Appendix A: Chemistry 2005-2006 ETF Report - Office of the Provost

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PAMS 08
-
09 ETF Summa
ry


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College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences 2008
-
2009 ETF Report

Jo
-
Ann Cohen, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

Peter Evans, Director of Computing and Information Systems


Section
1. Categorized ETF Expenditure Summary


a.

Personnel



Total for professional support staff (salary + benefits): $253,158 (16.20%)



Total for student
-
worker staff (salary + benefits): $35,778 (2.29%)



Combined for staff/student salaries and benefits: $288,9
35.99 (18.49%)


b.

IT infrastructure, equipment and services (computing labs, networking, etc.):
$897,202.57


c.

Non
-
IT infrastructure, equipment (experimental labs, wet labs, etc.):
$297,916.62


d.

Facilities (repairs and renovations, furniture, etc.):
$
1,010.31


e.

Discipline/instructional related field trips, professional

development/experiences, travel, conferences, services etc.: $55,502.07


Note that the
vast majority of these funds was spent by
the Department of Marine, Earth and
Atmospheric Sciences

for their required

field experiences
(
for their undergraduate majors
)
.


f.

Other/miscellaneous:
$22,427.48


Section 3 contains additional details of the C
ollege’s expenditures
; details for individual
departments are available from the College upon request.


Section 2.
Justification/Purpose of Expenditures

S
trategic Overview


a. New and/or Transformative Initiatives


The Mathematics and Statistics departments moved into SAS Hall in Spring 2009. This state of
the art teaching facility has been equipped with

extensive classroom/lab technology and was the
primary focus of the PAMS ETF efforts during the 2008
-
2009 fiscal year. We directed
considerable resources (from multiple sources including corporate donors such as SAS and
CISCO Systems, ETF and the college
’s state and foundation budgets) toward the facility this
past fiscal year and we will continue to examine the technology needs of the learning spaces
(within budget constraints). We will seek additional funding in future years as needed.


PAMS, in collabo
ration with CALS

and ClassTech,

participat
ed

in
a
pilot program
that led to the
establishment

of
a Student Response System
(SRS)
standard for campus.

The expanded use of
student response systems in Chemistry, Physics and MEAS has enhanced student learning

in
general and has enhanced student learning within the context of individual lectures in particular.

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The Mathematics and Statistics departments have indicated their interest in the use of “clickers”
and we expect to see similar results.


The PAMS HPC
ha
s been

heavily used, over the years, by majors within the College

and was
upgraded this year with s
everal

additional servers
. In addition, the College made a significant
investment in the OIT/HPC cluster this year and we expect to invest further in the
university
cluster in future years. Such investments help us to achieve greater efficiency in support and
hardware through the associated economies of scale.


Examples of additional initiatives are listed below.


1. Chemistry: Synthesis I and II.
Chemistry purchased instrumentation (surface area analyzer
and X
-
ray diffraction instrumentation) for use in two upper level undergraduate lab courses for
its majors. (Note that these labs were developed in response to recommendations made by an
external
review team that assessed the department’s undergraduate and graduate programs.)


2
.

MEAS:

Geological Field Camp
.
A new initiative this year included purchase of GPS
receivers, laptop computers, and accompanying software for mapping applications in the
field.
Faculty in MEAS report that these have greatly enhanced instruction for the Geologic Field
Camp. Last year, the ETF committee in MEAS received multiple requests for purchase of GPS
equipment for use in a wide range of courses and so the Department

anticipates that the
equipment will continue to be put to good use.


3. MEAS: Meteorology Lab.
With the opening of Jordan II in 07
-
08, MEAS began using a
new lab (5214) for its meteorology courses. As a result of the initial use, it was determined tha
t
the lab was too large to be used effectively without voice augmentation. So a system with
microphones, an amplifier and speakers was installed during the 2008
-
2009 fiscal year.


4
.

Mathematics:

Mathematics Mobile Computing Lab
.

Rather than equipping
a number of
new laboratories in SAS Hall, the Mathematics Department chose to try to optimize the use of
resources through the acquisition of an additional mobile lab. The Department requested, and
received one
-
time funding, for a mobile cart, wireless ac
cess points and 31 machines.


5
.
Mathematics:

Biological
Experiments in

Mathematics Courses.
The Mathematics
Department
developed for use in four classes (MA 325, 432, 573 and 574)

new experiments that
focus on the biological sciences
. These experimen
ts use
devices purchased from Finapre
s
s

Systems and the experiments were very successfully used in the above courses during 08
-
09.


6.

Physics: Clicker Systems.

Today’s students are active learners who want to always be in
touch. Current research suppo
rts the use of clicker technology in the classroom as an active
learning approach. In fact, the use of clickers allows students to actively participate in a lecture
and receive instant feedback from the instructor. Physics was an early adopter of this te
chnology
and expanded its reach this year by acquiring a set of clickers for use in all sections of PY 211,
PY 212, PY 205(M) and PY 208(M). In addition, the Department made clickers available to all
students enrolled in its service courses.



