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29 Οκτ 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 9 μήνες)

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Team:

Grey, Davis,
Miles, Conder

Subject:
Reading


Week of:
September 10
th


14
th



Vocabulary:

Reading Work shop, book nooks, just right books,
reading log, genre
,
Visualizing


Curriculum Learning

Objectives:



Procedures/Activities



Assessments


M

O

N

D

A

Y

o

I can
identify whether
a noun is proper or
common and capitalize
proper nouns.

o

I can use my rules for
capitalizing and
underlining book titles



L.3.1.

Demonstrate command
of the conventi ons of
standard

Engli sh grammar
and usage when wri ti ng or
speaki ng.

o

Explai n the functi on of nouns,
pronouns, verbs, adjecti ves,
and adverbs i n general and
thei r functi ons i n parti cular
sentences




L.3.2.

Demonstrate command
of the conventi ons of
standard Engli sh
capi tali z
ati on, punctuati on,
and spelli ng when wri ti ng.

o

Capi tali ze appropriate words
i n ti tles
.


I can spell words with
a long

O/OW

vowel.



RF.3.3.

Know and apply
grade
-
level phonics and
word analysis skills in
DLI


Day 1
-
Focus skill


Proper and Common Nouns/Book
Titles
-

Use direct whole class
instruction to introduce the focus skill. Students will complete Day one practice task to follow up on
mini lesson


Word Study


Focus Skill


Long /0/OW/Open Syllables

Grow, follow, shown, own, window, over, open, robot, total,
motor, there, their, those, also, almost
,
known, thrown, rainbow, bonus, moment

(last five words are challenge words)

Students will take a practice test o
n above words. Any word spelled incorrectly should be rewritten
5 times on the back of practice test
for homework and returned Thursday.


Reading Workshop

Standard Name
: Identify character traits in a story.

Supporting Text:
How to Eat Fried Worms

Objective:

I can

identify character traits of characters in a story.

Do
-
Now:

Round robin activity. Create a list of a minimum of 5 characters that you
have studied so far in your class. Put their names on chart paper and post in 5 areas
of the room, have students count off by 5’s and circulate in groups. Tell them they
can write o
ne word they could use to describe the character that they see. You can
also do this with as many characters as you have students for. You can put it on
paper and pass it around, or each group of students seated at a table can do one
character or pass arou
nd characters at the table.

Opening
: Raise your hand if you can describe to me what we were doing today in our
do now. Ask students to explore how they came up with the words that they did or
why they chose certain words or phrases to describe certain cha
racters.

Directed Instruction
:

Today we are going to learn how to identify characters by using words that we will
call traits. Traits are words that we can use to describe a character’s personality
or how they are as a character. Let’s look at some of th
e words that we use to


DLI practice
sheet.



Word study
notebook








Reading Journals

and

Graphic
organizer

decoding words.

I can identify
character traits of
characters in a story.



RL.3.3
. Describe
characters in a story
(e.g., their traits,
motivations, or
feelings) and explain
how their actions
contribute to the
sequence of events


describe characters: I notice a lot of you used words that are happy, sad, mad, we
are going to try and get away from using words that are “simple” to describe
characters and instead use words that are more complex vocabulary. Let’s
make a
list of all of the words we can use to describe a character’s traits. Use the
character trait resource guide to help student’s list traits. Create a list of
character traits for students to have to use as a resource on chart paper.

Guided Practice:

Compete a read aloud with students that has characters
displayed that would be easy for students to list traits for. As you are reading put
the character in the center of the chart paper and add traits around the character
to you can identify all of the t
raits. Guide students on making intelligent decisions
about the choice of words they are using to describe a character and make sure
they are citing evidence as to why they are selecting the trait they are choosing.

Independent Practice:

Students will com
plete a similar organizer or graphic organizer that you modeled on
their own, in independent or just right
books;

they can also do this during guided
reading groups. Students should complete a similar organizer or activity that
mirrors what you modeled.

C
losing:

What trait would you describe for yourself and why?


T

U

E

S

D

A

Y

o

I can
identify whether
a noun is proper or
common and capitalize
proper nouns.

o

I can use
my rules for
capitalizing and
underlining book titles



L.3.1.

