baccalaureate degrees in May, 2009.


Affirmative Action impact


As we mentioned in an earlier section, the students of color at Gordon College constitute 40%
of the student population and a much higher percentage of the residential student
population.
We anticipate that this program will make a positive contribution to the goal of increasing the
number of students of color who have a college degree with a science focus.


Degree inscription



Bachelor of Science


Biology


Fiscal and Enrollme
nt Impact, and Estimated Budget


In Appendix C

are

found enrollment projections and budget estimates for the first three years.
In summary:



T
he costs (in 2009 dollars) in the first three year
s a
re projected to be approximately
$286,000, $237,000, and $283
,000, due largely to new equipment needs. Once labs are
established, the annual steady state costs will be about $180,000

in 2009

dollars.



These costs will be offset by new tuition revenues of $40,000, $100,000, and $140,000
in the first three years. Go
rdon College will redirect the institutional funds necessary to
cover the difference.



The costs for the programming in education that complements the biology major and
allows the student to complete secondary certification are not included in the budget
13


e
stimates

above. These costs are detailed in the second part of Appendix A. These
costs in the first three years are $12,000, $45,000, and $47,000. Gordon College is
committed to redirect funds to cover these costs.



14


Appendix A


This graph was
prepared by Mark Peavey of the P
-
16 office of the University System of Georgia and represents the
number of science teachers over age 55 in each of the counties in the state. Note that three of the four counties in
the southern crescent of Atlanta served b
y Gordon College shaded by either yellow or orange shading indicating a
substantial number of science teachers are over age 55. Observe that immediately north of these counties are
found a host of orange and red counties, counties from which Gordon draws 1
1% of its student body.


2008 Number of Science (6
-
12) Teachers


Over 55 Years of Age







15


Appendix B


This appendix will contain information that Gordon College has gathered from local school
systems. Not all school systems have responded to our repeat
ed inquiries.

School District

2007
-
2008

Student
Enrollment

2008/2009
Projected

Student
Enrollment

2007/2008

Total
Teachers

2007
-
2008

HS
Teachers

2008/2009

HS Teachers
Needed

2008/2009
Biology
Teachers
Needed

BUTTS

3,441

3,583

245

67

10

8

CLAYTON




3,898

865

84



FAYETTE

22,130

17,531

1,857

524

12

4

HENRY

38,828

40,408

3,200

620

70

11

LAMAR

2,500

2,500

169

46

4

5

MONROE

3,872

3,925

300

80

7

8

PIKE

3382

3,720

225

64

5



SPALDING

10,805

11,021

788

175

10

4
-
6

UPSON

4963

4,973

338

88

10

1

TOTALS

89,921

87,661

11,020

2529

212

37


School Districts
With Demand for
Biology Teachers

School Districts’ Comments

BUTTS

Encounters difficulty in hiring Biology teachers before and during the school year.

FAYETTE

Biology teachers are most in demand when
hiring during the school year and this
trend is anticipated to continue into future school years.

HENRY

Throughout the school year, the hardest positions to fill are Biology teachers.

MONROE

The hardest teachers to find at any time of the year are
Biology teachers. The
Department of Corrections is relocating to Forsyth and there is potential for growth in
enrollment and an increase in demand for Biology teachers.

SPALDING

Teachers of Biology need to be able to cover all aspects of science and not
just
specialize in one field. There are very few institutions left in Georgia that offer
teacher certification with a bachelor

s degree. Most have moved to certification with
a master

s degree. This in turn will cause a shortfall in the future in all ar
eas as the
older teachers begin to retire and the newer crop of teachers finds it harder to obtain
certification with a bachelors. As a result, demand for Biology teachers is expected.

UPSON

Anticipates demand for Biology teachers to continue into future

school years.



16


Appendix C


This appendix contains enrollment and budget estimates for the degree:

Bachelor of Science with Major in Biology

I. Enrollment Projections



FY 2011

(Yr. 1)

FY 2012

(Yr 2)

FY 2013

(Yr. 3)



Student Majors







Shifted from other programs







New to institution

20

50

70

Total Majors

20

50

70

We anticipate that in the first year we will have 20 students in the junior level curriculum of the biology major. These wil
l
include both students who have been at Gordon College for their first two years of work and continue and students who
transfer to

Gordon for their last two years of work. We are counting both of these groups of students as new to the institution.
In the second year we will have both junior and senior students in biology classes.

