assessment of core objectives

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Core Course Review Documentation


Foundation
al Component Area:
LIFE & PHYSICAL SCIENCES


Component Area Option?

No





Yes


Cultural & Global Understanding





Yes


Undergraduate Inquiry & Creativity


Proposed Course:

General Physics (Phys 1144)

Credit
Hours:

4 (3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab)

Proposed by:

Jacqueline Dunn

Date:

January

14, 2013



Please document how the proposed course meets each of the following requirements. (You
may provide a written explanation or copy and paste the appropriate informat
ion from the
syllabus.)



Content:

Courses in this category focus on describing, explaining, and predicting natural
phenomena using the scientific method.


General Physics
presents the basic components of Newtonian mechanics

(kinematics,
dynamics,
energy
,
and momentum
)
. Content is addressed through lectures, readings,
problem assignments, and hands
-
on laboratory activities.


.




SKILLS:
Courses involve the understanding of interactions among natural phenomena and the
implications of scientific principles on the physical world and on human experiences.


Students will be able to:




Apply Newton’s laws to different physical situations.



Descr
ibe the motion of objects.



Recognize the forces acting on an object in different physical scenarios.



Use energy arguments to analyze the motion of objects.



Infer physical laws from collection and analysis of data in a laboratory setting.












ASSESSMENT OF CORE OBJECTIVES:
Assessments should be authentic, intentional and
direct. The following four Core Objectives must be addressed in each course approved to fulfill this
category requirement:


Critical Thinking Skills
-

to include creative
thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation
and synthesis of information


Critical thinking skills are developed through course readings, lectures, and group problem
sessions.

The specific assessment used in this course (see attachment in this

file) is the
Force Concept Inventory (FCI), which is administered to students at the end of the
semester. Students will be evaluated to see if they have exceeded the benchmark level of
the AACU VALUE Rubric for Critical Thinking (attached).
Students also
answer conceptual
questions on an ongoing basis, similar to those contained in the critical thinking skills
assessment.


Communication Skills
-

to include effective development, interpretation and expression of ideas
through written, oral, and visual commu
nication

Oral communication skills are developed through preparation of PowerPoint presentations
discussing the physics of roller coasters.

Students are assigned to work on a 5 to 10 minute
PowerPoint presentation in groups of about 5 students covering th
e physics behind a roller
coaster of their choice (see attachment in this file). Students will be evaluated to see if they
have exceeded the benchmark level of the Assessment for Communication Skills Rubric
(see attachment in this file), which focuses on V
isual Communication, and has been created
based on the AACU VALUE Rubric
s

for
Oral and Written Communication

(attached).


Empirical and Quantitative Skills
-

to include the manipulation and analysis of numerical data or
observable facts resulting in inform
ed conclusions

Empirical analytical skills and quantitative skills are developed through assigned readings,
group problem sessions, and laboratory activities

(students complete 10 laboratory
assignments)
.

The specific assessment used in this course (see attachment in this file) is to
have students

work in groups to solve assigned problems in class.

Students will be
evaluated to see if they have exceeded the benchmark level of the AACU VALUE Rubric for
Quan
titative Literacy (attached

in this file
).


Teamwork
-

to include the ability to consider different points of view and to work effectively with
others to support a shared purpose or goal

Teamwork skills are developed through group projects and problem ses
sions.

The specific
assessment used in this course will be the team presentation on roller coasters mentioned
under communication skills. Students are assigned to work on a 5 to 10 minute PowerPoint
presentation in groups of about 5 students covering the p
hysics behind a roller coaster of
their choice. Students will be evaluated to see if they have exceeded the benchmark level of
the AACU VALUE Rubric for Teamwork (attached

in this file
).


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

Provide any additional information supportin
g course
inclusion in the core (optional).


PLEASE ATTACH THE FOLLOWING

1.

Syllabus

2.

Assessm
ent for Critical Thinking Skills

3.

Assessment for
Communication Skills

4.

Asse
ssment for Empirical & Quantitative Skills

5.

