English Language Arts/Literacy Grade 3 Unit One Sample

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1


English Language Arts
/Literacy


Grade 3

Unit One Sample


This is
sample unit

with sample daily lesson tasks
. Use the
guide

for adapting and/or creating your own units using a similar format.

English Language A
rts/Literacy Grade 3

Anchor Text

The Stories Julian Tells
, Ann
Cameron (Literary, Appendix
B Exemplar)

Related Texts

Literary Texts




The Bee Tree
, Patricia Polacco



The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr.
Morris Lessmore
, William Joyce



More Stories Julian
Tells
, Ann
Cameron

Informational Texts




A Page is a Door
,” Remy Charlip
(Read Aloud)



My Librarian is a Camel: How Books
are Brought to Children Around the
World
, Margriet Ruurs

Nonprint

Texts

(e.g., Media, Website,
Video, Film, Music, Art, Graphics)



The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr.
Morris Lessmore

(Film)



The Red Book
, Barbara Lehman

Unit Focus

Students will learn that stories are important for learning
lessons about life and transmittin
g knowledge. Building on
the idea of reading stories to learn about cultures, this set
allows students to learn how storytelling can be a way to
pass on family history and traditions and build a strong
identity. Putting the same character in different situ
ations
can teach readers about how motivations, feelings, and a
person’s actions affect events and other people. Students
will also learn about the importance of reading and stories,
and how sharing stories can build relationships and
connect us to others.

Possible
1

Common Core
State Standards

Reading

RL.3.1, RL.3.2, RL.3.3, RL.3.4,
RL.3.5, RL.3.6, RL.3.7, RL.3.9,

RL.3.10


RI.3.1, RI.3.2, RI.3.4, RI.3.6,
RI.3.8

Text Complexity Rationale

The text complexity of the set
falls within the 2
-
3 grade
band. The anchor text is from
the lower end of the band,
which is appropriate for the
beginning of the school year.
Read alouds of texts that fall
above the grade
-
level band
allow students opportuni
ties
to increase their vocabulary
and understanding of
language.

Reading Standards:
Foundational Skills
2

RF.3.3a
-
d, RF.3.4a
-
c

Sample Research
3

Students will independently write a narrative based on the
illustrations from
The Red Book
. Students will
participate in
a
model
of
the process

for
writing stories from illustrations
using
The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore
.

Writing

W.3.1a
-
d, W.3.2a
-
d, W.3.3a
-
d, W.3.4, W.3.5, W.3.6,
W.3.8, W.3.10

Speaking and Listening

SL.3.1a
-
d, SL.3.2, SL.3.3,
SL.3.4, SL.3.6

Language

L.3.1a
-
b, d, h
-
i; L.3.2a, c
-
g;
L.3.3a
; L.3.4a
-
b, d; L.3.5a
-
c;
L.3.6




1

For support in integrating and centering standards around the reading of complex texts, refer to the
Grade 3 ELA/Literacy PARCC Model Content Framework
. For support in selecting
which standards to teach with each text, refer to the

append
ix of this document.
For information about how these standards will be assessed statewide in 2013
-
14, refer to the
Grade 3
Assessment Guidance 2013
-
2014 document
.

2

The listed Reading Standards: Foundational Skills are suggested for whole
-
class instruction using portions of the whole
-
class texts. Systematic and explicit instruction of the reading
foundationa
l skills based on student needs should occur through small
-
group instruction and be formally assessed at various points throughout the year.

3

“Sample Research” refers to student
-
led inquiry activities (as recommended with
each module/unit on the PARCC Model Content Frameworks
). These extension tasks allow students to
make connections with texts and should be done AFTER students have
read, written, and spoken about each individual text and demonstrated their understanding of the text. Multiple
text
-
dependent reading and writing performance tasks are expected prior to the Sample Research task.


2


English Language Arts/Literacy

Grade 3 Unit One Sample

OVERVIEW




What
will
students know and be able to do
by the end of this unit?

Students will
demonstrate

an
understanding of the unit focus and meet the expectations of the Common Core State Standards on the unit assessments.


Unit Focus

The “big ideas” of this unit include:

1.

What can we learn from reading and
storytelling?

2.

How can reading and storytelling
bring us together?

3.

How does reading and storytelling
add to our lives?

4.

How can stories tell us more about
ourselves and others?

Unit Assessment

Students will demonstrate
understanding of
the

“big

ideas


through various assessments:

1.

A
culminating writing task
, which assesses
whether students met the expectations of
the CCSS while
demonstrating
understanding of the anchor text.

2.

A
cold
-
read assessment
, which assesses
whether students can read “new” text(s)
and apply the same level of understanding
and mastery of the CCSS.

3.

An
extension task and accompanying
presentation
, which assesses student ability
to apply understanding of the “big ideas” to
other texts, their lives,
and/
or the real
world.

Daily Performance Tasks

Daily instruction and tasks aligned to
the CCSS prepare students to meet the
expectations of the unit assessments.


S
tudents
will daily
demonstrate

their:

1.

U
nderstanding of
texts and the
“big
ideas”

by meeting grade level CCSS
expectations for reading, listening,
and language;

2.

A
bility to express th
eir
understanding
by meeting grade
level CCSS expectations for speaking,
writing, and language
.


3


English Language Arts/Literacy

Grade 3 Unit One Sample

ASSESSMENTS





TYPE

CONTENT

CCSS ALIGNMENT

Culminating
Writing Task


Student Prompt:

Describe Julian, Huey, and his father. What is a central message, lesson, or moral that can
be learned by reading
The Stories Julian Tells
? Explain how that message is
conveyed
through the main
characters in the
text.

Write an essay that demonstrates command of proper grammar, usage,
punctuation, and spelling, and uses grade
-
appropriate words and phrases.
Refer to the text as the basis for
your answers, including key details and examples.

