Classroom Construction Initiative

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Classroom
Construction
Initiative

Inception Report





















March

2013









Table of Contents


1

Introduction

1

2

Project Description

1

3

Context of the Philippine

Australian Classroom
Construction Initiative

2

4

The CCI Work
-
streams

3

5

Inception Period Progress

4

6

Key Issues Arising During the Inception Period

16

7

Development of Implementation Plans

19

8

Risk Management

23

9

Gender and Disability Awareness

23

10

Resource and Budget Implications of the Work Plans

24

Annex 1: School Classroom Plans/Drawings Review

26

Annex 2: Physical and Environmental Screening check
lists

41

Annex 3: SBP4BE Standard Implementation Manual

49

Annex 4: Activity Matrix of SBP4BE M&E Activities

51

Annex 5: The PFSED Capacity Assessment Matrix

55

Annex 6: CCI Website Snapshot

61

Annex 7: Inception Workshop

63

Annex 8: Structure of the Bid Evaluation Report

66

Annex 9: The 15 Key Inspection Points during Cla
ssroom
Construction

68

Annex 10A: Provisional List of Schools Included in SBP4BE
Batch 1 Implementation Program (by region)

74

Annex 10
-
B: Work Plans for Technical Support Unit (Core Team)
during SBP4BE Implementation

79

Annex 11: Risk Management Plan

81

Annex
12: Red Flags to Identify Emerging Risks

88

Annex 13: CCI Gender and Disability Awareness Strategy

94

Philippines

Australia Classroom Construction Inception Report





Acronyms


AusAID

Australian Agency for International Development

BEST

Basic Education Sector Transformation

CCI

Phil
ippines

Australia

Classroom Construction Initiative

CCS


Classroom Construction Study

CPES

Constructors Performance Evaluation System

DepEd

Department of Education

FM

Financial Management

GoP

Government of the Philippines

PFSED

Physical Facilities and Schools Engineering
Division

PIPES

Project Implementation and Project Evaluation System

PMU

Project Management Unit (within PFSED)

PCC

Project Co
-
ordinating Committee

PPP

Public Private Partnerships

PSS

Partnerships Scoping Study

RAPS

Research and Policy Studies

SBP4BE

School Building Program for Basic Education

ToRs

Terms of Reference

TSU

Technical Services Unit



Philipp
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Australia Classroom Construction Inception Report

1


1

Introduction


This Report has been prepared for the Australian Agency for

International Development (AusAID) and
the Philippine Department of Education (DepEd). It describes the tasks and associated services both
currently being performed and also to be performed in the forthcoming months by Cardno Emerging
Markets (Australia)
Pty Ltd.

The report reflects both the significant initial fact
-
finding undertaken by the project team and the on
-
going consultative process between the CCI Technical Services Unit (TSU), AusAID, and DepEd
throughout the project inception period (i.e. Novem
ber 2012


February 2013). It also specifically
documents the consensus reached during the Inception Workshop.
1

The implementation approach and the various work
-
plans as described in this report are in
accordance with the Scope of Services agreed in the co
ntract between Cardno Emerging Markets
(Australia) and AusAID.

The report has been drafted as succinctly as possible with relevant detail being placed in supporting
appendices.

2

Project Description

2.1

Objective and Goals

The Government of Australia is providi
ng a grant of AU$20 million for the CCI Program over 20
months, from November 2012 through to July 2014, as one of its current programs to support the
Australia
-
Philippines Development Strategy which
operationalizes

Australia’s goal of improving access
to
and quality of education for Filipino children.

The CCI is a project designed to assist the Government of the Philippines (GoP), and specifically
DepEd, to improve educational learning outcomes by:

>

Developing a strategy for

establishing a comprehensive an
d sustainable approach to classroom
construction in the Philippines over the next decade.

>

Developing the capacity of DepEd, specifically the Physical Facilities and School Engineering
Division (PFSED) to successfully implement large scale classroom constru
ction programs

>

Pro
-
actively supporting PFSED to implement the AusAID funded SBP4BE classroom construction
program which is targeted to create approximately 800 classrooms during the project period.

CCI has therefore both short and long term goals, aimed at

contributing to this overarching goal,

>

In the short term, to implement the SBP4BE program


comprising approximately 180 projects
which will involve construction of approximately 800 classrooms and to strengthen PFSED capacity
to plan and implement; and




1

Inception Workshop held Pampanga 6
th



7
th

February

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Australia Classroom Construction Inception Report

2


>

I
n the longer term, to develop a strategy to create an effective and sustainable approach to
classroom construction, informed by research and evaluation on the various alternative modalities,
drawing upon good practice both in the Philippines and in the Asi
a region generally.

3

Context of the
Philippine

Aus
tralian

Classroom
Construction Initiative

3.1

The Influence of the Physical Classroom Environment on Learning

Learning is a complex activity that tests students’ motivation and physical condition. During a scho
ol
day, students and teachers struggle with noise, glare, absence of adequate light, mildew and mould,
dust, lack of fresh air and inappropriate temperatures. Most Philippines schools (apart from the newly
constructed ones), are now 40


50 years old built

in the post
-
war boom when communities were
getting back to normal. These older schools are usually poorly maintained and with static and
inflexible designs as well as being a source of health threatening materials such as asbestos, chalk
dust, cleaning su
pplies and lab chemicals contributing to general poor air quality.

There are a number of studies now available that conclude that the quality of the physical environment
significantly affects student achievement. One important factor in the design of facil
ities is the
provision of appropriate spaces for teachers so that they feel comfortable in their work environment.
The space that teachers use to share professional knowledge, form professional relationships and
accomplish daily duties must be an integral
part of school

/
classroom design, and it is acknowledged
that these spaces are just as important as the design of the classroom. This need not be anything
more than the provision of a bright, personal area within which teachers might recharge their energy

during the day and interact freely with other staff.

There is considerable debate about the merits of either

open learning spaces


or traditional classroom

boxes


organi
s
ed into lines of desks, and a volume of research now shows that the way that a teac
her
organi
s
es classroom space is a very significant factor in the way students learn. Researchers agree
that different arrangements of furniture within a classroom are required for different teaching and
learning contexts and subjects, and so it is essenti
al that facilities are designed to allow such flexibility
in approach. For Philippines schools, this means more flexible (modular) furniture in classrooms that
are not so crowded that rearrangement of spaces in different ways is not possible. More use of l
arger
classroom spaces with dividers provided to separate areas is one solution.

The Philippines does not yet appear to have embraced the concept of providing temporary
-
or

demountable


classrooms to cater for unexpected shortages of spaces in various loca
tions, either due
to an influx of students who have migrated to a new area or from natural calamities or conflict that has
damaged facilities. It would seem to be efficient and effective in the short
-
term for temporary facilities
that may have a life to 3
to 5 years to be erected in various places, especially if the classroom size for
effective learning is exceeded. This is a model that should be investigated.

We also now know that physical conditions in a classroom affect students’ engagement, attainment,
attendance and well
-
being. These are factors such as:

>

Temperature and air quality

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Australia Classroom Construction Inception Report

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>

Noise levels (external and internal)

>

Colour schemes used inside the learning space (bright colours for younger students, and also for
males; subdued colours for adolescents
and for females). This is still contested research but
attention needs to be directed to colour schemes.

>

Space in classrooms for visual displays of student learning is important.