II. Course Sections satisfying requirements



FY 2011

(Yr. 1)

FY 2012

(Yr 2)

FY 2013

(Yr. 3)



Previously Existing Biology

14

14

14

New Biology

5

8

12

In each year we presently teach nine sections of BIOL 1107K and five sections of BIOL 1108K, courses that are specifically
directed at students

majoring in biology and related areas. We also teach many sections of chemistry and physics courses
required in the science major but we have not included them in this statistic. In order to see the sections added, please s
ee
Appendix D in which we ide
ntify the course rotation of upper level biology courses.

III. Credit Hours

In these data, the existing enrollment is the enrollment in BIOL 1107K, BIOL 1108K, CHEM 1211K, CHEM 1212K, PHYS 1111K,
PHYS 1112K, and CHEM 2401K at Gordon in FY 2008. We
estimated the new enrollment by assuming each of the new students
identified in Section A takes four biology courses a year (all courses are four hours each).



FY 2011

(Yr. 1)

FY 2012

(Yr 2)

FY 2013


(Yr. 3)







Existing Enrollments

862

862

862



New

Enrollments

80

200

280

Total Credit hours

3768

4248

4568

IV. Degrees Awarded



FY 2012


(Yr. 2)

FY 2013

(Yr. 3)

FY 2014


(Yr. 4)



Degrees

14

18

22












17


V. Costs

We will use existing faculty members to deliver the biology curriculum for the major and will give the coordinator in biology

reassigned time to nurture the major and manage the associated assessment system. Dollar costs are computed as
portion of a

st
andard


salary for a biology Ph.D at Gordon.



FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013



EFT

Dollars

EFT

Dollars

EFT

Dollars

A. Personnel

existing

0.71

$39,050

.14

$7
,700

.71

$39
,050

Part
-
time













Graduate Assistants













Administrators

0.28

$15,400

0.28

$15,400

0.28

$15,400

Support staff













Fringe Benefits



$16,335



$23,430



$32,835

Total Existing Personnel Assignments

0.99

$70,785

1.42

$101,530

1.43

$142,285



B. Personnel
---

new






1

$55,000


1


$55,000

Part
-
time













Graduate Assistants













Administrators













Support staff













Fringe Benefits







16,600




16,500


Total Personnel Costs



$70,785



$101,530



$142,285

C. Start up Costs



FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013







Library

$500

$1,500

$1,500







Equipment

$160,000

$100,000

$100,000







Software

$0

$1,000

$1,000







D. Physical Facilities



FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013







Major renovation

$30,000

$0

$0























FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013







Total One
Time

$130,000

$101,000

$101,000







E. Operating Costs













Supplies/Expenses

$12,000

$20,000

$25,000







Travel

$500

$1,000

$1,000







Equipment

$10,000

$10,000

$10,000







Library

$1,000

$1,000

$1,000







Software

$1,000

$1,000

$1,000





















Total Recurring Costs

$24,500

$33,000

$38,000
























18


VI. New Revenue Sources



FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013







Reallocation of Existing Funds

$245,905

$137,330

$143,205





















New Student
Workload

XXXXXXX

XXXXXXX









Assumption: Presently each of the new students identified above would pay tuition of $997 per semester. In making our
computations we assume this to be true in Fall 2010 when the program would begin, but we use the $997
figure since all other
computations are in 2008 dollars.

New Tuition

$39,880

$99,700

$139,580







Federal Funds













Other grants













Student Fees













New State Allocation



























Total Revenues

$285,785

$237,030

$282,785





















Total Costs

$285,785

$237,030

$282,785







Total costs include personnel costs, start
-
up costs, and recurring costs.

VII. Budget: Education Courses to support certification track

Important Note: One of the two
tracks in the major in biology will be a track leading to teaching certification at the secondary
level. In addition to the new biology courses that we will add to the curriculum, we will be adding new courses in education.