RL.3.1, RL.3.2, RL.3.3
;

W.3.1, W.3.1a
-
d, W.3.4, W.3.10
;

L.3.1b, d, h
-
i; L.3.2d
-
g; L.3.3a,
L.3.
6

Return to Unit Overview


Return to
Sample
Pacing Chart


TYPE

CONTENT

CCSS ALIGNMENT

Cold
-
Read
Assessment
4

Student Prompt:

Read
the section entitled “I Learn Firefighting” from
More Stories
Julian Tells
. (
Note:

This
is a long section of the text, but students must read all of it for the full understanding of the text. Consider
doing a whole
-
class read aloud of “I Wish for Smokey the Bear” and then have students independently
read “Superboy an
d Me” and “Huey Makes the Leap” and answer questions.)
Then answer a combination of
multiple
-
choice and constructed
-
response questions
5
. Sample questions:

1.

What does Huey do to become strong? Why does he want to be strong?

2.

What is surprising about the talk
that Julian and his father have?

3.

What does “Huey Makes the Leap” mean?



How do the chapters “Superboy and Me” and “Huey Makes the Leap” build on each other?



Compare and contrast
The Stories Julian Tells

and
More Stories Julian Tells
, focusing on Julian. How

has
Julian changed? Why do you think he has changed? How do the two books relate to each other?

(
Note:

Standards alignment
depends on question content)

Possible Standards:

RL.3.1, RL.3.2
,

RL.3
.3, RL.3.4,

RL.3.5,
RL.3.6, RL.3.9, RL.3.10
;
RF.3.4a, c
;

W.3.4, W.3.10
;

L.3.1a
-
b, d, h
-
i; L.3.2a, c
-
g;
L.3.3a; L.3.4a
-
b, d; L.3.5a
-
c; L.3.6

Return to Unit Overview

Return to
Sample
Pacing Chart







4

Refer to assessment guidance and sample i
tems when creating classroom assessments:
Louisiana assessment guidance
,
Louisiana sample items
,
Assessment Design Transition
,
PARCC sample items


5

Ensure that students have access to the texts as they are testing.


4


English Language Arts/Literacy

Grade 3 Unit One Sample

ASSESSMENTS






TYPE

CONTENT

CCSS ALIGNMENT

Extension
Task and

Formal
Presentation

Student Prompt:

W
rite a narrative

based on the illustrations in
The Red Book
. Establish the situation,
introduce a narrator, and organize the events. Use dialogue, descriptions of the thoughts, feelings, and
actions of the characters to show their experiences and how they respond to different events. Use words
to signal time and o
rder, such as
before
,
during
,
after
, etc. Provide closure to your story. Use guidance and
support from peers to plan, revise, and edit your story. Then publish your story using technology.


After finishing the story, present and/or record

the story
. C
onti
nue to work collaboratively to create
engaging audio recordings for their narrative

either
individually or
through choral

reading.

Then play the
recording for the class and use
The Red Book
and
any other created

visual displays to enhance the
presentation.

(Note:
Students with reading fluency identified at risk may work with the teacher to build
fluency in prepa
ration for the audio recording.)

RL.3.1, RL.3.2, RL.3.3, RL.3.7
;

RF.3.4b
;

W.3.3a
-
d, W.3.4, W.3.5, W.3.6,
W.3.10
;

SL.3.1a
-
d, SL.3.3, SL
.3.4, SL.3.5,
SL.3.6
;

L.3.1b, d, h
-
i; L.3.2c
-
g; L.3.3a,
L.3.6

Teacher Note



View
The Red Book
as a whole class and lead a discussion modeling for students how to develop ideas
from the pictures. Discuss how the pictures can tell a story, establish a setting, convey a mood, or
emphasize certain aspects of a character. Then have students work in pair
s to brainstorm ideas about
what could be happening in each picture in the text. Select a particular section of the book as the basis
for the story and use sticky notes or storyboards to outline the events in the story. Sticky notes allow
students to be ab
le to
move the order of details and ideas around
easily
without feeling like they have
to rewrite and/or start over.
Monitor student products and v
erify that the initial outline of the story
connects to and reflects the illustrations in
The Red Book

(i.e.,

students are telling the story of the
illustrations, not an unrelated story).




Then compose individual narratives, which
develop real or imagined experiences or events using
effective technique
s
, descriptive details, and clear event sequences

that
unfold

naturally
. Use dialogue
and descriptions of actions, and events or show the respon
se of characters to situations



The engage students in peer review.
Establish criteria (e.g
.,
rubrics
, anchor charts, etc.)
and allow
opportunities for peers to make suggesti
ons and writers to make changes to strengthen the narrative as
needed throughout the process (i.e.,
planning, revising, editing, and publish
ing
)
.


Return to Unit Overview

Return to
Sample
Pacing
Chart


5


English Language Arts/Literacy

Grade 3 Unit One Sample

PACING OF TEXTS AND TASKS




INSTRUCTIONAL DAYS

TEXT(S)
6

CCSS ALIGNMENT

Day 1
-
3

The Bee Tree
, Patricia Polacco

Whole
-
Class Performance Tasks

Small
-
Group Instruction

Days 4


A Page is a Door
,” Remy Charlip (Read Aloud)

Whole
-
Class Performance Tasks

Small
-
Group Instruction

Days 5
-
8

The Fantastic
Flying Books of Mr. Morris

Lessmore (There is an
application

if you want to project
the story rather than provide a written copy for each student.)

