Rockwell Automation - Fisher College of Business - The Ohio State ...

subduedlockΜηχανική

5 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 10 μήνες)

76 εμφανίσεις

       
 
 
 
Rockwell Automation, Inc.
BUY
Ticker:  ROK      
Sector:  Industrials           Target Price:    $68.33 
Industry: Elec. Cmpt. & Equip.        Current Price:  $54.49 
March 3, 2008 
 
Financial Highlights: 
Market Cap:     $8 BB 
Annual Sales:        $5 BB 
2007 EPS:     $3.53 
2008(E) EPS:         $4.35 
Dividend Yield:       2.0% 
 
SIM Analyst: 
Stephen Soung 
Contact: 
412.498.5354 
soung.1@osu.edu 
 
Course: 
BUS‐FIN 824 
 
SIM Manager: 
Royce West, CFA 
 
Fisher College of Business 
 
The Ohio State University 
Columbus, OH
 
Company Highlights__________________________ 
Rockwell  Automation  is  a  company  devoted  to  the  improvement 
of  manufacturing  by  providing  industrial  automation  power, 
control and information solutions.  Last year, their Power Systems 
operating segment was sold to help enhance their transition from 
a  U.S.  based  hardware  company  to  a  global  technology  leader  in 
automation  solutions  and  services.      Annual  revenues  increased 
10% and EPS jumped 20% in 2007.  Of the $5 billion in revenues, 
46%  were  generated  in  emerging  international  markets.  
Rockwell’s  operating  margin  increased  to  20%  and  the  company 
generated  $531  million  of  free  cash  flow  from  continuing 
operations. 
Investment Outlook__________________________ 
ROK  and  its  management  team  aim  to  grow  revenues  10  to  12% 
in  2008.    This  growth  will  be  driven  by  strategic  acquisitions, 
growth  in  their  services  and  solutions  business,  and  continued 
return  from  their  investments  made  in  emerging  global  markets.  
Earnings  in  2008  are  projected  to  fall  between  $4.25  and  $4.45 
per  share.    The  divestiture  of  the  Power  Systems  segment 
increased  cash  to  $1.4  billion  in  2007,  which  will  enhance  ROK’s 
ability  to  invest  in  organic  growth  and  strategic  acquisitions, 
accelerate  cost  productivity  initiatives,  and  increase  free  cash 
flow.    Ratio  valuations  show  that  ROK  is  currently  undervalued 
relative  to  the  Industrials  sector  and  the  Electrical  Component  & 
Equipment  sub‐sector.    Rockwell’s  strong  financial  condition  and 
undervalued valuation make ROK an attractive investment. 
    Page 2 of 31 
 
Table of Contents 
 
 
1. Company Overview ___________________________________________________________   3 
I. Business Segments and Products                                                                                                3 
2. Macroeconomic Analysis _______________________________________________________  5 
I. U.S. Indicators                                                                                                                                 5 
II. Non‐U.S. Indicators                                                                                                                        8 
3. Sector Analysis _______________________________________________________________  9 
I. Sector Valuation                           9 
II. Sector Performance Factors                                              10 
4. Sub‐sector/Industry Analysis ___________________________________________________    11 
I. Sub‐sector Comparison                         11 
II. Electrical Components and Equipment Outlook                    11 
5. Company Analysis ____________________________________________________________  12 
I. Financial Analysis                                                                                                                           12 
II. Business Segment Analysis                        13 
III. Rockwell Performance Factors                        13 
6. Company Valuation ___________________________________________________________ 15 
I. Discounted Cash Flow Model                        15 
II. Valuation Analysis                          16 
III. DuPont Analysis                          19 
IV. Comparables Analysis                            19 
7. Conclusions and Recommendation ______________________________________________   22 
8. References _________________________________________________________________    23 
9. Appendices 
A. ROK Income Statement 
B. ROK Balance Sheet 
C. ROK Cash Flow Statement 
D. ROK DCF Model 
E. ROK DCF Model (Income Statement by Segment) 
F. ROK DCF Model (Income Statement – Part 1) 
G. ROK DCF Model (Income Statement – Part 2) 
 
 
 
    Page 3 of 31 
 
1. Company Overview 
 
Rockwell Automation, Inc. (ROK) is a company devoted to improving manufacturing efficiency by 
providing industrial automation power, control and information solutions.  They are the world’s 
largest “pure play” industrial automation company with a market cap over $8 billion and annual 
sales topping $5 billion.  Rockwell makes its major markets in food and beverage, automotive, 
water/wastewater, oil and gas, and home and personal care.  Employing roughly 20,000 people 
and serving customers in more than 80 countries, Rockwell is truly an international corporation.  
Rockwell Automation makes its global headquarters in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  
 
In 2007, ROK sold their Power Systems operating segment for an after‐tax gain of $868.2 million.  
After the sale of Power Systems, Rockwell restructured into two new operating segments: the 
Architecture & Software segment and the Control Products & Solutions segment. 
 
