Schoolwide Plan JW Stewart Middle School Douglas County School ...

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Schoolwide Plan

J.W. Stewart Middle School

Douglas County School System


Developed 2007
-
2008

Updated 2009
-
2010

Updated 2011
-
2012



Steering Committee Members:


Dewayne Jackson,
Principal

Kathryn Bolenbaugh, Assistant Principal

E. Renee Davis, Director, Title 1

Robin Dowdy, ELA

and Reading

Dept.
and 8
th

Grade
Chairperson
, ELA Teacher, Grade 8

Donna Henry
, Math
Dept. Chairperson
, Math Teacher, Grades 6, 8

Alicia Haynes, Educational

Evaluator,

Special Education Dept. Chairperson

Rita Ferrara
, Science Dept. Chairperson, Science Teacher, Grade
7

Angela Whitley, Social Studies Dept. Chairperson, Social Studies Teacher, Grades 6
-
8

Valerie Reed,
6
th

Grade Chairperson,
Social Studies Teach
er, Grade 6

Kelli Rowsey, 7
th

Grade Chairperson, ELA Teacher, Grade 7

Heather Deal,
Media Specialist

Tangelia Thompson
, School Counselor

Douglas Smith, Community Representative

Tonica Eason
, Parent

(Schoolwide Program Checklist #15)

School
Improvement Plan

3/18/2013

School Name:

J.W.
Stewart Middle

School Year:

2011
-
2012

Principal Name:

Dewayne Jackson

Title I Program:

X

Yes



No

Current AYP Status:

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

X

Made AYP


Adequate
Did Not Meet


Needs

Improvement











Sanctions Implementing (Select all that apply):


School Improvement Plan

(
School Improvement Plans are due to Area Director by
September 1, 2011
).


Public

School Choice


Supplemental Educational Services (SES)


Corrective Action Addendum
(The corrective action addendum is completed by the
school by the end of January
of each year.)


Restructuring



State Directed Improvement Contract

Principal’s Signature:


Date:

Area

Director’s Signature:

Date:

Associate
Superintendent’s Signature:

Date:




School Improvement Plan

The John W. Stewart Middle School Title I Schoolwide Plan is subject to the school improvement provisions of

Section 1116 of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.

(Schoolwide Program Checklist

#18)




SCHOOL DESCRIPTION:




John W. Stewart Middle School is located in the northeast section of Douglas County within the city limits of Douglasville, G
eorgia. John W. Stewart Middle
School has undergone many changes since openin
g its doors in 1957. Originally known as R. L. Cousins, the school began as a first through twelfth grade school serving
the African
-
American community of Douglas County. In 1972, the school became integrated and was renamed Douglas County Junior High Sc
hool. In 1973, it was
given its present name in honor of Mr. John W. Stewart, who was the principal from 1957 until 1977. The school currently ser
ves approximately 441 students and is
staffed by 38 certified teachers and paraprofessionals. The instructi
onal certified staff includes administrators, 6th through 8th grade teachers, special education teachers,
teachers of gifted students, Connections course teachers, a Media Specialist, a Counselor, a Social Worker, a School Psycholo
gist, a Speech Therapist,

and an Educational
Evaluator, all of whom are Highly Qualified
.

Support staff members include two paraprofessionals, office personnel, custodial staff, and cafeteria workers. Stewart
Middle School’s 90 percent free and reduced lunch rate qualifies it fo
r Title 1funding and services, which it began receiving in 2008.


Our Mission


To ensure learning for all students on all levels so as to empower them through literacy and problem
-
solving, also, to think and act both independently and
collaboratively.


Our

Vision


To be a high performing middle school that combines best practices and nurturing to students consistently and pervasively.



We Value




The creation of an educational enviro
nment where all students will and must learn.



Collaboration with one another, our parents, our community, and our students so that we can achieve our collective goals more

effectively.



Promotion of a positive school climate by modeling the qualities and ch
aracteristics; such as, trust and respect that we hope to instill in our students.



Providing an inviting classroom environment for students (an environment with clear expectations, consistent consequences, an
d specific, articulated academic
goals).



Identif
ication of essential outcomes for each student and the commitment to making those outcomes a reality.



Using methods of assessment that enable us to monitor the learning of individual students.



Teaching for mastery, while frequently assessing students’ unde
rstanding and providing a variety of opportunities for students to demonstrate mastery.





School Improvement
Plan (continued)






I.

A
COMPREHENSIVE NEEDS ASSESSMENT

of the entire school which addresses all academic areas and other factors that may



affect achievement

Schoolwide Program Checklist #1
, #15
)



A.

All individuals who will carry out and benefit from the schoolwide plan were involved in its development, including


students, parents, teachers, and support personnel. We had additional support from our system Title I Director.


C
ertified and Classified Instructional Personnel

were involved through a staff survey, the NSDC Standards Inventory (SAI),
which was administered in the
spring of 2010
.
T
he Leadership Team
, including members of the Data Team,

were involved in
providing and

analyzing the data which was so integral to the development of the plan.


Our students and parents

provided vital data by participating in separate

surveys which measured their perceptions of

current practices and processes as well as the learning enviro
nment at our school. The data from these surveys was

used to plan for improvement in many areas. Parents also participated through their involvement Very
Involved

Parent (VIP)

meetings,
and the school council
.


The Stewart Middle School Council

was also involved in updating the schoolwide plan. The council is comprised of parents,



teachers, and community members and provided valuable input regarding the direction of the planning process.


The Douglas County School
System Title I Director

assisted in the development of the plan by monitoring the progress of

the updating process.


B.
The following instruments were used to obtain the data necessary to

drive the planning process for our schoolwide



pr
ogram.


1. Student performance data came from the results of
the

Georgia Criteria

Referenced Competency Tests (CRCT)

from the



2010
-
20
1
1

school year. The results of analysis of this data are discussed in detail later in this document.


2. The
NSDC Standards Assessment Inventory (SAI)

provided perceptual data based on staff responses. This survey was


completed in

the spring of

20
1
0 by all teachers.


3. Parents


perceptual data was obtained from a
parent survey

conducted in the spring of 2011.



4. Student input was obtained through the
Student Opinion Survey
, which was administered in
the fall of 2010.
This survey


yielded information vital to

the improvement efforts of our school.






5. Data from
Guided Focus Walks

(teachers)
,
administrative o
bservations, Mini
-
GAPSS

walkthroughs conducted during


the

2010
-
2011

school year were used to determine areas of focus for the current school year.


C.

There are

no migrant students enrolled at Stewart Middle School at this time. If migrant students enroll in the future the
following procedures will be followed to ensure the academic success of these students.



1.
The school will notify th
e system level coordinator that we have enrolled a migrant student(s).





2.
The school will evaluate the progress of the student(s) and determine individual needs.





3.
Instruction and interventions will be
adjusted and individualized to ensure academic success.





4.
Migrant students will be considered for all interventions and programs following the same criteria as all other students



served at Stewart
Middle School.


D.

We have based our plan for improvement and service on data from all sub
groups of the student
population
, including


students with disabilities, who face the greatest challenge when meeting or exceeding standards for student pe
rformance


as measured by the CRCT tests
.



E.

We have analyzed
CRCT 2010
-
2011 ach
ievement data in order to identify subjects and domains in which teaching and



learning must be improved.





F.

Analysis of the data has helped us reach conclusions which will guide our improvement process.












RESULTS OF
ACHIEVEMENT DATA

ANALYSIS

CRCT 2011
-
Math


Strengths
:



7
th

and 8
th

grade FAY students met or exceeded the AMO for 2010
-
1011 in all AYP subgroups.



8
th

grade special education students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 100% over the previous year. (spring administ
ration)



8
th

grade students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 27% over four years (all students). (spring administration)



8
th

grade African American students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 25% over four years. (spring administration)



8
th

grade Caucasian students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 47% over four years. (spring administration)



8
th

grade Hispanic students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 38% over four years. (spring administration)



8
th

grade female
students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 26% over four years and by 13% in 2010
-
2011, outperforming their male counterparts by
7%. (Females had scored consistently lower than males for the previous three years.) (spring administration)



8
th

grade students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 17% in the Data Analysis and Probability domain and by 9% in th
e Geometry domain over the
previous year. (spring administration)



6
th

and 7th grade students increased their proficiency (meets+ex
ceeds) by 26% and 29% over 5 years, respectively, with 6
th

graders increasing proficiency by 18%
over the past year (all students).



