Gender Studies Postgraduate Programmes

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Gender Studies Postgraduate Programmes


MA Women’s and Gender Studies (GEMMA)

Handbook


Department of Social Sciences

University of Hull






2

Contents


Why Study Gender?







3

A Radical City








3

Hull Centre for Gender Studies






4

Centre for Gender Studies Postgraduate Conference



4

The
Journal of Gender Studies






5

The Suite of
Postgraduate

Degrees in Gender Studies



5

GEMMA MA Women’s and Gender Studies




6

GEMMA

Programme Structure






8

GEMMA Timetable








10

Qualit
y and Standards Framework





14

Module Specificat
ions







17



















3

This handbook should be viewed in conjunction with the
University
Student

Handbook

which contains

common guidelines and University
regulations
.
This is available at:

http://www2.hull.ac.uk/student/studenthandbook/regulations.aspx


Gender Studies at the University of Hull


Why Study Gender?

Gender issues have become a major focus within both a
cademic and political
spheres as a consequence of the changing relationships between women and
men throughout the world. Most national and supranational organisations,
such as the United Nations, the World Health Organisation, the World Bank
and the Europe
an Union, now have gender agendas and are
,

public
ly

at least,

keen to promote the participation of women in all spheres. Gender has never
been more crucial: transformations in gender relations have had a profound
impact on economies and social relations
worldwide. These transformations
have also had a profound theoretical impact across the social sciences,
philosophy and literature. They have influenced international policy making,
not least on equal opportunities in employment. Globally, gender issues ar
e
now a focus and preoccupation for political activity and social movements of
all kinds. The UN conferences on women demonstrate the pervasive
commitment of key decision makers to gender
-
related issues. Within this
con
text, the University of Hull’s p
ostgr
aduate programmes in Gender Studies
are making a major contribution to an established but still developing
academic and political agenda. The breadth and depth of our teaching and
research, together with the Journal of Gender Studies and the Centre for
Gen
der Studies, make the University of Hull one of the leading centres for
the
study of
gender studies in Europe.


A Radical City

Hull
and East Yorkshire
have

a long history of

feminism since the
eighteen
century philosopher and mother of First Wave Feminism,

Mary
Wollstonecraft, spent her formative years in Beverley, East Yorkshire. She
wrote a number of books on the education of women, and most famously
published
A Vindication of the Rights of Women

in 1792
. In this she argued that
both men and women were r
ational beings and should be treated as such
: a
radical proposition at that time
. Hull University’s Department of Philosophy
and the Centre for Gender Studies holds an annual public lecture in honour of
Wollstonecraft
.
The East Riding

was also home in the
early 190
0s to the
novelist, feminist and anti
-
racist Winifred Holtby
.

Organised feminism has

4

existed
here
since the spring of 1968, when a Women’s Rights Group was
formed around the campaign led by Lil Bilocca and the fishermen’s wives to
improve the safe
ty of trawlers. In the 1970s, six more groups emerged: a
Working Women’s Charter Group, a Women’s Committee of the Hull Trades
Council, Women’s Aid, Hull Women’s Centre, a National Abortion Campaign
Group and a University Union Women’s Group. In the early
1980s a further
group, Humberside Women in Education, was founded to work towards
equal opportunities in schools. This was followed by the foundation of the
Centre for Gender Studies

in the mid 1980s
. There continues to be a vibrant
and active network of w
omen’s centres, services and groups promoting
gender equality across the city with strong links to Gender Studies.
Students
of Gender Studies are encouraged to get involved in one of the active
women’s centres operating in the city, for example, Hull Women
’s Centre in
the city centre which celebrated its 30
th

anniversary in 2009, and North Hull
Women’s Centre serving north Hull near to the University Campus.


Hull Centre for Gender Studies

The Centre is currently celebrating its 25
th

Anniversary s
ince its
foundation in

1986.

The past year has therefore a series of special events, with Prof. Luce
Irigaray giving the Mary Wollstonecraft Lecture and
BBC4
radio presenter
Dame
Jenni Murray
OBE
joining us for the 25
th

Anniversary dinner. In
previous years

the Centre has run regular seminars which have attracted
high
-
profile speakers such as Suzanne Moore, Beatrix Campbell, Yasmin
Alibhai
-
Brown, Hilary Rose, Sheila Rowbotham, Val Miner, Patricia Waugh
and Margaret Whitford. Contributions have also been made
by a range of
international speakers from Pakistan, India, Russia, France, Holland, the
Sudan, Australia, China, the USA, Chile, South Korea
, Thailand, Eastern
Europe

and South Africa. Links have been established with gender and
women’s studies centres in
many of these countries. The centre also hosts day
conferences which have been well attended. Topics have included Men and
Masculinities, Feminism and Nationalism, Women and Work, Feminism and
the Subject, Gender Studies in the 90s and Refugee Women.

This
year the
theme of the seminar series is ‘Feminism Now’ with speakers including
Professor Sylvia Walby OBE Unesco Chair in Gender Research at the
University of Lancaster,

UK.


Centre for Gender Studies Postgraduate Conference

T
he Centre for Gender Studies
h
olds

regular

one day interdisciplinary
conference
s

for postgraduates in the University who have an interest in
gender issues and research.
The last conference
The Story of Why I am Here:

5

Questions and Methods in Gender Research,
was

held
on 4th

November
20
09
and was a attended by over 70 delegates

from across the university and
beyond
, providing a critical forum for debate and an opportunity for students
and staff to network and discuss their research and ideas.
GEMMA students
are strongly encouraged to att
end

such events
.


The Journal of Gender Studies

The success of the Centre for Gender Studies led to the launch of the Journal
of Gender Studies in May 1991, now a flagship for Gender Studies at the
University of Hull. Its editorial board is
in part
drawn from
Hull
Centre
members
(Dr Clisby, Dr Alsop, Dr Jagger, Dr Gonzalez
-
Arnal, Dr Capern, for
example are all editorial board members)
and an advisory board representing
gender interests worldwide. The journal is interdisciplinary and international
,

pu
blis
hed by Routle
dge

and has a thriving international subscription list.
Special issues have covered topics such as postcolonialism, transgendering,
and the f
uture of
f
eminist
f
iction.

Sample copies and the latest contents can be
viewed at:

http://www.tand
f.co.
uk/journals/cjgs


The Suite of
Postgraduate

Degrees in Gender Studies

The Master’s Programmes in Gender Studies are innovative and highly
distinctive in that they are all interdisciplinary, enabling students to study
gender issues and theories through

the lens of social science, politics,
philosophy and literature and history.


The
MA Gender and Development and the MSc Applied Social Research
(Gender Studies) are offered at both Masters and Diploma level and are
available as one year full time or two y
ear part
-
time programmes.
The
European Dual Award MA Women’s and Gender Studies (GEMMA) is
recognised and funded through the European Commission’s Erasmus
Mundus full scholarship scheme for which both EU and non
-
EU applicants
are eligible. GEMMA is a two y
ear programme leading to two Master’s
degrees and is available for full time study only.

In
2012
-
13

we are planning to launch a new MA Equality, Diversity and the
Law which will provide specialist training in the field, for example in relation
to the requirements of the Gender Equality Duty and Human Rights Act, and
be closely linked to needs of employe
rs and those working in this growing
sector.

Students can subsequently progress their academic studies from the Masters
level onto research degrees in Gender Studies at MPhil and PhD levels with
sp
ecialist one
-
to
-
one supervision
in their research field.