Assess
ment for Teamwork



Phys 1144


General
Physics

TTh 11:00 am


12:20 pm, Bolin Hall 312


Instructor:

Jackie Dunn

Office:

307D

Office Phone:
4184

Email:

jackie.dunn@mwsu.edu


Textbook:
Physics, Principles with Applications, 6
th

Edition
by Giancoli


(ISBN: 0130606200)


Office Hours:

MTWThF 9:00


11:00 am


Lab:

TW 2:00


3:50 pm, Bolin Hall 107


Grading:

Labs


10%, Paper


15%, Classwork & Quizzes


15%, Exams (3 @ 20%
each)


60%


Course Website:
http://faculty.mwsu.edu/physics/jackie.dunn/phys1144.asp


Course Description:

This course is designed

to introduce the student to the basic
concepts of physics. We will cover everything from linear kinematics to thermal physics.
To check that you are keeping up with the homework, there will be a short (no more
than 10 minutes!) quiz every two days.


Att
endance:

While attendance is not factored into your grade directly, you must attend
class regularly if you hope to do well. Quizzes and tests can only be made up if you
have an excused absence (illness counts only if you can provide a doctor’s note). Any

planned absences from class should be discussed with the instructor beforehand if you
are going to be missing a graded activity (e,g, test, quiz, etc.) so that make
-
up plans (if
approved) may be arranged. Excused absences include university sponsored eve
nts,
illness (documentation required showing you saw a doctor


you do not need to disclose
why) and the death of an immediate family member (parents, children, siblings, etc.).


Please try to arrive to class on time (or even a couple minutes early) as we
will start
right away. If you must come in late (better to come in later than to miss an entire
class), please do not be disruptive.


Lab:

All lab assignments must be completed during the lab period unless otherwise
noted. If you cannot attend your norma
l section at any time, please try to attend the
other section of the same week. If this is not possible, you must make arrangements
with the TA to make
-
up the lab. Labs will start Wednesday May 30.


Expectations:
Students should look over the chapters to

be covered on a particular day
prior to coming to class. It is recommended that you follow along in the text during
lectures as we will be following the text very closely.


Cheating and plagiarism will not be tolerated. If you take a direct quote from a

source
for one of your assignments, please indicate so by using quotation marks and citing the
source. It should go without saying that any work you hand in should be your own. You
may work together in pairs in lab, but you must submit your own work.


P
lease turn off your cell phone (or put in silent mode) while in lecture or lab. If
you must take a call during class (prohibited during exams and quizzes), please
leave the room first so you do not disrupt the class.


Note:
In accordance with the law, MSU

provides students with documented disabilities
academic accommodations. If you are a student with a disability, please contact me.


Note:

By enrolling in this course, the student expressly grants MSU a "limited right" in
all intellectual property created
by the student for the purpose of this course. The
"limited right" shall include but shall not be limited to the right to reproduce the student's
work product in order to verify originality and authenticity, and for educational purposes.


Exams:

Exams wil
l be held on the dates listed below. The final exam will be
cumulative.


Exam 1:

Tuesday October 2, 2007

Exam 2:

Tuesday November 12, 2007

Final Exam:

Tuesday December 11, 2007 @ 11:00 am


Topics to be Covered:


Kinematics in One and Two or Three
Dimensions

Dynamics and Newton’s Laws of Motion

Friction and Circular Motion

Gravitation

Work and Energy

Conservation of Energy

Linear Momentum

Rotational Motion and Angular Momentum


If time permits, we will also discuss:

Fluids

Wave Motion

Sound

Basic
Thermodynamics




Assessment for Critical Thinking Skills


The Force Concept Inventory (FCI), developed by I. Halloun, R. R. Hake, E. P. Mosca, and D.
Hestenes, is administered to students at the end of the semester. The FCI has been
administered national
ly since 1995 to assess students understanding of applying Newton’s
laws in different situations. The exam consists of 30 multiple choice questions. Since the
exam must be kept secure,
only a few

sample questions may be reproduced here

(se next
page)
.

T
he exam is given at both the beginning and end of the semester to measure
students’ improvement in understanding

over the course of the semester
.




1.
T
w
o

m
e
t
a
l

b
a
l
l
s

a
r
e

t
h
e

s
a
m
e

s
i
z
e

b
u
t

o
n
e

w
e
i
g
h
s

t
w
i
c
e

a
s

m
u
c
h

a
s

t
h
e

o
t
h
e
r
.

