Project Excellence Courses for Fall 2012 - Barrett, The Honors College

squeegovernorΒιοτεχνολογία

3 Δεκ 2012 (πριν από 4 χρόνια και 8 μήνες)

161 εμφανίσεις

Project Excellence Courses for Fall 2012

Through the program known as Project Excellence, Barrett juniors and seniors in good standing
(at least 18 honors credits and 3.25 cumulative
GPA)

have the extraordinary opportunity to take selected classes in ASU's Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law.


Pre
-
law students and other
students interested in law should consider taking one of these classes.

You should be aware that if you participate in Pro
ject Excellence, you will be taking an actual law school course; in most cases law students will
form the large majority of each class.


But past Project Excellence participants report that the professors in the law school are extremely free
with advice an
d assistance for Honors students.

Project Excellence Grading Policy


PE students are required to take graduate law courses on the same grading basis as the matriculated law students.


This policy means that PE
students cannot take a course on a Pass/Not P
ass basis where this option does not exist for law students.


However, when grading PE students,
faculty will grade PE students separately from the law students, and the law school curve.
All HON 494 Project Exce
llence classes for the Fall
2012

semester m
ust be taken for a letter grade.





Class#

Sec#

CAMPUS

COURSE

TITLE

DAYS

BEGIN

END

INSTRUCTOR

CAP

CREDITS

ROOM

88423

1007

Tempe

HON 494

International Institutions
(LAW691
)

W

3:30p

5:25p

GARTNER

10

2

LAW 109

88424

1008

Tempe

HON 494

Ideas of the First
Amendment (LAW791
)

W

10:0
0a

11:5
5a

WINER

5

2

LAW 110

88425

1009

Tempe

HON 494

International Human Rights
Law

(LAW709
)

MW

8:30a

9
:55a

ROTHENBERG

10

3

LAW 118

88426

1010

Tempe

HON 494

International Environmental
Law (LAW791
)

M
W

1:30p

2:55p

BODANSKY

4

3

LAWLB 119

88427

1011

Tempe

HON 494

Natural Resources Law
(LAW639
)

TTH

3:30p

4:55p

FELLER

5

3

LAW 114

88428

1012

Tempe

HON 494

Public International Law
(LAW615
)

MW

10:30a

11:55a

FELLMETH

5

3

LAWLB 119

88429

1013

Tempe

HON 494

Health Law & Policy

TTH

1:30p

2:55p

HODGE, JR.

5

3

LAW L1
-
23

(LAW650
)

88430

1014

Tempe

HON 494

Nanotechnology (LAW607
)

W

3:30p

5:25p

MARCHANT

5

2

LAW 110

88431

1015

Tempe

HON 494

Genetics

and the Law
(LAW617
)

TTH

10:30a

11:55a

MARCHANT

5

3

LAW 617


88432

1016

Tempe

HON 494

Research Methods in
International Law

(LAW691)


W

9:0
0a

9:5
5a

DIFELICE

5

1

LAWLB L102

88433

1017

Tempe

HON 494

Introduction to Law &
Economics (LAW 739
)

M
W

10:3
0a

11:55a

DIPIANTO

5

3

LAW 111

88475

1019

Tempe

HON 494

Sports Law (LAW715)

T

6:00p

8:55p

JAY

5

3

LAW 105

88476

1020

Tempe

HON 494

Private Property Rights

F

8:30a

11:25a

BIRNBAUM

10

3

LAW 114

88491

1021

Tempe

HON 494

Great Traditions in
Jurisprudence (LAW 691)

MW

1:30p

2:5
5a

WHITE

5

3

LAW 116

89254

1001

Tempe

HON 494

Regulations of the FDA

M

6:00p

7:55p

FEIGAL


10

2

PEB 201


Scroll down to view the course descriptions.



Registration Instructions:

Space is very limited for these classes (2
-

10 seats) and an
override is required to enroll
.


Barrett juniors and seniors in good standing (at least 18
honors credits and 3.25 cumulative GPA) interested in enrolling in a particular Project Excellence course should email Alexan
dra Aragon at
Alexandr
a.Aragon@asu.edu
.
Exceptions may be made for Barrett Upper Division admits who have less than 18 honors credits.


In your email:

Please include your name and 10
-
digit ASU ID number. Please list up to 3 choices of classes with your priorities in order 1
-
3. Example:

1.

Jurisprudence
,

#
88434

2.

Genetics and the Law
, #
88431

3.

International Institutions
, #

88423

Once we have confirmed your el
igibility to enroll in the class and given you an override, you’ll be sent a confirmation email and may register
online.
NOTE:


You will not receive an immediate response to your email but should hear back in at least 3 business days

please be patient!