I. Business Segments and Products 
 
Architecture & Software (A&S) 
 
Architecture & Software (A&S) generated 44% of ROK’s total revenue in 2007.  This segment has 
a complete portfolio of integrated control and information architecture for connecting a 
customer’s entire manufacturing operation.  Products within this segment include:   
 
• A&S’s Integrated Architecture and Logix controllers.  These devices perform multiple 
types of control and monitoring applications, including discrete, batch, and continuous 
process, drive system, motion and machine safety, and supply real time information to 
plant‐wide information systems. 
• A&S’s Other Products include: control platforms, software, I/O devices, communication 
networks, high performance rotary and linear motion control systems, condition based 
monitoring systems, industrial computers and machine safety components. (1) 
 
Headquartered in Mayfield Heights, Ohio, the A&S segment operates in North America, Europe, 
Middle East, Africa, Asia‐Pacific and Latin America.   The major competitors of the Architecture 
& Software operating segment are Emerson Electric Co, Mitsubishi Corporation, Omron 
Corporation and Siemens AG. (1) 
 
Control Products & Solutions (CP&S) 
 
Control Products & Solutions (CP&S) generated the other 56% of 2007 sales by providing 
intelligent motor control and industrial control products along with the customer support and 
application knowledge for implementation.  The portfolio of products offered by CP&S includes: 
 
    Page 4 of 31 
 
• Low and medium voltage electro‐mechanical and electronic motor starters, motor and 
circuit protection devices, AC/DC variable frequency drives, signaling devices and 
condition sensors. 
• Value‐added packaged solutions, including configured drives, motor control centers and 
custom engineered panels. 
• Automation and information solutions, including custom‐engineered hardware and 
software systems for discrete, process, motion, drives and manufacturing information 
applications. 
• Services designed to help maximize a customer’s automation and provide total life‐cycle 
support, including multi‐vendor customer technical support and repair, asset 
management, training and predictive and preventative maintenance. (1) 
 
Control Products & Solutions is headquartered in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and operates in North 
America, Europe, Middle East, Africa, Asia‐Pacific and Latin America.   The major competitors of 
the CP&S operating segment are ABB Ltd, Eaton Corporation, Emerson Electric Co, General 
Electric, Honeywell International, and Siemens AG. (1) 
 
    Page 5 of 31 
 
2. Macroeconomic Analysis 
 
In 2007, 54% of Rockwell’s sales were generated domestically while 46% of sales were 
generated outside of the U.S.  Therefore, domestic and foreign economic indicators need to be 
considered.  Three indicators used to meter the U.S. industrial markets are the Industrial 
Equipment Spending statistic, Capacity Utilization, and the Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ 
Index.  Foreign GDPs and Industrial Exports will be examined to determine the direction of non‐
domestic markets. 
 
I. U.S. Indicators 
 
Industrial Equipment Spending 
 
The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) generates the Industrial Equipment Spending 
statistic.  This statistic provides information about the spending of the U.S. industrial 
economy and can be used as a directional indicator for domestic growth.  Figure 1 is a plot 
of domestic Industrial Equipment Spending, which shows that Industrial Equipment 
Spending is near an all time high. 
 
 
Figure 1:  Industrial Equipment Spending in the U.S. (2) 
 
Capacity Utilization 
 
The Capacity Utilization figure is released by the Federal Reserve each month.  This statistic 
covers manufacturing, mining, and electric and gas utilities and provides insight into the 
level of capital expenditures into the U.S. manufacturing base.  Capacity Utilization is 
currently at 81.5%, which is 0.4% higher than a year ago. (3) The plot below shows Capacity 
Utilization levels over the past 4 years.  
    Page 6 of 31 
 
 
 
Figure 2:  Capacity Utilization Percentages 
 
The Federal Reserve estimates total industrial capacity to rise 1.9% this year after (vs. 
1.8 % in 2007) and manufacturing capacity to increase 2.1% in 2008 (same as 2007) (3).  
Both projections favor increased industrial output for the upcoming year. 
 
Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index  
 
The final indicator used to gauge the U.S. manufacturing economy is the Institute for Supply 
Management (ISM) Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI).  The chart below 
shows PMI values of the past 4 years.  A PMI over 50% indicates a growing manufacturing 
economy.  Conversely, a reading below 50% indicates a contracting economy. 
 
    Page 7 of 31 
 
 
Figure 3:  ISM Purchasing Managers’ Index 
 
The PMI for January 2008 was 50.7%, which was a 2.3% increase over December’s PMI 
(48.4%).  Based on historical PMI values its past correlation with the overall U.S. 
economy, January’s PMI of 50.7 corresponds to a 3% increase in annual real gross 
domestic product. (4)  Also, a consistent PMI over 41.1 indicates expansion of the 
overall economy. (4)  Therefore, PMI is indicating a growing domestic manufacturing 
economy. 
 
    Page 8 of 31 
 
II. Non‐U.S. Indicators 
 
Foreign GDP 
 
Emerging foreign markets are estimated to grow at 6‐6.5% in 2008. (5) China will lead 
foreign growth with a projected rate of 10.5%, which is similar to historical growth rates. 
Eastern Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) look to grow at 6% while Latin America is 
estimated to grow 4%. (5)  Rockwell has made commercial investments and has been 
steadily growing sales in each of these emerging markets.   The chart below shows GDP 
rates for emerging markets. 
 
Figure 4:  Emerging Market Plot of Real GDP (5) 

Although foreign GDPs are projected to stabilize/slow in 2008, industrial exports from the 
U.S. have not slowed.  
 
