STI CENTER SUMMARY OF WORK RECORD FOR LS-71108 DOCUMENT TITLE: Hardware Requirements Document (HRD) for Visuomotor and Orientation Investigations in Long-Duration Astronauts (VOILA)

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STI CENTER

SUMMARY OF WORK RECORD

FOR LS
-
71108

DOCUMENT TITLE:

Hardware Requirements Document (HRD) for Visuomotor and Orientation
Investigations in Long
-
Duration Astronauts (VOILA)


Date

Operator’s
Initial

Date
Worked

Date
Submitted to
Tech Editor

Date
Re
ceived
from Tech
Editor

PDF File
Made

Y / N

PDF File
Sent to

COMMENTS

06/04/04

mp

06/07/04





Format and Print

06/09/04

mp

06/09/04





Add LS number and
insert redlines

07/16/04

mp

07/16/04





Insert Redlines



























































































LS
-
71108

07/16/04

i

CONTENTS



Section

Page


1.0

SCOPE

1
-
1


2.0

APPLICABLE DOCUMENTS

2
-
1

2.1

DOCUMENTS

2
-
1

2.2

ORDER OF PRECEDENCE

2
-
4


3.0

SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS

3
-
1

3.1

ITEM DEFINITION

3
-
1

3.1.1

Experiment Description

3
-
2

3.1.1.1

Experiment Ove
rview

3
-
2

3.1.1.2

Operational Overview

3
-
4

3.1.1.3

Hardware Overview

3
-
5

3.2

CHARACTERISTICS

3
-
9

3.2.1

Performance Characteristics

3
-
9

3.2.1.1

Functional Performance Characteristics

3
-
9

3.2.1.1.1

System Performance and Functionality

3
-
9

3.2.1.1.2

Vest

3
-
10

3.2.1.1.3

VOILA
EE

3
-
10

3.2.1.1.4

VOILA Spring

3
-
11

3.2.2

Physical Characteristics

3
-
11

3.2.2.1

Mass and Center of Gravity Properties

3
-
11

3.2.2.1.1

VOILA EE Mass

3
-
11

3.2.2.1.2

VOILA Ancillary Hardware Mass

3
-
11

3.2.2.1.3

VOILA EE Center
-
of
-
Gravity Constraints

3
-
11

3.2.2.2

Envelope

3
-
11

3.2.2.2.1

Stowed Envelope

3
-
11

3.2.2.2.2

Deployed Envelope

3
-
13

3.2.2.2.2.1

On
-
Orbit Payload Protrusions

3
-
13

3.2.2.2.2.1.1

On
-
Orbit Permanent Protrusions

3
-
13

3.2.2.2.2.1.2

On
-
Orbit Semi
-
Permanent Protrusions

3
-
14

3.2.2.2.2.1.3

On
-
Orbit Temporary Protrusions

3
-
15

3.2.2.2.2.1.4

On
-
Orbit Momentary Protrusions

3
-
16

3.2.2.2.2.2

Deploye
d Envelope Dimensions

3
-
16

3.2.3

Reliability, Quality and Non
-
Conformance Reporting

3
-
16

3.2.3.1

Failure Propagation

3
-
18

3.2.3.2

Useful Life

3
-
18

3.2.3.2.1

Operational Life (Cycles)

3
-
18

3.2.3.2.2

Shel
f Life

3
-
18

LS
-
71108

07/16/04

ii

3.2.3.2.3

Limited Life

3
-
18

LS
-
71108

07/16/04

iii

CONTENTS (Cont’d)



Section

Page


3.2.4

Maintainability

3
-
18

3.2.4.1

Logistics and Maintenance

3
-
19

3.2.4.1.1

Payload In
-
Flight Maintenance

3
-
19

3.2.4.1.2

Mainte
nance

3
-
19

3.2.5

Environmental Conditions

3
-
19

3.2.5.1

On
-
Orbit Environmental Conditions

3
-
19

3.2.5.1.1

On
-
Orbit Internal Environments

3
-
19

3.2.5.1.1.1

Pressure

3
-
19

3.2.5.1.1.2

Temperature

3
-
19

3.2.5.1.1.3

Humidity

3
-
19

3.2.5.1.2

Use of Cabin Atmosphere

3
-
19

3.2.5.1.2.1

Active Air Exchange

3
-
19

3.2.5.1.2.2

Oxygen Consumption

3
-
19

3.2.5.1.2.3

Chemical Releases

3
-
21

3.2.5.1.2.4

Cabin Air Heat Leak

3
-
21

3.2.5.1.3

Ionizing Radiation Requirements

3
-
21

3.2.5.1.3.1

Instrument

Contained or Generated Ionizing Radiation

3
-
21

3.2.5.1.3.2

Ionizing Radiation Dose

3
-
21

3.2.5.1.3.3

Single Event Effect Ionizing Ra
diation

3
-
21

3.2.5.1.4

Additional Environmental Conditions

3
-
21

3.2.5.1.5

Pressure Rate of Change

3
-
24

3.2.5.1.6

Microgravity

3
-
25

3.2.5.1.6.1

Quasi
-
Steady Requirements

3
-
25

3.2.5.1.6.2

Vibratory Requir
ements

3
-
27

3.2.5.1.6.3

Transient Requirements

3
-
2
7

3.2.5.2

Acoustic Emission Limits

3
-
33

3.2.5.2.1

Continuous Noise Limits

3
-
33

3.2.5.2.2

Intermittent Noise Limits

3
-
35

3.2.5.3

Lighting Design

3
-
36

3.2.5.4

Front Panel Surface Temperature

3
-
36

3.2.6

Transportability

3
-
36

3.2.6.1

Launch and Landing

3
-
36

3.2.7

Operational Interface Requirements

3
-
36

3.2.7.1

Mechanical Interface Requirements

3
-
36

3.2.7.1.1

Connector Physical Mate

3
-
36

3.2.7.1.2

HRF Rack to SIR Drawer Structural Interface Requirements

3
-
36

3.2.7.1.2.1

Dimensional Tolerances

3
-
38

3.2.7.1.2.2

SIR Drawer Structural/ Mechanical Interfaces

3
-
39

LS
-
71108

07/16/04

iv

3.2.7.1.2.3

Reserved

3
-
39

LS
-
71108

07/16/04

v

CONTENTS (Cont’d)



Section

Page


3.2.7.1.2.4

HRF Rack Seat Track Interfaces

3
-
39

3.2.7.2

Electrical
Power Interface Requirements

3
-
39

3.2.7.2.1

HRF Rack Power Output Connectors

3
-
39

3.2.7.2.1.1

SIR Drawer Power Connectors

3
-
39

3.2.7.2.1.2

Rack Connector Panel J1 Power Connector

3
-
40

3.2.7.2.2

Voltage Characteristics

3
-
40

3.2.7.2.2.1

Steady
-
State Operating Voltage Envelope

3
-
40

3.2.7.2.2.2

Transient Operating Voltage Envelope

3
-
40

3.2.7.2.2.3

Ripple Voltage/Noise Characteristics

3
-
41

3.2.7.2.3

Maximum Current Limit

3
-
41

3.2.7.2.4

Reverse Current

3
-
44

3.2.7.2.5

Reverse Energy

3
-
44

3.2.7.2.6

Capacitive Loads

3
-
44

3.2.7.2.7

Electrom
agnetic Compatibility

3
-
44

3.2.7.2.7.1

Electrical Grounding

3
-
44

3.2.7.2.7.2

Electrical Bonding

3
-
44

3.2.7.2.7.3

Electromagnetic Interference

3
-
45

3.2.7.2.8

Electrostatic Discharge

3
-
47

3.2.7.2.9

Corona

3
-
47

3.2.7.2.10

Cable/Wire Design and Control Requirements

3
-
47

3.2.7.2.10.1

Wire Derating

3
-
47

3.2.7.2.10.2

Exclusive Power Feeds

3
-
47

3.2.7.2.11

Loss of Power

3
-
48

3.2.7.2.12

Alternating Current Magn
etic Fields

3
-
48

3.2.7.2.13

Direct Current Magnetic Fields

3
-
48

3.2.7.3

Command and Data Handling Interface Requirements

3
-
48

3.2.7.3.1

HRF Rack Data Connectors

3
-
48

3.2.7.3.1.1

SIR Drawer Data Connectors

3
-
48

3.2.7.3.1.2

HRF Rack Connector Panel J2 Data Connector

3
-
48

3.2.7.3.2

HRF Ethernet Interfaces

3
-
54

3.2.7.3.3

HRF Telecommuni
cations Industry Association/EIA
-
422 Interfaces

3
-
54

3.2.7.3.4

HRF Bi
-
Directional Discretes Interfaces

3
-
54

3.2.7.3.5

HRF Analog Int
erfaces

3
-
54

3.2.7.3.6

HRF Software Requirements

3
-
54

3.2.7.3.6.1

Definitions

3
-
54

3.2.7.3.6.2

Modes

3
-
54

3.2.7.3.6.3

Notes

3
-
54

3.2.7.3.6.4

VOILA CSCI

3
-
57

LS
-
71108

07/16/04

vi

3.2.7.3.6.4.1

CSCI Functional and Performance Requirements

3
-
57

LS
-
71108

07/16/04

vii

CONTENTS (Cont’d)