Demonstrate command
of the conventions of
standard English grammar
and usage when writing or
speaking.

o

Explain the function of nouns,
pronouns, verbs, adjectives,
and adverbs in general and
DLI


Day 2



Focus skill


Proper and Common Nouns/Book Titles

Students will complete daily practice (day 2) and teacher directs the follow up discussion. Students
correct the errors on their practice items.


Word Study



Long
/0/OW/Open Syllables

Students will write each of their word work words staircase style or

students will write each word.
Next to each word, write two additional words of at least three letters that can be spelled using
letters in the words (PICKLE


lick,

pick, like, and lip)

Grow, follow, shown, own, window, over, open, robot, total, motor, there, their, those, also, almost,
known, thrown, rainbow, bonus, moment
(last five words are challenge words)


Reader’s Workshop


Standard Name
:
I can
Identify character traits in a story.

Supporting Text:
How to Eat Fried Worms


DLI practice
sheet.



Word study
notebook








Reading Journals

and

their

functions in particular
sentences




L.3.2.

Demonstrate command
of the conventions of
standard English
capitalization, punctuation,
and spelling when writing.

o

Capitalize appropriate words
in titles


I can spell words with
a long
O/OW

vowel
.



RF.3.3.

Know and apply
grade
-
level phonics and
word analysis skills in
decoding words.

o

I can identify
character traits in a
story.

o

RL.3.3
. Describe
characters in a story
(e.g., their traits,
motivations, or
feelings) and explain
how their actions
contribute to t
he
sequence of events
.


Objective:

I can

take what characters are saying in a
text;

use their dialogue to
infer a character trait based on those characters' actions or words.

Do
-
Now:

I am going to say some phrases out
loud;

I want you to tell me what trait
you think are linked to those phrases. For example, if I shout: YOU WERE
SUPPOSE
TO BE MY BEST FRIEND HOW COULD YOU DO THIS TO ME. What is
a trait you could connect to those dialogue statements? I could say that person may
be described as angry, defeated, frustrated, aggravated

Opening
: Sometimes we cannot see a person’s actions or wha
t they are doing or
understand the plot of the story but we have the dialogue of the story or passage
our character is in. It is important that when we are inferring or assigning
characters traits that we are making sure we are using what is directly being

said
in the story to confirm or assign a character a trait. This is especially important
when answering test or quiz questions because we always want to refer back to the
text and really understand what the character is saying directly to make sure we
can

use direct evidence to support or answering or reasoning.

Directed Instruction
:

Today we

are

going to directly look at the dialogue of the story. Teachers may want
to just write the dialogue of stories previously discussed in these lessons or you
can ju
st focus on the words of the story. Or teachers can write different dialogues
up on the board that can directly imply a character trait. Direct students and
model how you only use modeling the text.

Guided Practice:
Model using a read aloud how you only l
ook at the dialogue or
words in a story, text, or passage to infer character traits. Refer to it as set text
examples. Encourage students to try and explore using traits and evidence. You may
even want to use a test prep passage.

Independent Practice:

Stu
dents use their guided reading group books, independent books, or a test
passage to use text to directly infer a character trait.

Closing:

Write text that would model _________________________ trait.

Graphic
organizer

W

E

D

N

E

S

D

A

Y

o

I can
identify whether
a noun is proper or
common and capitalize
proper nouns.

o

I can use my rules for
capitalizing and
underlining book titles



L.3.1.

Demonstrate command of
the conventions of
standard
English grammar and usage when
writing or speaking.

o

Explain the function of nouns,
pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and
adverbs in general and their
functions in particular sentences




L.3.2.

Demonstrate command of
the conventions of standard
English c
apitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when
writing.

Capitalize appropriate words in
titles

I can spell words with
a long
O/OW

vowel
.



RF.3.3.

Know and apply
grade
-
level phonics and
word analysis skills in
decoding words.