We
will be adding an additional
faculty member to help us develop our secondary certification program. However, because we are
initially creating only two majors

(biology and mathematics)

that will support a secondary certification track, this new faculty
member will devote only half t
ime to the secondary certification and the other half time supporting our very popular K
-
5
program. Should we, at a later date, add additional secondary majors, we will increase these resources accordingly.

A. Enrollment Projections



FY 2011

(Yr. 1)

FY 2012

(Yr 2)

FY 2013

(Yr. 3)



Student Majors








Shifted from other programs







New to institution

10

22

28

Total Majors

10

22

28


B. Course Sections in Education satisfying requirements



FY 2011

(Yr. 1)

FY 2012


(Yr 2)

FY 2013

(Yr. 3)



New Education

6

8

8

In the first year we would add one section each of EDU 2010, 2020, 2030 to accommodate the new students seeking secondary
certification. In addition we will teach two sections of 3000
-
level courses. We will continue
those sections in the second and
third years but will also add two additional sections, one of which will be student teaching at 12 semester hours of credit.

C. Credit Hours

Existing Enrollments













In first year, each of 10 students will take
5 education courses yielding 50 new enrollments. As students continue into the
second year, they take a three hour course and a 12 student teaching internship.

New Enrollments

50

150

276



Total Credit hours

150

366

432









D. Degrees Awarded

FY

2011

FY 2012

FY 2013



9

11

13

E. Costs



FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013

19




EFT

Dollars

EFT

Dollars

EFT

Dollars

Personnel

existing













Part
-
time













Graduate Assistants













Administrators













Support staff













Fringe Benefits













Total Existing Personnel Assignments

0



0



0

















Personnel
---

new





.5

$27,500

.5

$27,500

Personnel

existing













Part
-
time

.55

$10,500

.44

$8,400

.55

$10,500

Graduate Assistants













Administrators













Support staff













Fringe Benefits



$1,260



$8,708



$8,960

Total Personnel Costs



$11,760



$44,608



$46,960




20


Appendix D


This table identifies other biology programs in the state of Georgia.



Private
Colleges/Universities

Public Colleges/Universities

Agnes Scott College

Albany State University

Berry College

Armstrong Atlantic State University

Brenau University

Augusta State University

Brewton Parker College

Clayton State University

Emmanuel
College

Columbus State University

Emory University

Dalton State College

LaGrange College

Fort Valley State University

Mercer University

Georgia College and State University

Oglethorpe University

Georgia Gwinnet College

Paine College

Georgia Institute
of Technology

Piedmont College

Georgia College and State University

Reinhardt College

Georgia College and State University

Shorter College

Georgia Southern University

Spelman College

Georgia Southwestern State University

Thomas University

Georgia Stat
e University

Wesleyan College

Kennesaw State University


Macon State College


North Georgia College and State University


Savannah State University


Southern Polytechnic State University


University of Georgia


University of West Georgia


Valdosta
State University


21


Appendix E


A Comparison of Georgia Performance Standards in Biology with Proposed Curriculum in
Biology at Gordon College

Characteristics of Science


SCSh1: Students will evaluate the
importance of curiosity, honesty, openness,
and
skepticism in science.

These “habits of the mind” are implicit in
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22


features of the process of scientific inquiry.


these features in BIOL 1107 (Biology 1) and
BIOL 1108 (Biology II) but it will be part of
th
e conversation in all science courses taken
in this major.

SCSh9:

Students will enhance rea
ding in all
curriculum areas.

Reading assignments will be critical for
success in each of the courses in this major.
For those students in the teaching
certification track, strategies for integrating
reading with school science will be part of
the conversation of BIOL 4800

(Scie
nce
Curriculum and Methods for Secondary
Schools)

SB1:

Students will analyze the nature of the
relationships between structures

and
functions in living cells.

This material will be introduced BIOL 1107
(Biology 1) and BIOL 1108 (Biology II), but
will be the focus of the required course BIOL
3300 (Molecular and Cellular Biology)

SB2:

Students will analyze how biological
traits ar
e passed on to successive
generations.