Whole
-
Class Performance Tasks

Small
-
Group Instruction

Days
9
-
11

“The Pudding Like a Night on the Sea” from

The Stories Julian Tells
, Ann Cameron

Whole
-
Class Performance Tasks

Small
-
Group Instruction

Days 12
-
13

“Catalog Cats” and “Our Garden” from
The
Stories Julian Tells
, Ann Cameron

Whole
-
Class Performance Tasks

Small
-
Group Instruction

Days
14
-
1
8

My Librarian is a Camel: How Books are Brought to Children Around the World
, Margriet Ruurs and
research

Whole
-
Class Performance Tasks

Small
-
Group Instruction

Day
s

1
9
-
20

“Because of Figs” from
The Stories Julian Tells
,
Ann Cameron

Whole
-
Class Performance Tasks

Small
-
Group Instruction

Day
21
-
2
4

“My
Very Strange Teeth”

from
The Stories Julian Tells
,
Ann Cameron

Whole
-
Class Performance Tasks

Small
-
Group Instruction

Day
s

25

“Gloria Who Might Be My Best Friend” from
The Stories Julian Tells
, Ann Cameron

Whole
-
Class Performance Tasks

Small
-
Group Instruction

Days
2
6
-
2
9

Culminating Writing Task

and Cold
-
Read Assessment

Unit One Assessments

Day
30
-
31

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore

(film
)

Whole
-
Class Performance Tasks

Small
-
Group Instruction

Days 3
2
-
35

Extension

Task (
The Red Book
, Barbara Lehman)

Unit One Assessments







6

Texts can be written or visual, print or multimedia
.


A
1











Appendix

A
2


English Language Arts/Literacy

Grade 3 Unit One Sample

DAILY PERFORMANCE TASKS/PROMPTS





DAYS
1
-
3

Text
:


The Bee Tree
, Patricia
Polacco


Text Connections

This text connects to the Unit Focus because it offers opportunities for students to experience excitement
and interact with
storytelling.
Students are able to get an initial idea of how storytelling and books open us to new w
orlds and vicarious experience
s. This text also
provides an analogy for the reading process, which can be used to guide students as they learn to read texts more analyticall
y in grade 3.

Reader and Task Considerations

Some of the vocabulary words and definitely the names of the characters will be difficult for students to decode. Reading thi
s text aloud
for the first read will
help students to see the plot pattern that develops, which will help them understand the meaning of the text. The
text can be projected for students to read along on subsequent reads and the text can be placed in a classroom library for in
dependent
reading
.

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS/PROMPTS



Ongoing throughout the unit:
Build a vocabulary display that students can rely on in their writing. For example, after the first reading of
The Bee Tree
, engage
students in identifying the various ways that the group
chases the bee (e.g., “
chortled

as she
huffed

past,” “
wailed

as she
streaked

by,” “
scurried

by,” “
galloped

up
over,”
crossed, clattered
, “
clambered

through,”


sprinted

along,” “
waddled

after”). Using context clues, define the various words, verify their de
fin
i
tions using a
dictionary, and
illustrate the various word relationships through
semantic mapping

(e.g.,
Example One
,
Example Two
,
Example Three
).
Reinforce the meaning of the
words by ask
ing students to make real
-
life connections between the words and their use

by acting out the various meanings of the words
. Display these words for
students to use when they wri
te. (
RL.3.4
,
L.4.1a, L.3.4d, L.3
.5b
, L.3
.6
)



Analyze the meaning and construction of various phrases and sentences in
The Bee Tree
, focusing on the difference between literal and non
-
literal meanings. For
examp
le, the phrases “catch their breath” and “blinding speed.” Have students discuss the multiple meanings of those phrases and i
llustrat
e the various definitions.
Then discuss the non
-
literal meaning of the following phrases:
“There was music, dancing, tall t
ales and raucous laughter as they all buzzed about th
e sweet
adventure of that day.” and
“Mary Ellen
savored

the honey on her book. ’There is such sweetness inside of that book too!’ he said thoughtfully. ‘Such
things…adventure, knowledge, and wisdom. But
these things do not come easily. You have to
pursue

them.’”

(
RL.3.4
,
L.4.5a, L.4.6)



Following the first reading of the text, provid
e students with index cards labeled with specific events from the text. Have them place the events in sequenced order.
Then recount the story and discuss how each event in the text builds on the previous and leads to the next. (
RL.3.1,
RL.3.2,
RL.3.5
)



Working collaboratively, describe

the main characters in the story (e.g., their traits, motivations, and feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to
the
sequence of events. Record answers on a teacher
-
provided graphic organizer

or in journals
. Refer to specific parts of the text

on the organizer. (
RL.3.1, RL.3.3
)



Conduct a class discussion about
The Bee Tree
. Engage students in asking and answering questions to demonstrate their understanding of the text. Encourage
st
udent question asking by providing question stems or conversation starters and developing a routine to monitor that all stude
nts are participating in the question
asking and answering. (
SL.3.1a
-
c, SL.3.2
)

Sample text
-
dependent questions for
The Bee Tree
:

-

What can we learn about the setting
(i.e., time and place)
from the illustrations?

(
RL.3.1, RL.3.7
)

-

Reread the first and last page

of the text.
How did Mary Ellen’s feelings change over the course of the story?

(
RL.3.1, RL.3.3, RL.3.5
)

-

Why did the Grampa suggest they find a bee tree? How does he reveal his purpose? (
RL.3.1, RL.3.2, RL.3.3
)

-

Determine a central message or lesson that can be learned from reading this text. How is this message revealed? (
RL.3.1, RL.3.2
)

Return to
Sample
Pacing Chart


A
3


English Language Arts/Literacy Grade 3 Unit One Sample Daily Performance Tasks/Prompts

DAY

4

Text
:


A Page is a Door
,” Remy
Charlip (Read Aloud)


Text Connections


A Page is a Door


provides opportunities for exploration into various text types and discussions on how messages (experiences,
traditions, storytelling, life lessons) are conveyed through text and other formats.