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7
. Statisti
cs:

Instructional Computer Lab (SICL) in the new SAS Hall Building.
The
Statistics Department received funding to outfit the new SICL lab in SAS Hall with Dell
‘All
-
in
-
One’ systems
. Groups that have used the lab during summer school have been delighted
with the
systems. The new lab has expanded the availability of laptops for both undergraduate and
graduate students.


8.

Statistics: Expansion of Blade System.
The Department expanded the Blade system it
purchased two years ago to support the software
system ‘WinBugs.’ Last fall this system was
becoming overwhelmed; the expansion has met the increased need. Note that the software,
which implements MCMC methodology for Bayesian Analysis, is essential for one important
course (ST 740), and for doctoral s
tudents working in Bayesian Analysis.


b. Actions Taken to Improve Efficiency/Return on ETF Investments


PAMS evaluates the use of ETF funds relative to the existing needs each year. The committees
within the College that deal with computing issues are
consulted to ensure that the projects are
aligned with the faculty’s priorities and deans’ priorities for the College. The students within the
College are consulted through representatives on the PAMS Council.


The College has, for many years, examined re
quests from departments to determine if there are
common requirements for equipment that would be better purchased and supported centrally.
The PAMS HPC is one such example. Establishment of the cluster enabled us to focus resources
in a single facility,

thereby providing economies of scale in terms of power, UPS, networking,
backup, and the machines themselves. While this has been a very effective and efficient use of
college level funds, we recently decided that it would more efficient and effective to

have our
students use the university cluster. Consequently we invested a portion of our 08
-
09 ETF funds
in the university cluster and plan on adding to that investment in future years.



c. Unmet ETF
-
Eligible Needs


PAMS has many unmet needs and those needs will continue to
grow, particularly given
enrollment increases and declining state budgets. There are continuing needs within the
departments and within the College that have been identified and have not been addr
essed.
Some of those needs are included below. (Note that additional departmental unmet needs are
contained in the departmental narratives that are included as appendices at the end of this
document.)


1. Continuing Funding Needs


We are grateful to the
University for its

continuing support and for its

one
-
time support

over the
last several years,

particularly for those projects directed at outfitting SAS Hall.

We will
eventually need continuing support to replace the technology in the 210 lab spaces in
SAS Hall
(for example the Statistics Department’s new SICL lab and the mobile laptop cart used by the
Department of Mathematics) and will more immediately need continuing support to replace
hardware received as one
-
time funding in the past for labs in othe
r buildings (such as the
meteorology lab in Jordan II).


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For several years we have discussed the need for a large computer testing facility for
departments with large enrollment courses (such as CH 101). We have yet to identify an
appropriate space, nor t
he hardware and personnel resources, that would be needed for a large
facility of that type.


MEAS:

For students in the marine science major, oceanographic cruise experience is critical.


The Department is fortunate to have the R/V Cape Hatteras near at
hand and able to
accommodate student cruise activities.


However, for each undergraduate student, the
Department can only support about 8 hours at sea, a period barely long enough for orientation
and insufficient for deep
-
water oceanography.


Creative mean
s needs to be sought to allow each
undergraduate major at least two days at sea sometime during his/her four years at NCSU.



2. One
-
Time Funding Needs


Note that some of the one
-
time needs identified below require additional continuing funds to
replace/up
grade equipment on a regular cycle.


Chemistry:
Modern Chemistry laboratories rely heavily on numerous analytical instruments to
evaluate molecular structure, measure physical properties (e.g. pH, temperature), monitor rates of
chemical reactions, identify

components in reaction mixtures, etc. There are instructional
equipment needs that have not been met, especially in the BS program. Chemistry has begun to
implement several major changes in the laboratories taken by BS chemistry majors during their
juni
or and senior years. The plan is to phase in these changes over the four
-
year period that
began in Fall 2007. The Department remains on track with this project, and is planning on
phasing in its third new upper
-
division laboratory during the 09
-
10 academi
c year. The
Department needs to acquire equipment (at a cost of approximately $532,000) and needs to make
facility renovations for the new laboratory courses.


MEAS:
Although ETF support this past fiscal year was much improved over the past several
years when major upgrade of lab equipment had to be postponed, the Department still faced
funding shortages.


For example, the Department upgraded about half the full complement of
geology field equipment and postponed lab microscope repair until
the 09
-
10

fiscal year
.





Acquisition of new laptops for student use in labs had to proceed slowly after immediate needs
were met.


A new atmospheric sounding system has been needed for at least 10 years to replace
an antiquated 1980
-
vintage receiver with a more m
odern unit.


However, the cost, in the
neighborhood of $60,000, is prohibitive.


The Department plans to explore ways to split the cost
between ETF and research funding since the system can be used in both teaching and research.



In addition, the
Department has significant needs for its geology courses identified in last year’s
report.


Mathematics:

The Department
needs to replace computers for its graduate students housed in
the Laundry building as well as computers in the Multi
-
Media Lab that ar
e used by students
across campus.


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Physics:

The Department identified one
-
time funding needs in its report last year. No
additional one
-
time needs were identified at this time (although the Department did request
additional continuing funding for person
nel).