I can determine four
traits for a

character
and then support each
trait with a visual
from the text




RL.3.3
. Describe
characters in a story
(e.g., their traits,
DLI


Day 3
-


Focus skill


Proper and Common Nouns/Book Titles

Students wil
l complete daily practice (day 3
) and teacher directs the follow up discussion. Students
correct the errors on their practice items.


Word Study


Students will write words in a sentence. Correct spelling

and grammar count

Focus
Skill


Long /0/OW/Open Syllables

Grow, follow, shown, own, window, over, open, robot, total, motor, there, their, those, also, almost,
known, thrown, rainbow, bonus, moment
(last five words are challenge words)


Reader’s Workshop

Read Aloud:

Student Objective:

I can

determine four traits for a character and then support each trait with a
visual from the text



Do Now:

Think about four different character traits you can say about a character that we
discussed previously in a book.

Connection:

When we think of how our character was acting, assign them a trait, and then visualize
the scene that they were best dis
playing that trait. Today we are going to take it even farther and
think of

them having more than one
trait
;

we are going to think of them as they display 4 different
traits.

Teach/Model:

Watch me as I complete a read
aloud
. Think of 4 different traits fo
r my character
and then draw a scene that best represents each trait. Make sure you are completing 4 drawings and
make sure you are throwing in different traits that wouldn’t make sense for that character and give
reasoning behind each trait.

Link:

So tod
ay and
every day

when you think of your character, think of the multiple traits they may
possess and areas in the book where you can find evidence of those traits by visualizing the scenes
in your head.

Active Engagement:

Tell your partner a trait and hav
e them visualize a character, then you use
their character and come up with a different trait and visualize.

Independent Practice:

Using one of your books or a book that is read fold your paper into four
sections. Draw a scene that represents each trait

Closing:

Have Students share thei r 4 di fferent trai ts wi th a partner.


DLI practi ce
sheet.



Word study
notebook




Readi ng Journal s

and

Graphi c
organi zer

motivations, or
feelings) and explain
how their actions
contribute to the
sequence of events.



T

H

U

R

S

D

A

Y

o

I can
identify whether
a noun is proper or
common and capitalize
proper nouns.

o

I
can use my rules for
capitalizing and
underlining book titles



L.3.1.

Demonstrate command
of the conventions of
standard English grammar
and usage when writing or
speaking.

o

Explain the function of nouns,
pronouns, verbs, adjectives,
and adverbs in general
and
their functions in particular
sentences




L.3.2.

Demonstrate command
of the conventions of
standard English
capitalization, punctuation,
and spelling when writing.

Capitalize appropriate words
in titles

I can spell words with
a long
O/OW

vowel
.



RF.3.3.

Know and apply
grade
-
level phonics and
word analysis skills in
decoding words.

I can use evidence
DLI


Day 4

-

Focus skill


Proper and Common Nouns/Book Titles

Students will complete daily practice and teacher directs the follow up discussion. Students
correct the errors on their practice items.


Word Study


Write each spelling word in crayon or colored pencil. Write consonant letters in red
and each vowel in blue. If students are working with all 20 words, the can write words with
a
ll
letters scrambled up, then ask a partner to unscramble the words in their

notebook. Correct that
person’ s work.


Focus Skill


Long /0/OW/Open Syllables

Grow, follow, shown, own, window, over, open, robot, total, motor, there, their, those, also, almost,
known, thrown, rainbow, bonus, moment
(last five words are challenge
words)


Reader’s Workshop

Supporting Text:
How to Eat Fried Worms

Objective:
I can
use evidence from the text to describe a character

Assessment on Character and the use of traits.

After assessment
,

have students

in their
Independent
p
ractice

read
their just right books or a read
aloud book to go through and identify
3

certain trait for a character and explain that trait.

Model using a template just like the one kids will do on their own:



Character

Name:

Trait:

Page #/ Paragraph#

Evidence for

trait:


Trait:

Page #/ Paragraph#

Evidence for

trait:


Trait:

Page #/ Paragraph#

Evidence for

trait:


DLI practice
sheet.



