What is the future of mobile phones in an interactive world? Stephen Didcote 20004494 MA Design by Practice Research Paper

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Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


0


What is the future of mobile
phones

in an interactive world?


Stephen Didcote

20004494


MA Design by Practice

Research Paper



















Word count 2095

Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


1

Contents

1. Introduction

................................
................................
................................
.....................

2

2. Introduction of mobile phones

................................
................................
........................

3

2.1 Early mobile phones

................................
................................
................................
.

3

2.2 Introduction to ‘Pay As You Go/Talk’

................................
................................
.....

3

2.3 Advent of text

................................
................................
................................
...........

4

2.4 Introduction of camera

................................
................................
..............................

4

2.5 Personalising the mobile

................................
................................
...........................

4

2.6 Internet on mobile

................................
................................
................................
.....

5

3. Market research

................................
................................
................................
...............

6

3.1 Nokia N96

................................
................................
................................
.................

6

3.2 Apple I
-
phone 3G

................................
................................
................................
.....

7

3.3 Google G1 Android
................................
................................
................................
...

8

3.4 Comparisons

................................
................................
................................
.............

8

4. Future Technologies
................................
................................
................................
......

10

4.1 Infrared keyboards

................................
................................
................................
..

10

4.2 Inbuilt projectors

................................
................................
................................
.....

10

4.3 Rollable Screen.

................................
................................
................................
......

11

5. Conclus
ion

................................
................................
................................
....................

12

6. Bibliography

................................
................................
................................
.................

13

6.1 Reference to a book

................................
................................
................................

13

6.2 Referen
ce to a web page / WWW document

................................
..........................

13

6.3 ONLINE VIDEO

................................
................................
................................
....

14

6.4 ONLINE IMAGES

................................
................................
................................
.

14

Annex 1

................................
................................
................................
.............................

15

Annex 2

................................
................................
................................
.............................

17



Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


2

1
.
Introduction

It can be said that nearly every person in Britain knows what a mobile phone is.
However, not everyone kno
ws the capability of the devices
currently
available

or has a
clear notion of
where mobiles will be in
five or ten
years time
given the speed of
technological development.


This paper
will examine the
advances that have been made
in
development.
It will

explore the origins of the mobile phone
,
take an in
-
depth look at the
advent of
‘P
ay
As
Y
ou

G
o


services,
demonstrate
how present day phone
s

have changed with advances in
technology
,

such as cameras
,

and
will also examine Wireless Application Protocol
(WA
P).
By studying these
advances, and considering the requirements of the public by
means of
research

into

the views of a random sample of
mobile phone
users,
this paper
will
explore
how mobiles may
change in the future and why.


By taking a detailed look

at the
current mobile market, in particular the
Nokia N96, I
-
phone and the T
-
mobile android

which are recognised as being cutting edge technology
,

this paper will explore which keypad has been design
ed

for multiple uses
by
the modern
day mobile phone user

and
[
hopefully
]

answer which of the top model mobiles will
be
likely to survive the test of time.

Existing technology will be evaluated to determine
whether it may
influence future developments in the mobile phone market.

Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


3

2
.
Introduction of
mobile
phone
s

2
.1

Early mobile p
hones

When mobile phones
were first released in the
late
19
7
0
s
they

were design
ed

solely
a
s a

mobile communication device.
The
ir
only function was
to facilitate conversation
between
two people.
Many
phones were quite large and
impract
ical
for every day use.

The idea that a mobile phone could ever be
used for anything else was sheer fantasy.



2
.2 Introduction to ‘P
ay
A
s
Y
ou
G
o
/Talk


During the
mid
-
nineties

mob
iles phones became very popular especially with
the
release
of the
prepaid

ha
nd set.



Vodafone advertising emphasised the similarities between their "Pay As You
Talk" service and a public call box. Phone boxes were visually featured and the
presenter, tossing a coin in his hand, proclaimed the benefit of the simplicity of
call bo
xes and went on to say "Somebody's done it again. Put a pay phone in a
box". He also described Vodafone's service as "a pay phone".


(ofcom.com, 2003,
[WWW])


This advertisement describe
d the prepaid service. I
n layman’s terms some
one
could buy
a phone, p
u
rchase credit to make calls,

have the ability to monitor their spending and still
be contactable even after their credit had run out.




There was a

complaint

made
by two viewers and one comp
etitor
as
the advert
was

misleading. To compare "Pay As You Talk
" with a pay phone

(Phone Box)

was misleading because the Vodafone service required customers to pay in
advance separately for "service credits" and "call credits". Only the call credits
could be used to make calls. Service credits simply gave customers ac
cess to the
network for a period
. The reality of the "Pay As You Talk" service was that,
unlike a call box, not all the money spent was available for call charges.


(ofcom.com, 2003, [WWW])


Although
the Vodafone hand
set
s

were

not as advertise
d
,

prepaid ha
ndsets
were

cheap and
affordable. People could now buy a phone
,
not worry
about
running up
large bills as
payment
was done in

advance
,

and were still contactable even whe
n their credit had been
exhausted.