This material will be introduced BIOL 1107
(Biology 1) and BIOL 1108 (Biology II), but
will be the focus of the required course BIOL
3200 (Genetics)

SB3:

Students will derive the relationship
between single
-
celled a
nd multi
-
celled
organisms and the increasing complexity of
systems.

This material will be introduced BIOL 1107
(Biology 1) and BIOL 1108 (Biology II), but
will be the focus of the required course BIOL
3500 (Ecology)

SB4:

Students will assess the
dependence
of all organisms on one another and the flow
of energy and mater within their
ecosystems.

This material will be introduced BIOL 1107
(Biology 1) and BIOL 1108 (Biology II), but
will be the focus of the required course BIOL
3500 (Ecology)

SB5:

Students will evaluate the role of
natural selection in the development of the
theory of evolution.

This material will be introduced BIOL 1107
(Biology 1) and BIOL 1108 (Biology II), but
will be the focus of the required course BIOL
4200 (Evolution)




23


Appendix F


Below is found the initial curriculum with course names:


Major in Biology, Upper Level Curriculum

Course Number

Course Name

Prerequisites/

Corequisite

Hours

BIOL 3300K

Cellular and Molecular
Biology

BIOL 1108K, CHEM
1211

4

Study of cell
structure and function and concepts of molecular biology.

BIOL 3500K

Ecology

BIOL 1108K, CHEM
1211

4

Study of relationships between organisms and physical and biological environments
including study of relationships from perspective of individuals,
populations and
communities.

BIOL 3200K

Genetics

BIOL 1108 (prereq)

CHEM 2401K (coreq)

4

Study of fundamental principles of inheritance considering molecular, cellular,
organismal, and population phenomena.

BIOL 4200

Evolution

BIOL 3200K (coreq)

3

In
-
depth examination of major concepts and principles of the theory of evolution
.

BIOL 4000

Senior Seminar

12 hours upper level
BIOL courses

2

An integrative experience in which students will apply biological theory and knowledge
during the discussion
and presentation of diverse topics. Demonstration of oral and
written competency will be an important component of the course.

Additional biology courses

BIOL 3100

Biochemistry

CHEM 2401

3

Study of fundamental principles of biological macromolecules and important biological
chemical processes such as enzyme kinetics, metabolism and energy exchange.

BIOL 3600K

Plant Biology

BIOL 1108K, CHEM
1211K

4

Study of photosynthetic organisms, including unicellular and multicellular protistans,
bryophytes, seedless vascular plants, and seed plants.

BIOL 3520K

Invertebrate Zoology

BIOL 1108K, CHEM
1211K

4

Study of invertebrate organisms with emphasis on
phylogeny, comparative morphology
and physiology, behavior, and ecology.

BIOL 3550K

Vertebrate Zoology

BIOL 1108K, CHEM
1211K

4

Study of vertebrate organisms with emphasis on phylogeny, comparative morphology
and physiology, behavior, and ecology.

BIOL
3340K

General Microbiology

BIOL 1108K, CHEM
4

24


1211K

Survey of structure, physiology, metabolism, and identification of some of the more
important micro
-
organisms, including viruses.

BIOL 4100

Philosophy and Ethics of
Biology

BIOL 1108K, CHEM
1211K

3

Survey of the major ethical issues relating to biological and medical research and
practice and the philosophical principles being used in addressing these issues.

BIOL 4300K

Comparative Anatomy and
Physiology in Vertebrates

BIOL 1108K, CHEM
1211K

4

Comparative study of vertebrate structure and function and the role of phylogeny in
shaping these characteristics.

BIOL 4450K

Molecular Biology

BIOL 3200K

4

Study of living organisms and their properties resulting from the structure, function, and
interrelationships of their macromolecules.

BIOL 4500K

Biotechnology

BIOL 3200K

4

Survey of methods and techniques in modern cellular and organismal biology.

BIOL 4800

Science Curriculum and
Instruction in Secondary
Schools

3000
-
level biology
course

3

Planning, teaching, evaluation, and organization applied to the teaching of science at
the secondary level including laboratory experiences and analysis of trends. Course
integrates knowledge of science with skills in teaching Fieldwork component
required.