In many countries it has been determined that school designs should not be i
mposed or bought

off the
shelf




they must be the result of an articulated vision which should be facilitated by architects and
designers working with school stakeholders (students, teachers and parents). In the Philippine
context, this is not immediatel
y feasible given the urgency to construct new classrooms rapidly and
urgently, but it should be a longer
-
term vision as school communities take more responsibility for
managing their own schools.

The provision of adequate sanitation including continuous wa
ter supply is an essential factor in
promoting facilities within which students will feel comfortable. Separate toilets for boys and girls are
critical at both elementary and secondary level. Girls are maturing into adolescence at an earlier age
and freque
ntly at upper elementary level, and so they must have access to fresh sanitary conditions
for their personal comfort during their menstruation times. Where adequate piped water supplies are
not available then water should be harvested and stored in large a
nd enclosed storage tanks. In the
Philippines, much water is wasted due to run off instead of being collected through adequate spouting
that channels water into the storage tank.

In this context, CCI is therefore very timely in that the GoP recognised that

it is facing a critical
overcrowding in schools due to a shortage of classrooms nationwide, and which it is now recognised
as having an adverse impact on the learning achievement of students. DepEd estimated that
approximately 67,000 classrooms need to be

built to address the serious issue of classroom shortage
in the Philippines.


The Strategy Paper developed which will be developed as the final stage of CCI Research and Policy
Studies (RAPS) work program will provide a

route map


for the future approach

to classroom
construction design and construction in the Philippines over the next decade and will specifically
inform the design of CCI Phase 2 which, it is planned, will be a component of the AusAID
-
funded
Basic Education Sector Transformation

(BEST) pr
ogram.


4

The CCI Work
-
streams


4.1

Component 1:
SBP4BE


SBP4BE provides for the construction of approximately 180



200

one storey


or

two storey four
classroom buildings, together with the provision of school furniture, and with separate toilets for boys
and girls and with ramp access for disabled pupils.


The classrooms are to be constructed on sites at existing schools in
provinces of

Regions 3 (Aurora,
Bataan, Bulacan, Pampanga, Tarlac, Zambales) and Region 4
-
A (Cavite, Laguna, Batangas, Rizal,
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Australia Classroom Construction Inception Report

4


Quezon). The initial
Batch 1 implementation
schedule cove
r
s
4
9

sites with 200 classrooms in Region
3, and
61

sites with
468

classrooms in Regi
on 4
-
A).


4.2

Compone
nt 2:
Capacity Development


TSU will complete the capacity assessment tasks in two phases:

>

Initially, the focus would be solely on PFSED and its capacity to successfully implement SBP4BE


based on the present organi
s
ational structure.

>

Later, in a second Phase TSU will take a broader view and examine DepEd’s overall capacity to
implement the massively expanded construction programs now being planned.

4.3

Component 3:
Research and Policy Studies (RAPS)


The objective of the CCI RAPS work
-
stre
am is to:



Develop a strategy for a comprehensive and sustainable approach to classroom construction
informed by research and evaluation of the various modalities.



The development of this strategic road map will be based upon the findings and conclusion
s of two
inter
-
linked research studies:

>

The Partnerships Scoping Study (PSS)

will be a comparative analysis of current models of
classroom construction in the Philippines. The RAPS Team will describe the key features of each
model, links between the lead a
gency and the
DepEd
, and identify strengths and weaknesses of
the respective models.

>

The Classroom Construction Study (CCS)
will be an in
-
depth analysis of the efficiency and
effectiveness of planning, procurement, design and construction processes focuse
d on the models
identified for study in the preceding PSS and will include
The scope for improving:



design



materials utilisation



hazard proofing of classrooms



utilising schools in disaster management.


5

Inception Period Progress


The project formally comme
nced at the Inception Meeting held in DepEd PFSED on 27 November
2012. The core team was fully mobilised from the outset, while the RAPS team was mobilised in early
January 2013.


Since then, the Project team has completed a detailed and comprehensive stru
ctured program of fact
-
finding and stakeholder consultations.
Specifically, these
key tasks as discussed in the succeeding
section were completed or, in some cases, are on
-
going.


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Australia Classroom Construction Inception Report

5


5.1

SBP4BE



Classroom Construction and Design


At the outset of the project,
the Project Management Unit
-
B (PMU
-
B) of PFSED informed the TSU of
two standard classroom construction designs (i.e. a single storey 4 classroom design and a two storey
4 classroom design


both with external male, female and disabled toilets) were develop
ed and been
decided that both designs would be used for the classrooms to be constructed under CCI, unless
specific site conditions made this not possible.

Accordingly the CCI Infrastructure Specialist, together
with the two TSU engineers worked closely wi
th PFSED design staff to assess the designs.

The
comments on the review of the standard designs are set out in A
nnex

1.


It is however highlighted that the designs meet gender and disability requirements
. B
oth designs
include

separate toilet facilities for

boys and girls, and
also they provide both a separate toilet suitable
for disabled pupils and
wheelchair access

to classrooms
.

The TSU team

concluded that while generally, the designs were appropriate for this project, they
found a number of minor issues
which needed further technical clarifications, and which the team
worked with its PFSED counterparts to make the relevant amendments.


The only substantive point raised was related to the design for two windows in each classroom,
wherein a recommendation t
o introduce a three
-
window design in the Batch 2 implementation program
to allow a useful

real


on
-
site comparison on user
-
benefits of the two
-

and three
-
window designs to
inform future designs.

This point will be further considered during the planning fo
r the Batch 2
Implementation program.


5.2

SBP4BE



Site Inspection and Validation Surveys


Prior to the start of the project, PFSED prepared a list of 184 potential project sites for CCI
implementation.

TSU engineers have,

to date, conducted site inspection a
nd validation surveys and in
the process, assessed an updated list of
177

potential sites in Regions 3 (75

sites in, Bataan, San
Fernando City, Angeles City, Pampanga, Nueva Ecija, Cabanatuan City, T
arlac, and Zambales) and
4
-
A (102

sites in Cavite, Cavite

City, Dasmarinas City, Laguna, Batangas, Batangas City, Lipa City
Tanauan City, Rizal, Antipolo, Quezon, and Laguna).


In subsequent discussion
s
, it was further agreed that a two
-
stage implementation program should be
planned, wherein:

>

Batch 1


which wou
ld comprise the most straightforward sites would commence in
late
March
2013


and would cover approximately 50% of the individual sites

>

Batch 2


which would comprise those sites where neither of the two standard designs could be
used and which require a
dditional planning and design, to commence in
mid
July 2013, to cover
the remaining 60
-
70 sites.


It was further agreed in discussions between the TSU and the PFSED
-
PMU that only sites on which
one of the two standard designs could be constructed should be

selected for Batch 1 in order to make
the initial implementation program as straightforward as possible.


The TSU engineers, working together with the PFSED divisional engineers, began a survey of all
potential sites identify in order to identify those fo
r inclusion in the Batch 1 implementation program.
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6


One TSU engineer was allocated to review the Region 3 sites and one TSU engineer was given
responsibility to review the Region 4
-
A sites.


In addition to checking to ensure whether an individual would be
suitable for Batch 1, the TSU
engineers also checked other key physical aspects



i.e.

>

Does the site have electricity, water and sewage facilities?

>

Is the site likely to be at risk from flooding



and if so what remedial work is needed to mitigate the
risk

(e.g., increasing elevation) to address effect of inadequate drainage systems (flooding)?

>

Does the site have disabled access for disabled persons from the road
-
side to the school
entrance?