If
you later decide that you can no longer take the Project Excellence class it is important that you email
Alexandra.Aragon@asu.edu

to notify us
that the space is open. We will be running a waitlist for available seats and trying to place as many students as possible in
to these classes.

Finally, there will be a required Project Excellence orientation session before classes start.

By
signing up for a class, you are also agreeing to
attend the required orientation. Dates and times for the orientation session(s) are not established at this point, but you wi
ll be contacted over
the break with that information.


For students who have previ
ously completed a Project Excellence course the orientation is optional, but
strongly encouraged.



Fall 2012 Project Excellence Course Descriptions:


HON 494


International Institutions

This course will examine the role of
international institutions in responding to key global challenges and shaping international law. It will cover
the major institutions established since World War II, such as the United Nations and the World Bank. It will also explore th
e role of informal
e
conomic bodies like the G
-
8 and G
-
20 and the emergence of a new generation of institutions in recent decades to respond to new challenges in
areas such as global health. The course will also explore the role of private actors, including non
-
governmental or
ganizations and the private
sector, in shaping international institutions.


HON 494


Ideas of the First Amendment

This course on the First Amendment is based on a unique approach and materials developed by Prof. Vince Blasi at Columb
ia who has offered
such a course with great success at several law schools for about twenty years. The main text is Blasi’s Ideas of the First A
mendment (West,
Second Ed. 2012). Students wishing more information than is in this description should consult t
he text.

The premise is to organize the course, as Blasi puts it, “around leading thinkers rather than doctrinal topics.” Thus Blasi’s

materials are organized
around “seven of the most eloquent and historically significant articulations of the reasons for

a strong free speech principle.” These seven
classic writings range from political polemics (Milton and Madison), to philosophical essays (Mill and Meiklejohn), to “judic
ial opinions of unusual
intellectual ambition and insight” (Hand, Holmes and Brandeis
).This juxtaposition of perspectives prepares students to broadly examine and
critically evaluate traditional doctrinal categories of First Amendment jurisprudence. And, as Blasi suggests, this approach
also does better
justice to the “majesty ...[and] com
plexity” of the First Amendment than a more traditional course focused on “pragmatic judgments of small
compass” that emerge “by connecting the dots of numerous cases, presented in fragmentary form and organized according to prob
lem area.”

In the original
Preface to his text, Blasi adds: “[I]t is the (more original) thesis of this book that such [doctrinal] questions are best st
udied not by
examining, necessarily at a breathless pace, snippets of vast numbers of Supreme Court opinions that elaborate three
-

part tests and ever
-
proliferating doctrinal subcategories, but rather by engaging some of the greatest writings on the freedom of speech that hav
e been generated
in the Anglo
-
American tradition, and asking how those writings
-

some political polemics, some

judicial opinions
-

might help one to think about
the pivotal doctrinal questions.” Still, the course includes “most of the leading Supreme Court opinions interpreting the Fir
st Amendment,” and
“virtually all of the traditional doctrinal categories are co
vered.” Blasi has refined his approach in the 2012 second edition of the text, which
naturally is very up to date. The text, however, always will be supplemented as appropriate with the very latest Supreme Cour
t opinions in the
area.

Anoth
er great benefit of studying the First Amendment in this fashion is that students will be forced to closely examine “how some

of the finest
practitioners of the art of persuasion went about building their arguments.” The course therefore is also a superb c
ourse in legal advocacy and
rhetoric. By reading and studying virtually unedited selections by great writers (“well elaborated masterpieces of advocacy”)
, students should
improve their own writing. Students often have difficulty “getting started” on a pape
r


choosing an interesting and manageable topic,
developing an appropriate thesis, and the like. So, to assist this process, in consultation with the Instructor each student
will be required to write
an extended critique of one of the canonical writings (
of the student’s choice) around which the course is built and apply his or her critique to a
doctrinal issue or case.

Students wishing to earn an additional credit by writing a more substantial paper may sign up for a related 1
-

credit Independent Study w
ith
Prof. Winer.

Interested students should address any questions to Prof. Winer via e
-
mail at
lhwiner@asu.edu
.



HON 494


International Environmental Law

International environmental law has
expanded dramatically since 1972. With the increasing attention being given to global climate change and
the idea of sustainable development, it is again taking center stage in international relations and increasingly in US policy
, with the recent
appointm
ent of a national climate coordinator. This course will introduce the history, theory, principles and mechanisms of internati
onal
environmental law. It will consider how to create and structure legal instruments and procedures that can deal effectively wi
t
h the challenges of
global sustainable development. Since the field is so vast, we will concentrate on two substantive areas: the international l
aw of the
atmosphere, including air pollution, the ozone layer and climate change; and the international law of

biodiversity, including biodiversity in
general, endangered species and habitat protection.