Reader and Task Considerations

Students are likely to need support with understanding the format and purpose of an essay. The text will require multiple
readings
with a different focus for each additional read.

(
RI.3.10
)

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS/PROMPTS



Ongoing throughout the unit:
Build a vocabulary display that students can rely on in their writing. Define unknown and multiple
-
meaning words using
context clues. For example, focus on the words
incidental
and
momentous
. Illustrate the various word relationships through
semantic mapping

(e.g.,
vocabulary cards
,
word web
,
concept map
). Reinforce the meaning of the words by asking students to make real
-
life connect
ions.
Display these words for
students to use when th
ey write. (
RI.3.4
;
L.3.4a; L.3.5b
, c;

L.3.6
)



Ongoing throughout the unit:
Analyze the syntax and meaning of various phrases and
sentences in

each chapter. Engage students in deconstructing the
various sentences in the text to explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs and how each contrib
utes to the meaning of the
sentence, section, and the essay as a w
hole. Also, identify figurative phrases and discuss the difference between literal and non
-
literal and the various
meanings of the phrases. (
RL.3.1, RL.3.4
,
L.3.1a, L.3.5a
)



Analyze the text through discussion (focusing on text
-
dependent questions) and record the analysis through annotations. (Note: After the first read, it would
be useful to engage students in summarizing each section

of the essay.) Consider the following questions: At the beginning and end of the essay, how does
Charlip describe
excitement

in a book? In paragraphs 2
-
5, how does Charlip explain the action of turning a page in a book? How does Charlip feel about
turning

the pages in a book? What examples does he provide that describe his feelings? Then discuss whether Charlip likes or does not

like reading and how
he supports his idea. (
RI.3.1, RI.3.2, RI.3.3
, RI.3.8
,
SL.3.1a
-
d, SL.3.2, SL.3.6
)



What does the title mean: “A Page is a Door”? Illustrate both the literal and non
-
literal meanings of the phrase in journals. (
RI.3.1, RI.3.2
,
L.3.5a
)



Conduct a class discussion (e.g.,
fishbowl discussion
) comparing and contrasting the author’s point of view in “A Page is a Door” to Grampa’s point of view in
The Bee Tree

to their own point of view. (
RL.3.1,
RL.3.6,
RI.3.1,

RL.3.2
,
RI.3.2, RI.3.6, RI.3.9
,
SL.3.1a
-
d, SL.3.2, SL.3.6
)

Return to
Sample
Pacing Chart


A
4


English Lang
uage Arts/Literacy Grade 3 Unit One Sample Daily Performance Tasks/Prompts

DAY
S

5
-
8

Text
:

The Fantastic Flying
Books of Mr. Morris
Lessmore
, William Joyce

Text Connections

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore

depicts the curative power of stories. The main character experiences a great
tragedy when he loses his most prized possessions, books. He has a renewed
sense
of enjoyment when books are reintroduced into
his life.

Reader and Task Considerations

Students should be able to read
The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris
Lessmore
,

but are encoura
ged
to engage in multiple reads,
as this text is layered and determining meaning requires making multiple inferences. (
RL.3.10
)

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS/PROMPTS



Ongoing throughout the unit:
Build a vocabulary display that students can rely on in their writing. Define unknown and multiple
-
meaning words using
context clues. Illustrate the various word relationships through
semantic mapping

(e.g.,
Word Study Example
). Display these words for students to use when
they write. (
RL.3.4
;
L.3.4a; L.3.5c, L.3.6
)



Read aloud the text and then engage students in working collaboratively to recount the story and determine an initial lesson
or message they interpret from
the text. Using a graphic organizer, ask students to reread various portions of the text in groups and focus each rereading o
n a different purpose. For
example, on one rereading, have students view the illustrations in the te
xt and trace the various elements and notice any patterns or contrasts within the
illustrations (i.e., When books are in a person’s life, there is color; when books are gone, it is black and white. What is t
he meaning of that pattern?) Then, in
journals, h
ave students respond to questions such as, “What patterns and/or contrasts did you notice in the illustrations? How do the il
lustrations contribute
to the words on the page? How do they emphasize and/or convey a feeling or an idea that is important in this

story?” Then conduct a class discussion about
their findings, prompting students to make connections between the illustrations and mood, setting, and a central message (th
eme).

Other possible focus
areas for additional rereadings:

-

Analyze the meaning and

construction of various phrases and sentences in

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore
, William Joyce, focusing on
the difference between literal and non
-
literal meanings. For example, the phrases “his life was a book” and “every story has its

upsets.” Have students
discuss the multiple meanings of those phrases.

-

Identify the words and phrases that have the most effect on you as the reader. Why are those words or phrases particularly ef
fective?

-

Describe Morris (e.g., traits, motivations, feelin
gs) and identify and then explain how each of his actions adds to the sequence of events in the story;

-

Analyze how each part of the story builds on the next by creating a timeline or cause and effect map to chart out the plot of

the story. Refer to specif
ic
events and portions of the text on the organizer;

-

Reread the last few pages of the book. What happens at the end of the story? Why is this key detail important to the meaning
of the story?