6

MA

Women’s and Gender Studies (GEMMA) (360008)


Course Director
s
:

Dr Suzanne Clisby



Dr Rachel Alsop





Room 221




Room 267

Wilberforce Building


Wilberforce Building





Tel: 01482 465781



Tel

: 01482 465728





s.m.clisby@hull.ac.uk


r.alsop@hull.ac.uk


GEMMA
a
dmin
:

Claire Gregory


Dept

Postgraduate Secretary:




Room 225

(
Weds only)

Room 259




Wilberforce Building

Wilberforce

Building

Tel

: 01482 462011


Tel

: 01482 466215

gemma@hull.ac.uk












Introduction

The MA Women’s and Gender Studies (GEMMA) programme
, which was
launched in 2007

and has secured
Erasmus Mundus
funding until
2017
,

is the
newest addition to our suite of postgraduate programmes. It is also the first of
its kind worldwide
and is recognised as a ‘Masters of Excellence’ by the
European Commission. It
offers students an exciting opportunity to study
Women’s and Gend
er Studies both at the University of Hull and at one of
six

partner Universities in Europe. This is a two
-
year programme and successful
candidates graduate with a Dual Award: a Masters degree from both the
University of Hull and from the
ir chosen partner i
nstitution:

University of
Granada (Spain), University of Oviedo (Spain), University of Utrecht
(Netherlands), University of Bologna (Italy), Lödz University (Poland) and
Central European University (Budapest, Hungary).


From 2012 Rutgers
University in the
USA will
also
be joining the GEMMA Consortium.

The aim of this programme is to deliver a taught Masters programme over
two years in partnership with the University of Granada as the central
coordinating institution of the GEMMA programme

as a whole
. The MA

programme combines
a range of institutionally specific optional modules
with a set of
core modules common to each European partner. The

7

programme totals 240 credits (120 European Credit Transfer System), of
which 180 credits (90 ECTS) are taught and 60
credits (30 ECTS) are fo
r the
final extended dissertation (20,
000
-

30,000 words).


Course Content and Structure

This is an interdisciplinary programme, providing students with a theoretical
underpinning in gender studies and the opportunity to study
gender issues
from a variety of perspectives and academic disciplines. The programme
develop
s

stu
dent
s


advanced knowledge and understanding of contemporary
gender theories and substantive issues.
Students who complete the MA
Women’s and Gender Studies wil
l be able to:

(a)

command an advanced and critical knowledge of contemporary
gender theories and debates
.

(b)

critically apply an interdisciplinary approach to the study of
gender
.

(c)

demonstrate an advanced understanding of research methods
relevant to their particu
lar field of interest in women’s and gender
studies and analyse the social, ethical and political implications of
feminist research
.

The programme is structured as follows: students will spend their first year in
the ‘home’ institution
(in this case Hull U
niversity)
completing all taught core
modules (60 credits) and 60 credits of their optional modules, totalling 120
credits (60 ECTS). They then spend either one or two semesters in their
selected partner institution. They take 60 credits (30 ECTS) of optio
ns in
semester one in the partner institution and then can return to their home
institution in semester two to complete their final dissertation (60
credits/30ECTS). Alternatively they may remain at the partner institution
during semester two and complete
the dissertation there under joint
supervision between their home and mobility partners.
In a slight change to
t
he programme since 2010, scholarship
students whose partner University is
Utrecht are now required to remain in Utrecht for both semesters of th
eir final
year and complete their dissertations there.


In essence, then, this programme differs from the standard one
-
year full time
programme in two respects, it entails a second year during which time
students have the opportunity to study at a partner
institution for one or two
semesters where they complete an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) of optional
modules in semester one and the final stage 60 (30 ECTS) credit dissertation in
semester two. The languages of instruction at the partner institutions a
re
English, Spanish and Italian, depending on the chosen location. Students

8

must have
proof of
proficiency in the language of instruction. The language of
instruction at the University of Hull is English.

Thus, at Hull University:



First year students must take 120 taught credits across semesters one
and two.
In accordance with University regulations, t
he bal
ance
should be no greater than
7
0/
5
0 in each semester.
60 credits are
comprised of core modules and 60 credits of optional modu
le
choices.



Second year students take 60 cred
its of options in semester one and
undertake their final 60 credit dissertation in semester 2.



Please note 20 credits at the University of Hull equates to 10
E
uropean
C
redit
T
ransfer
S
ystem (ECTS)
. The credits
below are set
out as Hull credits not as ECTS credits.


Visas

Please remember that all students requiring visas to study are responsible for
organising their own visas. Advice on UK visas can be obtained via the
immigration section of the International Off
ice at the University of Hull
io
-
immigration@hull.ac.uk
. For mobility universities students should contact
the relevant country embassies for information on the visa process. Gaining
visas can be a lengthy process so please leave sufficient time.


GEMMA Programme Structure

Semester One

First Year Core
Modules (60 Hull credits /30 ECTS)

Code/Credit

36075

/
20

Feminist Theory: Between Difference and Diversity

36074 /
20

Feminist Methodology: Interdisciplinary Methods in Women’s


and Gender Studies

20295 /
10

Feminist Historiography

20296 /
10

Women’s
Movements Worldwide

Optional Modules
(N.B. options may be variable and subject to change

depending of staffing and availability
)

First year st
udents can choose no more than
1
0 credits in semester one or 20
credits of long thin modules.
The
semester 1

optio
ns below are thus most
relevant to second year
(mobility)

students

who choose 60 credits of options

9

in semester 1
. In certain circumstances students who wish to sit in on a
n
extra

module without taking the credits, just for
their
knowledge
enhancement, may

be permitted to do so at the discretion of the module
coordinator.


Long Thin Module (across semesters I and II)

36132

20

Indepe
ndent Gender Research

(this is based on indep
endent working
supported by workshops and
supervisory meetings across the year)



Semester One Modules

36126 /
20

Encountering Development: why gender matters


36949 /
20

Other(ed) Bodies: Anthropology of Gender and Sexual Diversity

35024 /
20

Key Issues in Identity Politics and Policies I:




diversity in a post national context

36144

/
20

The Body in Culture, Politics and Society

22167 / 20

Sex(u
ality), Gender and the Law (level 6)*


22999 /
20

Foundations of Human Rights

14222 /
20

Family Matters

(* dependent on numbers to run)

14311/20

Modern Children’s Literature

36932 /
10

Ethnographic Practice

369
39 /
10

Philosophical Issues in Applied Social Research

35702 /
10

The Research Interview

35703 /
10

Survey Methods and Questionnaire Design

49048 /
20

Postgraduate English for Academic Purposes

*Students at level 7 (Masters
) are p
ermitted to take up to 20 credits at level 6
(
3
rd

year undergraduate
)


Semester Two

Second Year students

core:
36978 / 60

Dissertation


Optional Modules
(N.B: options may be variable and subject to change)

First year students choose up to 60 credits:

Code/Credit


10

361
27

/
20

Current Perspectives on Gender and Development

3502
3

/
20

Key Issues in Identity Politics and Policies II:



cultures and practices of in/equalities

22118 /
20

Human Rights Violations

14120 /
20

Gender in Popular Culture

14121/ 20

Hystorical Fictions: Gender and Sexuality in neo
-
Victorian



Literature

14731 /
20

Research Skills, Methods and Methodologies II

36945 /
10

Explorations of Qualitative Research in Theory and Practice


36945 /
10

Central Issues in
Applied Social Research


35704 /
10

Quantitative data Analysis (must be taken with 35705)

35705 /
10

Computing with SPSS

(must be taken with 35704)



GEMMA Timetable

Week One

(commencing
Monday
2
6
th

Sept

2011
)
:


Welcome and Induction


Welcome
and lunch
meeting for all postgraduates in Social Sciences:

Monday 26
th

September
at 11.15am,
room to be confirmed
, immediately
followed by:

Welcome and induction
meeting for
Gender Studies/GEMMA

students
:
Monday 2
6
th

S
eptember 1
2
.
1
5
pm
-
2
.00pm
,
Wilberforce Building

Room

236
.