HON 4
94


Natural Resources Law

Most of the great open spaces of the western United States
-

forests, mountains, and deserts
-

are owned by the federal government in the form
of National Forests, National Parks, National Wildlife Refuges, and lands managed by the Bureau of Land Managemen
t (BLM). These publicly
-
owned lands are important sources of such commodities as timber, minerals, and oil and natural gas. They are also valued by t
he public for their
natural scenery, recreational opportunities, wildlife, and wilderness qualities. Over t
he last several decades, these lands have been the scene of
controversy and conflict over the environmental effects of logging, mining, livestock grazing, recreation, and other land use
s. This course will
cover the history of federal public land law, the a
dministration of federal public lands, and the interpretation and application of the major
federal laws affecting public land management, including the Endangered Species Act, the National Environmental Policy Act (N
EPA), the Federal
Land Policy and Manage
ment Act (FLPMA), the National Forest Management Act, the Wilderness Act, the Taylor Grazing Act, and the Mining Law
of 1872. In addition to casebook readings and class discussions, each student will work with a small group of other students
to prepare a
p
resentation to the class on a topic of current controversy in public land management.

This course will serve as the prerequisite for the Natural Resources Law Field Seminar if that seminar is offered in May. The

Natural Resources
Law Field Seminar is a on
e
-
week traveling seminar that features visits to the Colorado Rive in Glen Canyon, the forests of the Kaibab Plateau, and
desert rangelands on the Arizona Strip north of the Grand Canyon. To enroll in the Natural Resources Law Field Seminar, stude
nts must
have
taken either Water Law or Natural Resources Law. Students wishing to take the Natural Resources Law Field Seminar (if offered
) in May should
take Natural Resources Law or Water Law in the fall.


HON 494


Public International Law

This course is an introduction to public international law, which is generally the law governing relations among states. Most

fundamentally, the
course will explain how international law has developed, how modern international law is made, and how it is
enforced. As a survey course, we
will also examine a variety of subjects regulated by international law, including among many others, how international disput
es are resolved; the
law of the sea and outer space; state conduct during wars; international trad
e law; international human rights law; and the activities of the
major international organizations and tribunals, such as the United Nations and the International Court of Justice.


HON 494


Health Law & Policy

This course will explo
re major aspects of U.S. health care law and policy, including national health care reform initiatives; access, costs, and
quality of care; informed consent; health information privacy; professional licensure, privileging, and liability; health ins
urance a
nd tax
incentives; and end of life issues.


HON 494


Nanotechnology

Nanotechnology is the next “big thing” in technology and the law. Nanotechnology is the science of the small


the ability to manipulate and
utilize materials at the “nanoscale” level, where they display unique and beneficial characteristics. Nanotechnology is expec
ted to revolutionize
electronics, medicine, agriculture, materials science, consumer products, manuf
acturing, and many other industries. Already, several hundred
nanotechnology products are on the market, and many more are currently being developed. May law firms have recently establish
ed
nanotechnology practice groups to help service this rapidly emergi
ng new industry. This seminar will provide an overview of the legal and policy
issues relating to nanotechnology, including risk management, national and international regulation, intellectual property, p
rivacy issues, and
liability issues.


HON 494


Gene
tics and the Law

Many commentators predict that the 21st Century will be the Century of the Genome, in which advances in genetic technology wi
ll
fundamentally transform society, the economy, and our day
-
to
-
day lives. Already, advances

in genetic sciences are having a substantial impact
on diverse areas such as criminal law, health care, agriculture, and pharmaceuticals. The legal system is increasingly being
called upon to address
issues related to genetics, and many legislators, judge
s, regulators, and practicing attorneys are scrambling to learn about the new legal
problems and opportunities created by advances in genetic sciences. This course will provide students with background on gene
tics and recent
genetic advances, and it will a
ddress the legal consequences and issues associated with such advances. Specific legal topics that will be covered
include forensic uses of DNA, genetic privacy and confidentiality, genetic discrimination in employment and insurance, geneti
c testing in the

workplace, genetic screening, gene therapy and genetic enhancement, pharmacogenomics, stem cell and tissue culture research,
cloning, and
patenting and licensing of genetic technology. No prior study or knowledge of genetics or molecular biology is requir
ed. The readings will include
materials presenting the fundamental ideas of modern genetics.



HON 49
4


Research Methods in International Law

This course will teach students how to research international and foreign law. Students wil
l have several research assignments to complete, and
the instructor will provide feedback on each assignment.