T
h
e

b
a
l
l
s

a
r
e
dropped from the roof of a single story building at the same instant of time. The time it takes
the balls to reach the ground below will be:
(A)
a
b
o
u
t

h
a
l
f

a
s

l
o
n
g

f
o
r

t
h
e

h
e
a
v
i
e
r

b
a
l
l

a
s

f
o
r

t
h
e

l
i
g
h
t
e
r

o
n
e
.
(B)
a
b
o
u
t

h
a
l
f

a
s

l
o
n
g

f
o
r

t
h
e

l
i
g
h
t
e
r

b
a
l
l

a
s

f
o
r

t
h
e

h
e
a
v
i
e
r

o
n
e
.
(C)
a
b
o
u
t

t
h
e

s
a
m
e

f
o
r

b
o
t
h

b
a
l
l
s
.
(D)
c
o
n
s
i
d
e
r
a
b
l
y

l
e
s
s

f
o
r

t
h
e

h
e
a
v
i
e
r

b
a
l
l
,

b
u
t

n
o
t

n
e
c
e
s
s
a
r
i
l
y

h
a
l
f

a
s

l
o
n
g
.
(E)
c
o
n
s
i
d
e
r
a
b
l
y

l
e
s
s

f
o
r

t
h
e

l
i
g
h
t
e
r

b
a
l
l
,

b
u
t

n
o
t

n
e
c
e
s
s
a
r
i
l
y

h
a
l
f

a
s

l
o
n
g
.
2.
T
h
e

t
w
o

m
e
t
a
l

b
a
l
l
s

o
f

t
h
e

p
r
e
v
i
o
u
s

p
r
o
b
l
e
m

r
o
l
l

o
f
f

a

h
o
r
i
z
o
n
t
a
l

t
a
b
l
e

w
i
t
h

t
h
e

s
a
m
e

s
p
e
e
d
.
In this situation:
(A)
b
o
t
h

b
a
l
l
s

h
i
t

t
h
e

f
l
o
o
r

a
t

a
p
p
r
o
x
i
m
a
t
e
l
y

t
h
e

s
a
m
e

h
o
r
i
z
o
n
t
a
l

d
i
s
t
a
n
c
e

f
r
o
m

t
h
e

b
a
s
e

o
f

t
h
e
table.
(B)
t
h
e

h
e
a
v
i
e
r

b
a
l
l

h
i
t
s

t
h
e

f
l
o
o
r

a
t

a
b
o
u
t

h
a
l
f

t
h
e

h
o
r
i
z
o
n
t
a
l

d
i
s
t
a
n
c
e

f
r
o
m

t
h
e

b
a
s
e

o
f

t
h
e
table than does the lighter ball.
(C)
t
h
e

l
i
g
h
t
e
r

b
a
l
l

h
i
t
s

t
h
e

f
l
o
o
r

a
t

a
b
o
u
t

h
a
l
f

t
h
e

h
o
r
i
z
o
n
t
a
l

d
i
s
t
a
n
c
e

f
r
o
m

t
h
e

b
a
s
e

o
f

t
h
e
table than does the heavier ball.
(D)
t
h
e

h
e
a
v
i
e
r

b
a
l
l

h
i
t
s

t
h
e

f
l
o
o
r

c
o
n
s
i
d
e
r
a
b
l
y

c
l
o
s
e
r

t
o

t
h
e

b
a
s
e

o
f

t
h
e

t
a
b
l
e

t
h
a
n

t
h
e

l
i
g
h
t
e
r
ball, but not necessarily at half the horizontal distance.
(E)
the lighter ball hits the floor considerably closer to the base of the table than the heavier
ball, but not necessarily at half the horizontal distance.
3.
A