>

Is the site accessible from the main road?

>

Does the site have acce
ss to supply and delivery of construction materials?


The site inspections also assessed any potential environmental risk that the proposed construction
would create.


A sample completed

Physical Site Assessment Checklist


and the

Environmental Screening

Checklist


used by the TSU engineers when conducting the surveys are shown in A
nne
x 2.


Sites which did not meet the criteria for inclusion in the Batch 1 program, either because of lack of
adequate space for use of one or the other of the two standard de
signs or because
these

are already
beneficiaries of other projects, either

with

on
-
going or planned
construction
for completion in 2013
.
Sites unsuitable for use of one or other of the two standard designs

will be
subject of
further
discussion with PFSED
-
P
MU in order to ascertain whether they can be included in the Batch 2
implementation program.


The
detailed
implementation time table for Batch
1
is set out in Secti
on 7.1 below. Similarly
,

an
indicative timetable for the implementation of Batch 2 is also
included in Section 7.1 below.


5.3

Development of SBP4BE
Standard Implementation Manual


In order to provide a uniform structured basis for the conduct of the proc
esses to be followed, a
“Procedures
” manual

containing a detailed
set of
the
implementing
guide
lines and
procedures

for the
implementation of t
he SBP4BE program

has been developed

and agreed by PFSED.


The Implementation Manual has been issued as a “stand alone” document


an overview of the
structure and detailed content of the Manual is given in A
nnex

3.

The
Manual

is broadly

set out in
the following
sections
:

Table
1
: SBP4BE Standard Implementation
Manual

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Australia Classroom Construction Inception Report

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S.N.

Section

Content

1

Pre
-
bid procedures

Site inspection and environmental screening procedure.

2

Procurement

Tendering and bid award process

3

Construction

Procedures to be applied during the construction process
,
particularly
Quality

Assurance during
construction, including

the Schedule of
I
nspection P
oints

during construction.

4

Post Construction

Procedures
covering the Defects Liability Period, Warrant Inspections
and the Issue of the Certificate of Final Acceptance.

5

Financial Management

Specific financial arrangements in place to control the funds
-
flow
process and procedures of the SBP4BE program


The Manual will be used as the basis for the training to be given
to the divisions involved at the
two
Regional

/
Divisional level training workshops
which are
scheduled for 19
th

-
20
th

March
in Pampanga
for Region 3 and
21
st

and 22
nd

March in
Tagaytay for Region 4A,

Note: Although the
Manual has

initially been drafted specifically to cover the SBP4BE program

it

will
subsequently
be modified so that the
DepEd
regions and divisions not included in the SBP4BE
program can
also
be trained in the us
e of
a set of

Standard Operating Procedures applicable to all
PFSED classroom construction activities.


5.4

Development of Two Sets of Standard SBP4BE Bid Documentation


In order to both accelerate implementation of Batch1
projects
and to provide a uniform str
uctured
basis for the conduct of the procurement process, the TSU has drafted two sets of standard bid
documentation i.e. one set to cover the 4 classroom single storey bid and award process and one set
to cover the 4 classroom two storey bid and award pro
cess.

The documentation is contained in three volumes


as follows:


Volume 1

>

Invitation to Bid (advertisement)

>

Instruction to Bidders

>

Bid Data sheet

>

General Conditions of Contract

>

Special Conditions of the Contract

>

Technical Specifications (includes
the specified Inspection points during construction)

>

Sample Forms


Volume 2

>

Preamble

>

Bid Proposal Statement

>

Bill of Quantities*


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Australia Classroom Construction Inception Report

8


* As a standard procedure, to being prepared by PFSED


Volume 3

>

The Drawings


In addition, a priced Bill of Quantities will be
prepared by PFSED and forwarded to each procuring
entity so that the respective bids and awards committees at the division level can have a point of
reference when evaluating bids.


This documentation will be introduced at the Regional

/
Divisional level t
raining workshops scheduled
for week commencing 11
th

March in Pampanga for Region 3 and Tagaytay City for Region 4
-
A.


5.5

Project Monitoring for Progress and Evaluation of Outcomes of Classroom
Construction


An important component of CCI project management
involves the ability to provide timely and
accurate information relating to the progress of works for classroom construction.

It should also be
able to present basis for attributing the extent to which CCI project accomplishments contribute to
achieving th
e desired outcomes or objectives of AusAID development assistance in improving access
to education in the Philippines.


In order to
manage and monitor
the
inter
-
relat
ionships of project activities
,

outputs a
nd
outcomes
, a

CCI
M & E

framework
has been deve
loped.

This approach is illustrated diagrammatically below
:


Diagram
1
.

CCI Project Results Framework

T
he
M & E
framework will serve as
a

primary point of reference
in the monitoring of project outputs
.

The results framework as p
roposed will be the subject of subsequent planning meetings with the
relevant units at the DepEd central office, primarily with the PFSE
D monitoring and evaluation

unit and
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Australia Classroom Construction Inception Report

9


representatives of the Office of Planning Services, in order to assure that these a
re in line with the
overall institutional goals of the Department in providing quality education access.


Progress Monitoring.

The

TSU, jointly with identified PFSED counterparts at the Central Office PMU
and also at Division level, will conduct progress monitoring activities that will track:

>

Construction quality and compliance to standard civil works standards

>

Status of project
accomplishments v.v. targets per school

>

Compliance to bid processes and systems

>

Compliance to funds management process flow and systems

>

Quality and ability of private contractors implementing construction


To be able to provide timely and useful informatio
n to the CCI project management team, key
implementation milestones will be monitored to measure progress. Information on the status of these
implementation milestones in relation to specific success indicators and “red flag conditions, will be
reported t
o the
quarterly
Project Coordinating Committee

meetings
, along with
, as necessary

recommended actions to mitigate any delays in the schedules.

These milestone implementation risks
are

summarised
in a table set out in Annex 12.

Outcomes Monitoring and Evalu
ation.

In order to effectively report on the extent of CCI’s outputs to
higher level objective of improving access to education, the TSU will jointly implement evaluation
activities focusing on any, or all, of the following questions:


>

Process



How well was

the project designed and implemented (i.e. its quality)


>

Outcome



To what extent did the project meet the overall needs?



Was there any significant change and to what extent was it attributable to the project?



How valuable are the outcomes to the organisat
ion, other stakeholders, and participants?


>

Investment



Was the project cost effective?



Were the identified fiduciary risks properly managed?

>

Learnings



What worked and what did not?



What were unintended consequences?



What were emergent trends in the process

of implementing the project?


>

What Next




Can the project be scaled up?



Can the project be replicated elsewhere?

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Australia Classroom Construction Inception Report

10




Is the change self
-
sustaining or does it require continued intervention?


Where it will be identified, the TSU M&E Specialist will enhance exis
ting project monitoring tools being
used by PFSED progress reporting of CCI accomplishments, and will conduct workshop meetings to
inform identified PFSED staff who will be the users of these enhanced tools.


As agreed with PFSED, CCI will adopt two evaluation tools already being implemented by PFSED


the Project Implementation and Evaluation System or PIPES, which is a performance evaluation
system of classroom construction implementers on the aspects of proj
ect
planning, procurement,
project execution, and project closure,

and the Constructors’ Performance Evaluation System
(CPES), which
is a third party
-
initiated evaluation
of the

contractors implementing classroom
construction. As part of the technical assi
stance provided by TSU, these evaluation tools will be
reviewed and where appropriate, recommendations on improving or enhancements will be presented
to PFSED for adoption, prior to mainstreaming in the M&E for the project.