6
th

and 7th grade African American students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 36% and 26% over five years, res
pectively, with 6
th

graders increasing
by 20% in the past year.



7th grade Hispanic students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 37% over five years.



6
th

and 7th grade female students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 30% and 25%
, respectively, over five years, and by 28% and 10%, respectively, in
2010
-
2011.



7th grade students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 8% in the Algebra domain over the previous year.



6th grade students increased their proficiency (meets+ex
ceeds) by 17%, 7%, 12%, and 5% over the previous year in the Number and Operations, Data Analysis and
Probability, Geometry, and Algebra domains, respectively.


Challenges
:



Special Education students continue to score significantly below their regular
education counterparts on all grade levels.



8
th

grade students decreased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 2% over the previous year in the Algebra domain. (spring admini
stration)



8
th

grade students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by only 2%

over the previous year in the Number and Operations domain. (spring administration)



8
th

grade male students decreased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 1% over the previous year. (spring administration)



50% of 8
th

grade special education students met/e
xceeded, which is significantly lower than their regular education counterparts, 77% of whom met or exceeded
expectations. (spring administration)



7th grade students decreased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 5%, 3%, and 2% over the previous year in t
he Number and Operations, Data Analysis and
Probability, and Geometry domains, respectively.



7th grade male students decreased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 1% over the previous year.



6th grade students decreased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 2% over the previous year in the Data Analysis and Probabil
ity domain.



6
th

grade students have consistently scored significantly lower in the Measurement domain than in all other domains ov
er the past four years, creating a 7
-
19% gap
between Measurement and the other domains in 2010
-
11.





CRCT 2011
-
Reading


Strengths
:



6
th
, 7
th
, and 8
th

grade FAY students met or exceeded the AMO for 2010
-
1011 in all AYP subgroups.



6
th

and 8
th

grade students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 10% and 11% over five years, respectively, with 8% and 7% incre
ases, respectively, over
the previous year, reaching 94% and 97% meets/exceeds in 2010
-
2011 (all students). (spring administration
)



6
th

and 8
th

grade African American students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 11% and 12% over five years, respectively, wit
h 10% and 8% increases
over the previous year, respectively. (spring administration)



8
th

grade Caucasian students in
creased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 19% over five years, reaching 100% proficiency in 2011
-
2012, an increase of 10% over
the previous year. (spring administration)



8
th

grade female students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 10% over
the previous year, reaching 100% proficiency in 2011
-
2012 (spring
administration)



8
th

grade male students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 14% over five years, and by 5% over the previous year, rea
ching 95% meets+exceeds in 2011
-
2012 (spring
administration)



8
th

grade students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) in all domains, with no significant disparity among the domain sco
res (77
-
81% range).

(spring administration)



7th grade female students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 9% over five years and by 5% over the previous year,

reaching 98% proficiency in 2010
-
2011.



6th grade female students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) 12% over the previou
s year, and males increased their proficiency scores by 7%.



6th grade students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 6% and 11% over the previous year in the Literary Comprehen
sion and Reading Skills/Vocabulary
domains, respectively, with no sig
nificant gaps among the domains.

Challenges
:



Special Education students continue to score significantly below their regular education counterparts on all grade levels.



7
th

grade male students decreased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 10% over the previous year, scoring at 79% meets/exceeds v
ersus females at 98% proficient.


CRCT 2011
-
English Language Arts


Strengths
:



6
th
, 7
th
, and 8
th

grade FAY students met or exceeded the AMO for 2010
-
1011 in all AYP subgroups.



6
th
, 7
th
, and 8
th

grade students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 27%, 21%, and 20% over seven years, respectively, with one
-
year gains of 11%, 2%,
and 4% in 6
th,

7
th
, and 8
th

grades, respectively (all students).



6
th
, 7
th
, and 8
th

grade African American students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) over the past year by 12%, 5%, and 5%, respective
ly, reaching
meets/exceeds scores of 90%, 92%, and 91% in 2010
-
2011.




6
th
, 7
th
, and 8
th

grade female students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 18%, 2%, and 9%, respectively, over the previous year, r
eaching 98%, 95%, and
98% proficiency, respectively, in 2011
-
2012



6
th
, 7
th
, and 8
th

grade students increased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) in all domains, with no significant disparity among the domain sco
res (70
-
78% range).


Challenges
:



Special Education students continue to score significantly below their regular education counte
rparts on all grade levels.



6
th

and 8
th

grade male students scored significantly lower than their female counterparts, at 83% and 86% proficiency, respectively, vers
us 6
th

grade females at 98%

and 8
th

grade females at decreased their proficiency (meets+exceeds) by 10% over the previous year, scoring at 79% meets/exceeds vers
us 6
th

and 8
th

grade females at
98% proficien
t.

RESULTS OF
PERCEPTUAL DATA

ANALYSIS

Student Survey Fall 2010

Strengths
:



99% of
students agree that their teachers hold high expectations for their academic performance.



88% of students agree that their teachers enjoy teaching, and 95% of students agree that their principal likes his job.



93% of students agree that school is relevant
to their success later in life.

Challenges
:



59% of students report that they look forward to coming to school.



42% of students report that the students at school are well behaved.

Parent Survey Spring 2011

Strengths
:



93% of parents believe academic
learning is the the priority of SMS, and 94% feel SMS is doing a good job teaching the basic academic subjects.



96% of parents feel the front office staff is friendly and helpful, and 93% feel the staff demonstrates pride in the school.

Challenges
:



65% of
parents report having regular and meaningful communication with their child’s teacher(s).



73% of parents feel they work together with their child’s teacher to encourage strong study skills and learning at home.

Staff Survey Spring 2010

Strengths
:



SMS teach
ers agreed that the school’s strengths lay in Equity, Leadership, Resources, and Data Driven Decisions (3.3, 3.1, 3.1, 3.1, 3
.1 on 4
-
point scale,
respectively).

Challenges
:



SMS teachers agreed that the school’s challenges lay in Learning Communities,
Evaluation, Collaboration, and Family Involvement (2.5, 2.5, 2.8, 2.8 on a


4
-
point scale, respectively).

RESULTS OF
OBSERVATION DATA

ANALYSIS


Guided Focus Walks, Observations, Mini
-
GAPSS 2010
-
2011


Strengths
:



Posted standards 90%, GPS aligned lessons
92%, Content vocabulary 89%, Written/Verbal commentary 89%, Writing 81%, Facilitator 64%, Formative assessment
for immediate feedback/adjustment 68%

Challenges
:



Differentiation 50%, Standard referenced throughout lesson 64%, Higher order responses 12%, Clo
sing/Summary, Flexible Grouping 45%, Collaborative planning,
common assessments, parent involvement



Chosen by faculty and leadership in 2010
-
2011 as focus areas for 2011
-
2012 (based on GFW, Mini
-
GAPSS, and Observation Data):

o

Higher Order Thinking Skills/In
creased Rigor

o

Effective Closings/Summaries

o

Flexible Grouping based on Informal Formative Assessment and Common District Assessment Results

AREAS OF FOCUS BASED ON DATA ANALYSIS



GOAL 1
: The percentage of all 6
th
, 7
th
, and 8
th

grade math students in all subgroups meeting/exceeding on the 2011
-
2012 CRCT and CRCT
-
M will increase to 83.8%.


NCLB
10
Component #5


GOAL 2
: The percentage of all 6
th
, 7
th
, and 8
th

grade reading students with special needs meeting/exceeding on the 2011
-
2012 CRCT and CRCT
-
M will increase to 86.7%.

NCLB 10 Component #5


GOAL

3
: Parent attendance at monthly VIP (Very Involved Parent) meetings in 2011
-
2012 will increase to include

at least 50% of the parents of the student population.