BIOL 4900

Special Topics in Biology

BIOL 3200K and three
other upper level BIOL
courses

3

Special topics in biology not included in curriculum described in the catalog.

BIOL 4905K

Undergraduate Research in
Biology

TBA

2
-
4

Independent research

under the supervision of a faculty mentor. Includes literature
review, laboratory project and presentation of results.

Education Courses for Certification Track

EDUC 3003

Classroom Management

Acceptance into the
Secondary Education
Program

3

Survey of
standards and skills for organizing and managing classrooms and behavior for
students of diverse developmental levels, abilities, ethnicities, culture, language, and
exceptionalities. Field Experience Required.

EDUC 3503

Internship I (Secondary)

Acceptan
ce into
Secondary Education
Program

3

Directed practicum in the teaching of students in a school environment appropriate for
secondary certification.

EDUC 4005

Secondary Curriculum,
Acceptance into
3

25


Instruction, and
Assessment

Secondary Education
Program

General planning, teaching, and evaluating strategies for the secondary classroom
including the use of educational technology. Fieldwork component required.

SPED 3105

The Exceptional Learner in
the Secondary Classroom

Acceptance into
Secondary
Education
Program

3

Survey of methods and strategies for teaching exceptional students in the secondary
classroom. Topics include social skill development and behavior management and
relevant federal and state legislation. Fieldwork component required.

EDUC 4505

Internship II (Secondary)

EDUC 3503

12

Supervised full
-
time student teaching experiences in a secondary setting.




26


Appendix G


These purchases were made in June, 2009 to support laboratories in the biology major. We
anticipate spending an
additional $300,000 over the next three years to complete
equipping laboratories for majors.


Equipment Purchased FY 2009


Axioscope 40 FL Microscopes and Accessories





$23,000

Carl Zeiss Microscopes








$87,500

Electroporator and Accessories







$

2,000

Spectrophotometers: Scan UV
-
VIS and Accessories





$23,500

Pipette Series 2100

2 to 20 µL







$ 4,700




20 to 200 µL







$ 4,700




100 to 1000 µL






$ 4,700

Incubators and Accessories








$ 8,500

Mini Horizontal Systems








$ 2,400

Mini Vert Systems









$ 5,800

Centrifuges










$ 9,000

Microplate Universal Readers

and Accessories





$10,200

Generalized Dicot Flower Models







$ 2,000

pH Meter Kits

and Accessories







$ 3,000











Total $191,000


Appendix H

In

the following four tables we record information about the biology faculty.



Table 1: Scholarship and Publication Record



Table 2: Professional Service



Table 3: Current course assignments



Table 4: Course assignments after implementation of major



Name

Scholarship and Publication Record

Mark Brinkman

2008


Gardner, W.A., Diffie, R.K., and
M.A. Brinkman
.
Distribution of the fire
ant (Hymenoptera
-
Formicidae) hybrid in Georgia.

Journal of Entomological
Science 43(1): 133
-
137

2006


Brinkman,M.A.

Argentine ant (Hymenoptera
-
Formicidae) workers attack
on post
-
nuptial red imported fire ant (hymenoptera


Formicidae) queens in
Central Georgia.

Journal of Entomological Science 41(4):
394
-
396.

2005


Ipser, R.M.,
M.A. Brinkman

and W.A. Gardener. First report of
Brachvmvrmex obscurior

Forel (Hymenoptera

Formicidae) queens in Central
Georgia. Journal of Entomological Science 40(2): 250
-
251

2004


Brinkman, M.A.
, W.A. Gardner, and R. M. Ip
ser.
Fire ant (Hymenoptera


Formicidae) activity in simulated electric utility boxes treated with NaHCO
3
.

Journal of Entomological Science 39(4): 679
-
680.

Mustapha
Durojaiye

2001


Present:
Durojaiye, M.A.

and Fulford, K.
Experiments in General Biology
.

Editions 1
-
4, Pearson Custom Publishing.