HON 494


Introduction to Law & Economics

Since its foundation some 40
-
50 years ago, the economic analysis of law has gained significant traction among policy
-
makers and jurists. This
mode of legal analysis applies the insights, assumptions and normative commitments of microeconomics to legal rule
s and actors. In light of its
simplifying assumptions
--

chief among them, the notion that individuals respond "rationally" to the incentives contained in legal rules
--

the field
of law and economics has produced a number of useful (although controversial
) observations in a wide variety of doctrinal areas. This course will
provide a grounding in the basic conceptual tools of the field and offer a glimpse into its applications in tort, contract, p
roperty, and beyond. No
prior training in economics is requir
ed.


HON 494


International Human Rights Law

This class provides an in
-
depth introduction to international human rights law. It covers rights questions associated with torture, genocide and
extrajudicial execution as well as
economic, social, and cultural rights, reviewing the roles of treaty monitoring bodies, regional human rights
systems and non
-
governmental organizations. Open to law, graduate and Barrett College students.



HON 494


Sports Law

Sport
s law is a course that deals with various legal issues relating to the structure and operation of the sports industry, partic
ularly professional
sports. The course reviews the antitrust principles that apply to sports, the labor law principles applicable t
o sports associations and professional
athletes, the growing statutory regulation of professional and amateur sports, NCAA regulation of collegiate athletics, repre
sentation and
counseling of professional athletes, and various other legal issues relating t
o professional and amateur sports.



HON 494


Private Property Rights

This course will focus upon one of the most controversial topics in the law and a subject which has received considerable att
ention from the
United States Supreme
Court in recent years: the conflict between private property rights and the right of the government to acquire private
property for public use or to regulate the use of private property in a manner which substantially limits its economic potent
ial. The cou
rse will
include a detailed review of the most important United States Supreme Court decisions (e.g., Penn Central, Nollan, Lucas, Dol
an, Palazzolo,Tahoe
and Lingle) which, in the context of so
-
called "regulatory takings” disputes, explore the circumstance
s in which government action may go "too
far" and constitute a taking of private property without just compensation. The eminent domain process will also be discussed
, including the
United States Supreme Court's recent decision in Kelo v. City of New Londo
n. In addition, a unique section of the course will utilize the land
acquisition litigation arising from the planning and construction of the Bank One Ballpark/Chase Field project (Phoenix, Ariz
ona) as a case study.
Pleadings from the appellate proceedings

will supplement course materials and will focus on the purposes for which private property may be
condemned. The course instructor was the principal trial and appellate attorney for the Maricopa County Stadium District. The

course will also
examine the na
ture and history of title insurance and the role of title insurance in protecting private property rights. Unlike other cours
es which
focus solely on a limited area of substantive law or, alternatively, on procedural or evidentiary considerations, this inn
ovative course explores all
aspects of "takings" law from the evolution of the substantive law through the tactics and strategies often employed at trial

and in land use
planning decisions. The format will be principally lecture, with lively group discussi
on anticipated. The course is recommended for future trial
attorneys (government and private), for prospective real estate and land use lawyers, and for others with an academic interes
t in understanding
the law and history behind the headlines.


HON 494


Great Traditions in Jurisprudence

The purpose of this course is to consider the ‘great traditions’ of jurisprudence. For the purposes of this course, what this

phrase connotes is
investigation of the history and conceptual ramificatio
ns of what is now often taken to be the most fundamental antithesis in the conception of
law and legal systems: Must law necessarily be understood in terms of the attempt to embody and further some conception of mo
rality or of
human welfare? Or is law simp
ly a certain sort of human social convention, which finds in expression in
temporally,

and culturally diverse forms
and which stands in no necessary relation to any concepts of morality or of human welfare? The former kind of view, of which
there are many
variations, is the natural law tradition of jurisprudence; the latter, of which there are equally numerous variations, is the

legal positivism
tradition of jurisprudence. Beginning with Greek and Roman antiquity, we shall examine the historical roots of th
is question and the historical
background of contemporary jurisprudential doctrine. The course will consider relevant historical material up to and includin
g the jurisprudence
of William Blackstone and John Austin in the late
-
18th and early
-
19th centuries
. Figures that may be considered, in addition to Blackstone and
Austin, include Plato, Aristotle, Cicero (and the Stoic tradition), Justinian (and the tradition of Roman law), Augustine, Th
omas Aquinas, Marsilius
of Padua, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Pufen
dorf, and Grotius.


HON 494
-

Regulations of the FDA

This course will examine the regulation of drugs, medical devices, and biologics (e.g., vaccines) by the Food and Drug Admini
stration. These
categories of products are the primary products of the emergin
g biotechnology and genomics industry, as well as the traditional pharmaceutical
industry, and therefore is critical for students who are interested in representing life science companies or medical researc
h institutions.