s
t
o
n
e

d
r
o
p
p
e
d

f
r
o
m

t
h
e

r
o
o
f

o
f

a

s
i
n
g
l
e

s
t
o
r
y

b
u
i
l
d
i
n
g

t
o

t
h
e

s
u
r
f
a
c
e

o
f

t
h
e

e
a
r
t
h
:
(A)
r
e
a
c
h
e
s

a

m
a
x
i
m
u
m

s
p
e
e
d

q
u
i
t
e

s
o
o
n

a
f
t
e
r

r
e
l
e
a
s
e

a
n
d

t
h
e
n

f
a
l
l
s

a
t

a

c
o
n
s
t
a
n
t

s
p
e
e
d
thereafter.
(B)
s
p
e
e
d
s

u
p

a
s

i
t

f
a
l
l
s

b
e
c
a
u
s
e

t
h
e

g
r
a
v
i
t
a
t
i
o
n
a
l

a
t
t
r
a
c
t
i
o
n

g
e
t
s

c
o
n
s
i
d
e
r
a
b
l
y

s
t
r
o
n
g
e
r

a
s

t
h
e
stone gets closer to the earth.
(C)
s
p
e
e
d
s

u
p

b
e
c
a
u
s
e

o
f

a
n

a
l
m
o
s
t

c
o
n
s
t
a
n
t

f
o
r
c
e

o
f

g
r
a
v
i
t
y

a
c
t
i
n
g

u
p
o
n

i
t
.
(D)
f
a
l
l
s

b
e
c
a
u
s
e

o
f

t
h
e

n
a
t
u
r
a
l

t
e
n
d
e
n
c
y

o
f

a
l
l

o
b
j
e
c
t
s

t
o

r
e
s
t

o
n

t
h
e

s
u
r
f
a
c
e

o
f

t
h
e

e
a
r
t
h
.
(E)
falls because of the combined effects of the force of gravity pushing it downward and the
force of the air pushing it downward.
4.
A

l
a
r
g
e

t
r
u
c
k

c
o
l
l
i
d
e
s

h
e
a
d
-
o
n

w
i
t
h

a

s
m
a
l
l

c
o
m
p
a
c
t

c
a
r
.


D
u
r
i
n
g

t
h
e

c
o
l
l
i
s
i
o
n
:
(A)
t
h
e

t
r
u
c
k

e
x
e
r
t
s

a

g
r
e
a
t
e
r

a
m
o
u
n
t

o
f

f
o
r
c
e

o
n

t
h
e

c
a
r

t
h
a
n

t
h
e

c
a
r

e
x
e
r
t
s

o
n

t
h
e

t
r
u
c
k
.
(B)
t
h
e

c
a
r

e
x
e
r
t
s

a

g
r
e
a
t
e
r

a
m
o
u
n
t

o
f

f
o
r
c
e

o
n

t
h
e

t
r
u
c
k

t
h
a
n

t
h
e

t
r
u
c
k

e
x
e
r
t
s

o
n

t
h
e

c
a
r
.
(C)
n
e
i
t
h
e
r

e
x
e
r
t
s

a

f
o
r
c
e

o
n

t
h
e

o
t
h
e
r
,

t
h
e

c
a
r

g
e
t
s

s
m
a
s
h
e
d

s
i
m
p
l
y

b
e
c
a
u
s
e

i
t

g
e
t
s

i
n

t
h
e

w
a
y
of the truck.
(D)
t
h
e

t
r
u
c
k

e
x
e
r
t
s

a

f
o
r
c
e

o
n

t
h
e

c
a
r

b
u
t

t
h
e

c
a
r

d
o
e
s

n
o
t

e
x
e
r
t

a

f
o
r
c
e

o
n

t
h
e

t
r
u
c
k
.
(E)
the truck exerts the same amount of force on the car as the car exerts on the truck.
Assessment for Communication Skills


Students are assigned to work on a 5 to 10 minute PowerPoint presenta
tion in groups of
about 5 students covering the physics behind a roller coaster of their choice.


Presentation Rubric (specific to this assignment):


Points

5

3

1

Content

Appropriate amount
of content to fill the
allotted time.

Slightly less or more
content than what
was needed for the
allotted time (under
or over by less than
a two minutes).

Significantly less or
more content than
what was needed for
the allotted time
(under or over by
more than two
minutes).

Creativity

Uses graphics
appropriately a
nd
often. May make use
of props.

Uses graphics
appropriately, but
doesn’t include any
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q略獴u潮猠o潳敤
w楴栠h楴瑬t⁤楦i楣畬瑹
潲慫敳⁳汩杨琠
浩獴mk攠e渠
慮獷敲楮朠煵敳e楯湳i
p潳敤.

U
湡b汥⁴漠慤敱畡瑥汹
慮獷敲ⁱ略獴楯湳i
p潳敤.



Assessment for Empirical & Quantitative Skills


Students should be able to answer the following problems without difficulty.


(1)

A sled is initially given a shove up a frictionless 23.0 degree incline. It reache
s a
maximum vertical height 1.12 m higher than where it started. What was its initial
speed? You must use energy arguments to solve this problem.

(2)

Police investigators, examining the scene of an accident involving two cars, measure
72 m long skid marks of

one of the cars, which nearly came to a stop before colliding
(assume final speed is zero). The coefficient of kinetic friction between rubber and
the pavement is about 0.80. Estimate the initial speed of that car assuming a level
road using energy argu
ments.