Statistics:

The Department would like to expand its PC labs. But given the budget situation
facing the state and the University, the Department has decided to delay the request until the
budget situation improves.


d. Assessment of Impact of ETF I
nvestments on Student Learning


Discussions with students, meetings with the PAMS Student Council, meetings with the
computing committees within PAMS, and discussions with the departmental administrations
within the College are all part of the evaluation
p
rocess
of the effectiveness of ETF investments.


The use of ETF funding to support student learning within PAMS provides an essential element,
not only in the education of the majors in the College, but for all undergraduate students in the
University and
for many graduate students across campus. Many of the courses offered by the
College have a direct computer related component. Further, with Chemistry, MEAS,
Mathematics, Statistics and Physics all having lab components for many courses, the ETF
-
funded e
quipment and expendables used in their courses are essential elements in student
learning.

As noted earlier, Chemistry, MEAS, and Physics are integrating the use of student
response systems extensively within their courses and Mathematics and Statistics ar
e expected to
quickly follow with the use of this technology.



e.

Planning and Review Processes


Individual departments have established review processes involving faculty, students and staff.


The dean’s office, together with each department,

evaluates t
he
need for new

equipment or new
facilities as well as the need for replacing equipment in existing labs or the need for modifying
lab facilities. Input from faculty, staff
and students provides the basis for decisions that are made.


With the extensive needs associated with the opening of SAS Hall, the college’s ETF committee
made the decision in Spring 2008 to direct all available college
-
level resources in 2008
-
2009 and
all requests for new ETF

funding in 2008
-
2009 to equipping the learning spaces in SAS Hall.
Although our customary practice is to seek and evaluate funding requests from all departments,
the extraordinary opportunities and challenges of putting state of the art technology in SAS

Hall,
a building that houses two departments responsible for generating about 10% of all credit hours
generated on campus, quickly surfaced as the sole priority for 08
-
09.

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Section 3.
Itemized List of Expenditures by Account Code


ETF Expenditure Report a
s of June 30, 2009







Account

Description

Totals

51119


Epa Reg
-
all Other


$ 75,190.96

51219


Spa
-
reg. Salaries


$ 108,898.97

51270


SPA Longevity


$ 1,960.98

51319


EPA Teach
-
all Other


$ 25,035.33

51410


Non
-
Student Regular Wage


$ 2,232.05

51450


Student Regular Wage


$ 27,631.84

51811


Social Security


$ 12,916.36

51813


Federal Health Ins


$ 3,020.75

51821


State Retirement


$ 15,851.18

51830


Medical Insurance


$ 12,693.65

51871


TIAA Optional Ret


$ 1,304.01

51873


Optional Retirement Plan


$ 874.66

51891


Staff Benefits


$ 1,325.25

51923


Prof Consulting Fees
-
Admin


$
-


52101


Household Supplies
-
Janitorial


$ 28.44

52300


Educational Supply


$ 138,296.50

52400


Repair Supplies


$ 3,548.77

52450


Maintenance Equipment


$ 219.91

52510


Gasoline/Diesel Fuel


$ 450.43

52590


Other Motor Veh Supplies


$ 281.64

52600


Office Supply


$ 35,180.21

52650


Data Processing Supplies


$ 1,494.93

52823


PC Software Purch <$5,000


$ 699.93


52824


Server Software Purch <$5,000


$ 8,121.54

52870

Other DP Equipment <$5,000


$ 39,010.36

52873


LAN Equipment Purch<$5,000


$ 92.79

52874


PC & Printer Purch<
$5,000


$ 234,702.24

52875


Server Purchases <$5,000


$ 98,879.88

52900


Other Supply


$ 1,037.57

53112


In
-
State Transportation
-
Ground


$ 2,274.39

53114


In
-
State Subsistence
-
Lodging


$ 100.00


53115


In State Subsistence
-
meals


$ 65.25

53121


Out Of State Trans
-
Air


$ 1,331.77

53122


Out Of State Trans
-
Ground


$ 3,286.13

53124


Out Of State Sub
-
Lodging


$ 759.26

53125


Out Of State Subsistence
-
Meals


$ 507.50

53144


Board/nonemp Travel
-

Sub


$ 310.00


53230


Comm
-
telecomm Services


$ 5,935.00

53400


Printing and Binding


$ 12,478.30


53510


Repairs Bldg/gnds


$ 505.11

53600


Freight And Express


$ 758.17

53616


Administrative Services


$ (210.00)

53923


Svs Agreement
-

Lab Svs


$ 32.00


PAMS 08
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53925


Svs Agreement
-

Waste Remove


$ 505.20

53926


Svs Agreement
-

Security Svs


$ 2,400.00


53929


Service Agreements
-
other


$ 2,340.00

54350


Rent of Oth Equip
-
Other


$ 46,135.70


54438


Maint Agreement
-

Server Software


$ 5,603.91

54511

Insurance
-

Property


$ 139.68


55224


Server Software Purch >$5,000


$ 23,436.00

55310

Educ Equip
-
Classroom/Library


$ 261,778.00

55320


Educ Equip
-
scientific/medical


$ 121,740.32

55550


Other Equip
-
Comm>$5,000


$ 87,951.32

55572

Video Transmiss Equip>$5,000


$ 2,250.00

55574


PC/Printer Equipment >$5,000


$ 129,600.90






Total Costs


1,562,995.04





Total Budget


$ 1,562,980.00


Less: Total Costs


1,562,995.04


+ /
-

: Change in Accts Payable


(15.04)


Budget Balance


(0.00)



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College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (PAMS)







Categorized ETF Expenditure Summary as of June 30, 2009






















Professional


Student
-
Worker


IT


Non
-
IT






Other/


Account

Description


Support Staff


Staff


Infrastructure


Infrastructure


Facilities


Travel


Misc.