Registration:

Tuesday 2
7
th

September between 15.30 and 17.00 in Staff House


Welcome Postgraduate Dinner:
There will be an evening dinner for all
postgraduates in the department. This is scheduled for Wednesday 5
th

October following the first departmental research seminar. Further details
will be forthcoming.



11

Week Two

(commencing 4
th

October
)
: Classes begin

At the point of printing not all classes had been timetabled. Please refer to
programme coordinator or module tutor for further information. Please note
all
English modules (14***) will be timetabled after registration.

C
ode

Module Title

Day

Start

End

Location

Module
Leader

3607
5

Feminist Theory:
between
difference
and diversity


Wednesday
fortnightl
y

(Sem 1 & 2)

11.15

13.05


Alsop Dr R

20296L1/01

Women's
Movements
Worldwide


seminar
(runs every other
week alongside
Feminist
Historiography)

T
uesday

(
Sem 1)

11:15

13:05

LA
-
SR181

Capern Dr
A.L.

20295S1/01

Feminist
Historiography

seminar
(see above)

T
uesday

(Sem 1)

11:15

13:05

LA
-
SR181

Capern Dr
A.L.

36074S1/01

Feminist
Methodology:
Interdisciplinary
Methods in
Women’s & Gender
St畤i敳


周畲獤慹

⡓(m‱

ㄶ㨱1

ㄷ㨰1


-
䱒ㄸ

S敹mo畲⁄u


㌶〷㑓ㄯ〱

F敭en楳t
M整桯摯logy㨠
䥮I敲摩sci灬楮慲y
M整桯摳⁩渠
Women’s & Gender
St畤i敳

(s敥⁣潵es攠
摥dcri灴io渠n敬ew)

T
桵rs摡d

⡓(m‱


ㄶ⸱1



ㄸ⸰1

W
I
-
䱒ㄸ


㌵〲3

/


K敹⁩ss略s in

i摥湴ity⁰ 汩tics⁡湤
灯汩cies


呵敳摡d

(this time
/
place
may change)


(Sem 2)

16.15

18.05

BJ
-
SRH

Johnson
Dr
JM

Argyrou

Dr

V

350
24
L
1/01

Key issues in
i
dentity politics and
policies
I
:
diversity
in a post
-
national
context

Tuesday

(this time
/
place
may change)

(Sem 1)

1
6
:15

1
8
:05

BJ
-
SRH

Johnson

Dr

JM

Argyrou

Dr
V


12

36126
T1/01

Encountering
Development: Why
gender matters

-

Seminar

Friday

(Sem 1)

09.30

11.00

WI
-
221

Clisby Dr
SM

36
126
Scr1/01

Encountering
Development: Why
gender matters
-
Lecture and
film
screening

Friday

(Sem 1)

14:15

17:05

LA
-
LTB

Clisby Dr
SM

3
6127L1/02

Current Perspectives
on Gender and
Development

seminar

Monday


14.15

16.05

WI
-
221

Clisby Dr
SM

36949L1/01

Other(ed) Bodies:
Anthropology of
Gen
der and Sexual
Diversity

Tuesday

(Sem 1)

10.15

12.05

WI
-
227

Johnson Dr
JM

36932S1/01

Ethnographic
Practice

(runs every
other week
alongside
Philosophical Issues
below)

Thursday

(Sem 1)

10
.15

1
2
.05


Johnson Dr
JM

36939S1/01

Philosophical Issues
in Applied Social
Research (runs
every other week
alongside above)

Thursday

(Sem 1)

10.15

12.05


Argyrou Dr
V

35702S1/01

The Research
Interview

Thursday

(Sem 1)

0
9.15

10
:05

WI
-
LT28

Seymour Dr
JD

35703S1/01

Survey Methods and
Questionnaire
Design

Thursday

(Sem 1)

12
:15

1
3
:05

WI
-
L
R26

Butler Dr
RE

35953S1/01

Explorations of
Qualitative
Research
Theory and Practice

Thursday

(Sem
2)

10.15

11.15

LA
-
LTE

Butler Dr I

35704
S2

Quantitative Data
Analysis (taken
alongside 35705 as
joined module)

Thursday

(Sem
2)

09.15

10
.05

Co
-
LT
2

Butler

Dr
RE

35705
S2

Computing with
SPSS (taken
Thursday

(Sem 2)

12
.15

13
.05

FO
-
WestC

Butler
Dr
RE


13

alongside 35704
above)

36
14
4S
1/01

The Body in Culture,
Politics and Society

Monday

(Sem 1)

15.15

17.05

CO
-
LT1

Drake Dr M

36945S1/01

Central Issues in
Applied Social
Research

Thursday

(Sem 2)

11.15

12.05

WS
-
SR2

Seymour
Dr
JD

22999S1/01

Foundations of
Human Rights

Thursday

(Sem 1)

16
:15

18
:05

BJ
-
TR
9

Quirk, Dr J

22167S1/01

Sex(uality), Gender
and the Law

Seminars 1 & 2
(choose one group)

Monday

or

Friday

10
:15


12.15

12
:05


14.05

LO
-
SR710


WI
-
LR22

Harrison Dr
K,Clucas

Dr
RJ,Ward Dr
T

49048T1/01

Postgraduate
English for
Academic Purposes

(up to 3 students
permitted, need
IELTS 6.5 or
equivalent)

It is yet to be
confirmed that this
module will be
offered

Monday

9:15

12:05

FR
-
324

Dobson
Ms.K





14

MA Women’s and Gender Studies (GEMMA) Quality and Standards
Framework

1.

Student Progression


1.1

The regulations of the teaching institutions at which GEMMA
students are physically located apply even though those regulations
may differ between institutions.

1.2

Students progress through three stages: certificate, diploma and
dissertation stage. Students must satisfy the progression requirements
of each stage in order to progress to the next. These requirements may
vary between institutions and students must famil
iarize themselves
with the regulations of
both

their home and mobility institutions.
GEMMA Coordinators have a duty to ensure students have access to
the relevant information at their institutions.

1.3

Failure to satisfy progression requirements of the teachin
g institution
means the candidate is not entitled to progress on the double award
but may be eligible for a single award of one of the other institutions.
Any concerns with regards candidates’ satisfactory progression will be
presented to the Joint Board o
f Studies.

1.4

Unfair means: students are subject to the unfair means and plagiarism
regulations of the institutions they are located at. Records of
allegations of unfair means and/or plagiarism against a GEMMA
candidate must be presented to the Joint Board o
f Studies (GEMMA).

1.5

No institution will award either of the dual awards until the candidate
has satisfied the requirements of
both

awards. This will be reviewed
and confirmed at the Joint Board of Studies.

1.6

Classification of degrees: the conversion and comp
arability of degrees
across partner institutions is outlined in the Diploma Supplement.

2.

Language of assessment and study

2.1

The language of study and assessment may be Italian, Spanish or
English according to the language of study of the institution
the
candidate is located, and where the credit will be awarded.


3.