Section

Page


3.2.7.3.6.4.2

CSCI External Interface Requirements

3
-
57

3.2.7.3.6.4.2.1

Word/Byte Notations, Types and Data Transmissions

3
-
57

3.2.7.3.6.4.2.1.1

Word/Byte Notations

3
-
57

3.2.7.3.6.4.2.1.2

Data Types

3
-
58

3.2.7.3.6.4.2.1.3

Service Requests

3
-
58

3.2.7.3.6.4.3

CSCI Internal Interfac
e Requirements

3
-
58

3.2.7.3.6.4.4

CSCI Internal Data Requirements

3
-
58

3.2.7.3.6.4.5

CSCI Adaptation Requirements

3
-
58

3.2.7.3.6.4.6

Software Safety Requirements

3
-
58

3.2.7.3.6.4.7

Data Privacy Requirements

3
-
58

3.2.7.3.6.4.8

CSCI Environment Requirements

3
-
58

3.2.7.3.6.4.9

Software Quality Factors

3
-
59

3.2.7.3.6.4.10

Design and Imp
lementation Constraints

3
-
59

3.2.7.3.6.4.11

Precedence and Criticality of Requirements

3
-
59

3.2.7.3.7

Reserved

3
-
59

3.2.7.3.8

Reserved

3
-
59

3.2.7.3.9

Reserved

3
-
59

3.2.7.3.10

Medium Rate Data Link

3
-
59

3.2.7.4

Payload National Television Standards Committee (NTSC) Video
Interface Requirements

3
-
59

3.2.7.5

Thermal Control Interface R
equirements

3
-
59

3.2.7.5.1

HRF Rack Provided Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS)
Moderate Temperature Loop (MTL) Interface

3
-
59

3
.2.7.5.2

HRF Rack Heat Exchanger to SIR Drawer Interface

3
-
59

3.2.7.5.2.1

Reserved

3
-
60

3.2.7.5.2.2

HRF Rack Mounted SIR Drawer Cool
ing Fans

3
-
61

3.2.7.6

Vacuum System Requirements

3
-
63

3.2.7.7

Pressurized Gas Interface Requirements

3
-
63

3.2.7.8

Payload Support Services Interfaces Requirements

3
-
63

3.2.7.9

Fire Protection Interface Requirements

3
-
63

3.2.7.9.1

Fire Prevention

3
-
63

3.2.7.9.2

Payload Monitoring and Detection Requirements

3
-
63

3.2.7.9.2.1

Parameter
Monitoring

3
-
63

3.2.7.9.3

Fire Suppression

3
-
65

3.2.7.9.3.1

Portable Fire Extinguisher

3
-
65

3.2.7.9.3.2

Fire Suppression Access Port Accessibility

3
-
65

3.2.7.9.3.3

Fire Suppressant Distribution

3
-
67

3.2
.7.9.4

Labeling

3
-
67

LS
-
71108

07/16/04

viii

3.2.7.10

Other Interface Requirements

3
-
67

LS
-
71108

07/16/04

ix

CONTENTS (Cont’d)



Section

Page


3.2.7.10.1

Lightning

3
-
67

3.2.7.10.2

Rack Requirements


Pivot Keep Out Zone

3
-
67

3.3

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

3
-
68

3.3.1

Materials, Processes, and Parts

3
-
68

3.3.1.1

Materials and Processes

3
-
68

3.3.1.1.1

Materials and Parts Use and Se
lection

3
-
68

3.3.1.1.1.1

Russian Materials Usage Agreement

3
-
68

3.3.1.1.2

Commercial Parts

3
-
68

3.3.1.1.3

Fluids

3
-
68

3.3.1.1.4

Cleanliness

3
-
68

3.3.1.1.5

Fungus Resistant Material

3
-
68

3.3.1.2

Sharp Edges and Corner Protection

3
-
68

3.3.1.3

Holes

3
-
70

3.3.1.4

Latches

3
-
70

3.3.1.5

Screws and Bolts

3
-
70

3.3.1.6

Securing Pins

3
-
70

3.3.1.7

Leve
rs, Cranks, Hooks and Controls

3
-
70

3.3.1.8

Burrs

3
-
70

3.3.1.9

Locking Wires

3
-
70

3.3.2

Nameplates and Product Marking

3
-
70

3.3.2.1

Equipment Identification

3
-
70

3.3.3

Workmanship

3
-
71

3.3.4

Interchangeability

3
-
71

3.3.5

Safety Requirements

3
-
71

3.3.5.1

Electrical Safety

3
-
71

3.3.5.1.1

Safety
-
Critical Circuits Redundancy

3
-
71

3.3.5.1.2

Electromagnetic Interference Susceptibility for Safety
-
Critical Ci
rcuits

3
-
71

3.3.5.1.3

Mating/Demating of Powered Connectors

3
-
71

3.3.5.1.4

Power Switches/Controls

3
-
73

3.3.5.1.5

Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters/Portable Equipment Direct Current
Sourcing Voltage

3
-
73

3.3.5.1.6

Portable Equipment/Power Cords

3
-
73

3.3.6

Human Engineering

3
-
73

3.3.6.1

Closures or Covers Design Requirements

3
-
73

3.3
.6.2

Interior Color

3
-
73

3.3.6.2.1

Rack Mounted Equipment

3
-
73

3.3.6.2.2

Stowed/Deployable Equipment

3
-
75

3.3.6.2.3

Colors for Soft Goods

3
-
75

LS
-
71108

07/16/04

x

CONTENTS (Cont’d)



Section

Page


3.3.6.3

Full Size Range Accommodation

3
-
7
5

3.3.6.4

Operation and Control of Payload Equipment

3
-
75

3.3.6.5

Maintenance Operations

3
-
80

3.3.6.6

Adequate Clea
rance

3
-
80

3.3.6.7

Accessibility

3
-
80

3.3.6.8

One
-
Handed Operation

3
-
80

3.3.6.9

Continuous/Incidental Contact
-

High Temperature

3
-
80

3.3.6.10

Continuous/Incidental Contact
-

Low Temperature

3
-
81

3.3.6.
11

Equipment Mounting

3
-
81

3.3.6.12

Drawers and Hinged Panels

3
-
81

3.3.6.13

Alignment

3
-
81

3.3.6.14

Slide
-
Out Stops

3
-
81

3.3.6.15

Push
-
Pull Force

3
-
81

3.3.6.16

Covers

3
-
81

3.3.6.17

Self
-
Supporting Covers

3
-
81

3.3.6.18

Accessibility

3
-
83

3.3.6.19

Ease of Disconnect

3
-
83

3.3.6.20

Indication of Pressure/Flow

3
-
83

3.3.6.21

Self Locking

3
-
83

3.3
.6.22

Connector Arrangement

3
-
83

3.3.6.23

Arc Containment

3
-
83

3.3.6.24

Connector Protection

3
-
83

3.3.6.25

Connector Shape

3
-
84

3.3.6.26

Fluid and Gas Line Connectors

3
-
84

3.3.6.27

Alignment Marks or Gu
ide Pins

3
-
84

3.3.6.28

Coding

3
-
84

3.3.6.29

Pin Identification

3
-
84

3.
3.6.30

Orientation

3
-
84

3.3.6.31

Hose/Cable Restraints

3
-
84

3.3.6.32

Non
-
Threaded Fasteners Status Indication

3
-
85

3.3.6.33

Mounting Bolt/Fastener Spacing

3
-
85

3.3.6.34

Multiple Fasteners

3
-
85

3.3.6.35

Captive Fasteners

3
-
85

3.3.6.36

Quick Release Fasteners

3
-
85

3.3.6.37

Threaded Fasteners

3
-
89

3.3.6.38

Over Center Latches

3
-
89

3.3.6.39

Winghead Fasteners

3
-
89

3.3.6.40

Fastener Head Type

3
-
89

LS
-
71108

07/16/04

xi

3.3.6.41

One
-
Handed Actuation

3
-
89

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-
71108

07/16/04

xii

CONTENTS (Cont’d)