Industrials Exports 
 
According to the January 2008 ISM report, New Export Orders increased 6% from December.  
This is the 62
nd
 consecutive month of  export order growth.  The Electrical Equipment 
industry was one of the top industries reporting growth so far this year. (4) 

    Page 9 of 31 
 
3. Sector Analysis 
 
The Industrials sector is a mature sector with historical cyclicality.  It has outperformed the S&P 
500 over the past 5 years by 3.10% and has weathered the year‐to‐date economic uncertainty 
better than the 500 index.   
 
With the slowing U.S. economy, sales derived internationally will be more important.  Over 40% 
of the Industrials sector revenues are generated overseas.  In addition to having a global 
presence, the sector has increased revenues from higher‐margin, aftermarket services, which 
will help decrease cyclicality in the sector.  (6)   
 
I. Sector Valuation 
 
The consensus growth rate for the S&P500 Composite is 12% with a 4% standard deviation.   
The consensus growth rate for the S&P Industrials Sector Composite is 12% with a 3% standard 
deviation.  The table below displays how the Industrials Sector (SP‐20) is performing from a ratio 
valuation standpoint relative to the S&P 500. 
SP‐20 Relative to 
SP500 
High 
Low 
Mean 
Current 
Δ % from 
Mean 
P/Forward E  1.17  0.8  1.01  1.02  1.0% 
P/S  1.12  0.68  0.94  1.02  8.5% 
P/B  1.27  0.79  1.05  1.18  12.4% 
P/EBITDA  1.41  0.99  1.19  1.17  ‐1.7% 
P/CF  1.36  0.78  1.05  1.27  21.0% 
P/E/G ratio  1.22  0.95  1.09  1.03  ‐5.5% 
ROE  1.24  0.94  1.03  1.18  14.6% 
Table 1: Industrials Sector Ratios Relative to S&P 500 
From the sector valuation table above, the Industrials sector seems to be trading at a slight 
premium to the S&P.   This slight premium may be warranted since the industrials sector has the 
same growth rate as the S&P, but a lower variance (Std Dev of 3% vs. 4% for S&P500).   Also, the 
fact that the sector has increased revenues from higher‐margin, aftermarket services has 
contributed to a higher premium in the sector.  The only two valuation values that are 
discounted are the P/EBITDA and PEG ratios.   
    Page 10 of 31 
 
II. Sector Performance Factors 
 
The Industrials Sector is closely correlated to industrial and manufacturing indicators.  The most 
comprehensive indicator is the Industrial Production Index (IPI) .  
 
 
Figure 5:  Charts Comparing Industrial Production Index and SP‐20 Price (7) 
 
It is clear that the sector is highly correlated with the IPI.  If a recession were to surface, the IPI 
would likely decrease which would negatively affect the sector’s performance (notice slowdown 
in 2001 and 2002).  Although IPI is correlated with the sector, those companies with a larger 
global footprint should not be affected as much by a domestic slowdown.  
 
Although economists have been warning of a U.S. recession, the Industrial Production Index has 
been increasing for the past quarter.  In January, the IPI was at 114.2, which is up 0.7 since 
October 2007. (3)  This is a positive indicator for the Industrials Sector. 
 
    Page 11 of 31 
 
4. Sub‐sector Analysis 
 
I. Sub‐sector Valuation 
 
The Electrical Components and Equipment sub‐sector (EC&E) has had a very strong performance 
since 2002.  The chart below shows the sub‐sector’s price movements and its movement 
relative to the Industrials sector. 
 
 
Figure 6: Chart of Electrical Component and Equipment Sub‐sector (7) 
 
The industry is currently trading at a premium to SP‐20, near its 10‐year high, and may be 
slightly overpriced.  This premium is partially warranted due to the higher growth rates seen in 
the industry (8.5%) over other sub‐sectors in the past 10 years.  For instance, growth rates for 
Air Freight and Logistics, Industrial Machinery, and Industrial Conglomerates are 6.1%, 5.8%, 
and 2.6%, respectively.  (7) The Electrical Component and Equipment industry has also 
outperformed the overall Industrials sector in the past 10 years (8.5% vs. 4.9%). 
 
II. Electrical Components and Equipment Industry Outlook 
 
EC&E had EPS growth of 20% in 2006 and is projected to have finished with an EPS growth of 
32% in 2007. (8)  Although the industry is projected to slow compared to the growth experience 
in the previous two years, the sub‐sector should still outperform the overall market.   
 
Also, the Institute of Supply Chain Management found that the Electrical Equipment & 
Components industry was the fourth fastest growing industry in January 2008.  (4)  This is a 
positive start for the industry in an uncertain market environment.  
    Page 12 of 31 
 
5. Company Analysis 
 
I. Financial Analysis 
 
With the sale of their Power Systems operating segment, Rockwell Automation ended 2007 with 
a large amount ofcash and a healthy financial situation for the upcoming year.  Some of the 
financial highlights from last year included: 
 
• Sales increased 10% to just over $5 billion.  Domestic sales only increased 3% while sales 
in EMEA, Asia‐Pacific, and Latin America had double digit growth (27%, 13%, and 23%, 
respectively).  (1) 
 
• Operating margins were also improved to almost 20%.  This yielded a diluted EPS of 
$3.70, up 29% year‐over‐year.   
 