Detailed Project M&E activities

will be developed, as part of the capacity building initiative and will be
discussed and agreed with PMU at the start of the implementation phase



so that
the procedures will
be in place

well before construction begins in May or June of 2013. The procedu
res will also be the
basis for divisional level training courses.

The proposed M&E
Matrix of Activities is shown in Annex

4.


5.6

PFSED Capacity Assessment


Approach


At the start of the project, the TSU HR Specialist developed a Capacity Assessment Diagnostic

Matrix
which initially identified the key functions of PFSED, both at Central Office and at Regional

/
Divisional
level, as follows:


>

Central Office



Research and Information Management



Planning and Design



Project Management



Project Monitoring and Evaluati
on



Contractor’s Performance Evaluation

>

Surveying and School Mapping




Regional

/
Divisional level



Procurement




Monitoring and Quality Assurance during Construction


The Matrix was used as the basis for assessment of strengths and weaknesses in the performance of
each function. The PFSED management, primarily through its Unit Heads provided the inputs to help
TSU to complete the Matrix. The initial findings and conclus
ions were then tested in the breakout
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11


sessions during the Inception Workshop on 6
th

February 2013. The group outputs confirmed the earlier
findings and specifically highlighted the most critical areas for capacity development.


The completed Matrix summari
s
ing current performance, by function and highlighting weaknesses is
given as
A
nne
x 5.


Key Findings and Conclusions


The most significant finding is the weakness
, specifically at times of increased workload,

in the
divisional level capacity to carry out a
ppropriate quality assurance of contractor performance during
construction
,


The current practice is that construction work
, at times has to

continue

while waiting for the divisional
engineers to visit the site to carry out the appropriate stage inspection
.

This is in part due to the lack of
an agreed inspection schedule (i.e.,
not

built into the contractual documentation), and on the failure of

divisional engineers
, due to peaks in workload

to

be
able to
immediately
visit sites
at the point that a

schedule
d inspection point is reached.

This
lack of capacity to cover peaks in workload
presents a
significant risk on the part of the DepEd
, particularly for the implementation of the SBP4BE

program
as
it may be exploited by the contractor to

cut corners


and therefore, not building in strict accordance
with standards.


A major factor creating this situation is the present manpower levels of PFSED in terms of both the
number and employment status
2

of project engineers at the division level.

At present, the
re is only one
(1) or at most two (2) project engineers in each division who are responsible for inspecting at each key
inspection point in the construction process

and it is concluded that
resources

need to be
strengthened both in the short term to minimi
se risk during the SBP4BE implementation program and
also in the longer term particularly as divisional engineering workload increases due to DepEd’s
increased classroom construction programs
. This issue is discussed further in Section 6.2 below

(Quality A
ssurance of Contractor
Performance)

Other findings indicated


>

A general lack of detailed procedures for key tasks such as procurement, (at all stages in the
process) and M&E and systems for validating work done to support stage payments. This causes
perfor
mance to be inconsistent. Similarly, the PMU operates without use of any dedicated project
management software and instead, are using Excel spread sheets to plan and monitor
performance which reduces effectiveness and efficiency.

>

A need to develop the
general management and leadership skills of the senior staff at both Central
Office and at Regional

/
Divisional level
/.

Many of these issues can be addressed by specific
training based on the newly developed Standard Operating Guidelines (see Section 5.3
above) as
discussed below (Section 7.2).

However, the steps needed to address PFSED’s lack of capacity to
carry out appropriate and timely quality assurance of contractor performance during construction is
discussed separately (Section 6.2 below).





2

Project engineers do not have plantilla

positions in the DepEd, which was identified during the Inception Workshop as a
weakness in establishing and enforcing accountabilities at work, because of the transitory or

insecure


nature of their
employment.

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Sustain
ability


Sustainability of the capacity development initiatives will be ensured by means of a two pronged
strategy:


Initial staff Training


The initial capacity development work program will be delivered through both formal and on
-
the
-
j
ob
training and wi
ll cover the
development of skill competencies as identified earlier as critical to
successful implementation of classroom construction
activities. These will include:

>

Training of
the PFSED staff at Central Office and also both PFSED and other DepEd staff
in
divisional offices on the needs to support the implementation of the SPB 4BE program.


>

Delivery of skill based training courses for all PFSED staff covering: leadership training, project
management training plus other non
-
technical or non
-
procedurally o
rientated courses
-

the
carefully selected participants will be equipped with the key skills to facilitate effective leadership,
change management in order to meet the expected impacts and outcomes of the increasing focus
on future classroom construction i
nitiatives.


>

“On the Job Training” to be provided by TSU staff, is included in the work
-
program and will take
the form of on
-
site observation, coaching and feed
-
back based learning sessions


>

Extension of the training initially given to those divisions imp
lementing SBP4BE to relevant
PFSED and DepED staff in the other divisions.


Institutionalization


Institutionalization is primarily based on detailed documentation of “good practice
s

.


Particularly important in th
is context is the SBP 4BE Implementation
Manual (
see section above)
-

the
Manual has initially been drafted specifically to cover the SBP4BE program
. However,
the Manual will
subsequently be modified so that the PFSED regions and divisions not included in the SBP4BE
program can

also be trained
in the use of a set of standard set of “good practice” procedures covers
all phases of the classroom construction process.


Other manuals may also be developed to help sustain other interventions to improve organizational
effectiveness, such as, resource
planning and allocation, information management, as found
necessary during the course of project implementation.

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5.7


Development of ToRs for Research and Policy Studies (RAPS)


There have been two inputs for the RAPS component during the CCI inception period.

This section
describes the achievements of each.


RAPS Inception Visit


The RAPS Team met in Manila for the first time during an Inception Visit from 9 to16 January 2013.
Prior to meeting, the Studies Team Leader

prepared a planning document to brief the
team on the
project and objectives for the first input. Activities conducted during the initial site visit included
meetings with the DepEd, AusAID

and
the PPP Centre;

site visit to DepEd Bulacan Division to meet
with the division officials;

field visit to

the San Francisco Xavier High School; and team brainstorming
of the RAPS scope and approach.


The results of this visit included:

>

Formation of the RAPS Team and relationships with the CCI Team Leader and the broader CCI
Technical Support Unit

>

Establishmen
t of relationships with key CCI RAPS stakeholders


particularly AusAID’s education
unit and DepEd in Manila and in Bulacan (Region 3)

>

Clarification of the scope of each of the research studies

>

Development of the integrated sequential approach to be follo
wed to achieve the RAPS objectives.


RAPS Contribution to the CCI Inception Workshop


The Studies Team Leader, together with the Infrastructure specialist, made a second visit to the
Philippines in early February. The primary reason for this visit was to f
inalise the scoping of the ToRs
for the two research studies and also to participate in the CCI Inception Workshop on 6
-
7 February
2013. The Workshop provided an excellent opportunity to seek feedback from DepEd on the proposed
approach to the RAPS, throu
gh a PowerPoint presentation, syndicate sessions and discussion in
plenary.


The results of this visit included the following:

>

A more detailed understanding of DepEd and AusAID’s requirements

>

Developing the RAPS work plan and team inputs for conduct of the

two studies and for
development of the Strategy Paper

>

Finalisation of the ToRs for the two research studies

>

Recruitment of the Research Analyst

>

Commencement of recruitment process to replace Darvin Yambao , who unfortunately has to
withdraw from the team

on medical advice.