-

Compare
the points of view of
Morris
, Mary Ellen,
and Grampa
.
How do their opinions of books differ? How are their various points of view different
from your own point of view?
(
RL.3.1, RL.3.2, RL.3.3,
RL.3.4,
RL.3.5,
RL.3.6,
RL.3.7, RL.3.10
,
W.3.10
,
SL.3.1a
-
d, SL.3.2, SL.3.6
,
L.3.3a,
L.3.5a, c
)



Then conduct a

cl
ass discussion

(e.g., a
fishbowl discussion
) to determine a central message, le
sson, or moral of the text and explain how it is conveyed
through key details in the text.
(Sample prompting questions: Describe Morris Lessmore and his opinion of books. Why are Mr. Lessmore’s books important?
What words or phrases let us know that books
are significant to Morris and the other people?)
Refer to the text as the basis for answers.
Throughout the
discussion
e
ncourage student question asking by providing question stems or
conversation starters

and developing a routine to monitor that all students are
participating in the question asking and answering. (
RL.3.1, RL.3.2
,
SL.3.1a
-
d
, SL.3.2
, SL.3.6
)

Return to
Sample
Pacing Chart


A
5


English Language Arts/Literacy Grade 3 Unit One Sample Daily Performance Tasks/Prompts

DAYS
9
-
11

Text
:


“The Pudding Like a
Night on the Sea” from
The
Stories Julian Tells
,
Ann Cameron

Text Connections

The
Stories Julian Tells

provides opportunities for discussion about
the value of story
telling
and how it can enrich our lives by
teaching us lessons and helping us relate to others.
Each chapter of the
book begins a new storytelling adventure
, but each
adventure develops a different aspect of the characters and their interactions, which adds to the reader’s understanding of t
he
family relationships and the importance of storytelling.
The text also provid
es opportunities for vocabulary study and explorations of
how the structure of sentence reflects and emphasizes its ideas.

Chapter 1 focuses on the relationships in Julian’s family
(particularly between Julian and Huey) and how Julian uses storytelling to
get himself in and out of trouble.

Reader and Task Considerations

Focus on pages through 13
-
15 for students to read along for
close analytic reading

to determine word relationships. Highlight t
he
figurative language and word choice throughout.

(
RL.3.10
)

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS/PROMPTS



After the first reading of “The Pudding Like

a Night on the Sea” from The Stories Julian Tells discuss words with multiple meanings and how the characters
interpret them. How does Julian’s various understanding of the words change how he feels? (
RL.3.1, RL.3.3, RL.3.4
,
L.3.4a
)



Ongoing throughout the unit:
Analyze the
syntax and meaning
of various phrases and sentences in

each
chapter. Engage students in deconstructing the
various sentences in the text to explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs and how each contrib
utes to the meaning of the
sentence, section, and the essay as a whole. Also, identi
fy figurative phrases and discuss the
difference between
literal and non
-
literal and the various
meanings of the phrases. (
RL.3.1, RL.3.4
,
L.3.1a, L.3.5a
)



Ongoing throughout the unit
: In journals, following the reading of each chapter, recount the key details and then describe each character (e.g., their t
raits,
motivations, feelings), referring to and noting specific details from the

text. As each chapter is read, create a new entry. Then conduct a class discussion to
explain how the actions and experiences of each contribute to the sequence of events. For example: How does Julian’s “storyte
lling” get him in and out of
trouble? How do
es he use stories to make sense of situation and relate to others? After reading all the chapters in
The Stories Julian Tells
, work
collaboratively and using the journal entries to create a graphic organizer that compares and contrasts the characters and t
heir experiences. Then determine
a central message or lesson from the text and explain how it is conveyed through the characters. Publish the graphic organize
r using technology, and post
the organizer for the class to view. Then use the various organizers
to engage students in a class discussion about the various messages and lessons
determined from the text. Explore how each message or lesson was conveyed and prompt students to analyze how storytelling is
important for building
relationships, adding enjoym
ent to our lives, and learning about our pasts. (
RL.3.1, RL.3.2, RL.3.3, RL.3.9
,
W.3.6, W.3.10
,
SL.3.1a
-
d, SL.3.2, SL.3.5, SL.3.6
,
L.3.2a, d, L.3.6
)

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A
6


English Language Arts/Literacy Grade 3 Unit One
Sample Daily Performance Tasks/Prompts

DAYS
12
-
13

Text One
:

“Catalog Cats” of
The Stories
Julian Tells
, Ann Cameron

Text Connections

These chapters
continue to build on the
family
relationship
s, particularly
between Julian and his brother
.

Text Two:

“Our Garden” of
The Stories
Julian Tells
, Ann Cameron

Reader and Task Considerations

These
chapters can be used as a read along (an expert reader reads aloud as students follow along with an individual copy of the
text) and then analyzed through whole
-
class or smaller, collaborative group discussion.

(
RL.3.10
)

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS/PROMPTS



Ongoing throughout the unit:
Build a vocabulary display that students can rely on in their writing. Define unknown and multiple
-
meaning words using context
clues. Illustrate the various word
relationships. Display these words for students to use when they write. (
RL.3.4
;
L.3.4a; L.3.5c, L.3.6
)



Ongoing throughout the unit
:
Analyze the
syntax and meaning
of various phrases and sentences in

each chapter. Engage students in deconstructing the various
sentences in the text to explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs and how each contributes to
th
e meaning of the sentence, section,
and the essay as a whole. Also, identify figurative phrases and discuss the difference between literal and non
-
literal and the various meanings of the phrases.
(
RL.3.1, RL.3.4
,
L.3.1a, L.3.5a
)



Have students a
sk and answer questions about texts to demonstrate understanding of the text, referring to the text as a basis for the answer
. Encourage student
question asking by providing question stems or
conversation starters

and developing a routine to monitor that all students are participating in the question asking
and answering. (
RL.3.1
,
SL.3.1a
-
d, SL.3.2, SL.3.6
)

Sample questions for “Catalog Cats”
:

-

Recount the events of this chapter. Why mi
ght Huey suspect that Julian is not being truthful about the catalog?
Why might Huey believe Julian is telling the
truth? How do you know this? How does information in the previous chapter help you understand the events and relationships in

this chapter? (
RL.3.1, RL.3.3,
RL.3.5
)

-

Describe what Julian’s father thinks of Julian’s actions. How does he show his feelings?