Section

Page


3.3.6.42

DELETED

3
-
89

3.3.6.43

Access Holes

3
-
89

3.3.6.44

Controls Spacing Design Requirements

3
-
89

3.3.6.45

Accidental Activation

3
-
92

3.3.6.45.1

Protective Methods

3
-
92

3.3.6.45.2

Noninterference

3
-
92

3.3.6.4
5.3

Dead
-
Man Controls

3
-
94

3.3.6.45.4

Barrier Guards

3
-
94

3.3.6.45.5

Recessed Switch Protection

3
-
94

3.3.6.46

Position Indication

3
-
94

3.3.6.47

Hidden Controls

3
-
94

3.3.6.48

Hand Controllers

3
-
96

3.3.6.49

Valve Controls

3
-
96

3.3.6.50

Toggle Switches

3
-
96

3.3.6.51

Restrain
ts and Mobility Aids

3
-
96

3.3.6.51.1

Stowage Drawer Contents Restraints

3
-
96

3.3.6.51.2

Stowage and Equipment Drawers/Trays

3
-
96

3.3.6.51.3

Captive Parts

3
-
96

3.3.6.51.4

Handle and Grasp Area Design Requirements

3
-
96

3.3.6.51.4.1

Handles and Restraints

3
-
96

3.3.6.51.4.2

Handle Location/Front Access

3
-
98

3.3.6.51.4.3

Handle Dimension
s

3
-
98

3.3.6.51.4.4

Non
-
Fixed Handles Design Requirements

3
-
98

3.3.6.52

Electrical Hazards

3
-
98

3.3.6.52.1

Mismatched

3
-
101

3.3.6.52.2

Overload Protection

3
-
102

3.3.6.52.2.1

Device Accessibility

3
-
102

3.3.6.52.2.2

Extractor
-
Type Fuse Holder

3
-
102

3.3.6.52.2.3

Overload Protection Location

3
-
102

3.3.6.52.2.4

Overload Protection Identification

3
-
102

3.3.6.52.2.5

Automatic Restart Protection

3
-
102

3.3.6.53

Audi
o Devices (Displays)

3
-
102

3.3.6.54

Egress

3
-
102

3.3.7

System Security

3
-
104

3.3.8

Design Requirements

3
-
104

3.3.8.1

Structural Design Requirements

3
-
104

3.3.8.1.1

On
-
orbit Loads

3
-
104

3.3.8.1.2

Safety Critical Structures Requirements

3
-
104

LS
-
71108

07/16/04

xiii

3.3.8.1.3

First Modal Frequency

3
-
104

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-
71108

07/16/04

xiv

CONTENTS (Cont’d)



Section

Page


3.3.8.1.4

Launch and Landing Loads

3
-
105

3.3.8.2

Electrical Power Consuming Equipment Design

3
-
107

3
.3.8.2.1

Batteries

3
-
107

3.4

ACCEPTANCE AND QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

3
-
107

3.4.1

Thermal Environment Compatibility

3
-
107

3.4.2

Vibration and Sine Sweep

3
-
107

3.4.3

Functional Acceptance

3
-
107

3.4.4

Electri
cal, Electronic and Electromechanical Parts Burn
-
In

3
-
109

3.4.5

Flammability

3
-
109

3.4.6

Offgassing

3
-
109

3.4.7

Shock

3
-
109

3.4.8

Bench Handling

3
-
109

3.4.9

Payload Mass

3
-
109

3.4.10

Electromagnetic Compatibility

3
-
109

3.4.11

Acoustic Noise

3
-
109

3.4.12

Safety Critical Structure
Verification

3
-
109

3.4.12.1

Safety Critical Structure Dimensional Check

3
-
109

3.4.12.2

Safety Critical Structure Material Certificatio
n

3
-
109

3.4.13

Software Acceptance

3
-
111

3.4.14

Pre
-
Delivery Acceptance

3
-
111

3.4.15

Pre
-
Installation Acceptance

3
-
111

3.5

HRP PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

3
-
111

3.5.1

Safety

3
-
111

3.5.2

Documentation Requirements

3
-
111

3.5.2.1

Acceptance Data Package

3
-
111

3.5.2.1.1

Acceptance Data Pack
age Statement in Statement of Work

3
-
114


4.0

VERIFICATION PROVISIONS

4
-
1

4.1

GENERAL

4
-
1

4.2

RESERVED

4
-
2

4.3

ACCEPTANCE AND QUALIFICATION VERIFICATION
METHODS

4
-
2

4.3.1

Thermal Cycle Tests

4
-
2

4.3.1.1

Qualification Thermal Test

4
-
2

4.3.1.2

Acceptance Thermal Test

4
-
3

4.3
.2

Vibration Tests

4
-
3

4.3.2.1

Sinusoidal Resonance Survey

4
-
3

4.3.2.2

Random Vibration Analysis and Test

4
-
7

LS
-
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xv

4.3.2.2.1

Qualification Vibration Analysis

4
-
7

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xvi

CONTENTS (Cont’d)