S
ociety

began to

evolve

as mobile phones became mo
re affordable.
As more and more
people had mobiles they discovered that they could more easily contact others in
b
usiness, emergency

and social situations.
(
JENSON, S
, 2007,

Why Phones Are Not
Computers

[Online Video])

Figure 1

Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


4


During
this time

a built in address

book

w
as

introduced

into mobile phones
. A
n

alphabetic

keypad
enabled
names
to be entered
into the phone. In Britain the keypad was
the
E.161

which was
design
ed

to
work with the main
European
languages.



2
.
3

Advent
of
t
ext

People did not
yet
know it but t
ext was going to change the way in which
they
used
mobile phones.
Short message service

(SMS)

was originally designed as a
technic
al
protocol
not intended
for
commercial

use.
It was
only available on certain phones

in the

U.K
.

(
JENSON, S
, 2007,
Why Phones A
re Not Computers

[Online Video])

The first
SMS typed on a
GSM

phone is claimed
to have been sent by Riku Pihkonen, an
engineering student at Nokia, in 1993


(The Scotsman, 2003, [WWW])


W
hen texts were

introduce
d

commercially
,

users found this to be a che
ap
er

alterative to
phoning
.
Users i
n a
crow
d
ed place had the
ability
to
text
another
discretely instead of
trying to talk
in noisy surroundings
.

(
JENSON, S
, 2007,
Why Phones Are Not Computers

[Online Video]).

I
f a phone was of
f
,

or out of range
,

messages c
ould be
stored and kept
until
the phone was
re
connected to the network.


2
.
4 Introduction of camera


W
ith the success of SMS,
mobile companies re
cognised there was a market for
people
t
o
send images. This was actually a method of

Default Thinking


i.e.
mo
bile

companies
thought that i
f people l
ike text and
also
like camera
s
,

they
will
want
to send photos on
their mobiles. What
companies failed to

re
alise
was that people liked
the
camera
feature
for
differ
ing
reason
s, not just
its
original purpose of

sending

Multimedia Messaging
Service
(MMS).
(
JENSON, S
, 2007
,

Why

Phones Are Not Computers

[Online Video])


Anecdotal evidence suggests that
camera
s
are used
to document events in their lives
and
that
photo
s
are not always forwarded.

T
hey
merely
wanted a camera
available
when
required.
Although
people are not using

the camera
for
its
original
commercial
fu
n
ction
it is still
a
useful
feature
.


With other technologies such as
Wireless Application Protocol
(WAP)
, the
camera is
used
to
directly upload photo
s

to soci
al network
s like F
acebook.
This may incur a one
-
off
charge although
several
mobile services providers

offer
a monthly
internet
fee
.


2
.5 Personalising the mobile


After several years of pay as you go phone
s

being available, users welcomed

the concept

of pe
rsonalising their own

phones
. This
sparked the trend of interchangeable handset
covers,

personalising

ring tones
,

modifying

desk top background
s

and jewellery.


Mobile

companies embraced

th
ese trends

which

became a commercial business.
With the
production
of multi
-
coloured handsets
,

the practice of
changing cover
s

has
now
become
Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


5

obsolete
.
However, personalising ring tones has evolved
into

real music
tones

which
,

with the introduction of

WAP
,

ca
n be download
ed

with
in seconds.


The

I
-
phone is the biggest ad
vertiser
of this

feature,

as the I
-
phone
3G
has the facility to
connect to

the I
-
tune store
. This allows
the user to download a song within seconds

for a
nominal charge.


2
.6

Internet
on m
obile

I
nternet

access

on mobiles is still re
latively
new.
Most inte
rnet pages are designed f
or a
minimum resolution of approximately

800 x 600

pixels
. The size and resolution
limitations of the screen make it impractical

to display

full size website
s
. Additionally,
the
low connection
speed of 3G
means that
only
basic

we
bsites can be
viewed
.



Older mobile phone
s

us
e
d

to compress the webpage for mobile viewing

by
omitting

non
-
essential

functions. Newer mobile
s

comp
ens
ate
d

by
improving

resolution
. However,

as
the

screen was still small

this only
led to slight improvement
s
.

This has resulted in the
creation of website design purely for mobiles.
Further

a
dvances
have
allow
ed

the user to
rotate the phone
to
view the information in landscape instead of portrait. The

I
-
phone ha
s
had
the biggest improvement as it increase
d

the

screen size

by removing the keyboard.




A
major problem not

yet
fully

addressed i
s the

excessive number of key depressions
using a conventional

mobile keypad.
E
ntering web address
es

requires

inputting

domain
names and

the mobile extension

e.g.

“.mobi” re
quires 8 key presses.
Other
s

include
“.com” 7, “.net” 6, “.co.uk” 12, “.org” 7, “.tv” 5, “.edu” 6 and “.mp” 3.



Internet
access
has become
a
driving force

in generating

further
technological
advancements in mobile design.


Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


6

3
.
Market research

At present
there
are

so many mobiles on the market
it

would be impossible to
mention

them all. For this paper I will be researching the Apple “I
-
phone”, the Google “Android”
and the Nokia “N96”. The
se phones are high end

specification,
design
ed

to cater for a
range o
f differing

uses.


I undertook market research
of a sample of 30
mobile phone users, engaged in University
of Wales’ project work,
to canvass
anonymous
views
to

determine
:



T
heir current
mobile phone
make/model



Reason for purchase



Personal and household use




Experience of using the models listed above



A
nd
the technological advances that would be welcomed by users.


The demographics of the sample were also recorded.

12 people responded.


The survey questionnaire can be found at Annex 1 and a table summari
sing the results at
Annex 2.


Of
particular
note is that all respondents require the SMS function and that the telephone
function is of lesser importance.

As this sample comprised of people from a university
background I recognise that it may not be repre
sentative of the general public.


3
.1 N
okia
N96

The Nokia N96 is

the traditional style mobile using

an E.161 keypad as a method of
interaction
.

When the
Nokia advertised the

N96

they
promoted its

3.5G
connection speed which was faster than its rivals
,
en
abl
ing

B
BC I
-
pla
yer to be viewed. The phone also
had a

5mp camera, built

in
G
lobal Positioning System

(GPS)
,

Symbian

S60 for obtain
ing

new app
lication
s
,

a
16GB hard drive for

music and videos

and
a built in
stand to watch them.


Survey views indicate that
this
mobile phone
is

slightly to
o large with
a poor

menu
structure
. Additionally,

with

S
ymbian S60
the
install
at
i
on

of java app
lications

can be
difficult

and the phone
slow to respond.

The keypad was limiting but as people are used
to this design nothing
was said about its limitations.

Figure 2

Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


7


3
.2 Apple I
-
phone

3G


The Apple I
-
Phone
has

a
3.5 inch

touch
screen
, which is
used to display information and works as a means of
interaction. The p
hone has a good menu structure and is
easy to navigate.
With internet ac
cess
,

downloading
applications is simple

th
r
ough the app
lication

store.
The
mobile

is
used

as

an
I
-
pod with either a
n

8GB or 16GB

flash drive

for music and video storage
. The phone has
all the
latest

features

including
GPS
,
c
amera
,

a
ccelerometer,
p
roximity

sensor and a
mbient light sensor
for interaction.


Surveys views indicate that the
drawback

of the I
-
phone
is

that
it o
nly
has a
2.0
m
p

camera. It can
not be used to record
video and
,

although the
phone itself is good for editing documents
,

it lack
s

suffici
ent
function

to
cut and paste
.


Figure 3

Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


8

3
.3 Google G1 A
n
droid

The Google G1 android
has

an
innovat
ive
design
.

I
t uses
to
uch screen technology and a

QWERTY

keyboard as
a
method

of interaction.
For the Google android to be
original not all the information entere
d to the phone
would be saved locally. The

G
oogle android is dependent

on the web as contact details (name, mobile number, and
email a
ddresses), texts and emails are

stored virtually
.

I
f
the phone was lost the
user’s

mobile information would
be
recovered

a
nd
,

as an added advantage
,

information
could b
e

access
ed

via a computer.

Other

features of this
phone include

a 3.2
mp

camera and

GPS using Google maps, giving user
s

more detail
ed

information about the area.

Additionally

the phone was design
ed

to be open s
ourced to
allow developers to design application
s without pay
ing

for the rights
.


Survey respondents
ha
d

not
used the Google android
. F
eed
back
a
bout this
device would
have been useful as
it would
have
be
en

interesting to have first hand research on
the wa
y
the Google android stored information
.


3
.4
Comparisons

Marianne Schultz

undertook the following studies:
-



T
ext
Words Per Minute

To see how quickly text
can be entered
on a device, we time
d

how long it takes to
enter a set of standard text and calcul
ate
d

words per minute from the resulting
time. On the G1, this text yielded 47.5
6 words per minute, a result be
t
t
e
red

only
by the iPhone 3G at 61.50 words per minute among our comparison phones.
T
he
G1's physical keyboard requires deliberate presses to reg
ister contact on its
nearly
-
flat buttons, where
as

the iPhone 3G requires only a brief touch on its
sensitive touchscreen to register input.




One
-
Handed Typing (7.05)

To see how easy it is to enter text with one hand,
the words per minute were
calculate
d using the same standard text.

The results of this test are often more
Figure 4

Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


9

drastically different for QWERTY keyboard devices than non
-
QWERTY ones
since a full keyboard has greater distances between keys for a single hand to
travel, requiring more time to ente
r text. This was definitely the case with the G1
-

it took more time to ente
r text with one hand, resulting

in a lower words
-
per
-
minute
total

of 35.24.