Total

51119


Epa Reg
-
all Other


75,190.96














75,190.96


51219


Spa
-
reg. Salaries


108,898.97














108,898.97

51270


SPA Longevity


1,960.98














1,960.98

51319


EPA Teach
-
all Other


25,035.33














25,035.33

51410


Non
-
Student Regular Wage


(4,751.39)


6,983.44












2,232.05


51450


Student Regular Wage




27,631.84












27,631.84


51811


Social Security


11,973.64


942.72












12,916.36


51813


Federal Health Ins


2,800.28


220.47












3,020.75


51821


State Retirement


15,851.18














15,851.18


51830


Medical Insurance


12,693.65














12,693.65

51871


TIAA Optional Ret


1,304.01














1,304.01

51873


Optional Retirement Plan


874.66














874.66


51891


Staff Benefits


1,325.25














1,325.25

51923


Prof Consulting Fees
-
Admin


-















-


52101


Household Supplies
-
Janitorial














28.44


28.44


52300


Educational Supply








138,296.50








138,296.50


52400


Repair Supplies






3,548.77










3,548.77

52450


Maintenance Equipment








219.91








219.91

52510


Gasoline/Diesel Fuel












450.43




450.43



















281.64


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281.64


52600


Office Supply








35,180.21








35,180.21

52650


Data Processing Supplies






1,494.93










1,494.93


52823


PC Software Purch <$5,000






699.93










699.93


52824


Server Software Purch
<$5,000






8,121.54










8,121.54

52870

Other DP Equipment
<$5,000






39,010.36










39,010.36

52873


LAN Equipment
Purch<$5,000






92.79










92.79

52874


PC & Printer Purch<$5,000






234,702.24










234,702.24

52875


Server Purchases <$5,000






98,879.88










98,879.88

52900


Other Supply














1,037.57


1,037.57

53112


In
-
State Transportation
-
Ground












2,274.39




2,274.39

53114


In
-
State Subsistence
-
Lodging












100.00




100.00


53115


In State Subsistence
-
meals












65.25




65.25

53121


Out Of State Trans
-
Air












1,331.77




1,331.77

53122


Out Of State Trans
-
Ground












3,286.13




3,286.13

53124


Out Of State Sub
-
Lodging












759.26




759.26

53125


Out Of State Subsistence
-
Meals












507.50




507.50

53144


Board/nonemp Travel
-

Sub












310.00




310.00


53230


Comm
-
telecomm Services














5,935.00


5,935.00

53400


Printing and Binding














12,478.30


12,478.30


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53510


Repairs Bldg/gnds










505.11






505.11


53600


Freight And Express














758.17


758.17

53616


Administrative Services














(210.00)


(210.00)

53923


Svs Agreement
-

Lab Svs






32.00










32.00

53925


Svs Agreement
-

Waste
Remove










505.20






505.20

53926


Svs Agreement
-

Security
Svs














2,400.00


2,400.00


53929


Service Agreements
-
other








2,340.00








2,340.00

54350


Rent of Oth Equip
-
Other












46,135.70




46,135.70


54438


Maint Agreement
-

Server
Software






5,603.91










5,603.91

54511

Insurance
-

Property








139.68








139.68


55224


Server Software Purch
>$5,000






23,436.00










23,436.00

55310

Educ
Equip
-
Classroom/Library






261,778.00










261,778.00


55320


Educ Equip
-
scientific/medical








121,740.32








121,740.32

55550


Other Equip
-
Comm>$5,000






87,951.32










87,951.32

55572

Video Transmiss
Equip>$5,000






2,250.00










2,250.00


55574


PC/Printer Equipment
>$5,000






129,600.90










129,600.90



+ /
-

: Change in Accts
Payable






-











-




Total Costs


253,157.52


35,778.47


897,202.57


297,916.62


1,010.31


55,502.07


22,427.48


1,562,995.04























staff

student

Total







Salary



206,334.85


34,615.28


240,950.13







Benefits


46,822.67









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1,163.19

47,985.86


Total


253,157.52


35,778.47


288,935.99







Percentage of
Expenditures

16.20%

2.29%

18.49%







PAMS 08
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Appendix A: Chemistry


Chemistry’s
ETF expenditures are included in the consolidated PAMS expenditure summary in
Section 3 above.



Justification/Purpose of Expenditures



a. New and/or transformative initiatives undertaken


Approximately
$121,080 was spent during FY2009 to purchase instrumentation for use in
Chemistry’s revised BS Curriculum. These are shown in the column labeled Purchased FY2009
in Table 1. (See the items in Synthesis I and II during the 2008
-
2009 academic year.)










Our labs have continued the use of WebAssign to deliver instructional materials, present safety
training, conduct pre
-
laboratory quizzes, evaluate student laboratory results, and record
laboratory grades.