NCLB 10 Component #8


RESEARCH
-
BASED STRATEGIES

TO ADDRESS AREAS OF FOCUS


GOALS 1,2
: Teachers will learn and adopt current Learning Focused Schools tools, techniques and strategies to improve an
d increase the use of effective lesson closings/summaries,
higher order thinking skills, and data
-
based flexible grouping in planning and instruction.
(NCLB 10 Components #1, #2, #3, #4)

GOAL 2
: Students with special needs (RTI Tiers 2,3,4) will be given

individualized reading instruction through System 44 or Read 180, depending on their needs and skill level.


GOAL 1
: Math Enrichment classes will be available to students who did not meet expectations in math. (These students will attend M
ath Enrichment
in addition to their regular math
class).
(NCLB 10 Components #1, #2)

GOALS 1,2
:
Students will take GPS

aligned common district assessments developed through collaboration with the DCSS Academic Departments. The results of these

assessments
will be used

to guide instruction and provide students with additional support.


GOALS 1,2
:
Academic departments
,
functioning as Professional Learning Communities, will meet monthly for collaborative planning, data analysis of formative an
d summative
assessments, and for examining student work.
(NCLB 10 Components #1, #2)


GOALS 1,2
:
Students who do not meet expecta
tions in math and/or reading/language arts will be offered Saturday Academy, which will tailor instruction to meet student ne
eds in
math and reading. Transportation will be provided for these students.
(NCLB 10 Components #1, #2, #9)


GOALS 1,2
:
Stude
nts who do not meet expectations in math and/or reading/language arts will be offered Afterschool Tutoring, which will tailor

instruction to meet student needs.
(NCLB 10 Components #1, #2, #9)


GOALS 1,2
:
Students who are at risk will receive individual
ized pull
-
out math tutoring from SMS Math teachers for remediation of skills.
(NCLB 10 Components #1, #2, #9)


GOAL
3
:

Regular VIP

(Very Involved Parent) meetings will be held in order to inform parents and provide opportunities for increased involvement i
n the school. . All parent
communication will be sent in both English and Spanish.
(NCLB 10 Component #8)


GOAL

3
:

Generate mo
nthly newsletters that coincide with progress reports and report cards. The newsletter will focus on standards
-
based instruction and the school’s progress toward
achieving SBC’s. The newsletter will also inform parents about upcoming events and interventi
on opportunities at the school. Exemplary student work will be highlighted. Teachers
will staple newsletters to report cards/progress reports to go home.
(NCLB 10 Component #8)


GOAL
3
:

Parent and student representatives will participate in School Lead
ership PLC.
(NCLB 10 Component #8)


GOAL
3
:

Each academic department will host a family night, which will focus family, community, and student interest on their particul
ar department. Students will have
opportunities to perform or demonstrate artifacts o
f their standards
-
based learning along with regularly scheduled VIP meetings.
(NCLB 10 Component #8)


GOAL
3
:

In an effort to communicate student progress toward meeting standards with parents, teachers will systematically integrate th
e use of student ag
endas school
-
wide with
standard procedures and expectations for their use.
(NCLB 10 Component #8)


GOAL
3
:

The school counselors and social worker will work collaboratively to plan and present parent workshops and presentations focu
sed on helping student
s to be successful in
school.
(NCLB 10 Component #8)


GOAL
3
:

A parent resource center will be available for parents to visit and receive resources, training and education.
(NCLB 10 Component #8)


GOAL
3
:

A Community Outreach Facilitator will be house
d at Stewart Middle to assist parents with the parent resources center. He will also provide community

outreach to bridge
to gap between home and school.
(NCLB 10 Component #8)


GOAL
3
:

SMS will provide parent communication documents, such as Parent Compacts, Parent Involvement Policies, etc., in English as we
ll as Spanish, so that all parents will be
well informed regarding the services offered at the school as well as their role in th
e education of their child.
(NCLB 10 Component #6)





School Improvement
Plan (continued)

II.

SCHOOLWIDE REFORM STRATEGIES


(Schoolwide Program Checklist
#
2a
,
d)



A.
We will address the needs of all children in the school, particularly the
needs

of students who are farthest away from




d
emonstrating proficiency as measured by the CRCT, by implementing the following reform strategies:





1.

Max Thompson’s Learning Focused Schools
approaches to differentiated, student
-
centered instruction:

All teachers use the best
practices and approaches to instruction and curriculum prescribed in LFS on a daily basis. These practices ensure that stude
nts’
individual learning styles and needs are addressed through instruction techniques and learning act
ivities.

2.

Technology:

All classrooms are equipped with Smart Board technology, which is an interactive system that facilitates greater
differentiation, access to effective modalities, and efficiency of instruction and learning. In addition to three computer l
abs, teachers an
d
students also have access to “Computers on Wheels”, which are classroom sets of notebook computers and Netbook Mini Mobile
Computer Labs.

3.

Pyramid of Interventions/Response to Intervention model:

All interventions and resources are arranged in tiered f
ashion from least to
most restrictive. As a student demonstrates a need for additional assistance, those needs are met through individually tailo
red, research
-
based interventions that become more restrictive and specific as they progress through the pyram
id. All intervention decisions are data
-
driven. While interventions at each level may be different for each student, based on individual need, the process of interv
ention is the
same. In this way, students are assured their needs will be met appropriate
ly.

4.

Afternoon Tutoring:
SMS teachers provide extra assistance for struggling students each week.

5.

Saturday Academy:
At
-
risk students are provided additional instruction by SMS teachers in reading and math.

6.

ASP (After School Program) Tutoring
: Teachers

tutor students who are enrolled in ASP. The tutoring is focused on homework help
and remediation.

7.

Mentoring
: Staff members and community volunteers serve as mentors for students who demonstrate a need for adult guidance in their
lives.

8.

Learn & Serve Pro
jects:

Students

work with staff members to complete community service projects that promote cross
-
curricular
learning.



B.

The following are examples of scientifically based research that supports our effe
ctive methods and instructional


practices/strategies

(Schoolwide Program Checklist #2b,c)
:



1.

Standards Based Instruction:

The Georgia Performance Standards guide all planning, learning activities, and assessment.

2.

Ruby Payne’s A Framework for Understandi
ng Poverty

will be used as reference and support as we interact with students



and parents.

3.

The Georgia State Department of Education’s backward design

will be used to guide best practices, as outlined in Robert



Marzano’s What Works in Sch
ools and School Leadership that Works, and will be employed in the everyday practices,





policies, and processes of the school.

4
.
Informal Formative Assessments and Common District Assessments

are used to create
flexible grouping

in which


differentiated instruction

is delivered according to individual needs in order to ensure success for all students.

5
.
Professional Learning Communities
, as described in DuFour’s Professional Learning Communities at

Work and On


Common Ground , cont
inues to serve as our framework for improving student achievement. Our
Professional Learning


Communities examine student work products and analyze student assessment data and determine appropriate steps needed



to assure student achievement.

6
.
Monitoring Progress
: Our school administrators and staff perform walk
-
through observations in their Professional



Learning Communities and focus on the following elements when observing a classroom: the opening, the closing, the


use of th
e standard and essential question, the use of cooperative learning, the use of technology, the use of higher
-
level


learning skills, and the use of formative and summative assessments to guide instruction through flexible grouping and


differen
tiated instruction.

7
.
Teacher Mentoring
is provided for novice teachers as well as those new to SMS.

NCLB 10 Component #10

8.