(
SCHULTZ, M
,

2008, [WWW]
)


58% of survey
respondents
f
elt

t
he design of
the I
-
phone

to be
the futur
e of mobile phone

development.
14
% of those respondents
believed that the I
-
phone required feedback
from touching the
touch screen function. I
t is proven that the I
-
phone is faster at texting
two handed by 14 words per minute
compared to the Google Andro
id

(SCHULTZ, M,
2008, [WWW]).
Due to the

lack of
feedback

on the Google Android
in the survey, it is
difficult
to say whether people would prefer this style of inputting data.


There was no ‘Conventional Key Pad’/Nokia N96 in the Text Per Minute Speed Tes
t
.


Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


10

4
. Future Technologies

The mobile industry
is continually
d
e
signing
new and improving upon
feature
s

which
may be u
tilised in
future
make
s and

model
s
.

4
.1 I
nfrared ke
y
boards

Infrared keyboards are a new technology that would a benefit in the d
esign o
f mobile
phones
.

The built

in stand

of the Nokia N96
would facilitate

the projection of
an infrared
keyboard allow
ing

the user to enter information
, making the traditional keypad almost
obsolete. This
w
ould make surfing the web
similar to using a
home
co
mputer. One major
problem
of the keyboard is
the screen design

must be of sufficient size to accommodate
the technology.



The I
-
Tech laser keyboard acts exactly like any other
"ordinary" keyboard: A direction technology based on an
optical recognition m
echanism enables the user to tap on
the projected key images, while producing real tapping
sounds
.


(
I
-
Tech, 2008 [WWW]
)


As this keyboard still requires a surface another keypad or
input device would still be required
.



4
.2 Inbuilt projectors

Most mob
iles
are unable to display large amounts of
information on a small screen.

Pocket pro
jectors offer a
solution

w
ithout altering the size of the

screen. By
integrating

a projector into a mobile
the information can
be enlarged.

P
lugging in a key
board

would gi
ve
u
ser
s

access to the web

with an optimum sized

screen

in any
location
,

provided the
user
could

sit at a table
and
project on
to
a suitable surface.



A Pico pocket project
or

can easily share photos and videos from mobile devices, project
images on any sur
face, contains an ultra
-
light at 4 ounces including battery, with images
size up to 60 inches, vivid 1000:1 contrast ratio
,

LED light
source lasting

over 20,000
hours and
r
echarge battery conveniently via USB or included AC power adaptor
(
OptomaUSA, 2008,
[WWW]
)


Without an additional
QWERTY

keyboard this would only be useful
when integrated
i
nto a mobile device if

the user was intending
to watch a

film/television program
me

or to
display pictures
.

Figure 5

Figure 6

Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


11

4
.3 Rollable Scre
en.

“Polymer Vision has just came up with

a 4.8
-
inch
rollable screen for cellphones, GPS, and mobile
entertainment devices.


Mobile displays simply aren't practical for many of
the business
-
oriented applications enabled by
broadband networks. That's why Polymer Vision
developed a new flexible sc
reen technology that can
make their screen fit into almost anything within a
roll radius of 0.75 cm. The screen will probably have
a switching time of 0.5
-
1 ms, and an optimum refresh
rate of 50 Hz with a 240 x 320 pixels resolution.


It completely transfo
rms the experience of viewing content, so the phone becomes an
even more versatile business tool. This in turn will drive consumer demand for 'anytime,
anywhere' data
-
oriented broadband services, increasing operator revenues and opening
the way to new appl
ication areas
.


(
V
ASILE, C, 2006,
Rollable Screen for Cellphones?

[WWW])


Rollable screens are where mobiles should be heading.
A

conventional mobile even the I
-
phone has such little space available. If a rollable

touch screen


could be designed this

woul
d be the solution to the mobiles lack of space. Information could easily be read and
the technology wou
ld start to rival the PC

in web access
.



Figure 7

Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


12

5
. Conclus
ion

The design of mobile devices has

been pushed forward by advances in technology
.
Default thinking

has resulted in devices such as camera being added on a mobile.


At present
internet access is forcing mobile design

forward
.
Internet access

is still
difficu
lt as the screen size is too limited to display relevant
information. The three main
phone

compan
ies

have their own ideas how
to

accomplish

this, creating three distinct

devices.


T
he
survey analysis indicates that the touch screen of the I
-
phone will be the standard in
future mobile devices. The Google Android is
similar

in design

but with a
n additi
onal

physical QWERTY keyboard.


If mobiles are design
ed with

the
t
echnology
detailed in section 4
, it
would be possible to
use them either as
a
n

alternative or additional means
o
f

accessing the
internet
. By
projecting on the wall and using the virtual key
board
,

a user could be able to see full web
pages
and

enter information with
little
difficulty
. This
c
ould be a
viable
alterative to
using

a Personal Computer
.

However, mobility and confidentiality may be issues for
some users.

Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


13

6.

Bibliography



6.
1 Refe
rence to a book

5
th

International Symposium. Mobile HCI. 2003.
Human
-
Computer Interaction with
Mobile
Services

and Services
.
Undine
, Italy, September 2003



AGAR, J. 2003.
Constant touch a global history of the mobile phone
. Australia: Allen &
Unwin Pty. L
td


JONES, M and MARSDEN, G. 2006.
Mobile Interactive Design
. Swansea: University of
Wales Swansea

6.
2
Reference to a

web page / WWW document

APPLE. 2008.
Apple (United Kingdom)


iPhone.