The Chemistry Tutorial Center in Fox
contains computers and is staffed throughout the day with
graduate Teaching Assistants. The Center has proven to be a popular and effective instructional
resource.


b. Actions taken to improve efficiency/return on ETF investments


Chemistry is working ha
rd to reduce the quantity of chemicals used in its instructional
laboratories. This obviously reduces the cost to purchase the chemicals but also reduces the cost
to the university to properly dispose of chemical waste. Furthermore smaller quantities of
chemicals reduces the danger of fire, accidental exposure, etc. and makes for a safer laboratory
environment.



c. Unmet ETF
-
eligible need


Modern Chemistry laboratories rely heavily on numerous analytical instruments to evaluate
molecular structure, measu
re physical properties (e.g. pH, temperature), monitor rates of
chemical reactions, identify components in reaction mixtures, etc. There are instructional
equipment needs which have not been met especially in our BS program. Chemistry has begun
to implem
ent several major changes in the laboratories taken by BS Chemists during their junior
and senior year. These
began in Fall 2007 and
will be phased in over a four
-
ye
ar period
. The
Department remains on track with this project, and is phasing in its third
new upper
-
division
laboratory during AY09
-
10. We need to make equipment purchases and laboratory renovations
as these curriculum revisions are phased in. Details are provided in Table 1. The estimated cost
of the items remaining to be acquired is approx
imately $532,000.


The Gateway Profile 3 (9 years old and we have 40 of these), Profile 5 and Profile 6 computers
used in the Fox laboratories are systematically failing, and the company that purchased them
from Gateway is no longer in business. We will h
ave continued need to replace these computers
as the only place to now find parts for them is E
-
Bay.


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There is also a long term, yet continuing need for a permanent staff member to provide oversight,
TA training, arrange for waste disposal, order lab suppl
ies, and conduct instrument maintenance
for the instructional laboratories located in Dabney. Such an individual would substantially
improve and extend the useful life of the instruments used in these laboratories which are taken
by our junior and senior
BS majors and are consequently among the most sophisticated in our
instructional laboratory program.



d. Assessment of impact of ETF investments on student learning


The impact of ETF funds on student learning in Chemistry especially in this tight budget
year
was momentous. Were it not for ETF funds, we would not have had the funds to purchase the
chemicals, print the handouts, etc. needed to deliver a high quality laboratory experience.



e. Planning and review process


Chemistry asks each student
enrolled in an instructional laboratory to conduct a
evaluation/review of the performance of the graduate Teaching Assistant assigned to each
laboratory section. The survey requests an evaluation of the overall effectiveness of the
laboratory as well as t
he skills and effectiveness of the TA. These are used to help refine and
improve our laboratory offerings.



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Table 1 Laboratory Equipment


Equipment for Synthesis I Laboratory





Purchased

Projected



Needed

FY2009

FY2010

Gas Chromatograph

20000



UV
-
Vis Spectrophotometers (2)

10000


10000

HPLC

26000


26000

Rotovaps (2)

8000


8000

Computers (3)

4500


4500

Surface Area Analyzer

26080

26080


Small lab equipment


2000


2000

sub
-
total

96580

26080

50500




Equipment for Measurements I Laboratory



HPLC

26000


26000

Fluorescence Microscope

15000


15000

Zeta Potential Apparatus

15000


15000

Autotitrator


15000


15000

GC
-
MS

65000


65000

MALDI
-
ESI
-
MS

75000


75000

CE

50000


50000

sub
-
total

261000

0

261000




Equipment for Synthesis II
Laboratory







X
-
ray diffraction instrumentation

95000

95000


other items

136150


136150

sub
-
total

231150

95000

136150






Other Instructional Equipment



Computers Fox Labs

23983


23983

FTIR Instrumentation (Fox labs)

40000


40000

sub
-
total

63983

0

63983









Total Needs

652713

121080

531633





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Appendix B: Marine, Earth, and Atmospherics Sciences


MEAS’ ETF expenditures are included in the consolidated PAMS expenditure summary in
Section 3 above.


Justification/Purpose of Expenditures
-

Strategic Overview


New and/or transformative initiatives undertaken with ETF



This Department differs from most in that instructional
-
related field experiences often form a
major component of course work.


Last
year roughly 1300 students participated in these
activities in partial fulfillment of course credit.


Thus, approximately $46,000 or about 35% of
this year’s ETF budget supported field trips.



For example, ETF funds fully funded two student cruises aboard

the R/V Cape Hatteras, meeting
course and degree requirements for marine
-
science majors and affording a unique
measurements
-
based interdisciplinary opportunity for students in related disciplines.


The fund
supported student and faculty travel for geology

field experiences throughout the year, impacting
over 1200 students in MEA 110 plus additional undergraduate majors in upper
-
level courses
including geology majors enrolled in Geologic Field Camp (MEA 465), a required capstone
course.



A new initiative t
his year included the purchase of GPS receivers, laptop computers, and
accompanying software for mapping applications in the field.


Our faculty report that these have
greatly enhanced instruction for the Geologic Field Camp.