Teacher
-
Parent Conferences:

These meetings are held each year in the early fall and in the spring. In addition to the


regularly scheduled conference days, individual teachers as well as grade
-
level teams are available for conferencing when


requested by either the parent or a student

s teacher(s). At these meetings, parents are given information about the sch
ool

s


general interventions, such as standards
-
based classrooms, differentiation of instruction, instructional technology,


opportunities for tutoring, mentoring, and Saturday Academy. These practices and interventions comprise the
school

s r
ole



in ensuring student success. The
role of parents

in ensuring the success of their students is emphasized as parents are


encouraged to act as an extension of the school, by attending conferences, maintaining ready accessibility by updating


contact information, discussing and reinforcing individual student goals for improvement, assisting students with homework,


and participating in VIP meetings, where they can get additional support and information about how to help their children


succeed. Parents are also encouraged to make us of the state

s Online Assessment System at home to familiarize themselve
s


with the GPS and their student

s progress toward mastery of these standards. All parents are invited to visit our Parent


Resource Center, which is housed within the school, to obtain helpful information regarding resources to ensure student



success.
Students are responsible

for setting goals related to their mastery of standards in all academic subjects. They are


responsible for completing assignments and learning tasks that will ensure this mastery level. In this way, stude
nts are


encouraged to take ownership for their own education.




School Improvement
Plan (continued)





III.

INSTRUCTION BY HIGHLY QUALIFIED TEACHERS
(Schoolwide Program Checklist #3
, 3a
)


A.

We will provide instruction by teachers and paraprofessionals who meet the standards established by the state of Georgia
to be considered Highly Qualified.



Stewart Middle School provides instruction by teachers and paraprofessionals who meet

the standards established by the


state of Georgia to be considered Highly Qualified.

Currently, all of our teachers are Highly Qualified. Of the certified


teachers and staff members currently employed at Stewart Middle School, 8 hold bachelor’s degrees, 17 hold master’s


degrees, 7 hold specialist degrees, and 1 holds doctoral degrees. Additionally, there are three paraprofessionals,

all of


whom have met certification requirements.



B. We will implement a new teacher mentoring program for all teachers new to

Stewart Middle School.



Our school uses several strategies to attract highly qualifi
ed teachers from within Georgia and from other states to our


school. These strategies include

r
ecruiting from various colleges and universities, recruiting at various job fairs,


advertisement of job vacancies on the Teach Georgia website, advertisement of job vacancies on the Douglas County


School System website, and careful interviewing and screening of applicants, including thorough checking of given



references.



Additionally, novice teachers and those new to SMS are provided with mentors, who support and provide orientation


as they begin their tenure at our school. Support for these teachers includes assistance in c
lassroom management, school


policies and procedures, curriculum, and instruction.










School Improvement
Plan (continued)



IV.

HIGH
-
QUALITY AND ONGOING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT


(Schoolwide Program Checklist #4)


A.

We have included all appropriate stakeholders, such as teachers, administrators, paraprofessionals, counselors, and office
personnel in our professional development endeavors.




B
.

We have aligned our professional development with Georgia

s academic a
nd student achievement standards
.

Our teachers
and staff continue to
receive

professional learning

in how to effectively implement the Georgia Performance Standards.
Our curriculum and instruction practices are standards based and reflect research based b
est practices.


(NCLB 10 Components #3, #4)



Professional Learning FY11

*Indicates emphasis for year

Professional Learning FY12

*Indicates emphasis for year

Professional Learning FY13

*Indicates emphasis for year

1.

*Initiative Training: Train

entire staff in LFS



Identify the staff that needs to be LFS trained



Identify staff members to participate in LFS
trainer training



Teachers receive LFS refresher training
beginning January 4th

Continue to identify the faculty that needs LFS training and
p
rovide their training

Continue to identify the faculty that needs LFS training and
provide their training

-
*Monitoring for implementation:



E
-
walks



Formal Evaluation



Collaborative Department PLC Meetings



LFS Trainers



Guided Focus Walk

-
Monitoring for
implementation:



E
-
walks



Formal Evaluation



Collaborative Department PLC Meetings



LFS Trainers



Guided Focus Walks

-
Monitoring for implementation:



E
-
walks



Formal Evaluation



Collaborative Department PLC Meetings



LFS Trainers



Guided Focus Walks


-
*Evaluation:


Educator Understandings:



E
-
walk analysis



Guided Focus Walk Analysis



Discussions in PLC


Student Achievement Impact:



Teacher Perception/PLC



Common Language



Formative/Summative Assessments



Common Assessments



Benchmark Analysis



CRCT Data

-
Evaluation:


Educator Understandings:



E
-
walk analysis



Guided Focus Walk Analysis



Discussions in PLC


Student Achievement Impact:



Teacher Perception/PLC



Common Language



Formative/Summative Assessments



Common Assessments



Benchmark Analysis



CRCT

Data

-
Evaluation:


Educator Understandings:



E
-
walk analysis



Guided Focus Walk Analysis



Discussions in PLC


Student Achievement Impact:



Teacher Perception/PLC



Common Language



Formative/Summative Assessments



Common Assessments



Benchmark
Analysis



CRCT Data



2.

Initiative Training: Training and Implementation
of Professional Learning Communities to be used
in Department Meetings for Collaborative
Planning



State Facilitator will train teachers

Continue training staff on PLC Communities
to ensure it is
being used with fidelity

Continue training staff on PLC Communities to ensure it is
being used with fidelity

-
Monitoring for implementation:



Agenda/Meeting Minutes



Administrators attend PLC Meetings periodically



Formal Evaluation



Curriculum Department Chairs



Department Discussions



Collaborative Planning


-
Monitoring for implementation:



Agenda/Meeting Minutes



Administrators attend PLC Meetings periodically



Formal Evaluation



Curriculum Department Chairs



Department Discussions



Collabo
rative Planning

-
Monitoring for implementation:



Agenda/Meeting Minutes



Administrators attend PLC Meetings periodically



Formal Evaluation



Curriculum Department Chairs



Department Discussions



Collaborative Planning

-
Evaluation:


Educator Understanding:



E
-
walk



Guided Focus Walk Analysis



PLC Discussions


Student Achievement Impact:


Teacher Perception


Formative/Summative Assessment



Teacher Made Common Assessments



CRCT Data



Root Causes Data

-
Evaluation:

Educator Understanding:



E
-
walk



Guided Focus Walk Analysis



PLC Discussions


Student Achievement Impact:


Teacher Perception


Formative/Summative Assessment



Teacher Made Common Assessments



CRCT Data



Root
Causes Data

-
Evaluation:

Educator Understanding:



E
-
walk



Guided Focus Walk Analysis



PLC Discussions


Student Achievement Impact:


Teacher Perception


Formative/Summative Assessment



Teacher Made Common Assessments



CRCT Data



Root Causes Data

3.

Initiative Training: Training and Implementation
of Formative Assessment to be used in all
classrooms



The assistant principal and the curriculum
department chairs will be trained in
Formative Assessment offered by the Ga DOE
at
Callaway Gardens



Assistant Principal and department chairs will
train all teachers

Teachers will continue to be trained in formative assessment
and the expectations will be reviewed

Teachers will continue to be trained in formative assessment
and the expec
tations will be reviewed

-
Monitoring for implementation:



Ewalks



Focus Walks



Curriculum Department Meetings



Monthly Formative Assessment Charts

-
Monitoring for implementation:



Ewalks



Focus Walks



Curriculum Department Meetings



Monthly Formative Assessment
Charts

-
Monitoring for implementation:



Ewalks



Focus Walks



Curriculum Department Meetings



Monthly Formative Assessment Charts

-
Evaluation:


Educator Understanding:



E
-
walk Analysis



Guided Focus Walk Analysis



PLC Discussions


Student Ach
ievement Impact:


Teacher Perception


Formative/Summative Assessment



Teacher Made Common Assessment
Analysis



CRCT Scores



Mock Test Results (reading/math/lang.
arts/writing)



Root Causes Data



Stop Light Data



Flexible Grouping
Charts



-
Evaluation:

Educator Understanding:



E
-
walk Analysis



Guided Focus Walk Analysis



PLC Discussions


Student Achievement Impact:


Teacher Perception


Formative/Summative Assessment



Teacher Made Common Assessment
Anal
ysis



CRCT Scores



Mock Test Results (reading/math/lang.
arts/writing)



Root Causes Data



Stop Light Data



-
Evaluation:

Educator Understanding:



E
-
walk Analysis



Guided Focus Walk Analysis



PLC Discussions


Student Achievement Impact:


Teacher Perception


Formative/Summative Assessment



Teacher Made Common Assessment
Analysis



CRCT Scores



Mock Test Results (reading/math/lang.
arts/writing)



Root Causes Data



Stop Light Data






School Improvement
Plan
(continued)



V.

