ECSE 412A - Fall 2008 Discrete Time Signal Processing (3 cr.)

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B.
champagne

Page
1

11/24/2013



ECSE 412
A

-

Fall

2008

Discrete Time Signal Processing

(3 cr.)



Senate on January 29, 2003 approved a resolution on academic integrity,
which requires that the following reminder to students be printed on every
course outline:


McGILL UNIVERSITY VA
LUES ACADEMIC INTEGRITY. THEREFORE ALL
STUDENTS MUST UNDERSTAND THE MEANING AND CONSEQUENCES OF
CHEATING, PLAGIARISM AND OTHER ACADEMIC OFFENCES UNDER THE CODE
OF STUDENT CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURES (see
http://www.mcgill.ca/integrity

for more information).




General Information:


Instructor:





Prof. Benoît Champagne



Office: McConnell Engineering Building, Room 756



Tel: (514) 398
-
5701



Email:
champagne@ece.
mcgill.ca



Office Hours:


o

Monday & Wednesday
: 1:3
0pm to 4:3
0pm

o

Otherwise by appointment




Lectures

(CRN 2324)
:




M
onday, Wednesday and Friday
:
11
h
30a
m to

12
h
30p
m



Location: Trottier Building,
R
oom

ENGTR 210
0



Lectures will start on Wednesday, September
3, 20
08



NOTE: According to the official McGill schedule, a
n extra

Monday class w
ill be
given on Tuesday, Dec. 2
,

to replace
lectures

that would have been held

on
Monday, Oct. 13

(Thanksgiving Day)
.


Tutorials

(CRN 2325
)
:




Friday: 3h30pm to 4h30pm



Room ENGTR 21
00



Tutorials will start on Friday, September 12, 2008


Teaching Assistants:


Name

Office

Email

Responsibility

Neda Ehtiati

MC751

Neda.ehtiati@mail.mcgill.ca

Tutorials

Hafsa Qureshi

MC736

Hafsa.qureshi@mail.mcgill.ca

Problem Sets

Fang Shang

MC751

Fang.sh
ang@mail.mcgill.ca

Grading


B.
champagne

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TA’s Office hours
:




Ms. Hafsa Qureshi will be available to answer student questions, especially as
they relate to the problem sets:
Tuesday, 9h00am to 10h00am, Room MC736
(otherwise by appointment)
.



Course Description:

Prereq
uisite:




ECSE 304: Signals and Systems II
,

or



ECSE 306: Fundamentals of Signals and Systems

Objectives:



Digital signal processing (DSP) is prevalent in a wide variety of applications in
electrical and computer engineering, including: consumer electronics,

web
-
based multi
-
media processing, advanced wireline and wireless digital

communications, sonar and radar processing, remote sensing and biomedical
engineering, to name a few.



The main objective of the course is to equip the students with the
fundamental p
rinciples, methods and algorithms that are commonly used by
practicing engineers and scientists in the analysis, development and design of
modern DSP systems.




The emphasis will bear on one
-
dimensional signals, although certain
generalizations may be discu
ssed.

List of Topics:

Introduction

(1 hour)



Definition of digital signal processing (DSP), overview of a DSP system, the
discrete
-
time signal processing (DTSP) paradigm.

Part I: Basic

concepts

(~10 hour)



Discrete
-
time
characterization of
signals and system
s:


linear time
-
invariant
(LTI) systems, convolution, finite (FIR) and infinite (IIR) impulse responses,
difference equations.



Discrete
-
time Fourier transform (DTFT):


definition, types of convergence,
properties, frequency analysis of LTI systems, ideal f
requency selective filters,
phase and group delays.



z
-
transform (ZT): definition, properties,
rational forms,
unilateral ZT and
difference equations
,
z
-
domain analysis of LTI systems,

pole
-
zero

characterization , inverse system, all
-
pass and
minimum
-
phase

decomposition, linear phase property.



Discrete Fourier transform (DFT): definition, properties, relationship between
DFT and DTFT, circular versus linear convolution.



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champagne

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11/24/2013

Part II: Design and implementation issues for DSP systems

(~16 hours)



Digital processin
g of analog signals: uniform sampling, sampling theorem,
reconstruction formula, basic A/D and D/A functions, digital filtering of analog
signals.



Filter structures: signal flow graph representation, basic structures for FIR
and IIR systems (direct forms,
parallel, cascade, etc.), transposition theorem,
lattice filter structures.



Filter design techniques: numerical approximation problem, transformation
techniques for the design of IIR filters, FIR filter design by windowing and
frequency sampling, introduct
ion to computer optimization techniques.



Finite
-
precision effects: review of binary arithmetic, effects of coefficient
quantization on frequency response, round
-
off noise in digital filtering
, SQNR
computation, other effects.



Practical computation of the D
FT: fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithms,
radix
-
2 algorithms based on decimation
-
in
-
time and in
-
frequency,
generalization to mixed radix, FFT
-
based linear convolution (overlap
-
add and
overlap
-
save methods).



Introduction to programmable digital signal pr
ocessors (PDSP): motivation,
basic characterization and structural features, benchmarking of PDSP.

Part III: Advanced topics and applications

(~10 hours)



Frequency analysis of signals: DFT
-
based analysis, trade
-
off between
temporal and frequency resolution
, effects of windowing and spectral
sampling, time
-
dependent Fourier analysis (spectrograms).



Multirate systems: sampling rate conversion, fundamental identities,
polyphase decomposition, introduction to subband filtering, oversampling in
A/D and D/A conve
rsion.



Adaptive filtering

(if time permits)
: motivation, reference signal, cost
function, recursive optimization, the LMS algorithm, selected applications.