Last year, the ETF committee
received multiple requests for purchase of GPS equipment for use in a wide range of courses and
we anticipate that it will continue to be put to good use.



A second new initiative this year was the upgrade of our Distance Learning Facility.


Its
anticipat
ed uses include teleconferencing between graduate students and committee members for
advisory meetings, examinations, progress reports, and other related interactions where one or
more parties are at some distance from Jordan Hall.


Typical locations may i
nclude the coastal
facility at CMAST or other university sites where students or graduate advisory committee
members may be housed.



A second related use will allow students at the coast to participate in NCSU courses taught at
Jordan Hall, as for example
, MEA 459, where some NCSU students are at the coast and some
faculty are in Raleigh.


When the residence hall facility is completed at CMAST, it is anticipated
that additional courses will be offered in this manner.





Since the proposed video equipment
is portable, there is the additional advantage that the
teleconferencing can be set up in other rooms, adding to the flexibility of use.


The cost of the
upgrade plus service contract totaled $10,785 and was paid by the dean’s office in PAMS.


This
total i
s not reflected in our MEAS annual ETF expenditures.




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Actions taken to improve efficiency/return on ETF investments



The MEAS ETF committee attempts to measure student impact to assure maximum value when
prioritizing expenditures among the many express
ed needs.


For example, equipment for large
multi
-
section labs generally has a higher priority than equipment for smaller labs.


However, the
decision process is complex since expenditures that impact a required course for majors may be
valuable even if th
e class enrollment is more limited.


Generally, however, if a requested item is
expensive and impacts few students, it has a much lower priority, particularly if its use is limited
to an elective course.



Another means to measure effectiveness has been to

fund pilot projects, review the results, and
use the information for future purchase decisions.


For example, this past year the GPS system
was purchased and tested by the instructor and students and evaluated before purchasing
additional units and establ
ishing a central storage and means of oversight.



The committee actively seeks input from all departmental faculty and students in its decision
process.


As described below, an open and orderly process is followed each year.





Unmet ETF
-
eligible needs



The ETF support this past fiscal year was much improved over the past several years when major
upgrade of lab equipment had to be postponed.


However, we still faced funding shortages.


For
example, we upgraded about half the full complement of geology fi
eld equipment and postponed
lab microscope repair until next year.



Acquisition of new laptops for student use in labs had to proceed slowly after immediate needs
were met.


A new atmospheric sounding system has been needed for at least 10 years to
replace
our antiquated 1980
-
vintage receiver with a more modern unit.


However, the cost, in the
neighborhood of $60,000, is prohibitive.


We shall explore ways to split the cost between ETF
and research funding since the system can be used in both teachin
g and research.



Finally, for students in the marine science major, oceanographic cruise experience is critical.


We
are fortunate to have the R/V Cape Hatteras near at hand and able to accommodate student cruise
activities.


However, for each
undergraduate student, we can only support about 8 hours at sea, a
period barely long enough for orientation and insufficient for deep
-
water oceanography.


Again
creative means needs to be sought to allow each undergraduate major at least two days at sea
s
ometime during his/her four years at NCSU.





Assessment of impact of ETF investments on student learning



ETF investments are essential for student learning in today’s environment.


A major and
indispensable part of the hands
-
on instructional program in

geology is supported by field
-
trip
funding.


Similarly in oceanography, ETF affords the student’s only experience on the ocean.


Essential supplies, equipment and instructional support allow access to lab facilities used by
roughly 2500 students per year,

mostly in introductory 100
-
level labs taken in partial fulfillment
of general education natural science requirements.


Examples of important items include maps,

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rock samples, instrumentation, environmental data, and computers for display and analysis.



M
eteorology majors are supported by computing platforms and a real
-
time data stream that allow
analysis of atmospheric phenomena over a spectrum of spatial scales across wide reaches of the
planet.


Visual mapping of radar, satellite, in
-
situ, and model dat
a from this stream can easily be
accessed in the 6
th

floor laboratory and in all classrooms in Jordan Hall, thanks to ETF support.


Without such support, the 900 non
-
majors who enroll in MEA 135 each year, plus the 120
undergraduate majors would literally
be left in the dark.





Planning and review process



The ETF committee membership includes faculty who represent each major discipline and
includes those who teach the courses or supervise labs that impact the largest number of
students.


Committee membe
rship also includes a graduate and an undergraduate student
representative and our departmental staff IT expert who serves in an advising capacity.





The annual budget process begins early in the fall semester once the departmental budget
information bec
omes available.


At that time, all faculty are requested to submit any anticipated
ETF needs and the committee uses the requests together with budget history information to
develop a working budget for the academic year.


Input to the process is also sough
t directly
from students via informal classroom polls and through the student representatives on the
committee.



During the year, each expenditure is identified by faculty name and where possible, by lab or
course number.


As budget line items near projec
tions, or new unanticipated needs surface, the
committee may re
-
convene to re
-
budget.



Appendix C: Mathematics


Mathematics’

ETF expenditures are included in the consolidated PAMS expenditure
summary in
Section 3 above.


The salary portion of the ETF
funds was used to partially cover the salaries of the Systems
Manager, the Systems Manager Assistant, as well as Maple consultants who worked in the Math
Tutorial Center.