(
RL.3.1
,

RL.3.3
)

-

What does Julian learn from his father? What can we learn from that lesson
?

(
RL.3.1, R
L
.3.2
, RL.3.3
)

Sample questions for

Our Garden”
:

-

What is the father’s motivation for having Julian and Hue
y plant and take care of a garden? (
RL.3.1, RL.3.3
)

-

How are
Huey and Julian able to enjoy their vegetables? (
RL.3.1
, RL.3.3
)



Ongoing throughout the unit
: In journals, following the reading of each chapter, recount the key details and then describe each character (e.g., their t
raits,
motivations, feelings), referring to and noting specific details from the text. As each chapter i
s read, create a new entry. Then conduct a class discussion to explain
how the actions and experiences of each contribute to the sequence of events. For example: How does Julian’s “storytelling” g
et him in and out of trouble? How
does he use stories to mak
e sense of situation and relate to others? After reading all the chapters in
The Stories Julian Tells
, work collaboratively and using the
journal entries to create a graphic organizer that compares and contrasts the characters and their experiences. Then d
etermine a central message or lesson from
the text and explain how it is conveyed through the characters. Publish the graphic organizer using technology, and post the
organizer for the class to view. Then
use the various organizers to engage students in a
class discussion about the various messages and lessons determined from the text. Explore how each message or
lesson was conveyed and prompt students to analyze how storytelling is important for building relationships, adding enjoyment

to our lives, and le
arning about our
pasts. (
RL.3.1, RL.3.2, RL.3.3, RL.3.9
,
W.3.6, W.3.10
,
SL.3.1a
-
d, SL.3.2, SL.3.5, SL.3.6
,
L.3.2a, d, L.3.6
)

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A
7


English Language Arts/Literacy Grade 3 Unit One Sample Daily Performance
Tasks/Prompts

DAYS 14
-
18

Text
:

My Librarian is a Camel:
How Books are Brought
to Children Around the
World
, Margriet Ruurs

Text Connections

This text connects to the Unit Focus by exemplifying the importan
ce of
books
. It depicts
the many different ways in which
children
are provided access to literature
.

Reader and Task
Considerations

This is a complex informational text. Students should not be expected to read the entire text independently. Consider conduct
ing a
read along with one of the entries and then allowing students to read another entry in collaborative groups.

(
RI.3.10
)

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS/PROMPTS



Read and discuss one of the entries as a

class. Determine which entry to read by engaging students with the text features (i.e., the map, Table of Contents)
to select a country to study as a whole class. Then read the Introduction and the selected excerpt. Analyze the text as a cla
ss to recount
the key details from
the text, including information gained from the illustrations and other key text features (i.e., sidebars), and explain how e
ach key detail works together to
determine a main idea of the excerpt. Then ask students to describe the conne
ction between particular paragraphs in the text: How does the author
organize the information to support the main idea? Record knowledge gained from the reading on a graphic organizer or in a jo
urnal entry.

Then, working in
collaborative groups, read an ad
ditional entry from the text (each group will have a different entry) and repeat a similar analysis process using a graphic
organizer or journals.

(
RI.3.1, RI.3.2, RI.3.4, RI.3.5, RI.3.7, RI.3.
8, RI.3.10
)



Then engage in a short research project to gather additional information about the country, their children, their educational

systems, and their access to
books. Provide students with specific question
s to answer for their research. While resea
rching, take notes and sort the gathered information into
categories based on which teacher
-
provided question it answers. Then have students survey family members,
classmates
, adults around school, etc.
about
their favorite books, what they learned from th
ose books,
and from
where they get books and information
.

Work in collaborative groups to prepare a brief
presentation, including a visual display, of the information gathered from their additional reading of
My Librarian is a Camel
, their research, and th
eir
surveys. Present the findings to the class. As each group presents, record the information gained (asking questions as necess
ary) and then compare and
contrast the most important points and key details that each group presented. (
RI.3.1, RI.3.6, RI.3.7, RI.3.9, RI.3.10
,
W.3.7, W.3.8
,
SL.3.3, SL.3.4
)



Finally, work in collaborative groups to create an informational report that explains how books are viewed throughout the wor
ld.
The rep
ort should
introduce the topic, group
related information together, include
illustrations,
details
,

and facts that
suppo
rt and
develop the topic, use linking words to
connect ideas and information, and include a concluding statement or section. Students should work as a group to revise the r
eport, focusing on using
grade
-
appropriate words and phrases that have an effect on
the reader, and make sure the report demonstrates standard English grammar, usage,
conventions, and spelling. They will then type the report.
(
RI.3.1;

RI.3.6; RI.3.9
;
W
.3.2a
-
d
;

W.3.4
;

W.3.5
;

W.3.6
;

W.3.10
;

SL.3.1a
-
d
;
L.3.1b, d, h
-
i; L.3.2d
-
g;
L.3.3a, L.3.4a, L.3
.6
)

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Sample
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A
8


English Language Arts/Literacy Grade 3 Unit One Sample Daily Performance Tasks/Prompts

DAY
S

1
9
-
20

Text
:

“Because of Figs” from
The Stories Julian Tells
,
Ann Cameron

Text Connections


Because of Figs
” from
The Stories Julian Tells

continues to
develop an
on
going
theme. It provides reader opportunities to
ex
amine
Julian as a character and his
experiences from story to story
.