Word study
notebook








Reading Journals

And

Assessment

Draw Character

from the text to
describe a character


RL.3.3
. Describe
characters in a story
(e.g., their traits,
motivations, or
feelings) and explain
how their actions
co
ntribute to the
sequence of events





F

R

I

D

A

Y

o

I can
I can
identify
whether a noun is
proper or common and
capitalize proper
nouns.

o

I can use my rules for
capitalizing and
underlining book titles



L.3.1.

Demonstrate command
of the conventi ons of
standard

Engli sh grammar
and usage when wri ti ng or
speaki ng.

o

Explai n the functi on of nouns,
pronouns, verbs, adjecti ves,
and adverbs i n general and
thei r functi ons i n parti cular
sentences




L.3.2.

Demonstrate command
of the conventi ons of
standard Engli sh
capi tali z
ati on, punctuati on,
and spelli ng when wri ti ng.

Capi tali ze appropriate words
i n ti tles

I can spell words with
a long
O/OW

vowel
.

DLI


Students will complete the Day Five Assessment


Word Study


Students will be assessed on word work words.



Reading Workshop

2 Day lesson


Continue on Monday

Supporting Text:
How to Eat Fried Worms

Standard Name
:

Identify the main ideas in a story and use story details and prior
knowledge to understand ideas that are not directly stated in the text.


Objective:

I can

understand characters’ actions by asking, “Why did he or she do
that?” and coming up with reasonab
le explanations and inferences.


Do
-
Now:

Act out: have students complete an action in the class randomly have
students observe,
and then

ask students to explain or inference why they thought
they were acting a certain way. On the board or on chart paper w
rite down what
the
student’s

action is and list the reasoning the students come up with.


Opening
:

Linking back to the do now have the student who was completing the
action state the reason the way they acted the way that they did. Explain to
students tha
t sometimes we are not sure about a
person’s

actions just like we can’t
be sure
of characters actions
. In fact with a character it might even be a little
more difficult because we can’t really ask a character why they are doing what they
are doing or acting the way that they are acting the way that we can ask a person
right? So we have to do something cal
led inference.

DLI,

WORD STUDY

assessment




Reading Journals

and

Graphic
organizer



RF.3.3.

Know and apply
grade
-
level phonics and
word analysis skills in
decoding words.

I can use a sticky
note

to help me stay
focused on my
reading
.

o

RL.3.3
. Describe
characters in a story
(e.g., their traits,
motivations, or
feelings) and explain
how their actions
contribute to the
sequence of events


Directed Instruction
:

When we make an inference we “read between the lines”.
Give me
thumbs

up or thumbs down if you have ever heard of that phrase? Today
when you were making an inference about how your classmate was acting you were
readi
ng between the lines.

Author’s often
tell

you more than they say directly. When they say it directly they
are talking about the words they have explicitly written in the text. They give you
hints or clues that help you "read between the lines." Using thes
e clues to give you
a deeper understanding of your reading is called
inferring
. When you
infer
, you go
beyond the surface details to see other meanings that the details suggest or
imply

(not stated). When the meanings of words are not stated clearly in the

context of
the text, they may be
implied

-

that is, suggested or hinted at. When meanings are
implied, you may
infer

them.

Inference

is just a big word that means a
conclusion
or
judgment
. If you infer that
something has happened, you do not see, hear, fe
el, smell, or taste the actual event.
But from what you know, it makes sense to think that it has happened. You make
inferences
every day

and you just made inferences about the way one of your
classmates was acting. Most of the time we do this or inference

without thinking
about it.

Share example:

Suppose you are sitting in your car stopped at a red signal light.
You hear screeching tires, then a loud crash and breaking glass. You see
nothing
,
but you
infer

that there has been a car accident. We all know the sounds of
screeching tires and a crash. We know that these sounds
almost always

mean a car
accident. But there could be some other reason, and therefore another explanation,
for the sounds. Perhaps it wa
s not an accident involving two moving vehicles. Maybe
an angry driver rammed a parked car. Or maybe someone played the sound of a car
crash from a recording. Making
inferences

means choosing the most likely
explanation from the facts at hand.

On a chart,
write the definition of Inferencing, As
a class decides

on hand
motions to match this chant: Inferencing is a combining schema and
background knowledge with clues provided in the text to form a new idea.