Section

Page


4.3.2.2.2

Qualification for Acceptance Vibration Test

4
-
7

4.3.2.2.3

Acceptance Vibration Test

4
-
8

4.3.3

Functional Testing

4
-
8

4.3.4

Electrica
l, Electronic, and Electromechanical Parts Burn
-
In

4
-
8

4.3.5

Flammability

4
-
10

4.3.6

Offgassing

4
-
10

4.3.7

Shock Test

4
-
10

4.3.8

Bench Handling

4
-
10

4.3.9

Payload Mass

4
-
11

4.3.10

Electromagnetic Compatibility

4
-
11

4.3.11

Acoustic Noise

4
-
11

4.3.12

Safety Critical Structure Veri
fication

4
-
11

4.3.12.1

Safety Critical Structure Dimensional Check

4
-
11

4.3.12.2

Safety Critical Structure Material Certification

4
-
11

4.3.13

Software Acceptance

4
-
11

4.3.14

Pre
-
Delivery Acceptance

4
-
11

4.3.
15

Pre
-
Installation Acceptance

4
-
12


5.0

PREPARATION FOR SHIPMENT

5
-
1

5.1

GENERAL

5
-
1

5.2

PACKING, HANDLING AND TRANSPORTATION

5
-
1

5.3

PRESERVATION AND PACKING

5
-
1

5.4

MARKING FOR SHIPMENT

5
-
1

5.5

NASA CRITICAL SPACE ITEM LABEL

5
-
2


6.0

NOTES

6
-
1

6.1

DEFINITIONS

6
-
1



APPENDIX A

RESERVED

A
-
1

APPENDIX B

ISS PRESSURIZED PAYLOAD INTERFACE REQUIREMENTS
DOCUMENT VERIFICATION MATRIX

B
-
1

APPENDIX C

FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE VERIFICATION MATRIX

C
-
1

APPENDIX D

ACCEPTANCE AND QUALIFICATION TEST APPLICABIL
ITY
MATRICES

D
-
1


LS
-
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xvii

LIST OF TABLES



Table

Page


3.1
-
1

EQUIPMENT ITEMS

3
-
1

3.1
-
2

VOILA SOFTWARE

3
-
2

3.2.2.1.1
-
1

HRF SIR DRAWER CENTE
R
-
OF
-
GRAVITY CONSTRAINTS

3
-
12

3.2.5.1.4
-
1

ENVIRONMENTAL CONDIT
IONS ON THE ISS

3
-
22

3.2.5.1.5
-
1

ISS PRESSURE RATE OF

CHANGE

3
-
24

3.2.5.1.5
-
2

MPLM PRESSURE RATE O
F CHANGE

3
-
24

3.2.5.1.5
-
3

ORBI
TER MIDDECK PRESSURE

RATE OF CHANGE

3
-
24

3.2.5.1.6.2
-
1

ALLOWABLE INTEGRATED

RACK NARROW
-
BAND
ENVELOPE AND WIDEBAN
D INTERFACE FORCE VA
LUES
FOR ISPRS, 0.5% DAMP
ING FACTOR

3
-
30

3.2.5.1.6.2
-
2

NON
-
ARIS INTEGRATED RACK

TO ARIS ACCELERATION

LIMIT ALTERNATIVE TO

FORCE LIMITS

3
-
32

3.2.5.2.1
-
1

CONTINUOUS NOISE LIM
ITS

3
-
33

3.2.5.2.2
-
1

INTERMITTENT NOISE L
IMITS

3
-
35

3.2.7.1.2.1
-
1

DIMENSIONAL TOLERANC
ES

3
-
38

3.2.7.2.1.1
-
1

SIR DRAWER POWER CON
NECTOR PIN ASSIGNMEN
TS

3
-
40

3.2.7.2.7.3
-
1

RS03PL

3
-
45

3.2.7.3.1.1
-
1

HRF SIR DRAWER DATA
CONNECT
OR PIN ASSIGNMENTS

3
-
50

3.2.7.3.6
-
1

REQUIREMENTS TRACEAB
ILITY MATRIX

3
-
56

3.2.7.3.6
-
2

REQUIREMENTS ALLOCAT
ION MATRIX

3
-
57

3.3.6.52
-
1

LET
-
GO CURRENT PROFILE,
THRESHOLD VERSUS
FREQUENCY

3
-
101

3.3.8.1.1
-
1

CREW
-
INDUCED LOADS

3
-
104

3.3.8.1.4
-
1

RANDOM VIBRATION CRI
TERIA FOR HRF RACK P
OST
MOUNTED EQUIPMENT WE
IGHING 100 POUNDS OR

LESS IN
THE MPLM

3
-
105

3.3.8.1.4
-
2

RANDOM VIBRATION CRI
TERIA FOR HRF RACK P
OST
MOUNTED EQUIPMENT WE
IGHING MORE THAN 100

POUNDS IN THE MPLM

3
-
105

3.3.8.1.4
-
3

HRF RACK MOUNTED EQU
IPMENT LOAD FACTORS
(EQUIPMENT FREQUENCY

35 HZ)

3
-
107


4.3.2.2.2
-
1

QUALIFICATION FOR AC
CEPTANCE VIBRATION T
EST
LEVELS

4
-
7

4.3.2.2.3
-
1

ACCEPTANCE VIBRATION

TEST LEVELS

4
-
8


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-
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xviii

LIST OF FIGURES



Figu
re

Page


3.1.1.3
-
1

VOILA HARDWARE BLOCK

DIAGRAM

3
-
8

3.2.2.2.2.1.2
-
1

ON
-
ORBIT SEMI
-
PERMANENT PROTRUSION
S ENVELOPE

3
-
14

3.2.2.2.2.1.3
-
1

ON
-
ORBIT TEMPORARY PROT
RUSIONS ENVELOPE

3
-
15

3.2.5.1.4
-
1

OPERATING LIMITS OF
THE ISS ATMOSPHERIC
TOTAL
PRESSURE, NI
TROGEN AND OXYGEN PA
RTIAL PRESSURES

3
-
23

3.2.5.1.5
-
1

MANUAL FIRE SUPPRESS
ION SYSTEM PERFORMAN
CE
CHARACTERISTICS

3
-
25

3.2.5.1.6.2
-
1

A
LLOWABLE ⅓
-
OCTAVE INTERFACE FOR
CES FOR
INTEGRATED RACKS AND

NON
-
RACK PAYLOADS, 0.5%
DAMPING FACTOR

3
-
29

3.2.5.1.6.2
-
2

NON
-
ARIS TO ARIS ACCELER
ATION LIMIT ALTERNAT
IVE TO
FORCE LIMITS

3
-
31

3.2.7.1.2
-
1

HRF RACK SIR DRAWER
ACCOMMODATIONS

3
-
38

3.2.7.2.1.1
-
1

SIR DRAWER POWER CON
NECTOR PART NUMBER
M83733/2RA018

3
-
39

3.2.7.2.2.3
-
1

HRF RACK POWER OUTPU
T RIPPLE VOLTAGE SPE
CTRUM

3
-
41

3.2.7.2.3
-
1

HRF RACK POWER OUTPU
T TRIP CURVES

3
-
43

3.2.7.3.1.1
-
1

HRF SIR DRAWER DATA
CONNECTOR PART NUMBE
R
M83733/2RA131

3
-
48

3.2.7.9.3.2
-
1

MANUAL FIRE SUPPRESS
ION HARDWARE ENVELOP
E

3
-
66

3.2.7.9.3.2
-
2

CLOSED VOLUME PFE NO
ZZLE

3
-
67

3.3.6.4
-
1

ARM, HAND AND THUMB/
FINGER STRENGTH
(5TH

PERCENTILE MALE DATA
)

3
-
77

3.3.6.4
-
2

LEG STRENGTH AT VARI
OUS KNEE AND THIGH A
NGLES
(5TH PERCENTILE MALE

DATA)

3
-
78

3.3.6.4
-
3

TORQUE STRENGTH

3
-
78

3.3.6.7
-
1

MINIMUM SIZES FOR AC
CESS OPENINGS FOR FI
NGERS

3
-
80

3.3.6.33
-
1

MINIMAL CLEARANCE FO
R TOOL
-
OPERATED FASTENERS

3
-
88

3.3.6.44
-
1

CONTROL SPACING REQU
IREMENTS FOR UNGLOVE
D
OPERATION

3
-
91

3.3.6.45.4
-
1

ROTARY SWITCH GUARD

3
-
94

3.3.6.50
-
1

TOGGLE SWITC
HES

3
-
97

3.3.6.51.4.3
-
1

MINIMUM IVA HANDLE D
IMENSIONS FOR IVA
APPLICATIONS

3
-
100


4.3.1.1
-
1

QUALIFICATION THERMA
L TEST PROFILE

4
-
5

4.3.1.2
-
1

ACCEPTANCE THERMAL T
EST PROFILE

4
-
6

LS
-
71108

07/16/04

xix


LS
-
71108

07/16/04

xx

ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS



A

Ampere

AC

Alternating Current

ADP

Acceptance Data Package

APM

Attached Pressurized
Module

ARIS

Active Rack Isolation System

ATT

Acceptance Thermal Test

AVT

Acceptance Vibration Test



C&DH

Command and Data Handling

Cal

Calibration

CAM

Centrifuge Accommodation Module

CCB

Configuration Control Board

CCSDS

Consultative Committee fo
r Space Data Systems

CFU

Colony Forming Units

cm

centimeters

COTS

Commercial
-
Off
-
the
-
Shelf

CSCI

Computer Software Configuration Item



dB

Decibels

dBA

Acoustic Decibel Level

DC

Direct Current

deg

degree

dia

diameter

DRD

Data Requirements Documen
t



EEE

Electrical, Electronic, and Electromechanical

EIA

Electronic Industry Association

EMC

Electromagnetic Compatibility

EMI

Electromagnetic Interference

EPCE

Electrical Power Consuming Equipment

ESD

Electrostatic Discharge

EVA

Extravehicular Ac
tivity

EXPRESS

EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station



fc

footcandle

FEM

Finite Element Model

Freq

Frequency

ft

feet



g

Gravity

GB

Gigabytes

GFCI

Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter

LS
-
71108

07/16/04

xxi

GHz

Gigahertz

GSE

Ground Support Equipment

LS
-
71108

07/16/04

xxii

A
CRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS (Cont’d)



hr

Hour

HRD

Hardware Requirements Document

HRF

Human Research Facility

HRP

Human Research Program

Hz

Hertz



ICD

Interface Control Document

IMS

Inventory Management System

IMV

Intermodule Ventilation

in

inch

I
P

International Partner

IRD

Interface Requirements Document

ISIS

International Subrack Interface Standards

ISPR

International Standard Payload Rack

ISS

International Space Station

ITCS

Internal Thermal Control System

IVA

Intravehicular Activity



J
EM

Japanese Experiment Module

JSC

Johnson Space Center



kg

Kilogram

kHz

Kilohertz

kPa

KiloPascal

KSC

Kennedy Space Center



lb

pound

lbf

pounds force

lbm

Pounds Mass

LED

Light Emitting Diode



m/s

Meters Per Second

max

Maximum

MB

Megabytes

MDM

Multiplexer
-
Demultiplexer Module

MDP

Maximum Design Pressure

MHz

Megahertz

mils

one thousandth of an inch

min

minimum

min

minute

mm

millimeter

mm Hg

Millimeters of Mercury

LS
-
71108

07/16/04

xxiii

MPLM

Mini Pressurized Logistics Module

ms

Milliseconds

LS
-
71108

07/16/04

xxiv

ACRONYMS AND
ABBREVIATIONS (Cont’d)



msec

millisecond

MSFC

Marshall Space Flight Center

MTL

Moderate Temperature Loop

MUA

Material Usage Agreement



N

Newton (metric force measurement)