During the 2008
-
2009 academic year, the Department purchased 18 iMac computers for
use by
graduate students and one Mac Pro to help fill the needs of its graduate students for high
performance computing. In addition, two MacBook Pros were purchased for the graduate
students to check out.



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Appendix D: Physics


Physics’ ETF expenditures

are included in the consolidated PAMS expenditure
summary in
Section 3 above.


T
he Physics Department teaches about 5000 students in laboratories per academic year. The
Department offers laboratory experience to every student who enrolls in an introductor
y physics
or astronomy course. The Department also has a Lecture Demonstration Facility, which serves
instructors with apparatus, audiovisual equipment and computer projection systems and which
provides support for all introductory courses.


The laboratory

offerings fall into seven categories:

Calculus based physics, PY 205/208

Honors physics sections of PY 205/208 and physics major sections of PY 201/202/203


Algebra based physics, PY 211/212

Conceptual physics, PY 131


Conceptual Optics, PY 133

Astronomy, PY 123/124/125/126, new lab under development

Senior physics majors project laboratory, PY 452


Justification / Purpose of Expenditures



New or transformative initiatives undertaken with ETF


1) Clicker System:

Current research supports the use clicker technology in the classroom as an
active learning approach. Physics acquired a set of clickers for use in all sections of PY 211, PY
212, PY 205(M) and PY 208(M). Today’s students are active learners who want to

always be in
touch. The use of clickers allows students to actively participate in a lecture and receive instant
feedback from the instructor. While developing a new curriculum that takes advantage of this
technology, Physics made clickers available to
all students in service courses taught by our
department.


2) Matter and Interactions:

The Department has instituted, under the leadership of Dr. Ruth
Chabay and Dr. Bruce Sherwood, a completely new approach to the teaching of introductory
physics for scie
nce and engineering. Referred to as the "Matter and Interactions" curriculum,
physics is taught from an atomic nature of matter viewpoint, the way physics is actually done
today, from the very first day the students attend a physics class. This innovativ
e approach
allows students to use the underlying physical principles from the very start, resulting in
improved student understanding of physics. This curriculum is computer
-
intensive, requiring
computers and related hardware/software purchased using ETF
funds.


Actions taken to improve efficiency / return on ETF expenditures


Whenever possible, equipment is purchased that is compatible with existing equipment. This
allows the Physics Department to continue using existing equipment with upgrades, rather
than
purchasing complete sets of equipment. The Physics Department funds a portion of a full time

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IT technician with ETF funds. This technician is devoted to maintenance and repair of the IT
equipment used to support student learning. When new equipmen
t is purchased, long term cost
of replacement is considered, which occasionally results in equipment with a higher initial cost,
but lower long term cost in comparison to cheaper equipment, being purchased.


Unmet ETF
-
eligible needs


The Department faces
personnel needs that cannot be met.



Assessment of impact of ETF investments on student learning


ETF funds significantly impact every one of the approximately 5000 students each academic
year who take a 100/200 level physics course. ETF is essential to
the functioning of all of the
undergraduate physics labs in the Department: Conceptual Physics PY131, Physics for Engineers
and Scientists PY205/208, College Physics PY211/212, Physics for PY majors PY202/203,
astronomy labs PY125 and PY126, as well as the

upper division physics lab PY452. ETF is used
for the purchase of computers and interface devices required to have modern, up
-
to
-
date
laboratory exercises for physics students. It also supports all non
-
computer equipment used in
labs, and all lab suppli
es. Additionally, ETF allows the labs and programs to be professionally
developed and overseen by covering part of the salaries of the faculty supervising those activities
mentioned above, and covering part of an SPA staff IT person who maintains all the
IT
equipment in those labs.


Planning and review process for ETF expenditures


The Physics Department solicits budget requests and justifications from each of the faculty
responsible for ETF supported activities each spring. After all requests have been s
ubmitted and
converted to a standard format, generally all faculty involved meet with student representatives,
typically the president of the Society of Physics Students (undergraduate physics majors) and the
president of the Graduate Physics Student Assoc
iation. Proposals are presented and discussed by
the faculty and the student representatives, and priorities for the requests are set by consensus of
all present. This prioritized list is then presented to the Department Head for review and
approval. W
hen ETF funds are allocated to the Department, the Department Head sets budgets
for each ETF supported activity based on the priorities set. Each faculty member with an ETF
budget is responsible for purchasing the needed equipment and supplies. The Assist
ant
Department Head is the primary approving authority for all expenditure requests from all ETF
budgets, monitoring compliance with ETF purchasing guidelines, monitoring all ETF budgets,
and keeping records of material and equipment purchased by cost and
category.



Appendix E: Statistics


Statistics’ ETF expenditures are included in the consolidated PAMS expenditure
summary in
Section 3 above
.


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New Initiatives/Efficiency



We outfitted our new SICL lab in SAS Hall with Dell ‘All
-
in
-
One’ systems.


Groups

who have
used it this summer have been delighted with the performance of the systems.



We renewed the license for the software system “StatCrunch” and replaced the hardware that
supports it.


This system serves our large service courses (ST 311, ST 370,
and ST 507) very
well.