Reader and Task Considerations

This chapter can be
read independently and then discussed in
collaborative groups or as a whole class
. (
RL.3.10
,
RF.3.3a, c
)

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS/PROMPTS



Ongoing throughout the unit:
Build a vocabulary display that students can rely on in their writing. Define unknown and multiple
-
meaning words using
context clues. Illustrate the various word relationships. Display these words for students to use when they write. (
RL.3.4
;
L.3.4a; L.3.5c, L.3.6
)



Ongoing throughout the unit:
Analyze the
syntax and meaning
of various phrases and sentences in

each chapter. Engage stud
ents in deconstructing the
various sentences in the text to explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs and how each contrib
utes to the meaning of the
sentence, section, and the essay as a whole. Also, identify figurative phrase
s and discuss the
difference between
literal and non
-
literal and the various
meanings of the phrases. (
RL.3.1, RL.3.4
,
L.3.1a, L.3.
5a
)



Ongoing throughout the unit
: In journals, following the reading of each chapter, recount the key details and then describe each character (e.g., their t
raits,
motivations, feelings), referring to and noting specific details from the text. As each chapt
er is read, create a new entry. Then conduct a class discussion to
explain how the actions and experiences of each contribute to the sequence of events. For example: How does Julian’s “storyte
lling” get him in and out of
trouble? How does he use stories to

make sense of situation and relate to others? After reading all the chapters in
The Stories Julian Tells
, work
collaboratively and using the journal entries to create a graphic organizer that compares and contrasts the characters and th
eir experiences. Th
en determine
a central message or lesson from the text and explain how it is conveyed through the characters. Publish the graphic organize
r using technology, and post
the organizer for the class to view. Then use the various organizers to engage students i
n a class discussion about the various messages and lessons
determined from the text. Explore how each message or lesson was conveyed and prompt students to analyze how storytelling is
important for building
relationships, adding enjoyment to our lives, an
d learning about our pasts. (
RL.3.1, RL.3.2, RL.3.3, RL.3.9
,
W.3.6, W.3.10
,
SL.3.1a
-
d, SL.3.2, SL.3.5, SL.3.6
,
L.3.2a, d, L.3.6
)



Since this text is being read independently, it can be used to determine student’s ability to read and understand text at thi
s point
in the unit. Before
discussing the text as a class, ask students to write answers to two to three questions about the text and turn it in (e.g.,
Why does Julian eat the fig leaves?
What happens as a result? What does Julian learn from this experience? ). T
hen conduct a class discussion in which students a
sk and answer questions
about texts to demonstrate understanding of the text, referring to the text as a basis for the answer. Encourage student ques
tion asking by providing
question stems or
conversation starters

and developing a routine to monitor that all students are participating in the question asking and answering. (
RL
.3.1,
RL.3.2, RL.3.10
,
SL.3.1a
-
d, SL.3.2, SL.3.6
)

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A
9


English Language Arts/Literacy Grade 3 Unit One Sample Daily Performance
Tasks/Prompts

DAY
S

21
-
24

Text:


“My Very Strange

Teeth” from
The Stories
Julian Tells
, Ann
Cameron

Reader and Task Considerations

This chapter can be used as a read along (an expert reader reads
aloud as students follow along with an individual copy of the text)
and then analyzed through whole
-
class or smaller, collaborative group discussion.

(
RL.3.10
)

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS/PROMPTS



Ongoing throughout the unit:
Build a vocabulary display that students can rely on in their writing. Define unknown and multiple
-
meaning words using
context clues. Illustrate the various word relationships. Display these words for students to use when
they write. (
RL.3.4
;
L.3.4a; L.3.5c, L.3.6
)



Ongoing throughout the unit:
Analyze the
syntax and meaning
of various phrases and sent
ences in

each chapter. Engage students in deconstructing the
various sentences in the text to explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs and how each contrib
utes to the meaning of the
sentence, section, and the essay as a whole
. Also, identify figurative phrases and discuss the
difference between
literal and non
-
literal and the various
meanings of the phrases. (
RL.3.1, RL.3.4
,
L.3.1a, L.3.5a
)



Ongoing throughout the unit
: In journals, following the reading of each chapter, recount the key details and then describe each character (e.g., their t
raits,
motivations, feelings
), referring to and noting specific details from the text. As each chapter is read, create a new entry. Then conduct a class
discussion to
explain how the actions and experiences of each contribute to the sequence of events. For example: How does Julian’s
“storytelling” get him in and out of
trouble? How does he use stories to make sense of situation and relate to others? After reading all the chapters in
The Stories Julian Tells
, work
collaboratively and using the journal entries to create a graphic organi
zer that compares and contrasts the characters and their experiences. Then determine
a central message or lesson from the text and explain how it is conveyed through the characters. Publish the graphic organize
r using technology, and post
the organizer for

the class to view. Then use the various organizers to engage students in a class discussion about the various messages and le
ssons
determined from the text. Explore how each message or lesson was conveyed and prompt students to analyze how storytelling is

important for building
relationships, adding enjoyment to our lives, and learning about our pasts. (
RL.3.1, RL.3.2, RL.3.3, RL.3.9
,
W.3.6, W.3.10
,
SL.3.1a
-
d, SL.3.2, SL.3.5, SL.3.6
,
L.3.2a, d, L.3.6
)



Write an opinion essay that describes how Julian has changed
in this text. Focus on how he interacts with Huey, what his father teaches him, and what he
learns (or doesn’t) from those lessons. Refer to the text and key details as the basis for writing. Introduce an opinion, pro
vide reasons to support the
opinion, us
e linking words and phrases to connect opinions and reasons, and provide a conclusion. Guide students through the writing pro
cess and engage
them in peer revision and editing, focusing on using grade
-
appropriate words and phrases for effect, and demonstrat
ing proper grammar, usage,
conventions, and spelling.
(
RL.3.1; RL.3.2; RL3.3
;
W.3.1a
-
d; W.3.4; W.3.5; W.3.10
;
L.3.1b, d, h
-
i; L.3.2d
-
g; L.3.3a, L.3.4a, L.3.6
)

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A
10


English Language Arts/Literacy Grade 3 Unit One Sample Daily Performance Tasks/Prompts

DAY 25

Text
:

“Gloria Who Might Be
My Best Friend” from
The Stories Julian Tells
,
Ann Cameron

Text Connections

In “
Gloria Who Might Be My Best Friend
” from The Stories Julian Tells, Julian meets a new neighbor, Gloria, who earns his trust
(even though Gloria is a
girl) and they quickly build a friendship. This connects to the unit focus and the other stories in the book
because it offers the reader more interaction with Julian and his storytelling and learning new lessons.