[WWW]
http://www.ap
ple.com/uk/iphone/

(21/11/2008)


I
-
Tech. 2008.
I
-
Tech's Virtual Keyboard
-

A laser projected full
-
sized virtual QWERTY
keyboard

[WWW]
http://www.virtual
-
laser
-
keyboard.com/

(21/11/2008)


NOKIA. 2008.

Nokia Europe
-

Nokia N96


Products
. [WWW]
http://europe.nokia.com/n96

(21/11/2008)


OFCOM. 2003.
Television Advertising Complaints Reports
. [WWW]
http://www.ofcom.org.uk/static/archive/itc/itc_publications/complaints_reports/advertisin
g_complaints/show_complaint.asp
-
ad_complaint_id=269.html

(09/01/200
9)


OptomaUSA. 2008.
:: Welcome to OptomaUSA.com ::

[WWW]
http://www.optomausa.com/Product_detail.asp?product_id=399

(21/11/2008)


Sagecroft Technologies. 2005
-
2008.
Portable iPod
Nano projector » Coolest Gadgets

[WWW]
http://www.coolest
-
gadgets.com/20060630/portable
-
ipod
-
nano
-
projector/

(21/11/2008)


SCHULTZ, M. 2008
.
T
-
Mobile G1 Cell Phone Revie
w
-

Manufacturer
-

Reviews
-

WirelessInfo.com
-

Cell Phone Reviews and Wireless Plan Ratings
.

[WWW]
http://www.wirelessinfo.com/content/T
-
Mobile
-
G1
-
Cell
-
Phone
-
Re
view/Hardware.htm

(4/01/2009)


T
-
MOBILE. 2008.
T
-
Mobile G1 Black Overview
-

Pay Monthly
-

T Mobile
.

[WWW]
http://
www.t
-
mobile.co.uk/shop/mobile
-
phones/phones/pay
-
monthly/t
-
mobile/g1
-
black/overview/?WT.mc_id=ON_QM_S_Google&WT.srch=1

(21/11/2008)


The Scotsman. 2003.
Short message service
-

Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

[WWW]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Short_message_service

(09/01/2009)

Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


14

VASILE, C. 2006.
Rollable Screen for Cellphones?
-

The new technology boasts low
power consumption
-

Softpedia
. [WWW]
http://news.softpedia.com/news/Rollable
-
Screen
-
for
-
Cellphones
-
20140.shtml

(21/11/2008)

6.
3 ONLINE VIDEO

JENSON, S.

2007.
Why Phones Are Not Computers

[Online Video]
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mz9MELz1F
-
o&feature=channel_page

(12/11/2008)


M
INER, R

. 2007
.
Android: Building a Mobile Platform to Change the Industry.

[Online
Video]
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WUrMI9ZGxQ8&feature=channel_page

(12/11/2008)


6.
4 ONLINE IMAGES

FIGURE 1.
http://80sactual.blogspot.com/



FIGURE 2.
http://www.letsgodigital.org/images/artikelen/109/nokia
-
n96.jpg


FIGURE 3.
http://lh6.ggpht.com/renis00/RztARGhKYpI/AAAAAAAAAEo/pTipc3bhCXM/apple
-
iphone
-
intelligent
-
keyboard
-
on
-
screen
-
demonstration%5B2%5D


FIGURE 4.
http://www.sfgate.com/blogs/images/sfgate/techchron/2008/10/14/bu
-
google24_ph_0499190270.jpg


FIGURE 5.
http://www.virtual
-
laser
-
keyboard.com/


FIGURE 6.
http://www.coolest
-
gadgets.com/20060630/portable
-
ipod
-
nano
-
projector/

Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


15

Annex 1

Mobile, user, interface and interaction

1. Gender

[] MALE

[] FEMALE


2. Age:

[] 10
-
19

[] 20
-
29

[] 30
-
39

[] 40
-
49

[] 50
-
59

[] 60+



3. What make/model of mobile phone do you own?



4. How many mobile are used on a daily within your house hold?

[] 0

[] 1

[] 2

[] 3

[] 4

[] 5+


5. What do you use your mobile for?

[] Calls

[] Texts

[] Camera

[] Internet

[] GPS

[] Mobile Applicatio
n

[ ] Others (please specify)


6. When you bought your mobile, what were the reasons?


7. Have you tried the Nokia N96?

[] YES

[] NO

What do you like/dislike about the mobile interface?


8. Have you tried the I
-
phone?

[] YES

[] NO

Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


16

What do you
like/dislike about the mobile interface?


9. Have you tried the T
-
mobile/Goggle Android

[] YES

[] NO

What do you like/dislike about the mobile interface?