We expanded the Blade system we purchased two years ago to support the software system
‘WinBugs.’ Last fall this system was becoming overwhelmed; the expansion has met the
increased need.


This software, which implements MCMC met
hodology for Bayesian Analysis,
is essential for one important course (ST 740), and for several doctoral students working on
Bayesian Analysis.





To support some level of centralized computing for our computer labs running Vista, we have
moved to ActiveD
irectory and installed login servers to manage accounts and access.




Unmet Eligible ETF Needs/Impact of ETF



The computing facilities provided to our students are critically important tools for teaching,
learning, and research.


As demands for computing

have continued to rise, we have been limited
by space in our ability to handle the increasing demands of our graduate students and provide
some accessibility for our undergrads.


With expanded lab space in SAS Hall, we will be
watching to see how far thes
e new facilities will go in meeting the needs of our students.




Planning and Review



Each year, with the preparation of this annual report, and then in September, with the initial
departmental allocation, the department's plans for ETF facilities are exa
mined and revised,
involving the Systems Administrator, his supervisor, the department head, and a student
representative.





Department of Statistics


Three
-
Year Plan



The Department faces the constant need to update its Intel
-
based machines.


With 58
machines in
student labs and 28 in SICL, using a three
-
year projected useful lifetime, we have been needing
to replace at least 30 PC's each year.


Given the current economic situation, we have decided not
to include the growth of additional PC’s (up to 44

a year) we requested in our last year’s report at
present.


The new facilities include two large display monitors in SICL as well as two display
systems (PC+ monitor) each in the tutorial room and in the Statistics Commons.



Projected ETF Expenditures
for 2009
-
10



* Replace 30 PC's & laptops


* Replace an ETF Lab printer this year and, with a six
-
year lifetime, project annual purchases

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to replace 6 printers.

* Continuing funding fraction of SysAdmin and Tech Support Analyst

* License fees

* Printer supp
lies and maintenance



Projected ETF Expenditures for 2010
-
11



* Purchase/replace 30 PC's & laptops

* Replace WinBugs Blade system

* Replace Lab printer


* Replace Display Monitor this year and, with a four
-
year lifetime, project annual purchases to
replac
e monitors.

* Continuing funding fraction of SysAdmin and Tech Support Analyst

* License fees

* Printer supplies and maintenance



Projected ETF Expenditures for 2011
-
12



* Replace 30 PC's & laptops

* Replace Lab printer

* Replace two Display monitors

*
Continuing funding fraction of SysAdmin and Tech Support Analyst

* License fees

* Printer supplies and maintenance







Item


Description


Lifetime




2009
-
10


2010
-
11


2011
-
12

1


PC's



3 years


54,000





54,000


54,0
00*

2


WinBugs


3 years




0



20,000







0



3


StatCrunch


3 years






0





0




6,000

4


Lab Printers


6 years



3,500



3,500



3,500

5


Licenses




continuing




4,000





2,000




3,000

6


Displays


4 years




0



5,000



10,000

7


Supplies/Maint

continuing

5,000




5,000





5,000

8


part of SysAdmin

continuing




33,000



33,000


33,000

9


part

of TechSupport

cont.

39,500



40,000


40,000





Totals


$139,000


$162,500


$154,500*


*Assuming the budget improves in two years, we hope this figure can be increased by $20,000 in
the future.









Overview of Department of Statistics ETF Facilities



Through the support of ETF funds, the Department of Statistics provides and maintains the
Statistics Instructional Computer Laboratory (SICL), three large ETF Computer Labs (one
shared with under
graduates), and a shared ETF Blade WinBugs system.


In its current
configurations, the three Computer Labs consist of 58 computer workstations. Two ETF Lab
printers are maintained to serve each Lab.


To relieve demand on the Labs by advanced graduate

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stude
nts, the Department distributes laptops to doctoral students upon passing their prelim exam.




Students majoring or co
-
majoring in both Statistics and Biomathematics make use of these ETF
facilities.


Biomathematics has been receiving $5,000 in ETF funds
during the past couple of
years, and these funds are used by the Biomathematics Director at his/her discretion.


Administrative computing support is provided by both Mathematics and Statistics departments.


The Bioinformatics Research Center as a research
center is not eligible for ETF funds.


The MS
and PhD programs in Bioinformatics are administered through the interdisciplinary Genomics
program.



Appendix F: Operations Research


As part of a jointly administered program with the College of Engineeri
ng, PAMS provides ETF
support to Operations Research. The corresponding

expenditures are included in the consolidated
PAMS expenditure

summary in Section 3 above
.


ETF Expenditures:

$9,846.87

Eleven Dell PCs were purchased for student labs in Daniels and
Burlington.


Notes:

Decisions on computer equipment purchased with ETF funds are made so that individual
components can be easily upgraded in the future.

Student feedback is used to assess the impact of ETF investments; personal communication with
students

is used in the planning and review processes.

ETF purchases directly impact all 58 OR students and augment their computer support for
individual student research, teaching assignments and all OR classes.



Appendix G:

Biomathematics


Although the College

allocated $5,000 to the Biomathematics Graduate Program, the funds were
not used this year. So those funds were redirected to other ETF priorities.