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5.8

The CCI Project Website


CCI Website Overview


A CCI website has been designed and developed and it is now in the final stages of testing.


The CCI website will provide a

notice board


both for information related to the various CCI classroom
construction activities in Regions 3 and 4
-
A and also information relating to the conduct of the
Research Studies.. The website will have a comprehensive library of information that will be made
av
ailable to the public for their perusal and use.


In essence, the website is primarily a PFSED website as it is PFSED that is implementing the SBP4BE
program
. Therefore, a partially working

test


website was used at the recent Inception Workshop, as
the b
asis for a discussion, in order to ensure that PFSED could be fully involved in the design.


The TSU will manage the web
-
site, monitor content and make bi
-
weekly updates etc., PFSED will be
pro
-
actively encouraged to provide relevant content, including pho
tographs, from both Divisional and
also school locations.


Development platform


The CCI website is built on the
Joomla Content Management System (CMS)

platform which provides
user friendly site management with hot
-
button access to all the pages on the web
site and also to
selected external web
-
sites.

CMS functionality also provides a fully proven set of security functionality,
including firewalls to ensure that the website content is secure and safe from any malicious attacks.


Home Page


The proposed layou
t of t
he Home page is shown in Anne
x 6.


>

The

News


this section will provide updated information such as project updates, individual school
news
etc.

and will be updated bi
-
weekly. The section also contains a blog feature which

is
hoped

to
become a forum for thoughts, ideas and comments as the project progresses.

>

Classroom Construction


this section will provide the detail information on all issues relating to
the SBP4BE implementation work program and progress Visitors will be able to

see details on
divisional activity, milestone updates etc.

>

Locations


this section contains a Google
-
based interactive map where all the beneficiary
schools will be plotted. Visitors will see pop
-
up information on each location, with

drill down


functi
onality to key school data and a progress individual school implementation status.

>

Library


this section will be the repository for filing CCI’s research data, and key project
documents
3
, Visitors will have accessed to download documents. Documents will b
e classified at
the time of filing, and this section will also have a login system to allow access to documents
classified as

restricted


to

registered users

.

>

Contact


this section will feature CCI contact details and it will also have a

feedback


sec
tion for
any questions or comments that visitors may have.





3

Subject to individual clearance by both
DepEd and AusAID for all potentially sensitive documentation.

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Other Fe
atures


The CCI website has links to the AusAID and DepEd websites


which can be accessed by clicking on
their respective logos (found at the bottom of the home) page. Similarly, CCI has
requested both
DepEd and AusAID to include hot
-
button links on their websites to take visitors directly to the CCI
website.


The CCI website is also social media friendly as it has the capacity to

have hot
-
button integrated
directly with social media

sites

share buttons and links into say Facebook, Twitter or Linked
-
in.

TSU is
currently discussing whether there is value in opening one or more social media sites to activate this
functionality. Further soundings will be taken at the forthcoming PCC.


Launch d
ate


Both DepE
d

and AusAID have been given access to the test site so that they can fully review the
proposed design and content and it is planned to launch the web
-
site soon after
finalising
the
detail
implementation plans at the forthcoming Divisional Tr
aining and Planning workshops at end of March
2013.

Target date is 15
th

April 2013.

5.9

Funds Flow Arrangements


Currently, the AusAID funding for the SBP4BE program is deposited in a

special account


with Land
Bank of the Philippines.


>

After discussion with
Finance and Accounting Division, it is proposed that the following funds flow
arrangements should apply:

>

Each Division that will be involved in the SBP4BE program will open a new

Special Account

, to be
used solely for SBP4BE funds, and will send details
of the account to TSU, via PFSED PMU

>

Once the Batch 1 program has been finalised TSU will estimate the total value of all the contracts
in each individual Division. (based on the priced Bill of Quantities for the Standard designs)

>

TSU will instruct Finance

and Accounting Division to transfer to each Division 50% of the total
estimated value to the Division’s

Special Account


>

Each Division will make payments to Contractors, in accordance with the contractual
arrangements, directly from the Division’s

Special Account


and keep all relevant records on file

>

Once the funds in any Division

Special Account


are reduced to 10% of the sum originally
deposited, the Division will advise TSU who will then instruct Finance and Accounting Division to
transfer to t
he Division the remaining 50% of the original estimate (adjusted as necessary based on
the actual value of the contracts awarded)

>

The above process will be repeated for the Batch 2
i
mplementation program

>

TSU will periodically carry out

random


audits on the Divisional

Special Accounts



5.10

The Inception Workshop


A very pro
-
active, 2 day workshop was held on 6
th

and the February in Clarke, Pampanga. The
program for the
Workshop is shown in Anne
x 7.


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16


6

Key
I
ssues
A
rising
D
uring the Inception
P
eriod


6.1

Managing Fiduciary Risk


Fiduciary Risk
4



refers to the possibility that aid money may not be used as intended. In the context of
the SBP4BE program, the key fiduciary risks identified are: corruption, diversion of funds for other
uses, and failure to ac
hieve

value for money


or failure to ensure the long sustainability of the
investment due to weak quality and control processes and procedures during construction of the
classroom.


In the past

fiduciary risk has often been addressed by creating parallel

systems outside the
beneficiary’s own organisation
5
. However in the light of the Paris Declaration (2005) and the Accra
Agenda for Action (2008)
6
, donors are now directed to use, as far as possible, the beneficiary’s own
systems as the method of implement
ing aid projects.


In this context it is however recognised by the donor community that total reliance on country systems
can increase fiduciary risk and that careful consideration is therefore needed with respect to the
effectiveness of those systems. Equ
ally, it is important also to note that this new approach should not
be misconstrued as committing donors to using country systems

regardless of risk

.


Fiduciary risk therefore needs to be balanced against the potential development benefits of entirely
u
sing DepEd’s systems to implement the project.

In order to make this

balanced


assessment the TSU
reviewed the financial management and procurement systems in DepEd, with impact on the SBP4BE
program.


On this basis, the use of discrete

Special Accounts


in every Division that is implementing classroom
construction projects within the SBP4BE program (as specified above under the Funds Flow
arrangements) that the country systems can be used subject to the following strengthening of those
systems

, subject
to the application of the following parallel mechanisms to reduce fiduciary risk:

>

The procurement process and procedures set out in the Standard Operating Guidelines are
adopted and applied.

>

The procedures and systems covering Quality Assurance during cons
truction as set out in the
Standard Operating Guidelines are adopted and applied.


TSU will however test compliance on a random basis throughout the implementation process by
conducting both technical and financial audits at divisional level.


In addition,

it is proposed that just a single key control point be included within the process and that is
that the TSU give a

no objection


to the award of each individual contract after review of
the

Bid
Evaluation Report

.





4

AusAID has a fiduciary obligation to ensure that the proceeds of any grant given by it are used only for the purposes for whi
ch
the grant was provided.

5

Typically the practice of creating be
spoke systems outside the beneficiary’s regular systems is known as

ring fencing

.

6

The OECD DAC Paris Declaration (2005) specifically includes a commitment by donors to use country systems to the
maximum extent possible and, where use of country systems is not initially feasible, to design safeguards in ways that
strengthens rather than

undermine country systems and procedures. The OECD DAC Accra Agenda for Action (2008)
strengthens the obligation placed on donors to use country systems.