STRATEGIES TO INCREASE PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT.

(
Schoolwide Program Checklist #5)



A.

We have involved parents in the planning, review, and improvement of the school improvement plan/comprehensive


schoolwide program
by including them on our School Council and Steering Committee and by sharing information

about parent involvement opportunities and proposed intervention strategies at VIP (Very Involved Parent) meetings.

Pare
nts also have given important input by participating in a parent survey conducted during the spring semester of the

2010
-
2011 school year.


B.

We have a Community Outreach Facilitator who is housed within the school building
. His duties include the follo
wing:


1.

Build and maintain relationships with Community Partners.

2.

Work within neighboring communities to foster communication and cooperation with the school.

3.

Set up and maintain the Parent Resource Center.

4.

Plan and implement parent workshops.

5.

Produce
Monthly Newsletter (in English and in Spanish).

6.

Submit advertisements for upcoming events to the newspaper and Channel 17.

7.

Set up Calling Post.

8.

Solicit parents to help and volunteer.

9.

Plan VIP Meetings (morning, noon, evening).

10.

Plan a VIP Meeting for our Hi
spanic population.

11.

Participate in all professional development that relates to parent involvement (parent portal, OAS, etc.).

12.

Develop and implement a schedule of monthly workshops and sessions at the Parent Center.

13.

Prepare, track and maintain parent attend
ance and participation records.

14.

Empower parents to become active participants in the education of their children.

15.

Assist in the coordination of services for parents through multiple partnerships with public and private agencies.

16.

Provide opportunities for p
arents to enhance their knowledge of their child’s education experience.

17.

Identify resources that will meet the needs within each community.

18.

Conduct a written and oral survey of parent needs.

19.

Maintain accurate records, including documentation of all activit
ies and events.

20.

Establish an effective marketing and public relations strategy for the Parent Center.


C
.

We have developed a parental involvement policy.
The policy contains the following components.


1.

Includes strategies to increase parental involvement
, such as the development of a parent resource center, which is
housed within the school. Each month, VIP (Very Involved Parent) meetings are held both in the afternoon and in the
evening to accommodate different parent schedules. Parent newsletters are
sent home to keep parents abreast of
upcoming events and to offer strategies for how they can give academic support to their children at home.


2.

Describes how the school will provide individual student academic assessment results, including interpretation of those
results.

(Schoolwide Program Checklist #10)

Individual student assessment results will be sent home on a regular basis. This includes

report cards and progress
reports. All test results will be sent home in a timely manner, along with accompanying
directions

for interpreting those
results. Staff members will be available

to discuss test results during scheduled conferences and when re
quested by
parents.


3.

Makes the comprehensive school wide program plan available to the LEA, parents, and the public.

(Schoolwide Program Checklist #16, #17)

A copy of the plan will be provided to the Title I Director, who will keep it on file

and make it available at the district
level. Highlights of the plan will be published in the school newsletter. There will be notification made to parents and
the community that a complete copy is available for review at the school and on the website.


4.

Makes provisions for reporting of disaggregated data to stakeholders.
(Schoolwide Program Checklist #13)

Data boards are posted prominently throughout our school building, including one such board in the office area, where
parents and visitors will be
readily

able to view the data. The data are updated annually and include CRCT results,
attendance, and writing assessment results. Additionally, when individual score reports are sent to students


homes, a
letter is also sent which directs parents to the

state website for more information regarding our school

s performance on
state assessments. Disaggregated CRCT data are included in the School Improvement Plan, which is updated annually
and posted on the school website. CRCT data are reported in the At
lanta Journal Constitution annually. Administrators
provide information regarding assessment data at school council meetings, faculty meetings, and PTSO meetings.




D.

We have developed specific strategies to increase parental involvement at our school
.


1.

Regular VIP (Very Involved Parent) meetings will be held in order to inform parents and provide opportunities for
increased involvement in the school.

P
arent communication will be sent in both English and Spanish.


2.

Generate monthly newsletters that coincide with progress reports and report cards. The newsletter will focus on
standards
-
based instruction and the school’s progress toward achieving SBC’s. The newsletter will also inform parents
about upcoming events and

intervention opportunities at the school. Exemplary student work will be highlighted.
Teachers will staple newsletters to report cards/progress reports to go home.


3.

Parent and student representatives will participate in School Leadership PLC.


4.

Each academic department will host a family night, which will focus family, community, and student interest on their
particular department. Students will have opportunities to perform or demonstrate artifacts of their standards
-
based
learning along with re
gularly scheduled VIP meetings.


5.

In an effort to communicate student progress toward meeting standards with parents, teachers will systematically
integrate the use of student agendas school
-
wide with standard procedures and expectations for their use.


6.

T
he school counselors and social worker will work collaboratively to plan and present parent workshops and
presentations focused on helping students to be successful in school.


7.

A parent resource center will be available for parents to visit and receive res
ources, training and education.


8.

A Community Outreach Facilitator will be housed at Stewart Middle to assist parents with the parent resources center.
He will also provide community outreach to bridge to gap between home and school


9.

SMS will provide par
ent communication documents, such as Parent Compacts, Parent Involvement Policies, etc., in
English as well as Spanish, so that all parents will be well informed regarding the services offered at the school as well as

their role in the education of their c
hild.




School Improvement
Plan (continued)


VI.

PLAN FOR ASSISTING 5
TH

GRADERS AS THEY TRANSITION TO MIDDLE SCHOOL AND 8
TH

GRADERS AS


THEY TRANSITION TO HIGH SCHOOL.
(Schoolwide Program Checklist #6)


The following is a list of our
various activities that will help ensure successful transition of 5
th

graders from our feeder schools
into Stewart Middle School.


1.

In May of each school year, 5
th

graders and their parents are invited to Stewart Middle School for an informational meeting
a
bout the changes in environment, expectations, and opportunities students and parents can expect as they transition from
elementary to middle school.


2.

In May of each school year, Stewart Middle School sends its 6
th

grade teachers and counselors to each fee
der elementary school
to meet with 5
th

grade students. They give information, answer questions, and build rapport with students.


3.

In August of each school year, Stewart Middle School holds an Open House, where students, teachers, parents, and
administrato
rs can meet to share information, ask and answer questions, and tour the school.


4.

In August of each year, 6
th

grade teachers conference with their new students. They set goals, discuss expectations for academic
performance and behavior, and build rapport.



5.

Through analysis of student performance data, students who are determined to be at risk of failure as they transition to midd
le
school are targeted early in the school year to receive interventions that will remediate skills and/or augment regular stan
dards
-
based instruction. Grade level teams use the Response to Intervention model to determine appropriate interventions for stude
nts,
depending on their placement on the Pyramid of Interventions. Interventions might include placement in Success Lab for
math
and reading fluency interventions, counseling referrals, mentoring, SST referral and interventions, individual tutoring, etc.


6.

Each

August, the administrators hold grade level assemblies to discuss academic and behavioral expectations with students.
These meetings offer students the opportunity to ask questions and gain clarity of rules and expectations.




The following is a list of our various activities that will help ensure successful transition of our 8
th

graders into high school.


1.

Stewart Middle

School offers Summer School for students who failed two or more academic subjects or who failed either the
reading or math portions of the CRCT. This program helps students to remediate their skills before they move on to high scho
ol.


2.

Stewart Middle
School also offers Summer School for Title I students who want to prepare for 9
th

grade. This program helps
students preview what will be expected of them academically in high school.


3.

Through analysis of student performance data, students who are determi
ned to be at risk of failure as they transition to high
school are assigned an advisor who monitors their progress throughout the year. Advisors meet regularly with students to set

goals and review performance data, grades, attendance, and behavior. Advi
sors use the Stewart Middle School Response to
Intervention model to determine appropriate interventions for students, depending on their placement on the Pyramid of
Interventions. Interventions might include counseling referral, mentoring, SST, tutoring,

etc.


4.