10. Are there any mobiles at present that you think future mobiles 'may be designed'
around? If so, p
lease state which?


Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


17

Annex 2

Response Type: Normal Response

Collector: Mobile user interface and
interaction (Web Link)






Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


18















Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


19

IP Address: 86.151.135.190

Response Started: Mon, 12/15/08 3:00:56 PM

Response Modified: Mon, 12/15/08

3:07:34 PM



1. Gender

Male


2. Age:

20
-
29


3. What make/model of mobile phone do you own?

Sony Erricson W880i


4. How many mobile are used on a daily within your house hold?

4


5. What do you use your mobile for?

Calls

Texts

Camera

Internet

Mobile Applic
ation

Other (please specify)
-

Mp3 player


6. When you bought your mobile, what were the reasons?

Slim design. Aesthetically pleasing. MP3 player. I've liked using previous Sony Erricson
phones.


7. Have you tried the Nokia N95/N96?

No


8. Have you tried t
he I
-
phone/I
-
pod touch?

No


9. Have you tried the T
-
mobile/Goggle Android

No


10. Are there any mobiles at present that you think future mobiles 'may be designed'
around? If so, please state which?

Most current top of the range phones either look like an i
Phone or a Blackberry, it seems.
I haven't seen anything that innovative lately. So I can't really say.




Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


20

IP Address: 193.63.82.60


Response Started: Tue, 12/16/08 1:22:19 AM


Response Modified: Tue, 12/16/08 1:31:51 AM



1. Gender

Male


2. Age:

30
-
39


3. What make/model of mobile phone do you own?

Nokia 6680


4. How many mobile are used on a daily within your house hold?

2


5. What do you use your mobile for?

Calls

Texts

Camera

Internet

Other (please specify)
-

programming / dev


6. When you boug
ht your mobile, what were the reasons?

symbian os, 3g


7. Have you tried the Nokia N95/N96?

Yes

poor, deep menu structure. randomly scattered settings throughout. only used it a bit
though. Java / SYS app installation is a pain in the neck.


8. Have you tr
ied the I
-
phone/I
-
pod touch?

Yes

clean interface, menus are logical. app store is a godsend for installing/managing/finding
new software (good for developers too).


9. Have you tried the T
-
mobile/Goggle Android

No


10. Are there any mobiles at present that

you think future mobiles 'may be designed'
around? If so, please state which?

iPhone/touch raises the bar, expect to see even more 'clones' from other makers. Next up
will be some sort of nano
-
iPhone the current model is too expensive for younger market
a
nd a bit too big. Games may be a big driver for this. Something priced around the
Nintendo DS range. Still waiting for a laptop replacement phone device (netbook type
Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


21

thing). Also integrated micro projectors will be must
-
have features in the coming years,
to watch movies, work, and play games on mobiles.




Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


22

IP Address: 82.5.14.91


Response Started: Tue, 12/16/08 3:01:51 AM


Response Modified: Tue, 12/16/08 3:05:55 AM



1. Gender

Male


2. Age:

30
-
39


3. What make/model of mobile phone do you own?

sa
msung d900


4. How many mobile are used on a daily within your house hold?

2


5. What do you use your mobile for?

Texts


6. When you bought your mobile, what were the reasons?

communication


7. Have you tried the Nokia N95/N96?

Yes

nothing it's fine.


8. H
ave you tried the I
-
phone/I
-
pod touch?

No

n/a


9. Have you tried the T
-
mobile/Goggle Android

No

n/a


10. Are there any mobiles at present that you think future mobiles 'may be designed'
around? If so, please state which?

no idea mate




Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


23

IP Address: 90.21
4.104.114


Response Started: Tue, 12/16/08 12:57:09 PM


Response Modified: Tue, 12/16/08 1:09:31 PM



1. Gender

Male


2. Age:

20
-
29


3. What make/model of mobile phone do you own?

Samsung Tocca


4. How many mobile are used on a daily within your hou
se hold?

3


5. What do you use your mobile for?

Calls

Texts


6. When you bought your mobile, what were the reasons?

Upgraded from my last contract. However I maintain a mobile contact so I can phone
friends and family and talk for ages without worrying abo
ut the cost.


7. Have you tried the Nokia N95/N96?

No

seems to be a complicated version of the samsung interface. but really the same. the
aesthetic of the phone isn't as minimalist as i like.


8. Have you tried the I
-
phone/I
-
pod touch?

Yes

the touch scree
n really works and this is what surprised me about the phone and also my
samsung tocca. i thought it would be a nightmare to txt with and its actually quicker than
with convential buttons i find. plus with the iphone the ability to zoom in and out with
you
r fingers and also move the web browser around is really intuitive and cool looking.
also installing plugins and other features is beyond easy.


9. Have you tried the T
-
mobile/Goggle Android

No

Actually I don't know what to say about htis phone. I haven't
seen the user interface and
phone doesn't look anything special. But I haven't seen one in person so don't know.


10. Are there any mobiles at present that you think future mobiles 'may be designed'
around? If so, please state which?

probably the iphone if

we're talking interface, and the new blackberry looks pretty cool
aesthetically.

Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


24

IP Address: 193.62.97.111


Response Started: Thu, 12/18/08 5:11:49 AM


Response Modified: Thu, 12/18/08 5:14:27 AM



1. Gender

Male


2. Age:

40
-
49


3. What make/model
of mobile phone do you own?

Sny
-
Ericsson P1i


4. How many mobile are used on a daily within your house hold?

3


5. What do you use your mobile for?

Calls

Texts

Camera

Mobile Application


6. When you bought your mobile, what were the reasons?

Working with S
ony Ericsson on their design development and prototyping, phone
coordinated with Outlook, Word, Excel and included handwriting recognition


7. Have you tried the Nokia N95/N96?

No


8. Have you tried the I
-
phone/I
-
pod touch?

Yes

Like the colours, multitouch

interface and simplicity dislike the lack of tactile feedback


9. Have you tried the T
-
mobile/Goggle Android

No


10. Are there any mobiles at present that you think future mobiles 'may be designed'
around? If so, please state which?

No Response




Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


25

IP Add
ress: 217.42.139.98


Response Started: Thu, 12/18/08 5:06:35 AM


Response Modified: Thu, 12/18/08 5:19:45 AM


1. Gender

Male


2. Age:

30
-
39


3. What make/model of mobile phone do you own?

16GB iPhone 3G


4. How many mobile are used on a daily withi
n your house hold?

1


5. What do you use your mobile for?

Calls

Texts

Camera

Internet

GPS

Mobile Application

Other (please specify)
-

music & micro
-
blogging


6. When you bought your mobile, what were the reasons?

it's the best phone on the planet


7. Have
you tried the Nokia N95/N96?

Yes

I liked the way it was a bit like a mechano set, a messy jumble to technology to play with
and try to get to work. I didn't like the fact that it rarely worked adequately (browser and
GPS are barely functional in any natura
l context) and the physical form and interface are
confused, clumsy and unresponsive. The camera hardware was rather good but the
software was painful to use.


8. Have you tried the I
-
phone/I
-
pod touch?

Yes

I don't like not being able to copy & paste text
or record video yet. The usability of the
physical and software interface is far in advance of any other device. Everything on it
works from both a technical and usability perspective, including the browser and GPS.
The iTunes application store enables an
enormous rich responsive market of innovative
affordable (often free) software. None of its numerous recent imitators come close to
matching its quality.


9. Have you tried the T
-
mobile/Goggle Android

No

Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


26


10. Are there any mobiles at present that you think

future mobiles 'may be designed'
around? If so, please state which?

No Response


Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


27

IP Address: 193.62.97.111


Response Started: Thu, 12/18/08 5:12:10 AM


Response Modified: Thu, 12/18/08 5:22:27 AM


1. Gender

Male


2. Age:

20
-
29


3. What make/model

of mobile phone do you own?

Nokia N95


4. How many mobile are used on a daily within your house hold?

2


5. What do you use your mobile for?

Calls

Texts

Camera

Internet

GPS

Mobile Application

Other (please specify)
-

MP3


6. When you bought your mobile, w
hat were the reasons?

Amazing camera for a phone, Built in GPS Internet friendly phone and unlimited data


7. Have you tried the Nokia N95/N96?

Yes

The camera is so0metimes accidently turned on when the lens cover is opened as the
phone is put into a pocke
t. The interface is sometimes slow to respond and the menu
takes you to a wrong place. The inbox never gets full
-

amazing, i hate it when you run
out of space!


8. Have you tried the I
-
phone/I
-
pod touch?

No


9. Have you tried the T
-
mobile/Goggle Android

N
o


10. Are there any mobiles at present that you think future mobiles 'may be designed'
around? If so, please state which?

I think a lot of companies will incorporate multi touch facilities to their future phones,
whether this is a good or bad thing I am y
et to decide. I think if they merely copy the
iPhone then it will be bad, and the iPhone will loose some of its coolness, whilst if they
Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


28

develop on from and look at what is good and also bad about the existing techs then they
will make a better phone and a

strong competitor




Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


29

IP Address: 81.79.205.249


Response Started: Thu, 12/18/08 5:20:18 AM


Response Modified: Thu, 12/18/08 5:24:34 AM


1. Gender

Male


2. Age:

30
-
39


3. What make/model of mobile phone do you own?

iPhone


4. How many mobile are
used on a daily within your house hold?

2


5. What do you use your mobile for?

Calls

Texts

Camera

Internet

GPS

Mobile Application


6. When you bought your mobile, what were the reasons?

Better range of interactive possibilities, better apps, GPS with maps


7. Have you tried the Nokia N95/N96?

No


8. Have you tried the I
-
phone/I
-
pod touch?

Yes

Like the multitouch and the screen quality Don't like the inability to edit docs and cut and
paste (like the rest of the world...)


9. Have you tried the T
-
mobile/Gogg
le Android

No


10. Are there any mobiles at present that you think future mobiles 'may be designed'
around? If so, please state which?

Well, iphone sets the standards for unix powered phones. I think Symbian releasing the
OS was a good idea. And I think Go
ogle Android will do well. The big question is the
next version of J2ME MIDP and whether it will ever appear. Is Java on mobiles finally
dead?




Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


30

IP Address: 193.62.97.111


Response Started: Thu, 12/18/08 5:49:17 AM


Response Modified: Thu, 12/18/
08 5:50:52 AM


1. Gender

Female


2. Age:

20
-
29


3. What make/model of mobile phone do you own?

LG Chocolate


4. How many mobile are used on a daily within your house hold?

2


5. What do you use your mobile for?

Calls

Texts


6. When you bought your mobile,
what were the reasons?

I didn't buy it
-

_ have my husband's old phone!


7. Have you tried the Nokia N95/N96?

No


8. Have you tried the I
-
phone/I
-
pod touch?

No


9. Have you tried the T
-
mobile/Goggle Android

No


10. Are there any mobiles at present that you

think future mobiles 'may be designed'
around? If so, please state which?

I like the functionality of Nokia phones, they are user friendly.




Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


31

IP Address: 193.62.97.111


Response Started: Thu, 12/18/08 8:08:48 AM


Response Modified: Thu, 12/18/08

8:11:11 AM


1. Gender

Male


2. Age:

40
-
49


3. What make/model of mobile phone do you own?

Sony Ericsson


4. How many mobile are used on a daily within your house hold?

5+


5. What do you use your mobile for?

Calls

Texts

Camera

Internet

Mobile Application


6. When you bought your mobile, what were the reasons?

Work and social


7. Have you tried the Nokia N95/N96?

No


8. Have you tried the I
-
phone/I
-
pod touch?

Yes

Enjoyable new style of interaction for the non
-
phone type applications. Not so hot on the
inter
actions for fast important communications, especially as you always need to look at
the screen


9. Have you tried the T
-
mobile/Goggle Android

No


10. Are there any mobiles at present that you think future mobiles 'may be designed'
around? If so, please sta
te which?

i
-
phone




Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


32

IP Address: 86.132.182.30


Response Started: Fri, 12/19/08 6:54:00 AM


Response Modified: Fri, 12/19/08 7:00:32 AM



1. Gender

Male


2. Age:

20
-
29


3. What make/model of mobile phone do you own?

Nokia N95


4. How many mobile a
re used on a daily within your house hold?

2


5. What do you use your mobile for?

Calls

Texts

Camera

Internet

GPS

Mobile Application


6. When you bought your mobile, what were the reasons?

Free upgrade, good features, GP3 good camera


7. Have you tried the

Nokia N95/N96?

Yes

A bit slow sometimes


8. Have you tried the I
-
phone/I
-
pod touch?

Yes

No feedback on keypresses


9. Have you tried the T
-
mobile/Goggle Android

No


10. Are there any mobiles at present that you think future mobiles 'may be designed'
aroun
d? If so, please state which?

iPhone as a standard, but needs better touch feedback




Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


33

IP Address: 212.183.134.65

Response Started: Fri, 1/2/09 10:30:36 AM


Response Modified: Fri, 1/2/09 10:34:04 AM



1. Gender

Female


2. Age:

30
-
39


3. What make/
model of mobile phone do you own?

Blackberry Pearl


4. How many mobile are used on a daily within your house hold?

1


5. What do you use your mobile for?

Calls

Texts

Camera

Internet

Mobile Application


6. When you bought your mobile, what were the reasons?

Initially had a Blackberry Pearl for personal use
-

reasons were mainly for easy access to
email and Outlook. Current Blackberry is same and provided by work.


7. Have you tried the Nokia N95/N96?

No


8. Have you tried the I
-
phone/I
-
pod touch?

Yes

Ease of

use, touch screen and design. The icons are easy to navigate and intuitive.


9. Have you tried the T
-
mobile/Goggle Android

No


10. Are there any mobiles at present that you think future mobiles 'may be designed'
around? If so, please state which?

No Respo
ns



Stephen Didcote


MA Design by

Practice

20004494


Research Paper


34

IP Address: 90.201.198.25


Response Started: Fri, 1/9/09 3:57:53 AM


Response Modified: Fri, 1/9/09 3:59:59 AM



1. Gender

Male


2. Age:

30
-
39


3. What make/model of mobile phone do you own?

i phone


4. How many mobile are used on a daily wit
hin your house hold?

3


5. What do you use your mobile for?

Calls

Texts

Camera

Internet

GPS

Mobile Application


6. When you bought your mobile, what were the reasons?

it had an mp3 player and i could browse the web


7. Have you tried the Nokia N96?

Yes

i h
ave one of these too. it's ok, but it's a big bulky phone. one very poor aspect of it is that
you can leave applications open on it in the background, like games, and they drain the
battery VERY quickly


8. Have you tried the I
-
phone?

Yes

cant send MMS


9.

Have you tried the T
-
mobile/Goggle Android

No


10. Are there any mobiles at present that you think future mobiles 'may be designed'
around? If so, please state which?

No

Response