Philipp
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Australia Classroom Construction Inception Report

17


In order to ensure both uniformity and

also completeness of content, a standard structure of the Bid
Evaluation Report has been specified within the Standard Operating Guidelines.

For ease of
reference, it is shown in
Anne
x

8.


NOTE:

On the basis proposed, the TSU will not have an executive ro
le within the procurement or
contractor payment processes (the latter of which includes

quality assurance during construction
procedures

).

Therefore, only DepEd systems (strengthened as indicated) will be used for the
implementation of SBP4BE.


6.2

Quality A
ssurance of Contractor Performance


Good practice in terms of quality assurance of contractor performance demands that the on
-
site
construction work stops at specific points during the building process so that the work completed up to
that point can be ins
pected to ensure that it is in accordance with both the specifications and relevant
building regulations. For example, it is important to

check that footings are dug to the correct depth
before being filled with concrete, or that the concrete mix is correc
t before the foundations are laid, or
that the correct type and thickness of steel is embedded into the main supporting columns.


However, as highlighted under Capacity Assessment of PFSED (Section 5.6), PFSED’s capacity to
carry out consistent and compreh
ensive monitoring and quality assurance during construction of the
classrooms

is weak
, specifically at times of increased workload.

This inability of divisional engineers to
always
carry out specific inspections at the appropriate times means that construc
tion work is not
halted during construction and, as indicated above, this failure creates significant risk of the contractor
not building in strict accordance with the specifications. This in turn may result in substandard
buildings, which may for example
have structural failure, fail to withstand severe weather conditions,
might have shortened life spans, or will start to require significant maintenance well before the
expected date.


This derives from two factors:

>

Lack of structured methodology based on g
ood industry practice



with its consequent lack of fully
trained and competent divisional engineering staff.

>

Lack of
sufficient
resource to undertake all the inspection tasks required, at the right time,
particularly when there is an

increased building c
onstruction program
being

implemented
simultaneously
at the division level
via both DepEd funded
classroom construction projects
and

other
donor funded programs
.


Point (i) above has been addressed by TSU
, together with PFSED,

through the development of a

Schedule of Inspection Points during Construction


which is included as a section
of the
SBP4BE
Operating

Guidelines.

This topic will be the subject of a specific training session at the planned
Regional

/
Divisional level training workshops

for the divis
ions implementing SBP4BE funded projects.
(For ease of reference

the Schedule
is shown in A
nnex

9.)


Point (ii) however, is more difficult to solve in the short term and therefore it is recommended that in
the
Sbp4BE
Batch 1 Implementation program that PFS
ED employ

Independent Consultants


to carry
out this function.

This approach has a number of advantages:

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18


>

It provides short term technical expertise available for SBP4BE to carry out this essential function.

>

It provides a

capacity building


opportunity for PFSED division engineers



in that they can be
mentored at the worksite by these Independent Consultants as much as possible as they follow the

Schedule of Inspection Points

during Construction


mentioned above.

>

It will provide AusAID wit
h the maximum assurance that its fiduciary responsibilities are being
satisfied



in that it will ensure that the classrooms are constructed exactly as per the specification.


This is the approach is similarly in concept to that being adopted by NEDA in th
e PPP

program but
differs in

that the approach recommended for SBP4BE is for PFSED to employ individual consultants,
allocated to specific divisions, rather than use one, or perhaps two firms to have responsibility for the
quality assurance during construc
tion. The recommendation not to use an external firm is based upon
the recognition that a key objective of th
e CCI program is to develop
PFSED
capacity.

Clearly
, the

use
of an external firm does not support this objective
. Using

individual

consultants work
ing within DepED,
reporting to the PFSED Area
Managers and

working closely with divisional engineering staff will create
the environment to strengthen capacity in this key function. In addition
,

it will also give PFSED
the
experience of utilising
specialist resources as and where necessary
,

to
cover “peaks
” in workload.

It is therefore recommended that the use of Independent Consultants be

piloted


during Batch 1 of the
implementation program. It is important that PFSED implement this pilot rather

than TSU, in line with
the intent of the Paris Declaration (see Section 6.1) where one of the objectives of donor aid is to build
in
-
house capacity.

However, TSU will pro
-
actively support PFSED by drafting contract documentation
including the detail terms

of reference for the work to be done, and by assisting PFSED in the
evaluation and award process.


It is estimated that the cost of employing Independent Consultants will be approximately 4%



5% of
the contract cost

and it is recommended that this should

be funded out of the SBP4BE funds on the
basis of a

no objection


being given by TSU after review of the Bid Evaluation Report.


6.3

Implications of Outcome of Initial Site Inspection
s
:


The TSU e
ngineers have now inspected 234

sites proposed for SBP4BE
.


To

date, a total of
133
sites were rejected

for Batch 1 implementation due either because (i) the site is
unsuitable for use of either

of the two standard designs (67

sites); or (ii) because start of classroom
construction has started, or is planned to start

in the near future through other funding sources, e.g.,
local government units and funding

under the PPP initiatives or (66

sites).


For example, some sites excluded from Batch 1 were

because thes
e could not accommodate either of
the two standard classroo
m design
s
, but can, upon advice of TSU engineers, can be considered for
inclusion in Batch 2 if


speciali
s
ed


or

small site


specific designs e.g., 1 story 2 classrooms are
utili
s
ed
For example

some
sites were also found to have need for significant site p
reparation (i.e.,
demolition of existing structures, elevation of embankments) that wil require some amount of time to
ready the area for construction works.

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19


TSU will hold discussions with PMU in the near future to decide how best to select the appropriate

number of sites for Batch 2 (i.e., a mix of new sites and

/
or modified designs). The final number of
sites selected will be limited to the funding available.


7

Development

of
Implementation

P
lans


7.1

SBP
4BE Batch 1 Implementation Plan


TSU engineers have currently completed site inspections of
2
43

potential sites and the results show
that
110

sites are
meet the requirements for inclusion
in the Batch 1 Implementation
program
.


Given
,

however, t
hat the classroom shortage data used as the

basis for compiling the long
-
list of sites
for inspection was collated in 2009
,

PFSED and TSU
agreed
that in order to ensure maximum
effectiveness in applying AusAID funds
,

that all the potentially suitable sites
identified
for Batch 1
should now be reva
lidated based on the latest baseline data for classroom shortage.


This re
-
validation is currently on
-
going and to date 20 sites have been

put back

into the provisional
Batch 2 program so that further investigation of
current
need can be completed. It is

therefore likely
that the final Batch 1
implementation program

total will be slightly less than the provisional 468
classrooms.
as summarised in the following table:

Table
2
:
Provisional
Schedule of Schools Currently Selected For Im
plementation in Batch 1 (By
Region)

SUMMARY

No. of schools validated for Batch 1
implementation

No. Classrooms, Batch 1


Batch 1

Deferred

Dropped

TOTAL

1
-
story

2
-
story

TOTAL

TOTAL

110

67

66

243

88

380

468

Sub
-
Total, Region 3

49

26

45

120

12

196

208

Sub
-
Total, Region 4
-
A

61

41

21

123

76

184

260

The list of

110

schools
identified in Batch 1 is
set out in A
nnex

10
-
A.
The detailed
implementation
plans will be finalised at the
D
ivisional Training and Planning workshops scheduled
for Region

3 and
Region 4
-
A
in
late
March.

The TSU implementation plans developed to support implementation of both the SBP4BE program
and the capacity development and training program are set out in A
nne
x 10
-
B.