Each spring the 8
th

grade teachers and counselors meet with high school personnel and students to determine their 9
th

grade
scheduling choices. This process helps to ensure appropriate course placement and a smooth transition for students and par
ents.


5.

Each spring teachers and counselors come from the high schools to Stewart Middle School to meet with 8
th

graders. They
discuss expectations for academic performance and behavior and build rapport with students.




















School Improvement
Plan (continued)


VII.

INCLUDING TEACHERS IN DECISIONS REGARDING THE USE OF ACADEMIC ASSESSMENT INFORMATION


FOR THE PURPOSE OF IMPROVING STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT.
(Schoolwide Program Checklist #7
, #11, #12
)


The following are
the ways in which teachers are involved in the decision making process regarding the use of academic
assessment.


1.

Analysis of CRCT and formative data
during team, grade level, and department meetings/planning sessions to determine
student
strengths and
weaknesses.


2.

Teachers are included on the data team, which disaggregates and analyzes various forms of school wide data, including CRCT
data, which is used to identify student achievement levels and target instructional student needs. Disaggregated CRCT d
ata from
the state breaks down performance by individual, subgroup, grade, subject, domain, and schoolwide. The data
team

works to
analyze and interpret this data, and teachers use these results to determine individual student goals as well as performance

trends among subgroups that need to be addressed.


3.

Staff members are trained in the use of Test Trax, Thinkgate, and AIMS Web, which provides achievement data that can be
manipulated to create various types of group and individual reports to yield detai
led academic profiles of individual students and
subgroup performance on standardized tests.


4.

Teachers use benchmark tests and informal teacher assessments to guide instruction.


5. As needs for additional assessments arise, teachers will be included in
the selection and use of such assessments.












School Improvement
Plan (continued)


VIII.


COORDINATING AND INTEGRATING FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL SERVICES AND PROGRAMS.

(Schoolwide Program Checklist #8)



The following list identifies and fully explains the federal, state, and local services and programs we will coordinate and i
ntegrate
in our school
-
wide program.


For the 2009
-
2010 school year, the following resources were used:


1.

Title I (Schoolwide):








332,815
.00

These funds were used to meet the needs of our students through the purchase of instructional supplies, books, technology, an
d
instructional equipment. These funds also paid for Title I personnel, including teachers, a parent involvement

coordinator, and
an SES coordinator. Saturday Academy and Wednesday Tutoring was funded through Title I, as was our Spring Break CRCT
Prep Camp. Professional Development was provided through Title I, as were our VIP (Very Important Parent) meetings.


2.


P
rofessional Development (Douglas County School System):



2
,0
25
.00

These funds were used for professional development to further the goals set forth in the School Improvement Plan.



















I
X.

ACTIVITIES THAT ENSURE STUDENTS WHO EXPERIENCE DIFF
ICULTY MASTERING PROFICIENT OR



ADVANCED LEVELS OF ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT STANDARDS SHALL BE PROVIDED WITH EFFECTIVE,


TIMELY ADDITIONAL ASSISTANCE.

(Schoolwide Program Checklist #9
,
#
9
a,

#
9
b,

#
9
c)


Stewart Middle School is providing
several activities to ensure the success of all students, especially those who have yet to
demonstrate proficiency or advanced mastery of state academic standards. These activities are provided in a timely, efficien
t
manner and are listed below.



1.

Max Th
ompson’s Learning Focused Schools
approaches to differentiated, student
-
centered instruction: All teachers use the best practices
and approaches to instruction and curriculum prescribed in LFS on a daily basis. These practices ensure that students’ indiv
idual learning
styles and needs ar
e addressed through instruction techniques and learning activities.


2.

Technology:

All classrooms are equipped with Smart Board technology, which is an interactive system that facilitates greater
differentiation, access to effective modalities, and effici
ency of instruction and learning. In addition to three computer labs, teachers and
students also have access to “Computers on Wheels”, which are classroom sets of notebook computers and Netbook Mini Mobile Co
mputer
Labs.



3.

Pyramid of Interventions/Respon
se to Intervention model:

All interventions and resources are arranged in tiered fashion from least to
most restrictive. As a student demonstrates a need for additional assistance, those needs are met through individually tailo
red, research
-
based interve
ntions that become more restrictive and specific as they progress through the pyramid. All intervention decisions are data
-
driven. While interventions at each level may be different for each student, based on individual need, the process of interv
ention
is the same.
In this way, students are assured their needs will be met appropriately.


4.

Standards Based Instruction:

The Georgia Performance Standards guide all planning, learning activities, and assessment.


5.

Ruby Payne’s A Framework for Understanding P
overty

will be used as reference and support as we interact with students and parents.


6.

The Georgia State Department of Education’s backward design

will be used to guide best practices, as outlined in Robert Marzano’s What
Works in Schools and School Leade
rship that Works, and will be employed in the everyday practices, policies, and processes of the school.


7.

Informal Formative Assessments and Common District Assessments

are used to create
flexible grouping

in which
differentiated
instruction

is delivered a
ccording to individual needs in order to ensure success for all students.


8.

Professional Learning Communities
, as described in DuFour’s Professional Learning Communities at

Work and On Common Ground ,
continues to serve as our framework for improving student achievement. Our
Professional Learning Communities examine student work
products and analyze student assessment data and determine appropriate steps needed to assure stu
dent achievement.


9.

Monitoring Progress
: Our school administrators and staff perform walk
-
through observations in their Professional Learning Communities
and focus on the following elements when observing a classroom: the opening, the closing, the use of t
he standard and essential question, the
use of cooperative learning, the use of technology, the use of higher
-
level learning skills, and the use of formative and summative
assessments to guide instruction through flexible grouping and differentiated instru
ction.


10.

Teacher Mentoring
is provided for novice teachers as well as those new to SMS.

NCLB 10 Component #10


11.

Afternoon Tutoring:
SMS teachers provide extra assistance for struggling students each week.


12.

Saturday Academy:
At
-
risk students are provided

additional instruction by SMS teachers in reading and math.


13.

ASP (After School Program) Tutoring
: Teachers tutor students who are enrolled in ASP. The tutoring is focused on homework help and
remediation.


14.

Mentoring
: Staff members and community
volunteers serve as mentors for students who demonstrate a need for adult guidance in their
lives.


15.

Learn & Serve Projects:

Students work with staff members to complete community service projects that promote cross
-
curricular learning.



16
.

Teacher
-
Parent Conferences:

These meetings are held each year in the early fall and in the spring. In addition to the

regularly scheduled conference days, individual teachers as well as grade
-
level teams are available for conferencing when

requested by
either the parent or a student

s teacher(s). At these meetings, parents are given information about the school

s

general interventions, such as standards
-
based classrooms, differentiation of instruction, instructional technology,

opportunities for tutor
ing, mentoring, and Saturday Academy. These practices and interventions comprise the
school

s role



i
n ensuring student success. The
role of parents

in ensuring the success of their students is emphasized as parents are



encouraged to act as an extension of the school, by attending conferences, maintaining ready accessibility by updating


c
ontact

information, discussing and reinforcing individual student goals for improvement, assisting students with ho
mework,


and participating in VIP meetings, where they can get additional support and information about how to help their children


succeed. Parents are also encouraged to make us of the state

s Online Assessment System

at home to familiarize themselves


with the GPS and their student

s progress toward mastery of these standards. All parents are invited to visit our Parent


Resource Center, which is housed within the school, to obtain
helpful information regarding resources to ensure student

success.
Students are responsible

for setting goals related to their mastery of standards in all academic subjects. They are

responsible for completing assignments and learning tasks that will e
nsure this mastery level. In this way, students are

encouraged to take ownership for their own education.



School Improvement
Plan (continued)

School Name:
J.W. Stewart Middle

Principal Name:

Dewayne Jackson

School Year:

2011
-
2012


Measurable
Goals:

GOAL 1



The percentage of all 6
th
, 7
th
, and 8
th

grade math students in all subgroups meeting/exceeding on the 2011
-
2012 CRCT and CRCT
-
M will increase to 83.8%.