N/A

Not Applicable

N
2

Nitrogen

NASA

National Aeronautics and Space Administ
ration

NASDA

National Space Development Agency of Japan

NSTS

National Space Transportation System (Do not use

use⁓pmF

kqpC

kati潮al⁔elevisi潮⁓tan摡r摳⁃潭mittee



l
2

Oxygen

Oct

Octave

ORU

Orbital Replacement Unit



P/L

Payload

Pa

Pascal

PDA

P
re
-
Delivery Acceptance

PFE

Portable Fire Extinguisher

PHTR

Packaging, Handling, and Transportation Records

PI

Principal Investigator

PIA

Payload Integration Agreement

PPC

Point
-
to
-
Point Communication

psi

pounds per square inch

psia

pounds per square

inch absolute

PSRP

Payload Safety Review Panel

PU

Panel Unit

PUL

Portable Utility Light



QAVT

Qualification for Acceptance Vibration Testing

QTT

Qualification Thermal Test

QVA

Qualification Vibration Analysis



Rad

Radiation Absorbed Dose

RAM

R
andom Access Memory

RMA

Rack Mounting Adapter

rms

Root Mean Square

RMS

Root Mean Square

RSS

Root
-
Summed Squared



LS
-
71108

07/16/04

xxv

SE&I

Systems Engineering and Integration

SEA

Statistical Energy Analysis

LS
-
71108

07/16/04

xxvi

ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS (Cont’d)



sec

second

SEE

Single

Event Effect

SIR

Standard Interface Rack

SOW

Statement of Work

SPL

Sound Pressure Level

SSPC

Solid State Power Controller

SUP

Standard Utility Panel



TBD

To Be Determined

TBR

To Be Resolved

TIA

Telecommunications Industry Association

TPS

Task P
erformance Sheet



ug

microgravity

UIP

Utility Interface Panel

UOP

Utility Outlet Panel

USB

Universal Serial Bus

USL

United States Lab



V

Volts

VC
-
S

Visibly Clean
-
Sensitive

Vdc

Volts Direct Current

VES

Vacuum Exhaust System

VOILA

Visuomotor an
d Orientation Investigations in Long
-
Duration Astronauts

VRS

Vacuum Resource System

VVS

Vacuum Vent System



WGS

Waste Gas System

WS2

HRF Workstation 2

WSTF

White Sands Test Facility



ºC

Degrees Celsius

ºF

Degrees Fahrenheit








sec

Mic潳
ec潮





LS
-
71108

07/16/04

1
-
1

1.0

SCOPE


This specification defines the Human Research Facility (HRF) program requirements for
Visuomotor and Orientation Investigations in Long
-
Duration Astronauts (VOILA). The
VOILA is a subrack payload that will be installed in an HRF Ra
ck and will use cameras
mounted in the International Space Station (ISS) module aisleway to record crew
motion when exposed to visual stimulus.


The primary governing document for the requirements levied in this document is LS
-
71000, “Program Requirements
Document for the Human Research Facility.”


The requirements in Sections 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0 of this document consist of a minimum set

of constraints for the VOILA hardware and software.


The HRF Project Office is the controlling authority for this document.

The HRF
Configuration Control Board (CCB) or a delegated authority must approve any
deviations from the requirements of this document.





LS
-
71108

07/16/04

2
-
1

2.0

APPLICABLE DOCUMENTS


The following applicable documents of the exact issue shown herein form a part of this
sp
ecification to the extent specified herein. If a revision level or date is not cited, the
latest version of the document should be used.


All specifications, standards, exhibits, drawings or other documents referenced in this
specification are hereby inco
rporated as cited in the text of this document. Any updated

revisions to documents specified herein shall be reviewed to determine the impact to the
design. Changes to the design or this document shall only be made upon the direction
of the HRF CCB.


2.1

DOCUMENTS


Document Number

Revision

Document Title

FED
-
STD
-
595

B

12/89

Colors Used in Government Procurement

JPD 5335.3

A

Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center Quality
Management System (QMS)

KHB 1700.7

C

8/99

Space Shuttle Payload Ground Safety
Handbook

LS
-
60077
-
1

TBD

Drawer Dimensional Specification for the
Human Research Facility

LS
-
71000

B


Program Requirements Document for the
Human Research Facility

LS
-
71011

A

10/01

Acoustic Noise Control and Analysis Plan for
Human Research Facility Payloads and Rack
s

LS
-
71014

Draft

9/26/97

Mass Properties Control Plan Human
Research Facility Payload and Racks

LS
-
71016

A

8/29/01

Electromagnetic Compatibility Control Plan for
the Human Research Facility

LS
-
71020

B

Chg 3

02/05/04

Software Development Plan for the Hum
an
Research Facility

LS
-
71042
-
14
-
4

A

HRF Workstation 2 Interface Definition
Document

LS
-
71062
-
8

D

10/14/03

Interface Design Document for the Human
Research Facility Common Software

LS
-
71130

NC

11/97

HRF Human Computer Interface Design Guide

LS
-
71108

07/16/04

2
-
2

Document Number

Revision

Document Title

MIL
-
A
-
8625

F

9/93

Anodic Coatings for Aluminum and Aluminum
Alloys

MIL
-
STD
-
810

E

7/95

Environmental Test Methods and Engineering
Guidelines

MIL
-
STD
-
1686

C

10/95

Electrostatic Discharge Control Program for
Protection of Electrical and Electronic Parts,
Assemblies an
d Equipment (Excluding
Electrically Initiated Explosive Devices)

NASA
-
STD
-
6001

2/98

Flammability, Odor, Offgassing, and
Compatibility Requirements and Test
Procedures for Materials in Environments that
Support Combustion

NASA TM 102179

6/91

Selection of
Wires and Circuit Protective
Devices for STS Orbiter Vehicle Payload
Electrical Circuits

NHB 6000.1

D

9/90

Requirements for Packaging, Handling, and
Transportation for Aeronautical and Space
Systems, Equipment, and Associated
Components

NSTS/ISS 13830

C

Chg 6

1/04

Payload Safety Review and Data Submittal
Requirements for Payloads Using the Space
Shuttle and International Space Station

NSTS
-
1700.7

B

Chg 6

12/03

Safety Policy and Requirements For Payloads
Using the Space Transportation System

NSTS
-
1700.7B

ISS ADDENDUM

Basic

Chg 6

3/03

Safety Policy and Requirements For Payloads
Using the International Space Station

NSTS/ISS 18798

B

Chg 7

2/00

Interpretations of NSTS/ISS Payload Safety
Requirements

NSTS
-
21000
-
IDD
-
MDK

B

Chg 20

5/04

Shuttle/Payload Interfac
e Definition Document
for Middeck Accommodations

NT
-
CWI
-
001

A

Chg 2

7/31/01

Task Performance Sheet (TPS)

LS
-
71108

07/16/04

2
-
3

Document Number

Revision

Document Title

SAIC
-
TN
-
9550

12/01

Ionizing Radiation Dose Estimates for
International Space Station Alpha using the
CADrays 3
-
D Mass Model

SN
-
C
-
0005

D

Chg 8

1/03

S
pace Shuttle Contamination Control
Requirements

SP
-
T
-
0023

C

5/01

Specification, Environmental Acceptance
Testing

SSP 30223

J

05/00

Problem Reporting and Corrective Action
Space Station Program

SSP 30233

F

7/99

Space Station Requirements for Materials a
nd
Processes

SSP 30237

E

Chg 10

4/00

Space Station Electromagnetic Emission and
Susceptibility Requirements

SSP 30240

C

Chg 3

6/00

Space Station Grounding Requirements

SSP 30242

E

Chg 4

6/00

Space Station Cable/Wire Design and Control
Requirements for
Electromagnetic
Compatibility

SSP 30243

E

Chg 6

6/00

Space Station Requirements for
Electromagnetic Compatibility

SSP 30245

E

Chg 9

6/00

Space Station Electrical Bonding Requirements

SSP 30257:004

E

11/96

Space Station Program Intravehicular Activity
Restraints and Mobility Aids Standard
Interface Control Document

SSP 30512

C

9/94

Space Station Ionizing Radiation Design
Environment

SSP 30695

A

1/95

Acceptance Data Package Requirements
Specification

SSP 41017

E

6/00

Rack to Mini Pressurized Logistic
s Module
Interface Control Document (ICD) Part 1

LS
-
71108

07/16/04

2
-
4

Document Number

Revision

Document Title


F

5/00

Rack to Mini Pressurized Logistics Module
Interface Control Document (ICD) Part 2

SSP 50005

B,

Chg 1

11/98

International Space Station Flight Crew
Integration Standard (NASA
-
STD
-
3000/T)

SSP 50008

B

7/98

International Space Station Interior Color
Scheme

SSP 50313

See Web

Display and Graphics Commonality Standard
Document

SSP 52005

B

3/99

Payload Flight Equipment Requirements and
Guidelines for Safety
-
Critical Structures

SSP 52050

B

7/00

Internati
onal Standard Payload Rack to
International Space Station, Software Interface
Control Document Part 1

SSP 57000

E

4/00

Pressurized Payloads Interface Requirements
Document

SSP 57001

D

5/03

Pressurized Payloads Hardware Interface
Control Document Templat
e


2.2

ORDER OF PRECEDENCE


In the event of a conflict between the text of this specification and references cited
herein, the text of this specification takes precedence. Nothing in this specification,
however, supersedes applicable laws and regulation
s unless a specific exemption has
been obtained.