Question to Reveal Thinking:



After reading the tit
le, what do you predict the story will How did making a
prediction help you as a reader?



Can you share with the class how sometimes our predictions sometimes come
out different from what we originally thought?



What message do you think the author wanted
you to understand?



How does inferring help you see and understand what you read?


Language for Drawing Inferences:



I predict…



I think that…



That’s just what I thought…



My conclusion here is…


Guided Practice:

Today we are going to do just what we did on our do now but we
are going to make some inference about what a character is doing in a story. Watch
me as I read aloud a story to you and be ready to make some inferences about the
story.

Choose an event drive
n story with action that is happening with characters. Create
a t
-
chart that has action no one side and inference on the other side. List the
action as you approach it in the book, have students give you inferences. Do this a
couple times. Encourage studen
ts to turn and talk and state an inference. Make
sure you are taking time out to go over outrageous answers with students and make
sure they are staying clear of giving inferences that are the most like explanation
from the facts that are given at hand.


Independent Practice:

Students create their own t
-
chart of possible inferences
that are coming up with based on actions in a story. Students can do this based on a
read aloud, an independent book, a just right book, or in guided reading groups. This
would
also be a great center to have students do once you have practiced it using
whole class instruction.


Closing:

Now that you can make inferences you can really understand what is going
on in the story and use your brain to think about the things that are h
appening and
how when you inference you really connect with actions a character may be facing
that aren’t directly implied.


Quiz:

What is one inference you can make about the class? What is one inference
you can make about our school? What is one inferen
ce you can make about a
character in your book and why?









READING WORKSHOP

During reading workshop, students take part in a mini
-
lesson, independent
reading time, and a share time at the end. During
Independent Reading Time, students read from their book boxes in their book nooks or they are meeting with the teacher.
During share time, readers might meet as a whole class or just with their reading pa
rtner.

Team:

Conder, Davis,
Grey, Miles

Subject: Math

Week of:
September 10
-
14

Vocabulary:

frequency table, data, picture graph, key


Accommodations:
small group, extended time, read aloud, manipulatives


Curriculum Learning

Objectives:



Procedures/Activities



Assessments


M

O

N

D

A

Y

CC.3.
MD.3 Draw a scaled
picture graph and a scaled
bar graph to represent a
data set with several
categories. Solve one
-

and
two
-

step “how many
more” and “how many
less” problems using
information
presented in
scaled bar graphs.


CC.3.NBT.2 Fluently add
and subtract within 1000
using strategies and
algorithms based on place
value, properties of
operations, and/or the
relationship between
addition and subtraction

Learning Objective:



I can
use a
table to organize data and solve a problem.


Whole Group:



Review with students

how to write and count tally marks. Tell students that today they will be using tally
marks to help them solve problems. You can show the BrainpopJr. Movie “Tally charts and ba
r graphs” to
further explain tally marks. Stop video before it begins talking about bar graphs.



Complete the UNLOCK THE PROBLEM together with students. Allow them to fill in the answers in their
books. Model and discuss how to turn the tally chart into a f
requency table in order to solve problems.



Have students complete the SHARE AND SHOW in their workbook with a teacher check.



Students will complete a tally chart/ frequency table worksheet with a buddy or independently to turn in.


Small group
modification:



Pull struggling students to work in a small group with you.

Review skip counting by 5’s to help them count
tally marks quickly.


Math automaticity:
5 minute timed test on addition. Students will self check.


Technology:
Real World Video Ch. 2
, Animated Math Models

Teacher check


Tally chart/
frequency table
worksheet


T

U

E

S

D

A

Y

CC.3.
MD.3 Draw a scaled
picture graph and a scaled
bar graph to represent a
data set with several
categories. Solve one
-

and
two
-

step “how many
more” and “how
many
less” problems using
information presented in
scaled bar graphs.


CC.3.NBT.2 Fluently add
and subtract within 1000
using strategies and
algorithms based on place
value, properties of
operations, and/or the
relationship between
addition and subtractio
n

Learning Objective:



I can
read and interpret data in a picture graph.