(3)

An Olympic long jumper is capable of jumping 8.0 m. Assuming his horizontal speed
is 9.1 m/s as he leaves the ground, how long is he in the air and how high does he
go? Assume that he lands standing upright


that is, the same way he left the
ground.

(4)

A person exerts a force of 55 N on the end of a door 74 cm wide. What is the
magnitude of the torque if the force is exerted (a) perpendicular to the door, and (b)
parallel to the door?

(5)

Describe how you can determine the muzzle velocity of a bulle
t fired from a gun that
is lodged into a block of wood that is suspended by a pendulum, assuming the rope
attaching the block to the base of the pendulum remains taut. You must use both
conservation of momentum and conservation of energy in your explanati
on. You
must also draw a picture of the problem, labeling all important values.


The AACU quantitative literacy rubric is applied (copied below).



Capstone

4

Milestones

3



2

Benchmark

1

Interpretation

Ability to explain
information presented in
mathematical forms (e.g.,
equations, graphs, diagrams,
tables, words)

Provides accurate
explanations of
information presented
in mathematical forms.
Makes appropriate
inferences based on
that information.
For
example, accurately
explain
s

the trend data
sho
wn in a graph and
make
s

reasonable
predictions regarding what
the data suggest about
future events.

Provides accurate
explanations of
information presented
in mathematical forms.
For instance, accurately
explain
s

the trend data
shown in a graph.

Provides
somewhat
accurate explanations of
information presented
in mathematical forms,
but occasionally makes
minor errors related to
computations or units.
For instance, accurately
explain
s

trend data shown
in a graph, but may
miscalculate the slope of the
trend

line.

Attempts to explain
information presented
in mathematical forms,
but draws incorrect
conclusions about what
the information means.
For example, attempt
s

to
explain the trend data
shown in a graph, but will
frequently misinterpret the
nature of that

trend,
perhaps by confusing
positive and negative trends.

Representation

Ability to convert relevant
information into various
mathematical forms (e.g.,
equations, graphs, diagrams,
tables, words)

Skillfully converts
relevant information
into an
insightful
mathematical portrayal
in a way that
contributes to a further
or deeper
understanding.

Competently converts
relevant information
into an appropriate
and desired
mathematical
portrayal.

Completes conversion
of information but
resulting mathematic
al
portrayal is only partially
appropriate or accurate.

Completes conversion
of information but
resulting mathematical
portrayal is
inappropriate or
inaccurate.

Calculation

Calculations attempted
are essentially all
successful and
sufficiently
comprehensi
ve to
Calculations attempted
are essentially all
successful and
sufficiently
comprehensive to
Calculations attempted
are either unsuccessful
or

represent only a portion
of the calculations
Calculations are
attempted but are both
unsuccessful and are
not comprehensive.

solve the problem.
Calculations are also
presented elegantly
(clearly, concisely, etc.)

solve the problem.

required to
comprehensively solve
the problem.

Application / Analysis

Ability to make judgments
and draw appropriate
conclusions

based on the
quantitative analysis of data,
while recognizing the limits
of this analysis

Uses the quantitative
analysis of data as the
basis for deep and
thoughtful judgments,
drawing insightful,
carefully qualified
conclusions from this
work.

Uses the q
uantitative
analysis of data as the
basis for competent
judgments, drawing
reasonable and
appropriately qualified
conclusions from this
work.

Uses the quantitative
analysis of data as the
basis for workmanlike
(without inspiration or
nuance, ordinary)
judg
ments, drawing
plausible conclusions
from this work.

Uses the quantitative
analysis of data as the
basis for tentative,
basic judgments,
although is hesitant or
uncertain about
drawing conclusions
from this work.

Assumptions

Ability to make and evaluate
i
mportant assumptions in
estimation, modeling, and
data analysis

Explicitly describes
assumptions and
provides compelling
rationale for why each
assumption is
appropriate. Shows
awareness that
confidence in final
conclusions is limited
by the accuracy of t
he
assumptions.

Explicitly describes
assumptions and
provides compelling
rationale for why
assumptions are
appropriate.

Explicitly describes
assumptions.

Attempts to describe
assumptions.

Communication

Expressing quantitative
evidence in support of the
argument or purpose of the
work (in terms of what
evidence is used and how it is
formatted, presented, and
contextualized)

Uses quantitative
information in
connection with the
argument or purpose
of the work, presents
it in an effective
format, and explica
tes
it with consistently
high quality.