• Free cash flow derived from continuing operations was approximately 93% of continuing 
operations’ income, which demonstrated high quality earnings.   
 
• Cost productivity target of 4% was achieved. 
 
• 23.8 million shares of common stock were repurchased. 
 
Rockwell Automation and its management have done a solid job at consistently increasing sales, 
earnings, EPS, return on equity, and the dividend over the past five years.  The table below helps 
to illustrate this point. 
   2007  2006  2005  2004  2003 
Revenues ($ Mil)  5003.9  4556.4  4111.5  3644  3266.3 
Net Income Adjusted ($ Mil)  585  529.3  447.7  324.1  217.3 
EPS Adjusted  3.63  2.94  2.39  1.7  1.14 
Dividends Common (Per Shr)  1.16  0.9  0.78  0.66  0.66 
ROE  32%  30%  26%  19%  14% 
Table 2:  Rockwell Financial Highlights since 2003 
(For complete Financial Statements, please see the Appendix) 
 
    Page 13 of 31 
 
Rockwell management is focused on consistently generating cash, investing in organic growth 
and strategic acquisitions, and returning excess income to shareholders through dividends and 
share buybacks.  From the table above, it is clear that Rockwell has been succeeding in this 
mission and this objective looks to continue. 
 
Rockwell’s revenue is estimated to grow 10 to 12 percent in 2008.  This growth will be fueled by 
strategic acquisitions, growth in their services and solutions business, and continued return from 
their investments in emerging markets.  Diluted earnings for 2008 are projected to fall between 
$4.25 and $4.45 per share driven by productivity initiatives, share repurchase, and volume 
leverage.  A target free cash flow of 95 percent has also been set for this year.  Finally, 
Rockwell’s Board of Directors authorized $1.0 billion for additional repurchase of common stock 
in November of last year. 
 
II. Business Segment Analysis 
 
Architecture & Software (A&S) 
 
A&S increased sales in 2007 by 8% from $2.06 billion in 2006 to $2.22 billion in 2007.   This 
increase was attributed to growth in process applications, safety and Rockwell’s Compact 
Logix product.  Earnings for the segment increased 10% to $588 million.  The segment 
operating margin increase 0.6 points from 25.9% in ’06 to 26.5% in ’07 due in part to cost 
productivity initiatives and price increases.    
 
Control Products & Solutions (CP&S) 
 
CP&S had double‐digit revenue growth at 11% to bring 2007 sales to $2.78 billion.  Sales 
growth was driven by the power‐centric and solutions businesses.   Operating earnings for 
the segment also increased significantly (~17%) for a 2007 total of $397 million.  The 
segment’s operating margin also benefitted from cost productivity increasing from 13.6% in 
2006 to 14.3% in 2007.   
 
III.  Rockwell Performance Factors  
 
As with any business, risks and growth drivers surround Rockwell and its management.  If 
management minimizes risk and executes on drivers of growth, significant returns can be 
generated.  Below are some of the risks and catalysts for Rockwell Automation. 
 
Risks 
• Inability to capture market share in emerging markets, specifically in China, EMEA, and 
Latin America will lead to lower revenues and earnings 
    Page 14 of 31 
 
• Failure to provide customers with advanced technology products and solutions – due to 
the highly competitive nature of the industrial automation power, control and 
information business, failure to keep pace with technology can lead to price erosion and 
lower margins 
• Cost productivity not being executed will lead to lower margins and decreased earnings 
• Raw material inflation could decrease margins 
• Underperformance of new IT structure using Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system 
could adversely affect operations 
• Acquisition difficulties could occur, such as: 
o difficulties in integrating the acquired business, retaining the acquired business’ 
customers, and achieving 
o the expected benefits of the acquisition, such as revenue increases, cost savings 
and increases in geographic or product presence, in the desired time frames; 
o loss of key employees of the acquired business; 
o difficulties implementing and maintaining consistent standards, controls, 
procedures, policies and information systems; and 
o diversion of management’s attention from other business concerns
. (1)
 
 
Growth Drivers 
 
The previously stated risks can also be major growth catalysts if executed on correctly.   
 
• Ability to penetrate emerging markets and generate returns on commercial investments 
abroad 
• Successful anticipation, development, and distribution of industrial automation products 
and solutions to market 
• Successful execution of cost productivity initiatives 
• Smooth implementation of new ERP system will lead to more efficient and streamlined 
operations 
• Excess cash from Power Systems sale could be used for reinvestment in organic growth 
or strategic acquisitions 

Successful integration/implementation of acquisitions and partnerships to fill in 
competency gaps in current technology portfolio.  Examples of successful acquisitions by 
Rockwell Automations were:

o Acquisition of ICS Triplex – added critical control and safety solutions for the oil 
and gas, chemical and power generation industries. 
o
Acquisition of ProsCon Holdings Limited – enhanced position in the growing life 
sciences industry as a leading solutions delivery company (1)
 
 
    Page 15 of 31 
 
6. Company Valuation 
 
Multiple methods were employed to estimate the current value of Rockwell Automation.  A 
Discounted Cash Flow model was generated and then financial ratios were used to valuate the 
company. 
 