Whole Group:



Flashback
-

Review
making tally tables and frequency tables. Complete the engage activity on page 65.



Watch the BrainpopJr. Video on pictographs.



Emphasize the
importance of reading the key when using picture graphs.



Complete the UNLOCK THE PROBLEM together as a class on whiteboards. Model how to read the key
and solve. Also explain how to read half symbols. (Pg. 66) Have the class solve on whiteboards.



Students
will complete the ON YOUR OWN section independently and turn in for a grade.


Small group modification:



Pull struggling students to work in a small group with you. Show how to count on top of the graph to solve
the problems.


Math automaticity:
5 minute timed test on addition. Students will self check.

On Your Own
section for grade




HW

: Standards
practice
P33

W

E

D

N

E

S

D

A

Y

CC.3.
MD.3 Draw a scaled
picture graph and a scaled
bar graph to represent a
data set with several
categories. Solve
one
-

and
two
-

step “how many
more” and “how many
less” problems using
information presented in
scaled bar graphs.


CC.3.NBT.2 Fluently add
and subtract within 1000
using strategies and
algorithms based on place
value, properties of
operations, and/or the
r
elationship between
addition and subtraction

Learning Objective:



I

can draw a picture graph to show data in a table.


Whole Group:



Access prior knowledge with the ENGAGE activity on page 69 using the iTools: Graphs.



Model and discuss how to create a picture graph from information in a frequency table.



Complete the UNLOCK THE PROBLEM together as a whole group. Have students complete the share and
show on whiteboards with a teacher check.



Have students complete the ON
YOUR OWN and PROBLEM SOLVING sections with a partner to turn in.

Small group modification:

If students are
having trouble creating a picture graph, pull them in a small group to work with you. Model for them
how to draw pictures and count above them to mak
e sure they have drawn the correct amount.


Math automaticity:
5 minute timed test on addition. Students will self check.


Technology:

Animated math models

Page 71 & 72
-

turn
in


Teacher
observation








T

H

U

R

S

D

A

Y

CC.3.
MD.3 Draw a scaled
picture
graph and a scaled
bar graph to represent a
data set with several
categories. Solve one
-

and
two
-

step “how many
more” and “how many
less” problems using
information presented in
scaled bar graphs.


Learning Objective:



I can
survey the students in the class and create a picture graph.


Whole Group:



Flashback: Review
creating a tally chart and frequency table with students. Tell students that today they will
be completing a picture graph activity. Show students the rubric that will be used to grade the picture graph
activity. Give them directions on how to complete the

activity.

Independent work
:



Each student will survey the students in their class and record their responses with tallys. They will then
turn their tally chart into a frequency table. They will use the information they gathered to create a picture
Teacher
observation


Rubric


Picture graph final
product



HW: Standards
practice
P35 front
CC.3.NBT.2 Fluently add
and subtract within 1000
using
strategies and
algorithms based on place
value, properties of
operations, and/or the
relationship between
addition and subtraction

graph. T
he students will then answer questions using the information from their graphs. Students will refer
to the rubric to be sure they have completed the activity correctly.

Modifications:




Teacher can pull a small group to assist in creating the picture graphs
. The teacher can have the students
use 3 choices rather than 4 on their graph. The teacher can also give them the choice of picture representing
1’s, 2’s, or 5’s to make calculating easier.


Math automaticity:
5 minute timed test on addition. Students will self check.

and back


F

R

I

D

A

Y

CC.3.
MD.3 Draw a scaled
picture graph and a scaled
bar graph to represent a
data
set with several
categories. Solve one
-

and
two
-

step “how many
more” and “how many
less” problems using
information presented in
scaled bar graphs.


CC.3.NBT.2 Fluently add
and subtract within 1000
using strategies and
algorithms based on place
value, pro
perties of
operations, and/or the
relationship between
addition and subtraction


Learning Objective:



I can
survey the students in the class and create a picture graph.


Whole Group:



Tell students that they will be continuing and finishing the activity
from Thursday.