School
Keys
Strands

Actions, Strategies, and
Interventions

Timeline

Estimated Costs,
Funding Sources,
and Resources

Person(s)
Responsible

Evaluation of Implementation

of Strategies and

Impact on Student Learning

Artifacts

Evidence

Instruction
, Assessment

Teachers will learn and adopt
current Learning Focused Schools
tools,
techniques and strategies to
improve and increase the use of
effective lesson closings/summaries,
higher order thinking skills, and
data
-
based flexible grouping in
planning and instruction.


(NCLB 10 Components #
7
)

August
2011
-


May

2012

SMS department
chairpersons will
provide on
-
going
trai
ning and support
in the
implementation of
LFS tools,
techniques, and
strategies.



All
SMS
teachers



Unit and Lesson
Plans



Training
Documents



Observation
Documents




CDA and CRCT Assessment
Results



Observation Results


Evidence of higher order thinking is
reflected in assigned performance
tasks. Teachers ask appropriate
questions to assess higher order
thinking and problem solving ability.
Students are asked to explain and
support their answers as well as show
the evid
ence that validates their
reasoning. They are also able to
defend their answers and retell and
summarize what they have read or
learned.

Curriculum
,
Assessment

Students will take GPS

aligned
common district

assessments
developed through collaboration
with the DCSS Academic
Departments. The results of these
assessments will be used to guide
instruction and provide students
with additional support.


(NCLB 10 Components #
7
)

August

2011
-

May

2012

SMS department
chairpersons will
provide on
-
going
training and support
in the use and
analysis of the
common district

assessments.



All
SMS

teachers



Aligned
Common
District
Assessments




Assessment
Results



Analysis
Documentation


Aligned instruction is validated
through assessments created from the
GPS. Students can explain the
importance of these assessments, can
articulate their strengths and
weaknesses, and know where to get
additional help.

Curriculum

Math Enrichment classes
will be
available to students who did not
meet expectations in math. (These
students will attend Math
Enrichment in addition to their
regular math class).


(NCLB 10 Components #1, #2)

August

2011
-

May

2012

N/A



Math
Enrichment
T
eacher



Class, RTI
rosters



RTI

Progress
Data



Tiers 2,3,4
meeting
artifacts



Achievement
Data

(CRCT and
CDA results)



Unit/Lesson
Plans

Evidence of higher order thinking is
reflected in assigned performance
tasks. Teachers ask appropriate
questions to assess higher order
thinking and pro
blem solving ability.
Students are asked to explain and
support their answers as well as show
the evidence that validates their
reasoning. They are also able to
defend their answers and retell and
summarize what they have read or
learned.

Instruction

Students who do not meet
expectations in math and/or
reading/language arts will be
offered Saturday Academy, which
will tailor instruction to meet
student needs in math and reading.
Transportation will be provided for
these students.


(NCLB 10 Components
#1, #2, #9)

October

2011


April
2012

Title I funds




SMS teachers





Pre and Post
assessments
(Odyssey)



Saturday
Academy
Rosters



Achievement
Data (CRCT and
CDA results)


Students who need additional
assistance are enrolled in Saturday
Academy. The program
is
continuously monitored and teachers
can explain how students are moved
in and out of the program based on
assessment results.

Instruction

Academic
departments
,
functioning
as Professional Learning
Communities
, will meet monthly for
collaborative
planning, data analysis
of formative and summative
assessments, and for examining
student work.


(NCLB 10 Components #1, #2)

August

2011
-

May

2012

N/A



All Dept. Chairs



All
SMS
Teachers



Agendas and
minutes



Student work
samples



Achievement
Data (CRCT and
CDA results)



Unit/Lesson
Plans



Data Analysis
Documentation

School leaders and teachers can
articulate a common definition of
what rigor, relevance, and standards
-
based teaching and learning entails.
There is consistency across grade
levels as the
consensus is built.

Instruction

Students who do not meet
expectations in math and/or
reading/language arts will be
offered
A
fter
school T
utoring, which
will tailor instruction to meet
student needs.


(NCLB 10 Components #1, #2, #9)


September 2011
-
May 2012

Title I Funds




SMS Teachers



Attendance
Rosters



Assignment
Rosters



Achievement
Data (CRCT and
CDA results)


Students’ performance in class and on
formative and summative assessments
is improved and shows greater
mastery of the GPS.

Instruction

Students who are at risk will receive
individualized pull
-
out math
tutoring from SMS
Math teachers

for remediation of skills.


(NCLB 10 Components #1, #2, #9)



September 2011
-
May

2012

N/A



SMS Math
Teachers




Attendance
Rosters



Assignment
Rosters



Achievement
Data (CRCT and
CDA results)


Students’ performance in class and on
formative and summative assessments
is improved and shows greater
mastery of the GPS.






























School Improvement
Plan (continued)

School Name:
J.W.
Stewart Middle

Principal Name:

Dewayne Jackson

School Year:

2011
-
2012


Measurable Goals:

GOAL 2



The percentage of all 6
th
, 7
th
, and 8
th

grade reading students
served through

special
education

meeting/exceeding on the 2011
-
2012 CRCT and CRCT
-
M will
increase to 86.7%.


School
Keys
Strands

Actions, Strategies,
and Interventions

Timeline

Estimated
Costs,
Funding
Sources, and
Resources

Person(s)
Responsible

Evaluation of Implementation

of Strategies and

Impact on Student Learning

Artifacts

Evidence

Instruction

Students with special needs
(RTI Tiers 2,3,4) will be given
individualized reading
instruction through System 44
or Read 180, depending on
their needs and skill level.

(NCLB 10 Components #1, #2,
#9)


August

2011
-

May

2012

System 44: Special
Education Funding


Read 180: Title I
Funding



Ralencia
Howard, System
44 Teacher



Tina Justice,
Read 180
Teacher



Fannetta
Gooden, Read
180 Teacher



Student work
samples



Achievement
Data

(CRCT and
CDA results)



Data Analysis
Documentation

Students’ performance in class and on
formative and summative assessments
is improved and shows greater
mastery of the GPS.

Instruction

Academic
departments
,
functioning as Professional
Learning
Communities
, will
meet monthly for
collaborative planning, data
analysis of formative and
summative assessments, and
for examining student work.


(NCLB 10 Components #1, #2)

August

2011
-

May

2012

N/A



All Dept. Chairs



All
SMS
Teachers



Agendas and
minutes



S
tudent work
samples



Achievement
Data (CRCT and
CDA results)



Unit/Lesson
Plans



Data Analysis
Documentation

School leaders and teachers can
articulate a common definition of
what rigor, relevance, and standards
-
based teaching and learning entails.
There is

consistency across grade
levels as the consensus is built.

Instruction

Students who do not meet
expectations in math and/or
reading/language arts will be
offered Saturday Academy,
which will tailor instruction to
meet student needs in math
and reading.
Transportation
will be provided for these
students.


(NCLB 10 Components #1, #2,
#9)

September 2011


April 2012

Title I funds




SMS teachers





Pre and Post
assessments
(Odyssey)



Saturday
Academy
Rosters



Achievement
Data (CRCT and
CDA results)


Students who
need additional
assistance are enrolled in Saturday
Academy. The program is
continuously monitored and teachers
can explain how students are moved
in and out of the program based on
assessment results.

Instruction

Students who do not meet
expectations in math and/or
reading/language arts will be
offered
A
fter
school Tutoring
,
which will tailor instruction to
meet student needs.


(NCLB 10 Components #1, #2,
#9)

























September 2011
-
May 2012

Title I
Funds




SMS Teachers



Attendance
Rosters



Assignment
Rosters



Achievement
Data (CRCT and
CDA results)


Students’ performance in class and on
formative and summative assessments
is improved and shows greater
mastery of the GPS.



School Improvement
Plan
(continued)

School Name:
J.W. Stewart Middle

Principal Name:

Dewayne Jackson

School Year:

2011
-
2012


Measurable Goals:

GOAL
3



Parent attendance at monthly VIP (Very
Involved

Parent) meetings in 2011
-
2012 will increase to include at least 50% of the parents of the student population.