Uses quantitative
information in
connection with the
argument or purpose
of the work, though
data may be presented
in a less than
completely effective
format or some parts
of the explication may
be uneven.

Uses quanti
tative
information, but does
not effectively connect
it to the argument or
purpose of the work.

Presents an argument
for which quantitative
evidence is pertinent,
but does not provide
adequate explicit
numerical support.
(May use quasi
-
quantitative words
such
as "many," "few,"
"increasing," "small,"
and the like in place of
actual quantities.)





Assessment for Teamwork


Students are assigned to work on a 5 to 10 minute PowerPoint presentation in groups of
about 5 students covering the physics behind a r
oller coaster of their choice.


The AACU teamwork rubric is applied (copied below).



Capstone

4

Milestones

3



2

Benchmark

1

Contributes
to
T
eam
M
eetings

Helps the team move
forward by articulating
the merits of alternative
ideas or proposals.

Offers
alternative
solutions or courses of
action that build on the
ideas of others.

Offers new suggestions
to advance the work of
the group.

Shares ideas but does not
advance the work of the
group.

Facilitates the
C
ontributions
of
T
eam
M
embers

Engages team
members
in ways that facilitate
their contributions to
meetings by both
constructively building
upon or synthesizing the
contributions of others
as well as noticing when
someone is not
participating and
inviting them to engage.

Engages team members
in ways

that facilitate
their contributions to
meetings by
constructively building
upon or synthesizing the
contributions of others.

Engages team members
in ways that facilitate
their contributions to
meetings by restating
the views of other team
members and/or a
sking
questions for
clarification.

Engages team members
by taking turns and
listening to others without
interrupting.

Individual
C
ontributions
O
utside of
T
eam
M
eetings

Completes all assigned
tasks by deadline;

work accomplished is
thorough,
comprehensive
,

and
advances the project.

Proactively helps other
team members complete
their assigned tasks to a
similar level of
excellence.

Completes all assigned
tasks by deadline;

work accomplished is
thorough,
comprehensive
,

and
advances the project.

Completes all
assigned
tasks by deadline;

work accomplished
advances the project.

Completes all assigned
tasks by deadline.

Fosters
C
onstructive
T
eam
C
limate

Supports a constructive
team climate by doing
all of the following:



Treats team
members
respectfully by
being
polite
and
constructive in
communication
.



Uses positive
vocal or
written tone,
facial
expressions,
and/or body
language to
convey a
positive
attitude about
the team and

its

work.



Motivates
Supports a constructive
team climate by
doing

any three

of the
following:



Treats team
members
respectfully by
being polite
and
constructive in
communication
.



Uses positive
vocal or
written tone,
facial
expressions,
and/or body
language to
convey a
positive
attitude about
the team and
its work.

Supports a constructive
team climate by
doing

any two

of the
following:



Treats team
members
respectfully by
being polite
and
constructive in
communication
.



Uses positive
vocal or
written tone,
fac
ial
expressions,
and/or body
language to
convey a
positive
attitude about
the team and
its work.

Supports a constructive
team climate by doing any
one

of the following:



Treats team
members
respectfully by
being polite and
constructive in
communication.



Uses positive
vocal or written
tone, facial
expressions,
and/or body
language to
convey a positive
attitude about the
team and its
work.



Motivates
teammates by
expressing
confidence about
the importance
teammates by
expressing
confidence
about the
importance of
the task

and the
team's ability
to accomplish
it.



Provides
assistance
and/or
encouragement
to team
members.



Motivates
teammates by
expressing
confidence
about the
importance of
the task and the
team's ability
to accomplish
it
.



Provides
assistance
and/or
encouragement
to team
members.



Motivates
teammates by
expressing
confidence
about the
importance of
the task and the
team's ability
to accomplish
it.




Provides
assistance
and/or
encouragemen
t
to team
members.

of the task and
the team's ability
to accomplish it.




Provides
assistance and/or
encouragement
to team
members.

Responds to
Conflict

Addresses destructive
conflict directly and
constructively, helping
to manage/resolve it in a
way that strengthens
overall team
cohesiveness and future
effectiveness
.

Identifies and
acknowledges conflict
and stays engaged with
it
.

Redirecting focus
toward
common ground,
toward task at hand
(away from conflict)
.

Passively accepts alternate
viewpoints/ideas/opinions.