Independent work
:



Each student will survey the students in their class and record their responses with tallys. They will then
turn their tally chart into a frequency table. They will use the information they gathered to create a picture
gra
ph. The students will then answer questions using the information from their graphs. Students will refer
to the rubric to be sure they have completed the activity correctly.

Modifications:




Teacher can pull a small group to assist in creating the picture g
raphs. The teacher can have the students
use 3 choices rather than 4 on their graph. The teacher can also give them the choice of picture representing
1’s, 2’s, or 5’s to make calculating easier.


Math automaticity:
5 minute timed test on addition. Students will self check.

Teacher
observation


Rubric


Picture graph final
product

Team:

Grey, Davis,
Miles, Conder

Subject:
Writing


Week of:
September 10
th
-
14th

Vocabulary:

Writer’ s Workshop, Writing Process, Writer’ s

Notebook

Accom
m
odations:

extended time, peer buddy, scribe, verbal cues


Curriculum Learning

Objectives:



Procedures/Activities



Assessments


M

O

N

D

A

Y




3.SL.1D

Explain their own


ideas and
understanding

in

light of the
discussion.

I can
explain
the 1
st

step of the writing process.


Whole Group



Call students to meeting area for Writer’s Workshop



Go over today’s learning objective



Explain that good writers take time to develop their writing pieces through the writing
process.



The writing process
has 5 steps: Prewrite, draft, revise,edit, publish/illustrate

(YOU MAY
WANT TO CREATE AN ANCHOR CHART IF YOU DO NOT ALREADY HAVE ONE!)



Today, we will be focusing on the first step of the writing process.







Class Web




Explain that as a class, we will be writing a
narrative about the first day of school this week,
but today, we will be focusing on the prewriting stage.



In the prewriting stage, all we do is record our ideas in a graphic organizer, a list, or through
pictures.



Explain how to use the web to develop id
eas for writing and fill out a class web using
flipchart



Close Writing Workshop


T

U

E

S

D

A

Y


3.SL.1D

Explain their own


ideas and
understanding

in

light of the
discussion.


Whole Group:



Call students to carpet for Writing Workshop



Go
over learning objective and review 1
st

step in writing process



The next stage in the writing cycle is creating a rough draft.



What is a rough draft? It is the starting point of your actual writing.



In a rough draft, you should introduce the beginning,

middle, and end of your narrative along
with the characters and setting. Use flipchart to talk about what goes into the beginning,
middle, and end.



Close Writing Workshop







Class chart

W

E

D

N

E

S

D

A

Y


3.SL.1D

Explain their own


ideas and
understanding

in

light of the
discussion.

I can develop a rough draft.


Whole Group:



Call students

to carpet



Review learning objective and 1
st

and 2
nd

steps of writing process



When a writer is ready to start writing the rough draft, the first
thing they do is look at
their prewriting to see where they want to start.



The most important thing about a rough draft is putting your thoughts on paper. It is okay
to make spelling and grammar mistakes on a rough draft because you are just starting your

narrative and will probably want to make changes anyway.



It is also important to write on every other line. Writers do this because there will be a
time when they will need that extra line to fix up their writing.



Begin writing class narrative about the
first day of school, making sure to skip lines.



Close
Writing Workshop




Class Rough
Draft


T

H

U

R

S

D

A

Y


3.SL.1D

Explain their own


ideas and
understanding

in

light of the
discussion.

I can develop a rough draft.


Whole Group:



Call students

to carpet



Review learning objective and 1
-
2 steps of writing process



Today we will continue writing our rough draft of our narrative about the first day of school.



Continue writing narrative as a class, making sure to incorporate student ideas in almost

every sentence.



Class Rough
Draft



Close
Writing Workshop



F

R

I

D

A

Y

3.SL.1D

Explain their own


ideas and
understanding

in

light of the
discussion.

I can develop a rough draft.


Whole Group



Call students

to carpet



Review learning objective and 1
-
2
steps of writing process



Today we will continue writing our rough draft of our narrative about the first day of school.



Continue writing narrative as a class, making sure to incorporate student ideas in almost
every sentence.