7.2

Estimated Costs of the Batch1
Implementation P
rogram



PFSED have estimated the
average
costs of constructing each of the two separate designs as follows:


Table 3:
Average Construction Costs by Region

Region

One Story

Two Story

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20


Four
-
Classroom with Toilets

Four
-
Classroom with Toilets

Region 3

2,631,444.08

5,086,282.30

Region 4A

2,667,688.25

5,168,593.85



On this basis the est
imated
these
costs


and also on the provisional Batch 1 list of 110 sites the total
costs of the Batch 1 program
summarised in the following table
:










These cost estimates show that the weighted average construction cost of an individual classroom in
Batch 1 is
1,232
,
000
pesos. Therefore after adding the estimated furniture costs of 35,000 pesos per
classroom the total average cost of construction and fu
rniture is 1,267
,000 peso


which is
approximately
26
% over the initial (2011) estimate of 1,000,000 pesos per classroom
, inclusive of
furniture.

After discussion with PFSED it seems clear that the main reasons for this probable higher than
forecast costin
g is simply that the initial estimate

of the
weighted average classroom cost was based
on the assumption that would be a fairly even mix of both single story and two story constructions.

T
he site surveys of the potential sites showed that a significantly

higher
than estimated
number of t
wo
story constructions are needed,
as many sites were found to be too sma
ll to accommodate a single
stor
y design. (i
.e.

approximatel
y 2
0% for
single story constructions and 8
0% for two story
constructions). However
,
as sho
wn in the table above
, that

the average cost of a 2 story construction
is almost double that of a single story construction and
therefore the higher proportion of two story
constructions
has created the significantly higher weighted average cost.

It is
t
herefore important to highlight that

on the basis of the initial estimated 50/50 split of single and
two story constructions that the estimated average classroom cost, including furniture and
fittings

would have been approximately
PhP
1
,
015
,000
.00

pesos, which is in fact only marginally above the
initial estimated average cost of
PhP
1
,
00
0
,000.
00 pesos per classroom.

The increase in costs is therefore
solely due to the results of the site surveys
, which identified that
many of the selected sites ar
e too small to accommodate a single story constr
uction and that therefore
there

are more two story constructions than initially estimated.

The impact of this costing estimate is that in total it now seems likely that the total number of
classrooms that ca
n be funded out of the AusAID grant is likely to be in the region of
64
0
-

68
0
classrooms rather than the initial 800 classroom as forecast. The actual number of classrooms
Table 4: Batch 1
Cost Estimates for Classroom Construction

Region

No.
Classrooms

Construction Cost Estimates

1
-
S

2
-
S

Total

One
-
S
torey
Four
-
Classroom
with toilet

2
-
S
torey Four
-
Classroom
building with
toilet

Total

TOTAL

88

380

468

74,800,000.00

501,963,569.30

576,763,569.30

Region 3

12

196

208

10,200,000.00

258,163,569.30

268,363,569.30

Region 4A

76

184

260

64,600,000.00

243,800,000.00

308,400,000.00

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Australia Classroom Construction Inception Report

21


however

that can be included in Batch 2 will be dependent upon the type of construc
tion needed on
the selected sites.

7.3

SBP4BE Batch 2 Implementation Plans

The detail planning for Batch 2 will commence with a Planning Workshop which is scheduled for early
April 2013

with implementation targeted to begin by end of August 2013.

7.4

Capacity Deve
lopment


Training Plans


The TSU has identified an initial set of training interventions to be planned out for implementation
within the year:


Initial Orientation Training



this is an orientation training to prepare the participating divisions
implementing Batch 1 construction activities.

The training will be based on the Standard Operating
Guidelines and will focus on the following topics therein:


>

The procurement process



with particular emphasis on the bid evaluation process

>

Quality Assurance of Contractor Performance based on the Schedule of Standard Inspection
Points

>

Processing Contractor Stage payments

>

Conduct of Project M&E (e.g., progress monitoring of status)


Two

2 day training workshops have already been s
cheduled for conduct on March 19
-
20
for

Region 3
divisions (to be

held in
Clark Field,
Pampanga), and March 20
-
21

for Region 4
-
A divisions (to be held
in Tagaytay City).


Where appropriate, this workshop will be

repeated for new divisions with projects under Batch 2.

T
he
TSU will encourage and assist DepEd regional staff and select divisions to co
-
manage the
se
succeeding

workshop and maximi
s
e this opportunity to

transfer


skills to re
-
echo the workshop
activitie
s with fellow implementers.

Roll
-
out Orientations to remaining DepEd Divisions



Once the initial orientation training of the
relevant staff in the divisions in the two Regions implementing SBP4BE has been completed, the
course will be

rolled out


to all
the remaining divisions of both regions and in other divisions in the
same regions.


The logistics are still at the planning stage


and it is uncertain how many separate courses will be
involved.

While a large part of the staging in non
-
CCI areas will be
cost
-
based, another consideration
should be needs
-
based.

This can establish which topics address specific weaknesses in these
divisions (e.g. procurement, financial management, quality assurance, M&E or all of the above).


Other Trainings



these are speci
fic trainings that came out of the Inception Workshop, which can
include trainings on:

>

Project Management Training, based on use of the MS Project Management software tool

>

Records Management

>

Project Management and Leadership Training


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22


Specialist trainers w
ill deliver courses 1 and 2 above, with the TSU team, possibly supported by
specialist trainers, will deliver course 3.


The logistics for these courses are still at the planning stage and will be discussed further with PFSED
counterparts.


Schedule of Tra
ining Courses


The indicative training schedule is set out on page 2 of A
nne
x 5, with the final schedule to be agreed
with PFSED as plans are further developed.


7.5

Research and Policy Studies ToRs and Work Plans


The team proposes adoption of an integrated
sequential model with Transition Workshops between
the studies where findings can be discussed and planning commenced for the ensuing study as
illustrated below in Diagram 1.


Diagram
2
:
The Integrated Sequential Approach

TIME
Strategy Paper
Classroom
Construction
Study
Final
Workshop
Partnerships
Scoping Study
Transition
Workshop
Transition
Workshop

The tw
o studies will be conducted sequentially, with a key stakeholder workshop held between PSS
and CCS. In summary it is planned that:


>

The PSS will be conducted during the period from beginning of April through to mid June 2013

>

The CCS will commence immediate
ly once the PSS is finalised, and the conclusions and
recommendations are agreed by the stakeholders, and will be concluded by end of October 2013.


Each of the two studies will be conducted and completed through: stakeholder discussion; document
review; d
ata collection and analysis; presentation of findings at dedicated workshops; agreement of
conclusions and recommendations with stakeholders and preparation of the final Study Report.


Once consensus is reached on the conclusions and recommendations of two

studies, the
development of the Strategy Paper will begin. It is planned that this key development work will be
conducted over a 4 month period running through until end of February 2014.


A study tour is also proposed, within the work program for the dev
elopment of the strategy paper with
the overarching objective of enabling the key decision makers involved in classroom construction,
planning and design to observe first hand alternative community
-
based school construction models
implemented elsewhere in
the region.


Philipp
ines

Australia Classroom Construction Inception Report

23


Detailed plans for the study tour will be developed in the light of the findings and conclusions that will
arise out of both the PSS and the CCS studies.


For ease of reference, the draft ToR’s

and detailed schedules are issued, together with this Inception
Report, as a separate document.