I. Discounted Cash Flow (DCF) Model 
 
The discounted cash flow model yields a target price of $64.70 for Rockwell.    
 
The estimated diluted EPS for 2008 is $4.39 and $4.78 for 2009.   This price target is based 
on the following model assumptions: 
• Effective Tax rate set at 29% 
• Terminal Discount Rate set at 10% 
• Terminal FCF Growth Rate set at 5% 
• Capital Expenditures equal Depreciation and Amortization over time 
• 10‐12% increase in Revenues in 2008, in‐line with ROK management guidance 
• Free Cash Flow set at 95% of Net Income, in‐line with ROK management guidance 
• Outstanding Shares of Common Stock reduced to 151 MM from 161.2 MM using 
50% of authorized $1 BB funds for stock repurchase 
 
The detailed DCF model can be found in the Appendix. 
 
A sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the effects of the terminal discount rate 
and FCF growth rate on the target price.   
Target
Price ($)
Terminal FCF Growth Rate

2
3
4
5
6
7
Terminal
Discount
Rate
8.0



106.95


9.0



80.50


9.5
71.72
10.0 50.30 53.73 58.30
64.70
74.30 90.31
10.5



58.97


11.0



54.21


12.0
46.74
13.0
41.15
Table 3: DCF Sensitivity Study – Target Price for ROK 
 
 
 
 
    Page 16 of 31 
 
 
Change
from Current
Price (%)
Terminal FCF Growth Rate

2
3
4
5
6
7
Terminal
Discount
Rate
8.0



96.3%


9.0



47.7%


9.5
31.6%
10.0
-7.7% -1.4% 7.0% 18.7% 36.4% 65.7%
10.5



8.2%


11.0



-0.5%


12.0
-14.2%
13.0
-24.5%
 Table 4: DCF Sensitivity Study – Change from Current ROK Price 
 
The two tables above demonstrate the impact that a 0.5% change in terminal rate can have on 
the DCF target price.  Notice that even with a full percentage increase in terminal discount rate 
would yield a target price equal to the current market price.  Similarly, the terminal free cash 
flow growth rate could be decreased over 1% and result in a target price equal to the current 
market price.  Each of these terminal rates would be very conservative for Rockwell.   
 
II. Valuation Analysis 
 
The second method of valuation compared historical 10‐year financial ratios to current values.  
The table below shows the 10‐year high, low, mean and current financial ratio values for 
Rockwell on an absolute scale.   
Absolute
Valuation

High

Low

Mean

Current
Δ% from
Mean

Target E, S, B,
etc/Share

Target
Price

P/Forward E

99.9

12.1

19.9 13 -35% 4.50

$ 89.47
P/EBITDA

99.9

8.4

11.6 9 -22% 6.49

$ 75.34
P/S

3.28

0.52

1.99 1.75 -12% 33.40

$ 66.47
P/B

8.4

1.4

3.7 4.9 32% 11.93

$ 44.14
P/E/G ratio

2.4

0.7

1.3 0.9 -31% 64.94

$ 84.43
Table 5: Historical 10‐year Absolute Valuations for ROK 
 
    Page 17 of 31 
 
The target price seen in the table above was calculated using a reversion‐to‐the‐mean 
assumption.  Estimated target prices were calculated using the following equation.  
 
 
The average of all the target prices using the 10‐year mean is $71.97.  This target price is over 
11% higher than the discounted cash flow model estimate.  ROK is currently discounted when 
compared to 10‐yr historical levels.  It is trading at 12‐35% below historical valuation averages 
(except for P/B).    These valuation levels seem to indicate that ROK may be currently 
undervalued. 
 
Ratio valuation relative to the Industrials sector (SP‐20) was also used.  The table below displays 
the high, low, mean, and current Rockwell financial ratios versus SP‐20 over the past 10‐years. 
ROK vs. SP-20
Valuation

High

Low
Mean

Current

Δ% from
Mean

P/Forward E

3.96 0.68 1.1 0.87 -20.9%

P/EBITDA

99.9 1.06 1.35 1.06 -21.5%

P/S

2 0.36 1.22 1.21 -0.8%

P/B

2.56 0.39 0.91 1.55 70.3%

P/E/G ratio

1.63 0.47 0.92 0.78 -15.2%

Table 6:  Historical 10‐year Relative Valuations of ROK vs. SP‐20 
 
The relative valuations also show that ROK is currently trading at a discount to the Industrials 
sector (except P/B).   Based on the strong financial condition and increasing global reach of 
Rockwell Automation, ROK should be trading at least in line or at a slight premium to the 
Industrials sector.  
 
In addition to trading at a discount to the Industrials sector, Rockwell is also trading at a 
discount to the Electrical Components and Equipment sub‐sector. 
 