2009


Microbiology Manual


submitted for publication to Pearsons, Inc..

Gregory
Hartman

2009


Manuscript reviewer for
The American Midland Naturalist
.

2007


Guest Editor for
The Northeastern Naturalist
.

Table 1:
Biology Faculty

27


2005


Manuscript reviewer for
The Southeastern Naturalist
.

2004
-

Manuscript reviewer for
The American Midland Naturalist
.

2003


Hartman, G.D.,

and T.L. Yates. Moles
-
Talpidae. Pp. 30
-
55 In:
Feldhammer, G.A., B. Thompson and J. Chapman(eds.).
Wild Mammals

of North
America

Biology, Economics, Management.
John Hopkins University Press.

Linda Hyde

2008


Laboratory Manual for BIOL 1108, Principles of Biology II
, in
-
house pub.

2006
-

Laboratory Manual for BIOL 1107, Principles of Biology I
, in
-
house pub.

2006


Manuscript reviewer,
Biology
, 8
th

edition, Campbell & Reece, Pearson
Pub.

Phillip Jen

2006


Laboratory Manual for BIOL 1111, Introductory Biology I
, in
-
house pub.

2007


Laboratory Manual for BIOL 1112, Introductory Biology II
, in
-
house pub.

2006


Lab Manual for BIOL 2210, Anatomy & Physiology I
, in
-
house pub.

2007


Lab Manual for BIOL 2210, Anatomy & Physiology II
, in
-
house pub.

Cathy Lee

2005


Presentation: Stuart, M., Himangshu, S. and
Lee, C.

“Looking at new ways
of assessing student learning by use of online/CD
-
ROM test bank questions and
concept maps in an undergraduate biology class.” Southeastern Scholarship
Conference.

2005


Presentation:
Lee, C.,
and Dumas, N. “Use of Web Resources fo
r Biology
Lab Group Project for Undergraduate Students.”

2004
-

Presentation:
Lee, C.,
Liangyang, J
.,
Houghton, J., and Weber. “Crystal
structure study of PcaR: Multigene activator and repressor of own promoter.
Georgia State University.

Lynn Rumfelt

2006



Hsu, E., Pulham, N.,
Rumfelt, L.L.,

Flajnik, M.F.
The plasticity of
immunoglobulin gene systems in evolution.

Immunol. Rev, 210:8
-
26.

2006
-

Rumfelt, L.L.,
Zhou Y., Rowley B., Shinton S., Hardy R.R.
Lineage
specification and plasticity in CD19
-
negative
early B
-
cell precursors.

J Exp Med.
203(3): 675
-
87.

Porritt H.E., Flajnik, M. F.,
Rumfelt, L.L.,

Wourns, J.P.
Immunoglobulins in the
eggs of the nurse shark,
Ginglymostoma cirratum. Dev. Comp. Immunol. 29(5):
417
-
30.

Theresa Stanley

1998


Present;
Mentor for over 15 students conducting special projects as part
of BIOL 2295


Special Topics in Biology. Projects have ranged from determining
fecal bacteria in local water supplies to microbial dentistry, reconstructive
surgery, pharmaceutical drug abuse
, and equine ailments.

2001


Present: member of Georgia BOR Biology Academic Advising Committee.

2000


Stanley, T.L.,

Ellermeier, C.D., Slauch, J.M.
Tissue
-
specific gene
expression identifies a gene in the lysogenic phage Gifsy
-
1 that affects
Salmonella

enteric serovar typhimurium survival in Peyer’s patches.

J Bacteriol.
Aug:182(16) 4406
-
13.

Richard Tsou

2008


Developed and delivered 1st online course at Gordon College for
Anatomy & Physiology I.

2006


Developed and delivered the 1
st

online course at

Gordon College for
Introductory Biology I





Table 2: Biology Faculty

Name

Professional Activity

Mark Brinkman

2004


Present: manuscript reviewer for of Journal of Entomological Science.

2007


Manuscript reviewer for Journal of Pest Science.

2004


Present: Georgia Academy of Science member.

2004


Committee Chairman, U.E. Brady Award Student Poster Competition,
Georgia Academy of Science.