Boards of examiners

3.1

Each teaching institution will be responsible for holding a board of
examiners in accordance with its own framework. It is desirable for

15

members of other institutions
to be represented at and involved with
other boards as a way of promoting consideration of the comparability
of academic standards.

3.2

Assessments taken at each institution will be examined in accordance
with the regulations for boards of examiners at t
he awa
rding
institution. (n.b. a
t the University of Hull there is an appointed external
examiner who has oversight of assessments and is present at the exam
boards). Assessment grades, transcripts and relevant reports will be
shared at the Joint Board of Studies

(GEMMA).

3.3

Dissertations will be primarily supervised by nominated staff at the
institution awarding the credit but a second supervisor from the
candidate’s partner (either home or mobility) university will liaise with
both the first supervisor and the cand
idate and present their report on
the dissertation to the first supervisor and board of examiners. Reports
on dissertations should not normally exceed one side of A4.
Dissertation reports will be shared with the Joint Board of Studies
(GEMMA)

Samples of di
ssertations with the recommended grades and examiners
reports can be requested by board of examiners at either the home or
mobility university regardless of which partner institution was
awarding the credit. Nevertheless the board of examiners at the
partn
er university not awarding the credits cannot over ride the final
decision of the awarding institution.

4.

Transcripts and certificates

4.1

The responsibility for producing and issuing clear transcripts of grades
and final degree certificates lies with the
awarding institutions. The
final degree certificates should indicate that this is a dual award in
partnership with ‘X’ institution. This demonstrates mutual recognition
of the dual award.


5.

Pro
gramme approval, monitoring and review

5.1

While responsibility f
or each programme rests with the teaching
institution, the GEMMA consortium and Joint Board of Studies shares
ownership of the ‘package of programmes’ capable of resulting in a
dual award.


16

5.2

Facilitated through the Joint Board of Studies, there will be a pro
cess of
monitoring and review shared across the partners, informed by
individual processes of review at the home/awarding institution.

5.3

The Joint Board of Studies will facilitate cross institution consideration
(especially in terms of considering comparabil
ity of standards,
comparability of the learning experience, and strengthening further the
partnerships between institutions)

5.4

The programme is subject to review by the University of Hull as part of
its ongoing programme of periodic review.


6.

Appeals and c
omplaints

6.1

Candidates will be subject to the rights afforded under the regulations
of the home institution.

6.2

The Joint Board of Studies must consider the variability and
comparability of appeals and complaints regulations across the
Consortium.

6.3

Any
contractual relationship is between the student and the teaching
institution and therefore subject to the law of the jurisdiction in which
that institution operates.


7.

Student experience

7.1

Students will be treated in accordance with th
e regulations and
pro
cedures of

their teaching institution. They have access to all the
facilities afforded to postgraduate students at their teaching institution,
including the facilities in place to support students with specific needs
and disabilities.

7.2

Students have the ri
ght to a process of induction and supervision at
their teaching institution but these processes may vary between
institutions.






17

Module Specifications


Core Modules


3607
5
: Feminist

Theory: Between Difference and Diversity

Semester 1

Module Level 7

Credits 20

European Credit Transfer Scheme 10

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Aims and Distinctive Features

This module aims to introduce students to key debates and concepts within
gender theory. The
module explores different ways in which the social
construction of gender has been theorised.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Learning Outcomes

The module has the following Learning Outcomes:

1: Explore fe
minist traditions of thought about concepts of equality,
difference, diversity and gender

2: Understand key debates within feminist and gender theory and will be able
to engage critically with various social constructionist approaches to
femininities, mas
culinities, gender and sexuality.

3: Demonstrate an appreciation of the movement from feminist theories to
gender theories and of the transition from notions of sexual difference to
theories of multi
-
cultural and multi
-
ethnic diversity.

-----------------
---------------------------------------------------------------

Learning and Teaching Strategies

The module will be taught in 11 x 2 hour sem
inars in semester one and 11 x 2

hour tutorials in semester two.


-------------------------------------------------
-------------------------------

Assessment Strategies

The following assessment strategies are used within this module:

Students submit 2 x 2500 word essays (each 40% of the overall mark)

Each student gives two 20

minute presentations
followed by a
presentation
report (1000
-
1500 words) which provides details of the presentation and
reflects on the p
ost
-
presentation discussion.
(20% of the overall mark)
.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Indicative
Content

The module will include the
some of the
following topics:



Introduction to feminist theory



Naturalising debates: introducing the sex
-
gender distinction



Feminism and Psychoanalysis


18



Foucault and discourses of gender



Gender and sexuality



The social con
struction of masculinities



Liberal feminism and The First Wave: historical perspectives



Socialist and Radical feminisms and The Second Wave: 1970s
feminisms



Debates about difference



Feminism and postcoloniality

---------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------

Staffing

Dr
Rachel Alsop
, Dr Suzanne Clisby, Dr Mark Johnson, Dr Gill Jagger.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Recommended Reading

Alsop, R. A. Fitzsimons and K. Lennon (
2002) Theorizing Gender, Polity,
Cambridge

Andersen, M (1993) Thinking about Women: Sociological Perspectives on Sex
and Gender, McMillan, London.

Connel, R. (2002) Gender, Polity, Cambridge

Jaggar, A.M (1983) Feminist Politics and Human Nature, Rowman and

Littlefield, London.

Kimmel, M. (2004) The Gendered Society, Oxford University Press, Oxford

Tong, R (1989) Feminist Thought: A Comprehensive Introduction, Unwin
Hyman, London


36074
: Feminist Methodology: Interdisciplinary Methods in Women's and
Gender
Studies

Semester 1

Module Level 7

Credits 20

European Credit Transfer Scheme 10

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Aims and Distinctive Features

The module will enable students to gain an understanding of the key
methodological debates within women's and gender studies. It will assess the
use and applicability of quantitative and qualitative methods to the
investigation of gender divisions and divi
sions among women. The module
will explore the methodological issues of power in the research process,
fieldwork relationships, researcher self
-
reflexivity and research ethics. It will
also include a consideration of 'what' and 'who' are appropriate topics

for
feminist research. Diversity, difference and intersectionality between women
and men on the basis of integrated axes such as gender, class, ethnicity,
sexuality and generation and their effects of inclusion and exclusion form an
underlying tool for un
derstandings of research methods. Epistemological
approaches associated with standpoint theory and situated knowledge are
explored as well as the praxis of feminist research. The module will also
explore discourse and narrative analyses and the use of web,

bibliographical
and documentary searches as research tools.


19

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Learning Outcomes

The module has the following Learning Outcomes:

1: Understanding of relationship between theo
ry, methodology, technique
and policy making.

2: Appreciation of the variety of methodological and theoretical techniques
and viewpoints relating to gender and the implications this has for the
research process

3: Ability to evaluate techniques of social

research in social sciences and to
appreciate the role of epistemology in the research process.

4: Appreciation of theoretical, practical and ethical issues relating to a
critical/emancipatory paradigm of research.

5: Ability to critically select approp
riate research techniques to apply to
empirical enquiries regarding gender

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Learning and Teaching Strategies

The module will be taught in a combination of seminars and small g
roup
discussions on a weekly basis over 10 weeks.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Assessment Strategies

The following assessment strategies are used within this module:

O
ne 3000 word essay 60%

O
ne 2000 word evaluation of a feminist research study (independent project)
40%

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Module Constraints

Concurrent modules: This module will be run concurrently with Research
Skill
s, Methods, Methodologies I (
1
4730
). Students will be required to attend 5
seminars from this module in addition to and as an integral part of this core
Feminist Methodology module.
Students also attend all of the Feminist
Research methods sessions with Dr

Julie Seymour.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Indicative Content



The module will include the following topics:



An introduction to research methods, with an introduction to the
university archive (Prof. An
n Heilmann and Judy Burg, University
Archivist)



An introduction to feminist methodology. Does a feminist
methodology exist?