    Page 18 of 31 
 
StockVal
®
ROCKWELL AUTOMATION INCORPORATED (ROK) Price 54.71
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009 2010
PRICE RELATIVE TO S&P ELECTRICAL COMPNT & EQPT (S20D1)
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.7
1.0
HI 1.00
LO 0.21
ME 0.48
CU 0.40
02-27-1998
02-29-2008
PRICE / YEAR-FORWARD EARNINGS RELATIVE TO S&P ELECTRICAL COMPNT & EQPT (S20D1)
0.3
0.6
0.9
1.2
1.5
1.8
2.1
HI 1.85

LO 0.53
ME 1.06
CU 0.73
07-03-1998
02-29-2008
PRICE / SALES RELATIVE TO S&P ELECTRICAL COMPNT & EQPT (S20D1)
0.3
0.6
0.9
1.2
1.5
1.8
HI 1.67

LO 0.45
ME 1.14
CU 0.96
07-02-1999
02-29-2008
 
Figure 7:  Rockwell Ratios Relative to EC&E Sub‐sector 
 
ROK is trading below the 10‐year mean in price, price to forward earnings, and P/S to the 
EC&E sub‐sector.  Again, since Rockwell is in such as strong financial position and has excess 
cash to invest in growth, ROK should be trading at least in line with the sub‐sector.  If this 
holds true, then ROK stands to return substantial gains in the next few years. 
 
    Page 19 of 31 
 
III. DuPont Analysis 
 
DuPont Analysis was conducted on ROK to examine the quality of earnings.  The table below 
presents the breakdown of return on equity (ROE) over the past five years for ROK. 
 
2007 
2006 
2005 
2004 
2003 
EBIT  MARGIN%  17%  17%  16%  13%  11% 
INT BURDEN  93%  93%  93%  91%  85% 
TAX BURDEN%  72%  72%  71%  81%  95% 
ASSET T/O  1.08  0.98  0.94  0.90  0.83 
LEVERAGE  2.54  2.60  2.49  2.36  2.47 
ROE  32%  30%  26%  19%  14% 
% ROE from OPERATIONS  39%  39%  40%  42%  40% 
Table 7:  DuPont Analysis of ROK for Past Five Years 
 
Margins, ROE and asset turnover have been consistently increasing over the past five years.  
More importantly, as ROE has more than doubled in the past five years, management has 
been able to maintain high quality ROE by keeping about 40% of ROE derived from 
operations.  From this DuPont Analysis, it is clear that Rockwell management has been 
effective at executing the business plan and increasing the overall financial health of the 
company.   
 
IV. Comparables Analysis 
 
Since the industrial automation and power business is highly competitive, it would be 
prudent to evaluate Rockwell against its competitors.  The table below looks at the historical 
10‐year absolute valuations of Rockwell and three of its competitors: ABB Ltd (ABB), 
Emerson Electric (EMR), and Siemens AG (SI). 
    Page 20 of 31 
 
 
  
Absolute
Valuation

High

Low

Mean

Current

Δ% from
Mean

Sentiment

  
ROK 
P/Forward E

99.9

12.1

19.9

13

‐35% 
CHEAP 
P/EBITDA

99.9

8.4

11.6

9

‐22% 
CHEAP 
P/S

3.28

0.52

1.99

1.75

‐12% 
CHEAP 
P/B

8.4

1.4

3.7

4.9

32% 
EXPENSIVE 
P/E/G ratio

2.4

0.7

1.3

0.9

‐31% 
CHEAP 
ABB 
P/Forward E

99.9

11.2

15.9

16.1

1% 
IN‐LINE 
P/EBITDA

16

1.3

7.7

12.2

58% 
EXPENSIVE 
P/S

2.56

0.08

0.61

2.05

236% 
EXPENSIVE 
P/B

8

0.8

4.7

5.5

17% 
EXPENSIVE 
P/E/G ratio

2.8

0.7

1.2

0.8

‐33% 
CHEAP 
EMR 
P/Forward E

26.4

11

18.3

16.9

‐8% 
IN‐LINE 
P/EBITDA

13

6.5

10.1

10.2

1% 
IN‐LINE 
P/S

2.36

1.25

1.76

1.84

5% 
IN‐LINE 
P/B

5.3

2.9

4.1

4.6

12% 
EXPENSIVE 
P/E/G ratio

2.4

1.1

1.7

1.2

‐29% 
CHEAP 
SI 
P/Forward E

99.9

10.6

24.1

14.7

‐39% 
CHEAP 
P/EBITDA

13.7

3.3

6.5

10.6

63% 
EXPENSIVE 
P/S

2.4

0.35

0.88

1.26

43% 
EXPENSIVE 
P/B

7

1.2

2.4

2.6

8% 
IN‐LINE 
P/E/G ratio

4.8

0.6

1.9

0.7

‐63% 
CHEAP 
Table 8:  Historical 10‐year Absolute Valuations for ROK and Competitors 
    Page 21 of 31 
 
Of the four companies, ROK is the only one that looks to be discounted to historical 10‐year 
valuations.  ABB is currently trading at a significant premium and EMR and SI are in 
line/slightly expensive compared the 10‐year mean.  These valuations demonstrate that 
Rockwell has the highest potential upside amongst its competitors from a ratio valuation 
standpoint. 
 
    Page 22 of 31 
 
7. Conclusions and Recommendation 
 
There are always two sides to an investment story.  Therefore a list of pros and cons 
surrounding the investment decision in Rockwell Automation can be found below. 
 
