Bridging the capability gap in mobile and in-situ gamma spectrometry

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12 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 7 μήνες)

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Bridging the capability gap in mobile and
in
-
situ
gamma spectrometry

In
-
situ and mobile gamma spectrometry systems are important tools for measuring environmental
radioactivity, characterising contaminated land and detecting radioactive particles.
However, key
limitations
remain

in their application

and i
n many respects significant advancements have been
hindered by the limitations of existing detector technologies, including
poor spectral resolution of
scintillation technology (NaI(Tl), BGO) and th
e high acquisition and running costs of bulky and fragile
semi
-
conductor technology (HPGe). Moreover, the accuracy of measurement and detection capability
are compromised by issues of
variable

source geometry and s
olutions to this problem have
perhaps
beco
me the "Holy Grail" of environmental gamma ray spectrometry. The recent emergence of large
LaBr
3
(Ce) and LaCl
3

crystals
offer

the exciting potential of developing detectors with substantially higher
spectral resolution

and robustness in comparison with exi
sting technologies
.
These new crystals not
only
provide

the potential for improved detection capability but also the
opportunity to
develop

intelligent
data processing
techniques
for radionuclide and site (3 dimensional) characterisation.

The aim of this

research is to implement and exploit the significant radiometric advantages presented by this
new detector technology through the development of existing and new analytical techniques.


Detectors

will
be
characterised

both empirically and through Monte
Car
lo simulation.


The resulting s
pectra
will be
interrogated
in combination with novel
C
omputational
I
ntelligence

based
spectral processing routines

using data gathered
across
a number of
s
ites within

and distal to nuclear facilities
.
The
project benefits

greatly from

working within an ISO 17025 accredited laboratory

at Stirling and
the industrial
CASE partner

Nuvia Ltd, where developments can be
tested against existing systems and the technology step change
exploited.

This is a NERC

funded

industrial CASE studentship,
supervised Dr Andrew Tyler, Professor Leslie Smith
and Dr

David Copplestone at Stirling and the industrial partners at NUVIA Ltd

(
www.nuvia.co.uk
)
.

The
project will suit a candidate with

a strong physical sciences background.

Informal enquires should be
directed to Dr Tyler at
the Institute

of Biological and Environmental Sciences,

School of Natural
Sciences,

University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland UK, or preferably by email to
a.n.tyler@stir.ac.uk
. The closing date for applications is
1
8
th

March
2011. The anticipated start date is 01
October 2011
.