8

Risk Management

8.1

SBP4BE
Risk Management Plan


A Risk Management plan was developed at the outset of the project,

based upon interpretation of the
risks that ma
y affect the implementation of the various work
-
programs (the CCI Risk Management
Plan is shown in Annex 11)
.

This plan will
continue
be monitored and amended, as necessary, during the course of the project, in
consultation with AusAID and DepEd.


8.2

Red Flag
s to identify Emerging Key Risks

The “trigger
” points

for the key risks that could detrimentally impact on SBP4BE
progress have

been
identif
ied as a set of “Red Flags” a
s summarised
in
a t
able set out in Annex 1
2.

9

Gender and Disability Awareness

The Project team is very aware of the need to ensure that gender and disability issues are not
overlooked during the implementation of project.

The team is guided by the “
Gender and Disability Awareness” pre
pared for the project by AusAID and
is committed

to ensure that
CCI will continue to advance and mainstream gender
-
equality and
disability
-
responsive strategies in all phases of the classrooms construction program.

Specifically

the program will

ensure that
all pupils, whether boys or
girl
,

or

children

with
disabilities
will
benefit from the CCI investment. To date careful attention has be
en given to both
design and site
selection to ensure that every project includes separate toilet facilities for boys and girls, and that all
buildings have
both a sep
arate toilet suitable for disabled pupils
. In addition all approved sites
for
Batch 1
fully meet the necessary “disabled access” criteria
, and
that the designs meet gender and
disability requirements both designs include

separate toilet facilities for boys

and girls, and
also they
provide both a separate toilet suitable for disabled pupils and
wheelchair access

to classrooms
. For
the CCI Project, Ms.
Mary Ann Cheng (Project Liaison Officer) has operational responsibility for both
advising the Project Team
on Gender and Disability issues that impact on the project

a
nd on
monitoring implementation
.

The
Gender and Disability Awareness and S
trategy is detailed in Annex 13.


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ines

Australia Classroom Construction Inception Report

24


10

Resource and Budget Implications of the Work
Pl
ans


10.1

SBP4BE

and Capacity Development Work P
lans


The entire proposed TSU work program, including the extensive travel plans for field based work, and
the training workshops and course can be covered within the existing budget.

10.2

RAPS Work Plans


Budget issues relating
to the work program proposed to meet the RAPS ToR’s are discussed in the
RAPS ToRs which has been issued as a stand
-
alone document.











---------------------------------------

This report is subject to, and issued in accordance, with the provisions
of the Agreement between
Cardno Emerging Markets (Australia) and AusAID.

Cardno Emerging Markets (Australia) accepts no responsibility whatsoever for, or in respect of, any
use of or reliance upon this report by any third party.

19th February 2013.

Philippines

Australia Classroom Construction Inception Report


25









01

SCHOOL
CLASSROOM
PLANS /
DRAWINGS
REVIEW




Philippines

Australia Classroom Construction Inception Report


26


Annex 1:
School Classroom Plans/Drawings Review



TABLE OF CONTENTS

1

PROJECT OVERVIEW AND
Purpose of THE review

3

1.1

Project Overview

3

1.2

Purpose of the Review

3

2

A
vailability of

documents

3

3

R
eview

4

3.1

General: Completeness of information and organi
s
ation

4

3.1.1

Technical information

4

3.1.2

Technical Review

4

4

Findings, Comments and R
ecommendations

5




REVIEW

DATE

DESCRIPTION

REVIEWED BY

APPROVED
BY

1

14
February
2013

School Building Program for
Basic Education (SBP4BE)



Single Storey


Four
Classrooms



Two Storey


Four
classrooms



Renato M.
Corvera



Elmer I Texon



Severino

Abasa



Andrew Whillas


Philippines

Australia Classroom Construction Inception Report


27


Detailed Comments on S
BP4BE Drawings


1.

OVERVIEW AND PURPOSE OF THE REVIEW

Overview


Name and Title of the Project

:

Philippines Classroom Construction
Initiative

School Building Program for Basic Education
(SBP4BE)



Single Storey


Four Classrooms



Two Storey


Four classrooms

Type/Scope

:

Infrastructure / Standard


One Storey School Building
-

Four Classrooms

Two Storey School Building
-

Four Classrooms

Location

:

Region III and Region IVA

Project description

:

Proposed construction of single and two storey
school buildings of 4 classrooms with attached
toilet

Single Storey


Four
Classroom: Area


:

376.33 SQ.M

Two Storey


Four
Classroom



First Floor

area

:

213.75 SQ.M

Second floor area

Total area

:

:

213.75 SQ.M

427.5 SQ.M

Exterior wall

:

Concrete Hollow Block with plain cement plaster

Type of Truss

:

Steel Trusses




Purpose of the Review




To review the completeness of the
plans/drawings against relevant Philippine school
standards and assess the fitness
-
for
-
purpose of the designs for inclusion in the
SBP4BE program. S
uggest any modifications needed to meet required standards.



To confirm that gender and disability requiremen
ts as well as the environmental/
climate change issues have been appropriately incorporated into the standard design
drawings.


2.

AVAILABILITY OF DOCUMENTS




The Table below lists the drawings provided by DepEd for review.

The drawings
were Final Drafts and were not signed or dated.


Philippines

Australia Classroom Construction Inception Report


28


Table 1: Drawings Reviewed


Discipline

Single Storey



4 Classrooms

Two Storey



4 Classrooms

Architectural

A1
-

A7

A1
-

A7

Structural

S1
-

S3

S1
-

S3

Electrical

E1
-

E2

E1


E3

Sanitary / Plumbing

P1
-

P3

P1


P5

Mechanical

0

0

Total

Drawings Reviewed

15

18



3.

REVIEW

3.1

General: Completeness of information and organi
s
ation


3.1.1

Technical information


The Department of Education through the Physical Facilities and
School
Engineering Division (PFSED) has provided two sets of standard design
drawings. One(1) set for single storey


four(4) classrooms with attached toilet
and one(1) set for two(2) storey


four(4) classrooms with attached toilet for
Philippine Classroo
m Construction Initiative (PCCI) funded by AusAID through
the School Building Program for Basic Education Program (SBP4E). Table 1
above details the drawings provided for th
e two standard school designs.


The two standard designs were created especially f
or the SBP4BE by PFSED to
expedite the implementation process particularly during the pre
-
construction
stage.


However, it is recogni
s
ed that special additional site
-
specific design drawings
will be prepared by the PFSED for those sites where the standard
drawings will
require adaption to accommodate meet the specific requirements of actual sites.
For example sloping sites may require the adjustment of the foundations.



In reviewing the standard classroom designs reference was also made to the
Department o
f Education
,
EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES MANUAL,
2010
(Revised Edition).


The Educational Facilities Manual
(EFM)
was prepared by the PHYSICAL
FACILITIES AND SCHOOLS’ ENGINEERING DIVISION (PFSED), OFFICE OF
PLANNING SERVICES, within the Department of
Education.

The original 2007
version of the manual was revised in 2010 to incorporate Disaster Risk
Reduction criteria into school construction.

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Australia Classroom Construction Inception Report


29


3.1.2

Technical Review


A.

Single Storey


Four (4) Classrooms with attached toilet

(Refer also to specific comme
nts on the Drawings in Table 1C, in Annex A)





The classroom area of 7 m x 9 m (63.00 sq.m.) complies with the 45 students

occupancy as per minimum standard of 1.40 sq.m /place based on the