Identifying and accessing (electronic) resources in Libraries and
Archives (with Prof. Ann Heilmann and David Pennie, University
Lib
rary)



A consideration of the use of the following techniques in feminist
research: surveys and questionnaires; secondary data analysis;
interviews; ethnography; documentary analysis; referencing and
stylesheets; auto/biography; discourse analysis; narrativ
e and textual
analysis; media representation and visual data


20



Diversity amongst women and its implications for research



Does postmodern theory present a problem for empirical research?



Reflexivity and power: examining relationships in the research process



E
thical issues in feminist research

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Staffing

Dr JD Seymour
and
Dr B
Jones

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Recommended Reading

Griffin, G. (ed.) (2005) Research Methods for English Studies, Edinburgh
University Press

Letherby, G. (2003) Feminist Research in Theory and Practice, Open
University Press

Oakley, A. (2000) Experiments in Knowing: Gender and Method in the Social
Sciences

O'Connell Davidson, J. and Layder, D. (1994) Methods, Sex and Madness,
Routledge

Stanley, L. and Wise, S. (1993) Breaking Out Again: Feminist Ontology and
Epistemology, Routledge



20295
: Feminist Historiography

Semester 1

Module Level 7

Credits 10

European Credit Transfer Scheme 5

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Aims and Distinctive Features

It aims to familiarise students with the history of feminist texts and traditions
of feminist thought, highlig
hting issues that are central to feminist theory. The
module explores the relevance of feminist texts in terms of their critique of
culture and politics and the attempts of feminist scholars, past and present, to
produce

a feminist canon with a histori
ogra
phical and critical tradition of its
own.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Learning Outcomes

The module has the following Learning Outcomes:

1: demonstrate understanding and knowledge of the origins and trad
itions of
feminist thought;

2: contextualise key historical feminist texts and their relevance to modern
feminist thinking;


21

3: demonstrate critical awareness of some of the processes of feminist canon
formation and justify their decisions about what key texts to include in the
feminist canon.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Lear
ning and Teaching Strategies

The module will be taught in 5 x 2 hours seminars in alternate weeks with
additional independent study

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Assessment Strategies

The following assess
ment strategies are used within this module:

Essay assignment (3,000 words) (100%)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Module Constraints

Concurrent modules: Women's Movements Worldwide

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Indicative Content



Origins of feminist writing and thinking



'First' and 'second' and 'third' wave feminism



Key texts in modern feminist historiography I



Canon formation and hi
storiography

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Staffing

Dr AL Capern


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Recommended Reading

Kolmer, Wendy & Barthowski, Frances
(2005),
Feminist Theory

Morgan, Sue (2006),
The Feminist Reader



20296
: Women's Movements Worldwide

Semester 1

Module Level 7

Credits 10

European Credit Transfer Scheme 5

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Aims and Distinctive Features

The module aims to introduce students to important events and texts in the
history of women's communities and movements worldwide and through
time. This course will offer a framework for developing answers to the
following que
stions: can we speak of feminism before the term emerged in
the late 19th Century? Why is feminism often depicted as a Western
phenomenon? What are 'women's movements' and are they by definition

22

feminist? What roles have social phenomena like religion and
political
ideologies played in women's movements?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Learning Outcomes

The module has the following Learning Outcomes:

1: Understanding of the history of women's communities and movements;

2: Understanding of the framing ideologies of women's movements over time
and place;

3: Appreciation of the variety of standpoints of different feminisms in
historical context;

4: Abi
lity to evaluate the impact of feminism and women's movements
(especially suffrage movements) on historical events and political change.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Learning and Teaching Strategies

The
module will be taught in 5 x 2 hours seminars in alternate weeks with
additional independent study and individual tutor
-
student tutorials.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Assessment Strategies

The following

assessment strategies are used within this module:

Student
-
led seminar (collaborative) and submitted seminar report (500 words)
(25%)

Independent report (2,500 words) (75%)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Module Constraints

Concurrent modules: Feminist Historiography

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Indicative Content



Introducing the history of women's history in international perspective



Introduction to the
history of feminist thinking and ideas



Exploration of women's movements in international context



Examination of the role of religion and political ideologies in women's
movements



Case study: Europe, America or Australasia

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Staffing

Dr AL Capern

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Recommended Reading

Anthrobus, Peggy (2004),
The Global Women’s
Movement

Smith, Bonnie (2000),
Global feminism since 1945




23

36970
:

Dissertation (2
nd

Semester, 2
nd

Year students only)

The MA Thesis is crucial and a required part of the GEMMA Programme. It
should build on the knowledge and skills acquired, and show that the student
is capable of original, independent research. It takes the form of a research
report or treatise, written i
ndividually, from a feminist/gender perspective, on
a relevant subject chosen by the student and agreed with the supervisor.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Credits:

60 (European Credit Transfer Scheme
-

30
)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Length:
20,000
-
30,000 words.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject
: Relevant to Women’s Studies, and original, showing a n
ew insight
into the matter. Clearly formulated, with a theoretical framework and a valid
conclusion with theoretical support.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Languages:
The Institution awarding the credits f
or the Master Thesis will
decide upon the language in which the Thesis should be written. At any rate,
it should be one of the three official languages of the Consortium (English,
Italian, Spanish).

---------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------

Suggested structure of contents:

(optional sections marked with asterisks; final structure to be discussed with
supervisor)



[Cover page, Title page, Abstracts, *Acknowledgements]



Table of contents



Introduction / Review of previous w
ork



Theoretical / Methodological chapter



Core of thesis (results / discussion), divided into chapters and *sub
-
sections



Conclusions



Works Cited



*Appendix / appendices

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Registration
:

The thesis will be registered following procedures of the university of
submission, by the beginning of the fourth semester.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Supervision:

The institution award
ing the credits, via the local GEMMA Coordinator, will
allocate a
main supervisor
, attending to criteria of relevance to subject,
availability of staff, and student choice. The other partner institution involved
(home/mobility), via its GEMMA coordinator,
will assign a support

24

supervisor. Both will be allocated by the second week of the 4
th

semester at
the latest.

The thesis will be supervised primarily by the main supervisor, who will
follow the procedures of her institution. Contact with the student will
include
at least a preliminary research design meeting and two progress interviews
before the final draft.

The support supervisor will approve of the research design at the beginning
of the fourth semester and final draft before the submission of thesis.

Prior to the submission of the thesis, both supervisors will write a final report
(500 words maximum) to be submitted to the board of examiners nominated
by the awarding institution.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------
-------

Submission and assessment
:

Theses should be submitted and defended (if applicable) following the
procedures and dates of the awarding institution, and always before 30
September. Consortium universities may establish provisions for the
extension o
f this date according to their own rules and regulations. When
needed, Consortium universities will establish an earlier submission date so
that beneficiaries of the Erasmus Mundus scholarship can comply with the 24
months’ duration of such scholarship.

--
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The
assessment

will be carried out by a board of examiners nominated by the
awarding institution, and will include the participation of the support
supervisor (or another member

of staff from the partner institution), either in
the viva/defence or by means of a written report. Evaluation criteria will be
made public in advance and the ECTS grading system will be used.