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3.0

SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS


3.1

ITEM DEFINITION


The following items of VOILA will be designed and certified under this requirements
document for use on ISS as a part of the HRF Program. The HRF Rack hardwa
re
used with this hardware is certified under separate documentation that is maintained by
the appropriate program(s).


Table 3.1
-
1 lists the equipment items covered by this document, including the stowage
kits that will be used to transport the items and
contain the items on
-
orbit.



TABLE 3.1
-
1. EQUIPMENT ITEMS


Item Name

Part Number

Class

Quantity

Notes

VOILA Tracker
Bar

85
-
20100

I

3

Flight pair, Flight
Backup single

Provided by PI

VOILA EE

85
-
30100

I

2

Flight, Flight Backup

Electronics provided by
PI

Chassis & integration
provided by NASA

VOILA Chestpack

85
-
40400

I

2

Flight, Flight Backup

Provided by PI

VOILA Head
Display

85
-
40100

I

2

Flight, Flight Backup

Provided by PI

VOILA
Headphones

85
-
41000

I

2

Flight, Flight Backup

Provided by PI

VOILA Joys
tick

85
-
40600

I

3

Flight pair, Flight
Backup single

Provided by PI

VOILA Paddle

85
-
40500

I

2

Flight, Flight Backup

Provided by PI

VOILA Subject
Camera

85
-
41200

I

2

Flight, Flight Backup
Provided by PI

VOILA WS2
Cable

85
-
40801

I

2

Flight, Flight Backup

P
rovided by PI

VOILA Tracker
Bar Cable

85
-
40803

I

4

2 Flight, 2 Flight Backup

Provided by PI

VOILA Chestpack
Cable

85
-
40806

I

2

Flight, Flight Backup

Provided by PI

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Item Name

Part Number

Class

Quantity

Notes

VOILA Restraint
Platform

85
-
40300

I

1

Flight only

Provided by PI

VOILA Restraint
Pole

85
-
40700

I

1

Flight only

Provided by PI

VOILA Marker
Plate

85
-
40900

I

2

Flight, Flight Backup

Provided by PI

VOILA Restraint
Spring

SEG46119710
-
301

I

4

Flight pair, Flight
Backup pair

Provided by NASA

VOILA Vest

SEG46119738
-
301

I

2

Flight, Flight Backup

Provided by NASA

VOILA Cal Bar A

85
-
41300

I

2

Flight, Flight Backup

Provided by PI

VOILA Cal Bar B

85
-
41400

I

2

Flight, Flight Backup

Provided by PI



Table 3.1
-
2 lists the software items covered by this document.



TABLE 3.1
-
2. VOILA SOFTWARE


Program

Name

Part Number

Notes

VOILA CSCI

TBD




3.1.1

Experiment Description


3.1.1.1

Experiment Overview


VOILA will extend, simplify, and merge two sensory motor and performance
experiments originally developed for the 1998 STS
-
90 Neurolab mission. The two
components retain separate numbers (E085/E507) on ISS but are performed together.
The experiments use the HRF Workstation 2 (WS2) as “science kiosk” to perform
short (typically 30 minute long) tests to study the role of visual, vestibular, and haptic
cues

on spatial orientation and motor behavior. The experiment utilizes virtual
environment generation accessories first developed for the Neurolab as a tool to study
these processes during and after long duration (3
-
6 month) orbital flight. Restrained and

f
ree
-
floating subjects wear a wide field of view, color stereo head mounded display.
Protocols are based on 1
-
G paradigms, require little set
-
up time, and can be selected
and performed by an astronaut in an automated fashion using Session Manager
software.

Pre
-
flight, in
-
flight, and post
-
flight performances of each protocol are planned

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on each ISS increment.

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The Specific Objectives are to determine the effects of microgravity on the following:


(1)

The influence of scene symmetry, rotation, haptic cues, and e
xpected orientation on
static and dynamic self tilt (Virtual Tilting and Tumbling Room Protocols)

(2)

The onset of x
-
axis illusory linear self
-
motion without haptic cues (Linear Vection
Protocol).

(3)

The effect of perceived orientation on visual object recognitio
n and shape
recognition (Object Recognition Protocols).

(4)

Whether information used in grasping remembered objects is stored in head
-
fixed,
body
-
fixed, or exocentric reference frames (Virtual Grasping Protocol).

(5)

How the timing of catching movements depends on

anticipation of downward
acceleration (Virtual Catching Protocol).


The general hypothesis is that mental processes involved in self
-
orientation, object
perception, and motor control will be fundamentally altered in microgravity environments,
as evidenced

by visual reorientation, inversion, and proprioceptive illusions frequently
reported in
-
orbit by astronauts. These experiments on self
-
orientation, linear vection,
object perception, and motor control will help to characterize the contribution of gravity

to the mechanisms underlying these activities.


3.1.1.2

Operational Overview


In each session, based on the amount of crew time available, the Session Manager
program suggests one or more of five different visual perception protocols and one or
more of th
ree different visuomotor tasks. In
-
flight protocols are performed in up to
three possible conditions: quasi
-
free floating, lightly restrained, and/or with constant
-
force springs (simulated gravity).


Visual Perception


Protocol 1:

Tilted Room. Subject in
dicates perceived vertical while viewing a series
of tilted scenes.

Protocol 2:

Tumbling Room. Subject indicates vection magnitude and surface
identity while viewing rotating scenes.

Protocol 3:

Linear Vection. Subject indicates vection onset and magnitu
de while
viewing a moving corridor scene.

Protocol 4:

Figures. Subject indicates which complex 2D figure seems most
familiar.

Protocol 5:

Shading. Subject indicates which shaded circle seems most convex.

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Visuomotor Coordination


Protocol 6:

Grasping. U
pright. Subjects align the hand with an object oriented in
3D space.

Protocol 7:

Grasping. Head Tilt. Subjects repeat Protocol 6 with 30


head tilt.

Protocol 8:

Interception. Subjects intercept a flying ball with the dominant hand.


The following proto
cols will only be performed pre
-
flight and post
-
flight:


Protocol 9:

Tilted Bed. Subject aligns the bed to their subjective horizontal in a
dark room.

Protocol 10:

Luminous Line. Subjects align a luminous line to their subjective vertical
meridian in a d
ark room.

Protocol 11:

Tilted grasping. Subjects perform Protocol 6 while seated in a chair
inclined by 30


in the frontal plane.


3.1.1.3

Hardware Overview


The VOILA experiment depicted in Figure 3.1.1.3
-
1 will utilize the HRF Workstation 2
(WS2), which

is a rack
-
mounted computer drawer located in HRF Rack 1 and Rack 2.

The VOILA experiment will use the following components of the WS2:

1.

The graphics accelerator cards in the WS2 are used to render virtual environments
on the VOILA Head Display for the exp
eriment protocols.

2.

The WS2 sound card is used to record the subject’s audio notes.

3.

The WS2 data acquisition card is used to capture acceleration data from the
VOILA Paddle for the Interception and Grasping protocols.

4.

The Universal Serial Bus (USB) ports of

the WS2 are used to operate the VOILA
Joystick and the VOILA Subject Camera.

5.

The VOILA software will reside and operate on the WS2 hard drive.


VOILA also utilizes the HRF Flat Screen Display and the Workstation Keyboard to
operate the VOILA Session Manag
er software and the HRF Common Software on the
WS2.


VOILA consists of the following systems:


Visual Auditory Stimulus System


The VOILA EE transmits a stereoscopic video image to the VOILA Head Display.


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6

The VOILA Head Display provides the stereoscopic
display to the wearer.


The VOILA Headphones are noise cancellation headphones. They will be worn with
the VOILA Head Display to suppress audio directionality cues.


Inertial Tracking System


The inertial tracking system uses inertial cubes containing lin
ear accelerometers and
angular rate sensors to detect orientation information.


The VOILA EE processes the signals from the inertial cubes. Inertial cubes are
mounted on the VOILA Head Display, on the VOILA Marker Plate, and on the
VOILA Paddle.


Optical
Tracking System


The optical tracking system provides a second source of position and orientation
information by tracking a set of infrared Light Emitting Diode (LED) markers with
cameras. The infrared LED markers are mounted on the VOILA Head Display, th
e
VOILA Paddle, the VOILA Chestpack, the VOILA Restraint Platform, the VOILA
Calibration (Cal) Bars, and the Marker Plates.


