english policy - Princess Frederica CE VA Primary School

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Princess Frederica

College Road, London, NW10 5TP

Phone: 0208 969 7756

Fax: 0208 964 5372


CE VA Primary School

Headteacher
-

Mrs S. Nettey, NPQH

Email:
admin@princessfrederica.brent.sch.uk




















ENGLISH
POLICY
























Reviewed:



Autumn 2011

To be Reviewed:


Autumn 2013


What is English?

English at Princess Frederica CE VA Primary School

comprises of speaking and listening,
reading, writing, spelling, phonics and handwriting.


Scheme of work / Framework

The Primary Framework for literacy is the
basis of our planned work.

Key Stage One and Two
have the Collins Primary Literacy resources w
hich support the framework. Penpals and Draw
Write Now for handwriting, benchmarked reading books, Letters and Sounds and LCP phonics
plans are also used. We also use a range of high quality fiction and non fiction across the English
curriculum.


Timetabl
ing

A f
ormal E
nglish lesson is taught four times a week;

for at least one hour

in Key Stage Two, 45
minutes in Key Stage 1 and through whole class, focussed activities and independent choice
activities in the EYFS
.

From Year 1 upwards, children will prod
uce 1 piece of extended writing per
week.


P
honics and
spelling are directly taught in Key Stage 1 and Reception.



Reception
-

5 times a week



Year 1 and 2
-

3 times per week



Year 3 and 4
-

2 times a week.


Nursery children begin more formal sessions about le
tters and sounds in term 3. In Key Stage 2,
p
honics and spelling are taught in a combination of whole class, individual and group work

activities

depending on need.



Teachers hear children read aloud at least once a week in Key Stage 1 and 2.
In addition

to

library
time, children have a
session

of

reading at least two times per week. In this time children read
independently, in a pair or in a group as part of a guided reading session.



Assessment

In English we assess on a daily, periodic and transitiona
l basis. We believe the most important
feature of our pract
ice

is high quality

feedback which enables children to make the next steps of
progression in their learning.
In all English activities we:

-

clearly
define and explore learning objectives and success

criteria with children;

-

directly relate marking and feedback

to
learning
objective
s and success criteria;

-

tell

child
ren what they have

done well
;

-

give formative comments
which
are suitable for the child’s level of ability;


-

provide children with time to r
espond to feedback and be involved in the assessment process;
and,

-

link our assessments to our future planning



Target Setting

Curricular targets relating to school development priorities are set yearly. Targets are then layered
by class and ability. Each child is aware of the class target and individual target they are working
towards.




Moderation

and monitoring

Standards in E
nglish are moderated regularly. Each year teachers participate in moderation
meetings on writing to share level judgements with other colleagues. Some teachers participate in
Brent moderation meetings.


Termly monitoring of English takes place. This invol
ves the scrutiny of planning and children’s
English books. Feedback is given on an individual basis and whole school priorities are identified
for future development.


Resources

English resources are largely stored in classrooms with each teacher having a
ccess to various big
books, text books and interactive resources. Reading books are mostly arranged within two
collections. The learning to read collection consists of a progressive scheme with reading recovery
and book band levelled books. This is primari
ly used to help teach phonics and decoding. Guided
reading books are also part of this collection and are used to promote group discussion about
texts and comprehension strategies. The reading for pleasure collection consists of our library in
KS1 and 2, a
nd our classroom book sets in Foundation Stage.


Health and Safety

Out of school educational activities guidelines and regulations pertaining to the safe use of
materials should be consulted in relation to any appropriate practical activity.


Speaking a
nd Listening

Speaking and listening objectives are taken from the Primary Framework for Literacy. Skills are
assessed in line with the school’s assessment policy. Speaking and listening is fully integrated
throughout the curriculum.

Foundation Stage and
Key Stage 1 have timetabled ‘show and tell’ sessions; each child will have
the opportunity to ‘show’ at least once per half term.


Writing

In the Foundation Stage, provision is made for children’s mark making on a daily basis. In each
classroom there is a
designated mark making area as well as opportunities in other areas.
Children also participate in regular small focus group activities where writing for a purpose is
introduced.


It is expected that the skills taught in literacy lessons will also be used
in other subjects and writing
should be of a high standard in these exercise books also.


Writing is taught in class using a variety of strategies. Teachers in Reception and Key Stage 1 use
shared writing and talk for writing as set out in the DFE Developi
ng Early Writing Document.
In
Key Stage 2 teachers model the writing before independent tasks and writing frames / planning
formats are used to support children when necessary.


Pupils

should write clearly and carefully

in their books
. On the top line
they

should write the date.
They

will also be asked to write or stick in the learning question or title.


Classroom Organisation

Every classroom should have the following;



At least one alphabet on display (KS1)



Word banks, word books and dictionaries



Displays

of words related to topics

and tricky words



Plastic letters for the children to sort and feel

(KS1 & FS)




Resources



Searchlights


(Cambridge)

Y2
-
6



Letters and Sounds FS

Y2

Other resources which support spelling are listed below;



A variety of alphabet friezes



Alphabet books, including home made ones



Upper and lower case sets of letters (felt, plastic and wood)



A wide range of dictionaries



Word games such as scrabble, crossword books, alphabet jigsaws and word searches



Examples of

different alphabets



Tongue twister cards and poems



Collins Focus on Spelling



Spelling Bank



NLS Termly high frequency words

Handwriting: Principles and practice

We aim to develop children’s ability to write neatly, clearly and suitably for a range of dif
ferent
purposes.