Course Material:

Web

Support:



The course web page on McGill University’s
my
Courses

(WebCT Vista) will be
used extensively to post course rela
ted information

(e.g.
course outline,
problem sets, exam solutions, etc.). Make sure you consult it regularly.

Cl
ass Notes
:





A

set of
class
notes

developed

over th
e last few years
by Professor
s
Champagne and
Labeau

will be used as the main text
.



These notes
, which

are organized in Chapters that closely follow the topics
listed under Course Description
,
will be made available
(in PDF format)
on the
course
W
eb pag
e
.



A

list

of the
specific
sections of the
class note

covered in class during each
lecture

will
be maintained

on the Web page
.


B.
champagne

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4

11/24/2013

Matlab Primer:




A quick introduction to Matlab will be given during the first tutorial. The
corresponding slides will
be made availab
le on the course
Web page.




For those who want
to know more:

o

There are several
free Matlab
tutorials available on the Web; s
imply
search for
Matlab tutorials

or
Matlab primer

with you
r favorite engine.

o

A few e
xamples
of such tutorials are given

below
under

Some
Interesting Links
.

o

Several textbooks are also available for learning Matlab, such as the
one by R. Pratap under
Supplementary Texts
below
.


Old Exams:




A limited subset of midterms and final exams previo
usly given in 412 will be
made available via

th
e course Web page.



These should be consulted by the students prior to examinations.


Supplementary Texts:

For those who like to learn from a more complete textbook,
I would recommend the one by Proakis and Manolakis below. Students who are
looking for addi
tional problems and exercises should get hold of the Schaum’s
Outline by Hayes.





M. H. Hayes, Digital Signal Processing, Schaum’s Outlines, 1999.



A. V. Oppenheim and R. W. Schafer,
Digital Signal Processing,

Prentice
-
Hall,
1975.



A. V. Oppenheim, R. W. Sc
hafer with J. R. Buck, Discrete
-
Time Signal
Processing, 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1999.



R. Pratap,
Getting Started with MATLAB: A Quick Introduction for Scientists
and Engineers,
Oxford University Press, 2002.



J. G. Proakis and D. G. Manolakis,
Digital Signa
l Processing: Principles,
A
lgorithms, and Applications, 4th

Ed.,

Prentice H
all, 2007
.

Some interesting links:




Nice stuff on signals and systems:
http://www.jhu.edu/~signals/index.html



Filter design ap
plets:
http://www.dsptutor.freeuk.com/



FFT benchmark:
http://www.fftw.org/




Matlab tutorials:

-

htt
p://math.ucsd.edu/~driver/21d
-
s99/matlab
-
primer.html

-

http://users.ece.gatech.edu/~bonnie/book/TUTORIAL/tutorial.html




IEEE Signal Processing Society:

-

http://www.signalprocessingsociety.org/



Homework and Evaluation:

Problem sets:



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There will be
six (6
)

problem sets

(i.e. about one every two

week
s
)
,
to be
posted on the course Web

page along with due date
s and other r
elevant info
.



These

may

i
nclude
more
advanced problems

t
hat require the use of numerical
computing (i.e. Matalb) and/or the study
of selected

research papers.



Students are allowed to do the problem sets either alone
or in team o
f two
.
A

standard cover pag
e

format will be provided on the Web
.



An assignment box has

be
en

reserved for the course.



For each problem set
,
only
selected problems will be marked.



Solutions
wi
ll be posted

on the
Web
once the due date is past.



All

problem sets will be counted towards
the final mark.



Marked assignments will be available
for pick up
on the 7
th

floor
of McConnell
Engineering
(near elevators).

Midterm examinations:




There will be 2 midterm examinations,
50

minutes each in duration, and held
during normal class time:

-

Mid
t
erm #1: ,
Wednes
day,
October

8
, 200
8

-

Midterm #2: ,
Wednes
d
ay
,
November 12
, 2008



These
will be of the CLOSED BOOK type:

only the faculty standa
rd calculator
and
a dictionary

will be allowed,

NO crib sheet allowed.



Both Midterms

will be counted towards th
e final mark.



List of material covered by each midterm will be posted on the Web page.

Final examination:



There will be a final examination, 3 hours in duration (date and time to be
announced by the Faculty)



This
will be of the CLOSED BOOK type:

only the f
aculty standard c
alculator
and

a dictionary

will be allowed;

NO crib sheet allowed.



The final examination will cover all the material included in the class notes
and/or seen in class during the term.

Marking scheme:

Problem sets

1
5
%

Midterm #1

17.5
%

Midt
erm #2

17.5
%

Final examination

50
%


Marking Policy (Assignments and Midterms):



No assignment will be accepted after the assignments have been collected
from the assignment box.



Any requests for re
-
evaluation of an assignment must be made within one
week
of its re
turn by contacting t
he instructor.




Marked assignments not picked up within two weeks may be discarded.



There will not be any make
-
up examinations

for students who miss a
Midterm.


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champagne

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Students who miss such a midterm due to illness
should notify the
instructor within a week

of the examination and provide him with an
adequate
medical certificate

stating the date and nature of the illness.



Under presentation of a proper certificate, and only in this case, the mark for
the missed examination will be comp
uted from that obtained at the final
examination.



Students who miss a midterm for unjustified reasons (e.g.: no medical
certificate, going to the exam at the wrong time or on the wrong day, etc.)
will automatically get a mark of zero.



Any request

for reeva
luation of a Midterm must be made within a week of its
return by contacting the instructor.



Marked Midterms that have not been picked up after two weeks of their
return may be discarded.