The VOILA Tracker Bars contain three cameras each. Two tracker bars are used to
track all of the LED markers. The tracker bars ar
e mounted into the seat track at
opposite ends of the module such that the subject is between them.


The VOILA EE processes the optical tracking information provided by the VOILA
Tracker Bars.


Subject Input System


The subject input system allows the crew

to make inputs via the VOILA Chestpack,
VOILA Joystick, VOILA Paddle, and VOILA Microphone.


The VOILA Chestpack is a connection box that is worn on the front of the VOILA
Vest. The chestpack connects with the VOILA EE through one cable that provides
pow
er and data channels. The VOILA Joystick, VOILA Paddle, VOILA
Microphone, and a set of infrared LED markers on the VOILA Vest will connect into
the chestpack. The chestpack will have infrared LED markers mounted on its exterior.


The VOILA Joystick allow
s subjects to respond to stimuli presented in the Room,
Vection, Figures, and Shading protocols.


The VOILA Paddle consists of a handle that can be gripped with either hand. In the
dominant hand, the paddle will be used to measure hand movement, position
and
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7

orientation during the Grasping and Interception protocols. The paddle contains one
inertial cube and a linear accelerometer to detect motion onsets. A set of infrared LED
markers is mounted on the exterior of the paddle.


The VOILA Microphone is use
d for subject voice recording. The microphone will be
mounted to the VOILA Head Display or the VOILA Vest for hands
-
free operation.


VOILA Restraint System


The VOILA Restraint System is composed of four parts which are used to restrain the
subjects in ce
rtain postures, prevent them from drifting into other equipment, and
provide haptic feedback for certain protocols. The four parts of the restraint system are
the VOILA Vest, the VOILA Restraint Platform, the VOILA Restraint Springs, and the

VOILA Restrai
nt Pole.


The VOILA Vest is an adjustable vest worn by the subject. The vest has attachment
points for the VOILA Restraint Springs along its waist, and for the VOILA Pole on the
front and back of the vest near the wearer’s center of gravity. A number of
adjustment
straps on the vest allow the subject to distribute the force from the VOILA Restraint
Springs onto the waist and shoulders. The vest has an attachment point for the VOILA
Chestpack, and attachment points for temporary stowage of the VOILA Joyst
ick and
the VOILA Paddle. The vest also has an attachment point for the VOILA Marker
Plate, which is a metal plate with infrared LED sensors attached to track the subject’s
upper torso.


The VOILA Restraint Platform is an adjustable aluminum platform that

mounts onto the
seat tracks. Subjects will stand on the platform and use the VOILA Restraint Springs
to simulate gravity in the Room and Vection protocols. The platform can be folded into
a chair for the seated position, and unfolded into a bed for the
supine position during the
Grasping and Interception protocols. It has removable padding for comfort and wide
Velcro straps for restraint.


The VOILA Restraint Springs are two constant force springs that provide 25
-
35

lbs of
downward force when displaced
between 31 and 40 inches simulating the haptic
sensations of gravity on the subject’s feet. One end of each spring is mounted on the
VOILA Restraint Platform. The other end of each spring is attached to the bottom of
the VOILA Vest.


The VOILA Restraint
Pole is approximately 1 meter in length with an attachment point
on one end that fits into a seat track. The other end has a swivel joint and a quick
-
release attachment point for the VOILA Vest. The swivel joint provides minimal
hindrances to subject rot
ational drift while preventing subject translational drift beyond
experiment measurement boundaries and ISS protrusion boundaries. The joint can also
be locked to prevent large rotational motion of the subject.


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Subject Surveillance System


The VOILA Sub
ject Camera is used to capture still images of the subject performing
the experiment. It will be mounted to the wall or ceiling of the module with a seat track
attachment.


Cal Bars


The VOILA tracker system is composed of two CODA tracker bars, each of w
hich
acquires 3D position in its own 3D reference frame. The cal bars are used to compute
a coordinate transformation that allows data from both tracker bars to be expressed in a

common 3D reference frame. The cal bars each consist of two LED markers and

associated marker driver boxes. The cal bars are mounted on the wall of the module
opposite the two tracker bars. The tracker software uses the positions of the four
markers on the cal bars to define the common reference frame.




Figure 3.1.1.3
-
1. VO
ILA Hardware Block Diagram

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9

3.2

CHARACTERISTICS


3.2.1

Performance Characteristics


3.2.1.1

Functional Performance Characteristics


3.2.1.1.1

System Performance and Functionality


A.

VOILA shall interface to the HRF Workstation 2 per the R2WS Interface
Defini
tion Document, LS
-
71042
-
14
-
4.

B.

VOILA shall interconnect per the VOILA Interconnect Drawing.

C.

VOILA peripherals (excluding cables) not worn or held by the subject shall mount
to the ISS Seat Track.

D.

VOILA shall provide a stereoscopic display to the subject.

E.

VO
ILA shall be operable by subjects wearing eyeglasses.

F.

VOILA shall be able to display at a minimum resolution of 640x 480 pixels or
higher.

G.

VOILA shall provide subject head, hand (right or left), and torso
orientation and
position information to the R2WS in

three orthogonal axes.

1.

Displacement shall be measured between 0


200 cm with a clear line of sight in
a 2 x 2 x 2 meter cube workspace.

2.

Orientation shall be measured from 0
-

359 degrees with a clear line of sight in a
2 x 2 x 2 meter cube workspace.

H.

VOI
LA shall provide one area microphone capable of measuring audio signals
ranging from 1


90 dB.

I.

VOILA shall
route audio signals from the area microphone real
-
time to
provide
monaural
audio signals to the subject
.

J.

VOILA shall provide a joystick with at leas
t two buttons operable by either a left or
right
-
handed subject.

K.

VOILA shall enable the subject to make software menu selections.

L.

VOILA shall provide one pushbutton and one trigger switch operable with a single
hand, left or right.

M.

VOILA shall enable the s
ubject
to signal certain events in a protocol to the R2WS.

N.

VOILA shall provide a microphone such that
subject comments may be recorded
on the R2WS.

O.

VOILA shall provide a means to allow the subject to drift rotationally within the
confines of the 2 x 2 x 2
meter workspace.

P.

VOILA shall be capable of providing
still photographs to the R2WS.

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10

Q.

VOILA shall provide an adjustable seat with a backrest for the subject in the seated
position.

R.

VOILA shall provide a structure to allow the subject to lie flat.

S.

VOILA shal
l provide straps to restrain the subject in the seated, supine, and prone
positions.

T.

VOILA shall provide a means for the subject to input crew identification and to
select the experiment protocol.


3.2.1.1.2

Vest


A.

The Vest shall provide attachment points p
er the VOILA Interface Control
Document (ICD).

B.

The Vest shall provide attachment points for temporarily stowing VOILA
peripherals during experiment operations.

C.

The Vest shall provide attachment points for two Constant Force Assemblies along
the waist of th
e subject.

D.

The Vest shall provide straps to distribute the force from each Constant Force
Assembly to the shoulders and hips.

E.

The Vest shall provide straps to adjust for fit and comfort of the subject.


3.2.1.1.3

VOILA EE


A.

The VOILA EE shall provide a rear

power connector per Section 3.2.7.2.1.1.


B.

The VOILA EE shall provide a rear data connector per Section 3.2.7.3.1.1.


C.

The VOILA EE shall provide a front panel circuit breaker rated at 7.5 amps.


D.

The VOILA EE shall provide a front panel LED for drawer power

on/off indication.


E.

The VOILA EE shall provide two
International Subrack Interface Standards

(ISIS)
handles (part numbers 683
-
43700
-
1 and 683
-
43700
-
2).


F.

The VOILA EE shall have a removable front panel connector plate.


G.

The VOILA EE shall have a removable
internal electronics mounting plate.


H.

The
VOILA EE

shall provide a fan per Sections 3.2.7.5.2.2A


3.2.7.5.2.2.F.


I.

The
VOILA EE

fan shall have a power draw equal to or less than 30 W.


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11

3.2.1.1.4

VOILA Spring


A.

The VOILA spring shall provide a mechanical at
tachment point to the Vest.

B.

The VOILA spring shall provide a mechanical attachment per the VOILA ICD.

C.

The VOILA spring shall provide a force coefficient of 0.5 lbs/inch or less over a
range of 20 to 40 inches in length.

D.

The VOILA spring shall provide a min
imum of 32 lbs force when attached to the
VOILA vest while worn by a crewmember in a posture required for the experiment.

E.

The VOILA spring shall not require additional adjustments to generate the minimum
force beyond the attachment to the vest worn by a cr
ewmember in a posture
required for the experiment.


3.2.2

Physical Characteristics


3.2.2.1

Mass and Center of Gravity Properties


3.2.2.1.1

VOILA EE Mass


The VOILA EE mass shall be less than 64 pounds per set of slide guides or a total of
64 pounds (29.0
3 kg).