School
Keys
Strands

Actions, Strategies,
and Interventions

Timeline

Estimated
Costs,
Funding
Sources, and
Resources

Person(s)
Responsible

Evaluation of Implementation

of Strategies and

Impact on Student Learning

Artifacts

Evidence

Student, Family,
Community
Involvement

Regular VIP

(Very Involved
Parent) meetings will be held
in order to inform parents
and provide opportunities for
increased involvement in the
school. . All parent
communication will be sent
in both English and Spanish.

(NCLB 10 Component #8)


August 2011
-

May
2012

Title I Funds



Community
Outreach
Facilitator



Master schedule of
meetings



Meeting agendas
and minutes



Pamphlets, etc.
containing info for
parents



Achievement Data (CRCT and
CDA results)


Parents participate in the VIP

meetings and can articulate how their
participation helps their children
make greater academic gains.

Student, Family, Community
Involvement

Generate monthly
newsletters that coincide
with progress reports and
report cards. The newsletter
will focus on standards
-
based
instruction and the school’s
progress toward achieving
SBC’s. The newsletter will
also inform parents about
upcoming events and

intervention opportunities at
the school. Exemplary
student work will be
highlighted. Teachers will
staple newsletters to report
cards/progress reports to go
home.

(NCLB 10 Component #8)

August

2012


Ongoing

N/A



Media Specialist




Principals




Teachers



Newsletters



Student work
samples




Achievement Data (CRCT and
CDA results)


Teachers and parents can explain
how their child is progressing towards
meeting/exceeding the standards.

School Improvement
Plan
(continued)

School Name:
J.W. Stewart Middle

Principal Name:

Dewayne Jackson

School Year:

2011
-
2012


Measurable Goals:

GOAL
3



Parent attendance at monthly VIP (Very
Involved

Parent) meetings in 2011
-
2012 will increase to include at least 50% of the parents of the student population.


School
Keys
Strands

Actions, Strategies,
and Interventions

Timeline

Estimated
Costs,
Funding
Sources, and
Resources

Person(s)
Responsible

Evaluation of Implementation

of Strategies and

Impact on Student Learning

Artifacts

Evidence

Student, Family,
Community
Involvement

Parent and student
representatives will
participate in

School
Leadership
PLC.

(NCLB 10 Component #8)






August

2011
-
Ongoing

N/A



SMS Leadership
PLC



Meeting
sign
-
in
sheets,
agendas
and minutes


Parents can articulate how
involvement assists them in
ensuring
their children have academic success.

Students can explain how their
involvement has a positive impact on
their achievement.

Student, Family, Community
Involvement

Each a
cademic departments
will host a family night, which
will focus family, community,
and student interest on their
particular department.
Students will have
opportunities to perform or
demonstrate artifacts of their
standards
-
based learning
along with regular
ly
scheduled VIP meetings.

(NCLB 10 Component #8)




Sept
ember 2011
-
May

2012

Title I Funds



Department
Chairs



All SMS
Academic
Teacher
s



Community
Outreach
Facilitator



Principals




Parent Invitations



Photographs



Pamphlets, etc.
containing info for
parents



Student work with
commentary



Meeting agendas



Parent sign
-
in
sheets



Achievement Data (CRCT and
CDA results)


Parents who participate in the Family
Nights can articulate how their
participation helps their children
make greater academic gains. They
can des
cribe what exemplary
standards
-
based student work looks
like and the process involved in
producing the student work products.

School Improvement
Plan
(continued)

School Name:
J.W. Stewart Middle

Principal Name:

Dewayne Jackson

School Year:

2011
-
2012


Measurable Goals:

GOAL
3



Parent attendance at monthly VIP (Very
Involved

Parent) meetings in 2011
-
2012 will increase to include at least 50% of the parents of the student population.


School
Keys
Strands

Actions, Strategies,
and Interventions

Timeline

Estimated
Costs,
Funding
Sources, and
Resources

Person(s)
Responsible

Evaluation of Implementation

of Strategies and

Impact on Student Learning

Artifacts

Evidence

Student, Family,
Community
Involvement

In an effort to communicate
student progress toward
meeting standards with
parents, teachers will
systematically integrate the
use of student agendas
school
-
wide with standard
procedures and expectations
for their use.

(NCLB 10 Component #8)


August

2011



Ongoing

Title I Funds



Principal




Leadership
Team




Teachers



Student agenda
entries



Student work with
commentary




Achievement Data (CRCT and
CDA results)



Parent survey

results


Parents and teachers can explain how
they communicate about student
work and
progress towards meeting
standards.

S
tudent, Family, Community
Involvement

SMS will provide parent
communication documents,
such as Parent Compacts,
Parent Involvement Policies,
etc., in English as well as
Spanish, so that all parents
will be well
informed
regarding the services
offered at the school as well
as their role in the education
of their child.

(NCLB 10 Componen
t

#
6
)



August

2011



Ongoing

Title I Funds



Community
Outreach
Facilitator



Parent Compacts



Parent
Involvement Policy



VIP meeting
records and
artifacts in Spanish




Achievement Data (CRCT and
CDA results)



Parent survey

results




Parents and teachers can explain
how they communicate about
student work and progress
towards meeting standards.

School Improvement
Plan
(continued)

School Name:
J.W. Stewart Middle

Principal Name:

Dewayne Jackson

School Year:

2011
-
2012


Measurable Goals:

GOAL
3



Parent attendance at monthly VIP (Very
Involved

Parent) meetings in 2011
-
2012 will increase to include at least 50% of the parents of the student population.


School
Keys
Strands

Actions, Strategies,
and Interventions

Timeline

Estimated
Costs,
Funding
Sources, and
Resources

Person(s)
Responsible

Evaluation of Implementation

of Strategies and

Impact on Student Learning

Artifacts

Evidence

Student, Family,
Community
Involvement

S
chool counselors and social
worker will work
collaboratively to plan and
present parent workshops
and presentations focused on
helping students to be
successful in school.

(NCLB 10 Component #8)


August

2011



Ongoing

N/A



Counselor
s




Social Worker



Community
Outreach
Facilitator



Workshop
agendas
,
handouts
,
pamphlets



Parent attendance
sheets



Achievement Data (CRCT and
CDA results)



Parent survey

results


Parents can articulate the importance
of their participation in actively
monitoring their child’s
progress
toward meeting the standards. They
can explain how they can impact
student achievement through their
involvement.

Student,
Family,
Community
Involvement

A parent resource center will
be
available

for parents to
visit

and receive resources,
training and education.

(NCLB 10 Component #8)


August 2011


Ongoing

Title I Funds



Community
Outreach
Facilitator



Parent sign
-
in
sheets



Informational
booklets
,
pamphlets, etc.



Achievement Data (CRCT and
CDA results)



Parent survey

results


Parents can discuss various resources
available to them and their child
which will assist in helping the
student to improve academically.

School Improvement
Plan
(continued)

School Name:
J.W. Stewart Middle

Principal Name:

Dewayne Jackson

School Year:

2011
-
2012


Measurable Goals:

GOAL
3



Parent attendance at monthly VIP (Very
Involved

Parent) meetings in 2011
-
2012 will increase to include at least 50% of the parents of the student population.


School
Keys
Strands

Actions, Strategies,
and Interventions

Timeline

Estimated
Costs,
Funding
Sources, and
Resources

Person(s)
Responsible

Evaluation of Implementation

of Strategies and

Impact on Student Learning

Artifacts

Evidence

Student, Family,
Community
Involvement

A Community Outreach
Facilitator will be housed at
Stewart Middle to assist
parents with the parent
resources center. He will also
provide community outreach
to bridge to gap between
home and school

(NCLB 10 Component #8)


August 2011


Ongoing

Title I F
unds



Community
Outreach
Facilitator



Weekly, Monthly,
Quarterly,
Semester, and
Annual Goal
Sheets and
Agendas



Achievement Data (CRCT and
CDA results)



Parent survey

results


Parents can articulate how contact
with the liaison is helping them to
assist their

children in achieving
academic success.