--------------------------------------------------------------
------------------

For general details on the preparation and submission of dissertations at the
University of Hull please see the university’s postgraduate handbook or


http://www2.hull.ac.uk/student/studenthandbook/postgraduatetaughtstuden
ts/dissertation
.aspx




25

Options

Please note that all module outlines can be found at:
www.courses.hull.ac.uk

Long Thin Modules

(running across semesters one and two)


36132
: Independent Gender Research

Semesters

1 and 2

Module Level 7

Credits 20

European Credit Transfer Scheme 10

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Module Rationale

This module aims to develop student's scope for independent learning

and
library
-
based research.

-------------------------
-------------------------------------------------------

Aims and Distinctive Features

This module aims to e
nhance students
understanding of the ways in which
feminism has engaged with and transformed a particular area of knowledge
.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Learning Outcomes

The module has the following Learning Outcomes:

1: To reflect critically on the impact of feminist ideas on academic
knowledge.

2: To work independently.

3: To use library resources to conduct research.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Learning and Teaching Strategies

The following learning and teaching strategies are used within this module:

The module runs

over 2 semester
s and consists of 2

x

1
-
hour workshops

plus
individual meetings
arranged with the appointed Gender Studies

supervisor
as necessary.

One introductory session takes place at the beginning of semester 1,
followed
by
a progress session at the
beginning of seme
ster 2
.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Assessment Strategies

The following assessment strategies are used within this module:

In semester 1 students submit a project outline (up to 1000 w
ords) detailing
their chosen area of study; key questions; and research strategy (10% of total
mark).

Students submit a 4000 word report detailing the impact of feminist thought

26

on their chosen area of study plus a
n extended annotated bibliograph
y (90%
of
the total mark).

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Arrangements for Revision and Private Study

Independent learning is central to this module. Students undertake
independent library
-
based research exploring th
e impact of feminist thought
on a particular study area.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Staffing

Dr R Alsop
& Dr S Clisby


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Recommended Reading

Specific to individual students


Semester One Options

36126
: Encountering Development: Why Gender Matters

Semester 1

Module Level 7

Credits 20

European Credit Transfer Scheme 10

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Aims and Distinctive Features

This module aims to introduce students to current theoretical and substantive
development issues, paying special attention the analysis of gender

within the
context of development. The first part of the module equips students with
relevant conceptual and methodological tools which are then applied to a
range of substantive issues, examined through the lens of gender. Issues
examined include the nat
ure of poverty, work, households and the gendered
divisions of labour, industrialisation, environmental management and the
gendered analysis of development planning.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Learning
Outcomes

The module has the following Learning Outcomes:

Students will be in a position to critique and construct project proposals
within the field of development AND are sensitised to a range of perspectives
relevant to policy dimensions of governments
and non
-
governmental
agencies in developing countries AND develop understanding of both
historical trends and current development theories and approaches, with
emphasis being placed on deeper explorations of gender analyses of
development.

---------------
-----------------------------------------------------------------

Learning and Teaching Strategies

Weekly lectures
, films

and seminar discussions over 11 weeks.


27

Through a combination of lectures, films, seminar discussions and
presentations, the students
are able to gain an holistic introductory
perspective of gender and development issues pertaining to the above
learning outcomes

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Assessment Strategies

The following assessment strategies are used within this module:

One essay of 2500 words

The essay requires knowledge of a range of both theoretical and substantive
issues covered throughout the module.

One written assignment of 2500 words.

The written

assignment requires the students to critically analyse
development planning initiatives and produce a development project
proposal based on case study material.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Indicative C
ontent

1.
Introduction to development: poverty and livelihoods in the developing


world.

2.

Approaches to Development: classical and radical approaches

3.

The World Bank, IMF and structural adjustment policies

4.

Gender analysis in development and development planning: theoretical



approaches

5.

Why gender matters in development.

6.

Work, households and the gendered divisions of labour

7.

Gender dimensions in rural change

8
.

Gender, employment & indu
strialisation

9
.

Environment, sustainability, gender and development: issues and practice.

10
. Environmentalisms and gender analyses: theoretical approaches.

11
. Gender & development: summary case
-
study
-

project planning exercise

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Staffing

Dr SM Clisby

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Recommended Reading

The reading list for this module is available fro
m Dr Clisby upon registration
for this module.

Introductory and key texts:

Key text: Henshall Momsen: Gender and Development (Routledge, 2004
(first ed.) and 2010 (second ed.))

Allen & Thomas (eds): Poverty and Development into the 21st Century
(O.U.Press,

2000)

Rai: Gender and the Political Economy of Development (Polity Press, 2002)


28


36949
: Other(ed) Bodies: Anthropology of Gender and Sexual Diversity

Semester 1

Module Level 7

Credits 20

European Credit Transfer Scheme 10

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Aims and Distinctive Features

The aim of this module is to introduce students to a range of critical and
cross
-
cultural perspectives on sexual diversity and gender variance. D
etailed
ethnographic case studies (including film) will be used to explore and engage
recent theoretical discussions of identity, sexuality and gender
transformation
.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Assessme
nt Strategies

The following assessment strategies are used within this module:

1 x 1000 word essay/presentation (25%)

1 x 4000 word essay (75%)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Indicative Content

Lectures:



Introduction and Overview



Ritualized Same
-
Sex Sexuality in Melanesia I



Ritualized Same
-
Sex Sexuality in Melanesia II



'Third Sex'/'Third Gender': Debating the Native American Two
-
Spirit II



Gender is Burning or Camping it up in America I



Gender is Burning o
r Camping it up in America II



Global Desirings and Translocal Loves I



Global Desirings and Translocal Loves II



Diverse Relations: Re
-
Writing Kinship

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Staffing

Dr JM Johnson



35024
: Key issues in identity politics and policies: diversity in a post
-
national context

Semester 1

Module Level 7

Credits 20



European Credit Transfer Scheme 10

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


29

Module
Rationale

Introduces students to:

1. K
ey theoretical debates surrounding issues of cultural differences and in
equalities in local and global (post
-
national) contexts.

2. The main political movements reflected in, and fostered by these debates.

3. The
ways in which these debates come to bear on issues of social policy and
provision.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Aims and Distinctive Features

The module is interdisciplinary and focuses on issues of cultu
ral difference,
focused in particular on postcolonialism, multiculturalism and migration. Its
aim is to bring theoretical perspectives to bear directly on social policy issues
and examine how policy concerns i
nform theoretical perspectives.

---------------
-----------------------------------------------------------------

Learning Outcomes

The
se

module
s have

the following Learning Outcomes:

1: the key theoretical debates surrounding issues of cultural differences and
inequalities in local and global (post
-
na
tional) contexts.

2: the main political movements reflected in, and fostered by these debates.

3: the ways in which these debates come to bear on issues of social policy and
provision.

