PowerPoint Presentation - INTERACTION DEVICES

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INTERACTION DEVICES



Lori Stringer


INTERACTION DEVICES


Interaction devices involve physical actions
of dragging, clicking, typing, speaking,
writing, etc. . .



Devices should be easy to use.

GOALS OF INTERACTION
DEVICES




Increase
performance speed




Reduce error rates of
users

HISTORY OF INTERACTION
DEVICES


Sharp Rocks


Chalk


Papyrus and Paper



Ink


Quills and Fountain Pens


Pencils


Ballpoint Pens


Typewriters




Sharp Rocks


The all
-
purpose tool
for the cave man; good
for killing, skinning,
and making drawings
on the cave wall.

Chalk


“A soft, earthy
substance, of a white,
grayish, or yellowish
color, consisting of
calcium carbonate, and
having the same
composition as
common limestone.”

Papyrus and Paper


Egyptians, Romans,
Greeks and Hebrews used
papyrus.


Wood
-
fiber paper was
invented by the Chinese in
105 A.D.


“Paper was not widely
used throughout Europe
until paper mills were
built in the late 14
th

century.”

Ink


Invented by the Chinese, it
was originally made of
soot and lamp oil mixed
with the gelatin of donkey
skin and musk.


Other mixtures included:
dyes and colors from
berries, plants, and
minerals.


By 400 A.D. Ink was
uniformly made of iron
-
salts, nutgalls, and gum.

Quills and Fountain Pens


Quills were introduced
around 700 A.D.


Goose feathers were the
most common


Lasted only one week


The oldest fountain pen
has survived since 1702,
but the first practical pen
wasn’t patented until
Lewis Waterman came
along in 1884.

Pencils


The process to make pencils
was patented in 1795 by a
French chemist named Nicolas
Conte.


“He used a mixture of clay and
graphite that was fired before it
was put in a wooden case.”


Since the mixture was fired in a
kiln, you could control the
hardness.


The name pencil comes “from
the old English word meaning
‘brush’.”

Ballpoint Pens


Invented by two
Hungarian brothers
(Ladislo Biro and George
Biro) in 1938.


Today the “Bic Crystal
has a daily world wide
sales figure of 14,000,000
pieces.”


Today much of the world
still refers to these pens as
Biros

Typewriters


Invented in 1868 by
Christopher Latham
Sholes.


The first one was more
like a telegraph
instrument, it did not have
keys. Sholes later added
them.


Remington & Sons started
production on them in
1874.

CURRENT INTERACTION
DEVICES


Keyboard


Mouse


Trackball


Touchpad/Trackpad


Pointing Stick


Joystick


Wheel



Light Pen


Touch Screen


Stylus


Graphic Tablet


Tablet PC


Voice Recognition


Handwriting Recognition

Types of Keyboards



QWERTY


DVORAK


Enhanced


Cordless


Ergonomic


Keyboard Facts


QWERTY: standard keyboard. The fist six
leftmost letters on the top alphabetic line
spell QWERTY


Enhanced: Most commonly used today.
These keyboards have twelve function keys
along the top, 2 CTRL keys, 2 ALT keys,
arrows, etc.


Keyboard Facts II


Cordless: a battery
-
powered device that
transmits data using wireless technology,
such as radio waves or infrared waves.


Ergonomic: this keyboard is specially
designed to reduce the chance of wrist
injuries.

QWERTY





ENHANCED KEYBOARD


ERGONOMIC KEYBOARD


Pointing Devices


Pointing device: an input device that allows
you to control a pointer on the screen


They are generally fast and easy to use, but
require hand
-
eye coordination

Types of Pointing Devices


Mouse


Trackball


Touchpad/Trackpad


Pointing Stick


Joy Stick/Wheel


Light Pen


Touch Screen


Stylus


Mouse


Invented by Doug
Englebart in 1964.


Most used pointing
device for desktop
computers


Types of Mice


Mechanical Mouse: has a rubber or metal ball on
the bottom. The motion of the ball controls the
motion of the pointer. This type should be used on
a mouse pad.


Optical Mouse: has no moving mechanical parts
inside. It uses optical sensors or lasers that emit
and sense light to detect the mouse’s movement.
The type often requires a special mouse pad.

Trackball


Stationary pointing device
with a ball on top,(upside
down mouse)


To move the pointer you
rotate the ball


Requires frequent cleaning
because of oil and dust


Benefit: you don’t have to
move the entire device, so
it takes up less space

Touchpad/Trackpad


Small, flat, rectangular
device that is sensitive to
pressure and motion


You move the pointer by
sliding your finger around


You tap the pad to initiate
a “click”


Most often found on
notebook computers

Pointing Stick


Pressure sensitive
device shaped like a
pencil eraser that is
positioned between
keys on the keyboard.


First developed by
IBM for their
notebook computers

Joystick & Wheel


These devices are used for
game software or flight
and driving software.


The name joystick comes
from early history in
aircraft control.


Joystick: a vertical lever
mounted on a base. It is
easily moved in multiple
directions.


Wheel: a steering
-
wheel
type device used in auto
simulation games

Light Pen


A handheld device that
contains a light source
or can detect light.


Some require specially
designed monitors.


One problem is hand
fatigue.


Touch Screen


A touch sensitive
display you interact
with by touching areas
of the screen with your
fingers


Examples: Kiosks
(Wal
-
Mart automotive
department) and ATM
machines

Stylus


Looks like a ballpoint
pen. It uses pressure to
write and draw lines.


Original names were:
“electronic pen” or


“e
-
pen”


Other Interaction Devices


Graphic Tablet


Tablet PC


Voice Recognition


Handwriting Recognition

Graphic Tablet


It is a flat, rectangular
electronic plastic board


Also called a “digitizer” or
“digitizing tablet”


Used along with a stylus


One use: architects, map
makers, artists, and
designers create drawings
and sketches using it

Tablet PC


Weighs around 3 lbs.


Uses a digital pen


Microsoft version uses
Windows XP Professional


It has handwriting and
voice recognition
capabilities


Take notes and save
them


Convert handwritten
documents into typed
documents


Voice Recognition


Voice recognition: a
computer’s capability of
distinguishing spoken
words.


You speak into a
microphone and the words
display on the screen.


You can also edit and
format a document by
speaking or spelling
instructions.

Handwriting Recognition


Process by which
handwritten letters and
symbols are translated into
characters that the
computer understands.


Used by many notebook
computers and handheld
computers.


Requires the use of a
stylus.

Problems


One problem with
keyboards is that the
keys are so close
together you often hit
the wrong key.


Fast typists are slowed
down because of the
need to switch
between the mouse
and the keyboard.


Most of these devices
are for your hands and
can cause fatigue and
other long term health
problems such as
carpal tunnel
syndrome.

Future


In the future devices
may be:


Very small


Embedded in the
environment, in other
words all around us


Rely more on voice
command instead of
mice and other input
devices

References


www.csse.monash.edu.au/courseware/cse5930/lectures/lec
ture10.ppt


http://inventors.about.com/library/weekly/aa100197.htm


http://inventors.about.com/library/weekly/aa100897.htm


http://inventors.about.com/library/weekly/aa101697.htm


http://inventors.about.com/library/inventors/blpen.htm


www.ask.com


www.microsoft.com


Shelly, Cashman, Vermaat.
Discovering Computers:

Concepts for a Digital World
. United States: Thomson

Learning, 2001.