3.2.2.1.2

VOILA Ancillary Hardware Mass


VOILA hardware to be stowed outside of the VOILA main housing shall meet the
weight limitations of each M02 Bag, 200 lbf, when stowed as defined in Section
3.2.2.2.1.B.


3.2.2.1.3

VOILA EE Center
-
of
-
Gravity
Constraints


HRF Rack mounted Standard Interface Rack (SIR) drawer instruments shall meet the
center of gravity constraints specified in Table 3.2.2.1.3
-
1, HRF SIR Drawer Center
-
of
-
Gravity Constraints. (LS
-
71000, Section 6.2.1.2.4)


3.2.2.2

Envelope


3.2.2
.2.1

Stowed Envelope


A.

VOILA’s main housing will consist of a single 4
-
PU SIR drawer.


B.

VOILA hardware to be stowed outside of the VOILA main housing shall fit within
one M02 Transfer Bag, 34.25 in (W) x 20.5 in (D) x 19.5 in (H),

in the VOILA
stowed c
onfiguration. (
NOTE
: The VOILA platform (standing/supine) will be
stowed outside the stowage bag.)

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12

TABLE 3.2.2.1.3
-
1. HRF SIR DRAWER C
ENTER
-
OF
-
GRAVITY CONSTRAINTS


Drawer Configuration

X (in)

Min.

X (in)

Max.

Y (in)

Min.

Y (in)

Max.

Z (in)

Min.

Z (in)

Max.

Single Slide Drawer (4
-
PU)

-
1.75

+1.75

+7.99

+12.00

-
0.63

+0.87

Double Slide Drawer (8
-
PU)

-
2.20

+2.20

+10.24

+14.00

+1.675

+3.975

Triple Slide Drawer (12
-
PU)

-
1.50

+1.50

+9.74

+13.00

+6.37

+8.87

NOTE
:

Center of gravity envelope is measured from t
he drawer coordinate system as defined below. The
geometric center for “Z” axis is measured from the centerline of the bottom
-
most rail toward the top
of the drawer. Total maximum integrated mass (including drawer, contents and slides) on any one
set of
slides is limited to 64 pounds. Multiple
-
slide drawers are to evenly distribute loading
between the sets of slides.






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13

3.2.2.2.2

Deployed Envelope


3.2.2.2.2.1

On
-
Orbit Payload Protrusions


Definitions for on
-
orbit permanent protrusions, on
-
orbit sem
i
-
permanent protrusions,
on
-
orbit temporary protrusions, on
-
orbit momentary protrusions, and protrusions for
on
-
orbit keep alive payloads can be found in Section 6.1, Definitions. The requirements

in Section 3.2.2.2.2.1 apply to installation and operation

activities but not to
maintenance activities.


NOTE
:

The on
-
orbit protrusion requirements in this section are applicable to when the
payload is on
-
orbit and do not apply to other phases of the transportation of
the payload [e.g., launch, landing, Mini Pre
ssurized Logistics Module
(MPLM) installation]. (LS
-
71000, Section 6.2.1.1.5)


A.

On
-
orbit protrusions, excluding momentary protrusions, shall not extend laterally
across the edges of the rack or pass between racks. (LS
-
71000, Section
6.2.1.1.5.A)


B.

The
integrated rack hardware, excluding momentary protrusions, shall not prevent
attachment of Rack Mounting Adapter (RMA) on any seat track attach holes. (LS
-
71000, Section 6.2.1.1.5.B)


Constraints which may be associated with payload protrusions include the

following:




Removal of the protrusion during rack installation, translation, and crew translation.




Removal of the protrusion if RMA is installed on the rack.




Removal of the protrusion to prevent interference with microgravity operations.




Remova
l or powering off of the rack if the protrusion blocks Portable Fire
Extinguisher (PFE) access or the fire indicator.




May limit the rack location (e.g., Protrusion located in the floor and the ceiling are
limited to a total of no more than 12 inches).




May limit operation of the payload.


As indicated by the constraints above, protrusions have a negative impact on crew
operations and are to be minimized. (LS
-
71000, Section 6.2.1.1.5)


3.2.2.2.2.1.1

On
-
Orbit Permanent Protrusions


Not applicable to VOIL
A.

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3.2.2.2.2.1.2

On
-
Orbit Semi
-
Permanent Protrusions


A.

Not applicable to VOILA.


B.

Other on
-
orbit semi
-
permanent protrusions shall be limited to no more than 500
square inches within the envelope shown in Figure 3.2.2.2.2.1.2
-
1. (LS
-
71000,
Section 6.2.
1.1.5.2.B)
NOTE
: VOILA will take exception to this requirement.


NOTE
:

The sum of the on
-
orbit semi
-
permanent protrusions and the on
-
orbit

protrusion for keep alive payloads is limited to no more than 500 square
inches. (LS
-
71000, Section 6.2.1.1.5.2.B)


NOTE
:

The SIR and ISIS drawer handles are not included in the 500 square inch
limit. (LS
-
71000, Section 6.2.1.1.5.2.B)


C.

All on
-
orbit semi
-
permanent protrusions shall be designed to be removable by the
crew with hand operations and/or standard Intravehic
ular Activity (IVA) tools. (LS
-
71000, Section 6.2.1.1.5.2.C)





Figure 3.2.2.2.2.1.2
-
1. On
-
Orbit Semi
-
Permanent Protrusions Envelope



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15

3.2.2.2.2.1.3

On
-
Orbit Temporary Protrusions


A.

On
-
orbit temporary protrusions shall remain within the envelope show
n in Figure
3.2.2.2.2.1.3
-
1. (LS
-
71000, Section 6.2.1.1.5.3.A)
NOTE
: VOILA will take
exception to this requirement.


B.

The combination of all on
-
orbit temporary protrusions for the integrated rack shall
be designed such that they can be eliminated or ret
urned to their stowed
configuration by the crew with hand operations and/or standard IVA tools within 10
minutes. (LS
-
71000, Section 6.2.1.1.5.3.B)


NOTE
:

Integrated racks must provide stowage for on
-
orbit temporary protrusions
within their stowage allocat
ion. (LS
-
71000, Section 6.2.1.1.5.3)


NOTE
:

On
-
orbit temporary protrusions for payloads located in the floor or ceiling are
limited to 6 inches each or a total of 12 inches for both floor and ceiling. (LS
-
71000, Section 6.2.1.1.5.3)





Figure 3.2.2.2.2.1
.3
-
1. On
-
Orbit Temporary Protrusions Envelope

LS
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71108

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-
16

3.2.2.2.2.1.4

On
-
Orbit Momentary Protrusions


Not applicable to VOILA.


3.2.2.2.2.2

Deployed Envelope Dimensions


There are no requirements for deployed envelope dimensions beyond those
documented in Section
3.2.2.2.2.1.


3.2.3

Reliability, Quality and Non
-
Conformance Reporting


A.

Reliability is ensured by compliance with the applicable qualification and acceptance
tests documented in Section 3.4 and by compliance with the useful life requirement
documented i
n Section 3.2.3.2. HRF hardware maintainability is ensured by
compliance with the applicable ISS maintainability requirements derived from SSP
57000 and documented in Section 3.0.


B.

Quality


1.

Quality Assurance for VOILA hardware developments, handling
, or testing at
Johnson Space Center (JSC) shall be implemented in accordance with JPD
5335.3, “JSC Quality Manual.” (LS
-
71000, Section 7.3.1)


2.

Quality Assurance for VOILA hardware developments, handling, or testing at
MIT shall be implemented per the Q
uality Assurance Plan for VOILA, Drawing
Number 85
-
01001.


C.

Non
-
Conformance Reporting


1.

For flight hardware produced under a contract or subcontract at a site other
than JSC, non
-
conformance reporting requirements shall be specified in the
Statement of

Work (SOW) Data Requirements List, and Data Requirements
Documents (DRDs) shall be used to identify the submittal and data
requirements. (LS
-
71000, Section 7.3.2.1)


2.

For flight hardware developed at JSC, non
-
conformance reporting shall be in
accordance

with JPD 5335.3 and the applicable technical division plan. (LS
-
71000, Section 7.3.2.2)


3.

Non
-
conformances, which meet the Level 1 Problem Reporting and Corrective
Action criteria for payloads as defined in SSP 30223, shall be reported in
accordance wit
h SSP 30223. (LS
-
71000, Section 7.3.2.3)


4.

Software non
-
conformance reporting shall be in accordance with LS
-
71020
-
1,
“Software Development Plan for the Human Research Facility.” (LS
-
71000,
LS
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71108

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