Reader and Task Considerations

This chapter can be read independently and then discussed in collab
orative groups or as a whole class. (
RL.3.10
,
RF.3.3a, c
)

PERFORMANCE TASKS/PROMPTS



Ongoing throughout the unit:
Build a
vocabulary display that students can rely on in their writing. Define unknown and multiple
-
meaning words using
context clues. Illustrate the various word relationships. Display these words for students to use when they write. (
RL.3.4
;
L.3.4a; L.3.5c, L.3.6
)



Ongoing throughout the unit:
Analyze the syntax and meaning of various phrases and sentences in

each chapter. Engage students in
deconstructing the
various sentences in the text to explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs and how each contrib
utes to the meaning of the
sentence, section, and the essay as a whole. Also, identify figurative phrases and di
scuss the difference between literal and non
-
literal and the various
meanings of the phrases. (
RL.3.1, RL.3.4
,
L.3.1a, L.3.5a
)



Have

students ask and answer questions about texts to demonstrate understanding of the text, referring to the text as a basis for
the answer. Encourage
student question asking by providing question stems or
conversation starters

and developing a routine to monitor that all students are participating in the
question asking and answering. (
RL.3.1
,
SL.3.1a
-
d, SL.3.2, SL.3.6
)

Sample questions for “Gloria Who Might Be My Best Friend”
:

-

How does Julian’s feelings towards Gloria change? Trace Gloria’s actions through the
text and discuss the events which allow you to notice what type of
friend Gloria appears to be. (
RL.3.1, RL.3.2, RL.3.3, RL.3.5
)



Ongoing throughout the unit
: In journals, following the reading
of each chapter, recount the key details and then describe each character (e.g., their traits,
motivations, feelings), referring to and noting specific details from the text. As each chapter is read, create a new entry.
Then conduct a class discussion to
e
xplain how the actions and experiences of each contribute to the sequence of events. For example: How does Julian’s “storytel
ling” get him in and out of
trouble? How does he use stories to make sense of situation and relate to others? After reading all the

chapters in
The Stories Julian Tells
, work
collaboratively and using the journal entries to create a graphic organizer that compares and contrasts the characters and th
eir experiences. Then determine
a central message or lesson from the text and explain h
ow it is conveyed through the characters. Publish the graphic organizer using technology, and post
the organizer for the class to view. Then use the various organizers to engage students in a class discussion about the vario
us messages and lessons
determin
ed from the text. Explore how each message or lesson was conveyed and prompt students to analyze how storytelling is importan
t for building
relationships, adding enjoyment to our lives, and learning about our pasts. (
RL.3.1, RL.3.2, RL.3.3, RL.3.9
,
W.3.6, W.3.10
,
SL.3.1a
-
d, SL.3.2, SL.3.5, SL.3.6
,
L.3.2a, d, L.3.6
)

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A
11


English Language Arts/Literacy Grade 3 Unit One Sample Daily Performance Tasks/Prompts

DAYS
30
-
3
1

Text
:

The Fantastic Flying
Books of Mr. Morris
Lessmore
, William Joyce
(Short Film)

Text Connections

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore

depicts the curative power of stories. The main character experiences a great
tragedy when he loses his most
prized possessions, books.

This text connects to the unit focus by offering opportunities for students
to make connections about the importance of books and storytelling.

Reader and Task Considerations

Make sure to use the wordless version with no voiceovers. Use this
short film as a model for how to compose stories from images.
This is in preparation for the Extension Task.

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS/PROMPTS



Watch the film in its entirety.
Then rewatch the film and stop at key scenes throughout:

-

A
nalyze how of the
illustrations contribute to the setting and the mood conveyed throughout the

film:
What does the change in color signify
? Refer to
details from the film to support the answers.
Does this film happen over a short or long period of time? How do you know?
(
RL.3.7
,
Rl.3.1
)

-

Discuss how each part of the film builds on the next.
(
RL.3.1,
RL.3.5, R
L.3.6
)

-

What is the importance of the story that Mr. Morris Lessmore’s writes? (
RL.3.1, RL.3.2
)



Then, as a
shared writing

or typing

t
ask
, produce

sentences

that convey the message of the illustrations depicted in the scene. Allow students to express
th
eir own point of view

based on the visual images
to develop

sentences.
As students produce sentences, ask them to
identify which

part of the
images
help
ed

them come to
their
decision
about what to include. Then take the sentences and put them into an order
ed narrative. Read the story in its entirety
and a
sk for suggestions from students to improve the response

(adding dialogue, expanding sentences, using different words or phrases for different
effects)
, revising it as necessary.

Determine a central message

or lesson in the narrative. Make any additional changes as necessary. Throughout the shared
writing, model how to use
standard English grammar,
usage
, capitalization, punctuation, and spell
ing

and grade
-
appropriate words and phras
es.
(
RL.3.1,
RL.3.2, R
L.3.3, RL.3.5, RL.3.6,

RL.3.7
,

W.3
.3a
-
d, W.3.4,
W3.5,
W.3.6
,
L.3.1a
-
b, d, h
-
i; L.3.2a, c
-
g; L.3.3a; L.3.6
)

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Sample
Pacing Chart