Close
Writing Workshop


Class Rough
Draft


Team:

Grey,
Watson, Miles,
Conder

Subject:
Science and Social
Studies

Week of:
September 10
th



14
th


Vocabulary:


Science:

Oxygen, vertebrate, mammal, bird, reptile, amphibian, fish,
invertebrate


Social Studies:

Rural, agriculture,
economy, Compass rose, grid system


Curriculum Learning

Objectives:



Procedures/Activities



Assessments


M

O

N

D

A

Y

SC
-
EP
-
3.4.1

Students will explain
the basic needs of
organisms.
Organisms
have basic needs. For
example, animals need
air, water and food;
plants need air, water,
nutrients and light.
Organisms can survive
only in environments in
which their needs can be
met.

I can identify what animals need to live.




Introduce
vocab: oxygen p. 113 student books



Have students add this definition to their science journals.



Have students recall a plant’s needs. Discuss how these may be similar or
different from the needs of animals.



Have students partner read p. 116
-
120 in student

books.



Have students complete p. RS 17/18 in student workbooks.

RS 17/18
student
workbook



T

U

E

S

D

A

Y

SS
-
EP
-
4.4.1

Students will
describe ways
people adapt
to/modify the
physical
environment to meet
their basic needs
(food, shelter,
clothing).

DOK 1


I can identify features of a rural community.




Introduce new vocab: rural, agriculture, economy



Access prior knowledge: view pictures on page 56 and 57 of student
books and discuss: what kind of community do you think this shows? How
is it different from

the communities we have been studying (urban,
suburban)? How might life there be different from an urban community?



Students will partner read p. 56
-
61



Students will complete p. 16 and 17 in student workbooks

Student
workbook pages
16/17

W

E

D

N

E

S

D

A

Y

SC
-
EP
-
3.4.3

Students will describe
the basic structures and
related functions of
plants and animals that
contribute to growth,
reproduction and
survival.


Each plant or animal has
observable structures
that serve different
functions in growth,
survival and
reproduction. For
example, humans have
distinct body structures
for walking, holding,
seeing and talking.
These observable
structures should be
explored
to sort, classify,
compare and describe
I can describe the distinguishing characteristics of the different groups of
vertebrates.




Introduce vocab: vertebrate, mammal, bird, reptile, amphibian, fish p.
123 student books.



Have students add these

vocab to their science journal: vertebrate,
amphibian



Build on prior knowledge: how are the bats in the picture like birds? How
are they different? What characteristics do all vertebrate have in
common?



Jigsaw this chapter and have each group read one sec
tion. Each group
will share out a summary of their section.



Pass out paper or construction paper for each student to create a
vertebrate of their choice.



Students will write a paragraph describing the distinguishing
characteristics of the vertebrate they

have chosen.

Vertebrate
descriptive
paragraph

organisms.



T

H

U

R

S

D

A

Y

SS
-
EP
-
4.1.1

Students will use
geographic tools (e.g.,
maps, globes, mental
maps, charts, graphs) to
locate and describe
familiar places at home,
school and the
community.


I can use a map to locate places in a community.




Introduce vocab: Compass Rose, grid system,



Discuss whole group p. 30, 31 student books



Discuss whole group p. 48, 49 student books



Have students turn to p. 59 in student books. Students will discuss is
sm
all groups what is being shown about the map of Arkansas
communities.



Groups will share what they observed on the map.



Students will complete p. 5 and 13 of student workbooks and may work
with a partner.

Workbook
pages 5 and 13


F

R

I

D

A

Y

SC
-
EP
-
3.4.3

Students will describe
the basic structures and
related functions of
plants and animals that
contribute to growth,
reproduction and
survival.


Each plant or animal has
observable structures
that serve different
functions in growth,
survival and
reproduction. For
example, humans have
distinct body structures
for walking, holding,
seeing and talking.
These observable
structures should be
I can classify invertebrates.




Introduce new vocab: invertebrate p. 135 student books



Have students add this vocab to their science journal



Students will partner read p. 138
-
144 in student books



Students
will complete p. RS 21 and 22 in student workbooks. May work
in groups or with a partner.


RS 21/22
student
workbook

explored
to sort, classify,
compare and describe
organisms.