--------------------------------------------------------------------
------------

Learning and Teaching Strategies

The following learning and teachin
g strategies are used within the
s
e

module
s
:

35023 20

x 2 hour seminars
& 35024 10 x 2 hour sessions

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----

Assessment Strategies

The following assessmen
t strategies are used within the
s
e

module
s
:

35023

1 x 1500 word seminar paper and presentation 12%

1 x 3000 word assignment 35%

1 x 500 word essay
-

proposal and presentation 3%

1 x 5000 word essay 50%


35024

1 x 3000 word essay (70%)

1 x 1500 word essay (25%)

1 x essay proposal and presentation (5%)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Indicative Content

What do we mean by identity po
litics? The shape of identity politics, past and
present, in relation to such issues as postcoloniality, gender, age, sexuality,

30

disability, race and ethnicity. The interplay between policy and politics
around such issues.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Staffing

Dr V Argyrou

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Recommended Reading

B Parekh, Rethinking Multiculturalism: Cultural Div
ersity and Political
Theory Palgrave/Macmillan(2000)

I M Young, Justics and the Politics of Difference Princenton University
Press(1990)

M Lloyd, Beyond Identity Politics: Feminism, Power and Politics Sage(2005)

S Benhabib, The Rights of Others: Aliens
, Residents, and Citizens Cambridge
University Press(2004)

W Kymlicka, Politics in the Vernacular: Naionalism, Multiculturalism and
Citizenship Oxford University Press

(2001)



3
6144
:
The Body in Culture, Politics and Society

Semester 1

Module Level 7

Credits 20

European Credit Transfer Scheme 10

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Module Rationale

This interdisciplinary module is presented as an option for students on the
MA in Women's and Gender Studies
(GEMMA) as a bespoke postgraduate
module to substitute for the offer of the undergraduate module Social Bodies
on that programme. The new module is designed to also be offered on the
MA in Popular Culture and the MA in Diversity Culture and Identity within

the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Aims and Distinctive Features

The module engages with interdisciplinary work on the body as a medium
and the embodied subject in polit
ics, culture and society, working through
cultural and historical comparative studies which develop the work of a
range of theorists such as Mauss, Freud, Foucault, Elias, Sennett, Arendt.

------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------

Learning Outcomes

The module has the following Learning Outcomes:


31



1: How recognition of embodiment transforms theoretical debates
surrounding issues of cultural differences and inequalities in local
and global (post
-
national) contexts (MA 3
58359)



2: How political movements and policy operate both upon and through
the medium of the body (MA 358359)



3: How recognition of embodiment in the study of politics, culture and
society invokes questions of gender



4: The module attends particularly
to changes in the understanding
and representation of the body and how these are related to
transformations in power, knowledge and media, through a range of
textual forms (eg novels, film, public performance, images in
manuals, posters, advertising) (MA 8
80017).

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Learning and Teaching Strategies

The following learning and teaching strategies are used within this module:

The module will be delivered through 2
-
hour weekly sessi
ons, including the
option to attend weekly lectures delivered for the undergraduate module
36008 Social Bodies, but with separate seminars, module assessment and
reading list
.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-

Assessment Strategies

The following assessment strategies are used within this module:



1 X 4,000
-
5,000 word essay.

Reassessment will take the same form as the initial assessment for this
module.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Indicative Content

-

The body of culture
-

the essential constructedness of the body in
everyday life, through comparative studies engaging also with the mode of
representatio
n.

-

Anomalous bodies, social order and social control

-

Manners, formalisation, and infomalisation in social life and cultural
representation

-

The body as object and subject of power, surveillance and normalisation


32

-

The body politic
-

the body of
political community (eg. city, nation,
civilization) and its representation in a range of media forms and policy
contexts, in relation to power

-

Racialisation of bodies in scientific representation, culture and politics

-

Sexuation of bodies in scientific

representation, culture and politics

-

The question of technology and the body

-

Modified bodies
-

the future of humanity or posthuman futures?

-

Death, dying and the dead

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Staffing

Dr
MS Drake lecturer


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Recommended Reading

Petersen, A. The Body in Question: A Socio
-
Cultural Approach (Routledge
2007)

Shilling, C. The Body in Culture, Technology and Society (Sage 2005)

Blackman, L. The Body (Berg 2008)

Falk, P. The Consuming Body (Sage 1994)

Miglietti, F.A. Extreme Bodies: The Use and Abuse of the Body in Art (Skira
2
003)

Thomas, H. & Ahmed, J. Cultural Bodies (Routledge 2003)

Thomas, H. The Body, Dance and Cultural

Theory (Palgrave 2003)

Balsamo, A. Technologies of the Gendered Body (Duke University Press 1997)

Sennett, R. Flesh and Stone: The Body and the City in
Western Civilisation
(1994)

Bordo, S. Unbearable Weight:

Feminism, Western Culture and the Body
(2003)

Arthurs, J. & Grimshawm, J. Women's Bodies: Cultural Representation and
Identity (1999)

Juvin, H. The Coming of the Body (2010)


Module Level

Level 7

Na
ture of Study

Taught Programme

Credits

20

European Credit Transfer Scheme

10

Probable Attendance

10


33

Location

Hull Campus

This module is not available as a


This module is available as a postgraduate training module

This module is availablhange

students

14311:
Modern Children’s Literature

Semester 1


Module Level 7

Credits 20

European Credit Transfer Scheme 10



1.1.1

Module Rationale

This is an addition to the MA Nineteenth
-
Century studies programme, which
is also available to English MA programmes in Creative Writing, English
Literature, Women, Gender and Literature, or Modern and Contemporary
Literature. This is now offered as a modu
le in the MA in Nineteenth
-
Century
Studies, but is open to students from other MA programmes in the
department. It follows on from the English undergraduate module, 'Classics
of British Children's Literature'.



1.1.2

Aims and Distinctive Features

The module a
ims both to consider developments in children's literature
through the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and to explore different
critical approaches to a set of recommended texts. These will be arranged
around core categories, such as 'social reali
sm', 'the school story,' 'the
children's adventure story,' 'fantasy writing' and 'children's poetry.'



1.1.3

Learning Outcomes


The module has the following Learning Outcomes:



1: Identify the most influential and enduring trends in late 19th and
20th century
writing for children



2: Relate these trends to (mainly British) social and cultural
developments.



3: Evaluate a range of critical approaches to the study of children's
literature.



4: Demonstrate the ability to engage in extensive research and organize
t
his research into a coherent and structured essay.


34



1.1.4

Learning and Teaching Strategies

The following learning and teaching strategies are used within this module:



10 two hour seminars (weekly), mostly led by student presentations
followed by informal discussion and close reading of texts.



1.1.5

Assessment Strategies

The following assessment strategies are used within this module:



1) An analysis of a passage chosen by

the student from a children's
book, which addresses the ambiguities of the genre in terms of
addressee and 'voice' (2000 words)



2) An essay on two texts or more, chosen from a set of questions set by
the tutor (3000 words)



1.1.6

Reassessment Strategy

As ab
ove



1.1.7

Arrangements for Revision and Private Study

No special arrangements will be needed: MA programmes assume long
periods of private study



1.1.8

Module Constraints

No pre/post
-
requisite requirements have been recorded for this module.



1.1.9

Indicative Content

Week 1: Introduction: themes, issues, critical approaches

Week 2: Animal Stories: a declining trend? From Beatrix Potter to Watership
Down

Week 3: The rise of the school story: from Tom Brown and Billy Bunter to
Harry Potter

Week 4: Social Realism from Th
e Family from One End Street to Anne Fine

Week 5: Children's Poetry post
-
Lear: from Hilaire Belloc to Michael Rosen

Week 6: Richmal Crompton's Just William: the classic child hero?