Mustapha
Durojaiye

2008


Grand Awards Judges Chair at the Intel International Science and
Engineering Fair.

-

Member of National Association of Biology Teachers, Southeastern Society of
Electron Microscopists and of the American Association of Microbiologists.

2000


Present: Mentor for Lucent technology’s Math and Science grant.

1999


Present: Project Director
of Health Careers opportunity Program funded
by Health and Human resources.

1996
-

Present: Co
-
Project investigator Elementary Science Education
Partnership
-
NSF Grant

28


-
1985
-
2003 Judge at Atlanta Science Fair and Georgia Science/Engineering Fair

Gregory
Ha
rtman

2004
-

Present: American Society of Mammalogists, Grants
-
in
-
Aid Committee.

1998
-
2006


Coordinator for Southwestern Louisiana, National Marine Fisheries
Service Sea Turtle Stranding and Salvage Network.

2005


Student Paper Evaluator, American Societ
y of Mammalogists Annual
Meeting, Southwest Missouri State University.

Linda Hyde

2009


Southeastern Regional Conference of the Human Anatomy and
Physiology Society

2008


Strategies for Success Workshop sponsored by Pearson Science

2007


Teaching Anato
my and Physiology Lab Online sponsored by John Wiley

2002


Georgia P
-
16 Network Mtg., Teaching and Learning Science & Math

Phillip Jen

2006
-

09


Teaching matters Conference, Gordon College

Cathy Lee

2001
-

Present: Member of National Association of
Biology Teachers.

2008/09


Teaching Matters Conference, Gordon College.

2008/09


Participant in SOTAB (State
-
of
-
the
-
Art in Biology) symposium.

Lynn Rumfelt

2009


Georgia STEM Institute Conference at UGA.

2004


2007: Annual seminars for Molecular and
Cellular Biology Department,
Sunnybrook Research Institute, Ontario, Canada.

2006


19
th

Annual Meeting Canadian Society for Immunology


Halifax, NS

Theresa Stanley

2006
-

Present: advisor/mentor ‘Bridges to Baccalaureate Program’ through
University of we
st Georgia and Georgia State University.

2002


Present: Director of Regional Science Olympiad.

Richard Tsou

2005


Present: Annual presentations to Teaching Matters Conference, Gordon
College.

2002


Present: Science Fair judge at three regional high sch
ools

2002


Present: Regional Science Olympiad judge.



















Table 3: Biology Faculty

Name

Current Assignments

Mark
Brinkman

BIOL

1107,

1108, 1111, 2295

Mustapha
Durojaiye

BIOL 2211, 2250, 2295

Gregory
Hartman

BIOL 1107,

1108,

2210

Linda Hyde

BIOL 1107
,

1108

Phillip Jen

BIOL
111,
1112, 2210

Cathy Lee

BIOL 2210
, BIOL 2211

Lynn Rumfelt

BIOL 1111,
BIOL 1112,
ISCI 2001

Theresa
Stanley

BIOL 1011, 1111, 2250, 2295

Richard Tsou

BIOL 1111,

1112,
2210, 2295

Table 4: Biology Faculty

Name

Assignments After Implementation

Mark
Brinkman


BIOL
1107,
1108, 1111, 3520, 3600, 4900K

Mustapha
Durojaiye


BIOL
2210,
2211, 2250, 3340, 3500, 4900K

Gregory
Hartman


BIOL 1107,
1108,
2210, 3200, 4200, 4900K

Linda Hyde

BIOL 1107,
1108,
3550, 4000,
4900, 4900K

Phillip Jen

BIOL
1111,
1112, 2210, 3300, 4900K

Cathy Lee

BIOL 2210,
2211,
3100, 4450, 4900K

Lynn Rumfelt

BIOL 1111,
1112,
4900, 4900K

29

















Note: Initially, BIOL 4800 will be taught by part
-
time faculty while we conduct a search for a
Ph.D. in science education.

Theresa
Stanley


BIOL 1011, 1111, 2250, 4100, 4500, 4900K

Richard Tsou

BIOL 1111,
1112,
2210, 4300, 4900K