Pros
  Cons
 
 Effective Management – high quality of 
earnings, increasing margins, adding 
value for shareholders 
 Past management performance does not 
guarantee future performance 
 Strong Financial Health – increasing 
revenues, earnings, and free cash flow 
 Industrials sector trading at a slight 
premium to the S&P 500 
 Excess Free Cash for Investment into 
Organic Growth or Strategic Acquisitions 
 Industrials sector is cyclical in nature – 
slow down in U.S. economy could 
significantly affect the sector 
 Increasing Share in Emerging Markets – 
46% of Revenues generated 
Internationally  
 Consistent Stock Repurchase Plan  
 Discounted Ratio Valuation on Absolute 
and Relative Scale to Industrials Sector 
and EC&E Sub‐sector  
 Currently trading at Discount Compared 
to Competitors 
 
The target price for Rockwell Automation, Inc. is $68.33.  This price is based on the average of 
the DCF model price and the ratio valuation price.   As of March 3, 2008, ROK was trading at 
$54.49.  This provides a 25% upside and a BUY rating for ROK

 
Based on the solid performance of the current management team, the strong free cash flow 
and financial health of the company, and the current discount to the sector, Rockwell 
Automation is well positioned to outperform the market. 
  
    Page 23 of 31 
 
8. References 
 
I. Rockwell Automation, Inc. 2007 Annual Report (10‐K) 
II. Bureau of Economic Analysis.  “Gross Domestic Product: Fourth Quarter 2007 Release. “ 
January 30, 2008.  Accessed Feb 29, 2008. 
<http://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/national/gdp/2008/txt/gdp407a.txt

III. Federal Reserve Statistical Release.  “Industrial Production and Capacity Utilization 
Release.”   February 15, 2008.  Accessed Feb 29, 2008.  
<http://www.federalreserve.gov/Releases/g17/Current/

IV. Institute for Supply Management.  “January 2008 Manufacturing ISM Report On 
Business.”   Accessed Feb 29, 2008.  <http://www.ism.ws/ISMReport/MfgROB.cfm

V. Berghaim, Stefan.  “Global economic outlook 2008.”  Deutsche Bank Research.  February 
14, 2008. 
VI. Standard & Poor’s Equity Research.  “2008 Sector Outlook: Industrials.”  December 10, 
2007.  Accessed Feb 29, 2007.  
<http://www.businessweek.com/investor/content/dec2007/pi20071210_906973.htm

VII. StockVal Security Analysis and Valuation Modeling Software.  
VIII. Jaffe, Michael.  “Rockwell Automation Stock Report: Sub‐Industry Outlook.”  January 26,  
2008. 
    Page 24 of 31 
 
9. Appendices 
         Page 25 of 31 
APPENDIX A:  ROCKWELL INCOME STATEMENT 
INCOME STATEMENT 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 
Revenues ($ Mil) 5003.9 4556.4 4111.5 3644 3266.3 3775.7 4134.8 4493 4670 
Cost of Goods & Services 2906.6 2656.4 2448 2081.2 1955 2589.7 2886.8 2939 3178 
Gross Profit 2097.3 1900 1663.5 1562.8 1311.3 1186 1248 1554 1492 
S G & A Expense 1278.6 1141 997.4 1058.6 967.7 907.4 1041 1040 1018 
R&D Expense 143.1 148.5 128 121.7 121.6 123.2 169 209 188 
EBITDA 969.9 909.8 803.1 666.5 540.7 493 476.2 804.7 773 
Depreciation & Amortization 117.9 117.4 127.4 186.7 190.6 197.7 225 225 251 
EBIT 852 792.4 675.7 479.8 350.1 295.3 251.2 579.7 522 
Interest Expense 63.4 56.6 45.8 41.7 52.5 66.1 83.2 72.7 84 
Pre‐Tax Income 788.6 735.8 629.9 438.1 297.6 229.2 168 507 438 
Taxes 219.3 206.5 182.2 84 16.2 5.5 43 163 155 
          
Net Income Reported ($ Mil) 1487.8 607 540 414.9 286.4 121.5 305 636 559 
Net Income Adjusted 585 529.3 447.7 324.1 217.3 168.3 147.1 367.3 281 
EPS Reported 9.23 3.37 2.88 2.17 1.51 0.64 1.65 3.35 2.89 
EPS Adjusted 3.63 2.94 2.39 1.7 1.14 0.89 0.79 1.93 1.45 
          
Shares Outstanding (Thou) 161200 179900 187200 191100 190100 188800 185300 189900 193600 
Dividends Common (Per Shr) 1.16 0.9 0.78 0.66 0.66 0.66 0.93 1.02 1.02 
Dividends Preferred ($ Mil) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 
 