35

Week 7: Adventure Stories: Arthur Ransome and Enid Blyton

Week 8: Domestic

Fantasy : Mary Norton's The Borrowers; Tom's Midnight
Garden

Week 9: The comic fantasy from Dr Seuss to Roald Dahl

Week 10: Global Fantasy: Tolkien and Pullman



1.1.10

Staffing

Prof VR Sanders

Co
-
ordinator



1.1.11

Recommended Reading

Avery, Gillian, and
Julia Briggs, Children and Their Books (Oxford, 1989)

Bratton, J S, The Impact of Children's Fiction (Croom Helm,1981)

Brown, Penny, The Captured World: The Child and Nineteenth
-
Century
Women's Writing in England (Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1993)

Butler, Charle
s (ed), Teaching Children's Fiction (Palgrave Macmillan 2006)

Carpenter, Humphrey, Secret Gardens (Allen and Unwin, 1985)

Carpenter, Humphrey and Mari Prichard, The Oxford Companion to
Children's Literature (OUP 1984)

Cosslett, Tess, Talking Animals in Bri
tish Children's Literature 1786
-
1914
(Ashgate 2006)

Coveney, Peter, The Image of Childhood (Penguin, 1967)

Dusinberre, Juliet, Alice to the Lighthouse: Children's Books and Radical
Experiments in Art (Macmillan, 1987)

Hunt, Peter, An Introduction to Childr
en's Literature (OUP, 1994)

Hunt, Peter, Criticism, Theory, & Children's Literature (Blackwell 1991)

Hunt, Peter, Understanding Children's Literature (Routledge, 1999)

Jackson, Mary V, Engines of Instruction, Mischief and Magic (Scolar Press,
1989)

Jackso
n, Rosemary, Fantasy: The Literature of Subversion (Methuen, 1981)

Knoepflmacher, U C. Ventures into Childland: Victorians, Fairy Tales, and
Fantasy (University of Chicago Press, 1998)

Lurie, Alison, Boys and Girls Forever: Children's Classics from Cindere
lla to
Harry Potter (Penguin 2003)

Lurie, Alison, Don't Tell the Grown
-
Ups (Bloomsbury, 1990)

Nelson, Claudia, Boys will be Girls: The Feminine Ethic and British Children's
Fiction, 1857
-
1917 (Rutgers UP, 1991)

Nikolajeva, Maria, Children's Literature Come
s Of Age: Toward a new
Aesthetics (Garland,1996)

Nikolajeva, Maria, Introduction to the Theory of Children's Literature
(Tallinn, 1996)

Nodelman, Perry, The Pleasures of Children's Literature (Longman, 1996)

Prickett, Stephen, Victorian Fantasy (Harvester,

1979)

Rose, Jacqueline, The Case of Peter Pan (Macmillan, 1984, revised 1992)

Simons, Judy and Shirley Foster, What Katy Read: Feminist re
-
readings of
'classic' stories for girls (Macmillan, 1995)

Stephens, John, Language and Ideology in Children's Ficti
on (Longman, 1992)

Thacker, Deborah Cogan, and Jean Webb, Introducing Children's Literature:
from Romanticism to Postmodernism (Routledge 2002)

Thwaite, Mary F., From Primer to Pleasure in Reading (1972)

Tucker, Nicholas, The Child and the Book (Cambridge
UP,1981)

Tucker, Nicholas (ed), Suitable for Children? (1976)


36

Wullschläger, Jackie Inventing Wonderland (Methuen1995)

Zipes, Jack, Breaking the Magic Spell: Radical Theories of Folk and Fairy Tales
(1979)

Zipes, Jack, Sticks and Stones: The Troublesome Suc
cess of Children's
Literature… (Routledge 2002)



22167
: Sex(uality), Gender and the Law

Semester 1

Module Level 6
(MA students are permitted to take up to 20 credits at
undergraduate level 7)

Credits 20

European Credit Transfer Scheme 10

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Module Rationale

The module reflects existing and emerging research interests of the team,
specifically: Tony Ward's research focus on evidence in cases of child sex
abuse and

rape;
Rob

Clucas' interest in
sexuality, gender and the law and the
intersection with religion
, and
Karen Harrison
's work
on paedophilia
.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Aims and Distinctive Features

This m
odule has the distinctive aim of contextualising modern questions of
sex, sexuality and gender against the background of a society and legal
system which has its roots in Judaeo
-
Christian norms. Questions of how we
live our lives well are popularly seen as

issues of personal morality and state
interest. This law module's consideration of sex, sexuality and gender in our
society
-

topics of live contemporary debate within Christianity
--

gives
appropriate attention to the two principal institutions which hav
e had and
still have primary jurisdiction over the ordering of our lives: the Christian
religion and law.

One of the next steps identified by Jeremy Clines in Faiths in Higher
Education Chaplaincy (a report commissioned by the Church of England
Board of Ed
ucation, 2008) is to consider whether there are ways of "including
'social, cultural, moral and spiritual development' topics in the curriculum in
a way that would help members of an academic community to develop a
sophistication of discourse in addressing

religion and belief issues" (at p. 119).
This module, integrating historical and contemporary questions of law,
religion and ethics, might be seen as a contribution towards that goal.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
---------

Learning Outcomes

The module has the following Learning Outcomes:


1.

Appreciate the role of law and religion/the Christian church within
society, within historical and contemporary contexts;


37

2.

Extract information from some of the relevant primary t
exts studied on
the course.

3.

Read complex primary and secondary materials and summarise the
key arguments;

4.

Communicate arguments and ideas effectively.

5.

Identify some concepts and debates in the areas of sex, sexuality and
gender;

6.

Show an elementary awar
eness of how these issues relate to and differ
from one another;

7.

Describe in basic terms one or more of the central positions taught on
the course.

8.

Recognise at least one theory or ethical standpoint that has some
application to a problem raised;

9.

Attemp
t to apply knowledge of one or more theory or ethical
standpoint to a particular problem;

10.

Acknowledge the relationship of theoretical and ethical arguments to
some recurring legal and religious problems.

11.

Recognise and discuss at a basic level some areas
of theoretical and
conceptual debate about law and religion in the context of sex,
sexuality and gender;

12.

Develop an opinion upon issues in this course that draws to some
extent upon approaches and ideas studied.


------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------

Seminars, 2
-
hour, x 10

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Assessment Strategies


1 x 5000 word essay

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Indicative Content

1. Introduction: legal norms and social challenges

2. History and context: sex and sexuality (including celibacy) and the
Christian church; The criminalisat
ion and decriminalisation of homosexuality
in historical context

3. The public/private divide (is there an area of private life into which the law
cannot legitimately enquire?)

4. The church and contemporary issues of equality: gender (the ordination of
wo
men priests and consecration of women bishops); homosexuality (of the
people and the priesthood) and same
-
sex partnerships

5. Conceptions of partnership, marriage and the family

6. Gay rights
--

historical perspective and antidiscrimination legislation

7.
Transsexualism and intersex

8. Consent
-

what is consent; what degree of competence is required;
heterosexual and homosexual ages of consent

9. Child sexual abuse

10. Sexual offences on trial

----------------------------------------------------------------
----------------

Staffing


38

Dr BR Clucas
Co
-
coordinator


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Recommended Reading

R v Brown

Civil Partnership Act 2004

Employment Equality (Sexual Orientation) Regulations 2003

Sexual Offences Act 2003

Equality Act (Sexual Orientation) Regulations 2007

Gender Recognition Act 2004

1998 Lambeth Conference Resolution 1.10

Issues in Human Sexuality

Some Issues in Human Sexuality: A Guide to the Debate

The Windsor Report 2004
http://w
ww.anglicancommunion.org/windsor2004/index.cfm

Marcella Althaus
-
Reid and Lisa Isherwood (eds), 2005. Sexual Theologian.
London: Continuum Press.

Beckmann, Andrea, 2009. Ch 4 from The Social Construction of Sexuality and
Perversion: Deconstructing Sadomaso
chism. Houndmills, Basingstoke:
Palgrave MacMillan