  Page 26 of 31 
 
APPENDIX B:  ROCKWELL BALANCE SHEET 
BALANCE SHEET 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 
Cash & Equivalents ($ Mil) 624.2 408.1 463.6 473.8 226.4 289 121 170 
Accounts Receivable 927.7 743.6 799.6 719.9 651.5 645 704 737 
Inventories 504.7 411.5 569.9 574.3 536.1 557 600 610 
Other Current Assets 325.4 624.8 353.4 258.1 278 266 296 936 
Total Current Assets 2382 2188 2186.5 2026.1 1692 1757 1721 2453 
Plant & Equipment Gross 1665.1 1515.7 2179.6 2139.7 2158.3 2181 2168 2254 
Accumulated Depreciation 1154.8 1047.2 1405.1 1335.2 1241.2 1193 1093 1060 
Plant & Equipment Net 510.3 468.5 774.5 804.5 917.1 988 1075 1194 
Other Long‐Term Assets 1653.5 2078.9 1564.1 1370.6 1330.8 1210.8 1247.7 1614 
Total Long‐Term Assets 2163.8 2547.4 2338.6 2175.1 2247.9 2198.8 2322.7 2808 
Total Assets 4545.8 4735.4 4525.1 4201.2 3939.9 3955.8 4043.7 5261 
         
Accounts Payable 498.5 395.7 388.5 362.2 315.2 325 346 478 
Short‐Term Debt 521.4 219.8 1.2 0.2 8.7 161.6 10.4 16.4 
Other Current Liabilities 724.6 677.8 551.2 501.2 451.8 479 499 530 
Total Current Liabilities 1744.5 1293.3 940.8 863.6 775.7 965.6 855.4 1024.4 
Long‐Term Debt 405.7 748.2 748.2 757.7 764 766.8 909.3 910.6 
Deferred Income Taxes 0 75.5 0 89.3 35.3 140 209 199 
Other Long‐Term Liabilities 652.8 700.2 1187 629.6 778.1 474.4 469.5 457.8 
Total Long‐Term Liabilities 1058.5 1523.9 1935.2 1476.6 1577.4 1381.2 1587.8 1567.4 
Total Liabilities 2803 2817.2 2876 2340.2 2353.1 2346.8 2443.2 2591.8 
Minority Interest 0 0       
Preferred Equity 0 0       
Common Equity 1742.8 1918.2 1649.1 1861 1586.8 1609 1600.5 2669.2 
Total Equity 1742.8 1918.2 1649.1 1861 1586.8 1609 1600.5 2669.2 
Total Liab & Equity 4545.8 4735.4 4525.1 4201.2 3939.9 3955.8 4043.7 5261 
 
  Page 27 of 31 
 
APPENDIX C:  ROCKWELL CASH FLOW STATEMENT 
CASH FLOW STATEMENT 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 
FREE CASH FLOW 
Net Cash From Operations 444.9 313.3 548.3 596.9 419.9 461.9 335 645 760 
Capital Expenditures 131 122.3 102.7 98 107.6 99.6 157 217 250 
Free Cash Flow 313.9 191 445.6 498.9 312.3 362.3 178 428 510 
Dividends Common ($ Mil) 187 161.9 146 126.1 125.5 124.6 172.3 193.7 197.5 
Free Cash Flow After Dividends 126.9 29.1 299.6 372.8 186.8 237.7 5.7 234.3 312.5 
ADJUSTED CASH FLOW 
Net Income Reported ($ Mil) 1487.8 607 540 414.9 286.4 121.5 305 636 559 
Accounting Adjustment ‐902.8 ‐77.7 ‐92.3 ‐90.8 ‐69.1 46.8 ‐157.9 ‐268.7 ‐278 
Net Income Adjusted 585 529.3 447.7 324.1 217.3 168.3 147.1 367.3 281 
Depreciation & Amortization 117.9 117.4 127.4 186.7 190.6 197.7 225 225 251 
Cash Flow Adjusted 702.9 646.7 575.1 510.8 407.9 366 372.1 592.3 532 
Capital Expenditures 131 122.3 102.7 98 107.6 99.6 157 217 250 
Free Cash Flow Adjusted 571.9 524.4 472.4 412.8 300.3 266.4 215.1 375.3 282 
Dividends Common ($ Mil) 187 161.9 146 126.1 125.5 124.6 172.3 193.7 197.5 
Free Cash Flow Adjusted After Divs 384.9 362.5 326.4 286.7 174.8 141.8 42.8 181.6 84.5 
CASH FLOW STATEMENT SUMMARY 
Net Cash From Operations 444.9 313.3 548.3 596.9 419.9 461.9 335 645 760 
Net Cash From Investing 1398.9 52.7 ‐96.3 ‐65.2 ‐131.4 ‐171 153 ‐228 ‐324 
Net Cash From Financing ‐1673.1 ‐556.1 ‐551.7 ‐312 ‐335.3 ‐97.4 ‐197 ‐677 ‐243 
Other Cash Flows 45.4 139.2 88.1 27.7 ‐16 ‐25.7 ‐340 94 60 
Change In Cash & Equiv 216.1 ‐50.9 ‐11.6 247.4 ‐62.8 167.8 ‐49 ‐166 253 
  Page 28 of 31 
 
APPENDIX D:  ROCKWELL DCF MODEL  
 
  Page 29 of 31 
 
APPENDIX E:  ROCKWELL DCF MODEL (INCOME STATEMENT BY SEGMENT) 
 
  Page 30 of 31 
 
APPENDIX F:  ROCKWELL DCF MODEL (INCOME STATEMENT ‐ PART 1) 
 
  Page 31 of 31 
 
APPENDIX G:  ROCKWELL DCF MODEL (INCOME STATEMENT ‐ PART 2)