Principles



Handwriting should be actively taught



A flexible, fluent and legible handwriting style empowers children to write with confidence
and creativity



Associating handwriting movement with visual letter patterns and aural phonemes wi
ll help
children learn to spell


We have a consistent approach to the teaching of handwriting. We begin by using the Draw Write
Now approach in conjunction with Penpals
. This

ensures that multi
-
sensory, creative activities are
available for the children to

access in relation to forming letters correctly. The Penpals scheme is
used throughout Key Stage Two.

Handwriting is taught in standalone sessions
. Further exercises
in real life writing
are part of our practice. Homework may

be given to consolidate lette
rs practised
in lessons.


Pupils begin to use Berol handwriting

pens
in Y
ea
r 3 and are introduced to fountain pens in year 4
.

Black or blue ink is used. Biros are never used.


L
eft
-
handers may have different needs from right
-
handers
. Suitable pens should
be made
available and i
t should be recognised that extra time might be needed for left
-
handers to complete
tasks.


Early diagnosis is followed by a systematic method of improving the handwriting


it is an
approach where stages can be subdivided and taught

slowly and repetitively.

a.

posture;

b.

position in relation to desk;

c.

positioning of the paper;

d.

noticing whether the writing is relaxed;

e.

noticing whether the pressure is correct


not too much or too little;

f.

the pen should be held lightly, about an inch from th
e point between the thumb and first
finger with the middle finger giving support;

g.

the formation of letters should be in the correct direction, e.g. clockwise or anti
-
clockwise;

h.

noticing whether the methods of joining are appropriate or inappropriate.


Some

children are given a
pencil grip
to help position the
hand

properly.

Timing



‘Little and often’ is the most effective approach



The whole
-
class session for e
ach unit (including warm
-
up): 10

minutes



The independent session:10

15

minutes.



Extra daily
‘practice times’ of 5

10 minutes are ideal

in KS1 and year 3
. Use these to:



practise the high
-
frequency words



extend their pattern practice


The following patter is used:


Short/tall
: referring to ascenders and
descenders

Tail
: referring to letters with
descenders

below the line

Up / down / over / round
: referring to the direction of the pencil

Flick
: referring to the flick on completion of some letters

Bump
: referring to the curve on m and n

In KS2 the words
ascender

and
descender

may also be used.


Join
s


Form more details about the formation of letters and joins, please see Penpals.


Foundation Stage


Use a pencil and hold it effectively to form
recognisable letters, most of which are
correctly formed


Children use plain paper, malleable and
tactile
materials.

Handwriting books introduced in the
summer term.

Readiness for handwriting

In Nursery,

activities develop fine and gr
oss motor
control as well as
awareness of ind
ividual letter
formation. Formal lessons begin in

spring term
of
Reception,
or when

children are ready to start
practis
ing formation. H
andwriting sessions are linked
with the daily
phonics
.

Handwriting is also developed through continuous
provision and focus activities. Penpals and Draw Write
Now are used for this.

Key Stage 1

Write
most letters, correctly formed and
orientated, using a comfortable and
efficient pencil grip
.


Write legibly, using upper and lower case
letters appropriately within words, and
observing correct spacing within and
between words
.


Form and use the four basi
c handwriting
joins
.

Handwriting books are used

Beginning to join

F
ormal handwriting sessions are linked progressively
to phonics work

and are taken from the Penpals
programme
. Children have direct teaching of
handwriting in at least 3 sessions per week.

Other handwriting activities are delivered through daily
starters and fast finishers exercises. These are taken
from the Draw Write Now scheme.


Lower Key Stage 2

Write with consistency in the size and
proportion of letters and spacing within
and between

words, using the correct
formation of handwriting joins
.


Write consistently with neat, legible and
joined handwriting
.



Track line books are used.

Securing the joins

In Year 3

formal handwriting sessions are linked
progressively to phonics work. Childr
en have direct
teaching of handwriting in at least 2/3 sessions per
week. Children are taught how to join letters and they
write words in a smooth, joined style.

In year 4 handwriting sessions
should total no more
than 30 minutes.
I
ntervention work is conducted with
children who have difficulties writing in a legible, joined
style.

Upper Key Stage 2

Adapt handwriting for specific purposes,
for example printing, use of italics
.


Use different styles of handwriting for
different pur
poses with a range of media,
developing a consist
ent and personal
legible style

English books are used as appropriate.

Presentation skills

Formal handwriting lessons continue to be conducted
on a weekly basis linked to spelling and vocabulary
work. More

intensive intervention work is conducted
with children who have difficulties writing in a legible,
joined style. This may include the completion of home
-
based handwriting practi
c
e.


Spelling and Phonics: Principles and practice


Aims and Objectives

It is our aim to ensure all children are able to
read, write and spell

fluently.


Foundation Stage

Nursery children engage in daily activities in order to develop their listening skills. They follow
Phase 1 of the Letters and Sounds programme. In term 3 of

Nursery, children will begin Phase 2
of the Letters and Sounds programme. Sound books will then be sent home weekly.


Reception children will participate in daily direct teaching of synthetic phonics. Children will also
engage in a weekly small group phon
ics activity. Sound books continue to be sent home weekly.


Throughout the Foundation Stage, phonemic awareness will be reinforced and developed on a
continuous informal basis. Displays around the classroom will support the children’s independence
and use
of phonics skills and word and phoneme walls are used to help reinforce learning of tricky
words and new phonemes.


Througout Foundation Stage and Year 1 careful choices are made about the reading books used
to teach children to read. At least 2 booka


Key

Stage 1

In spelling children should be
taught in accordance with the learning objectives in the Primary
Framework.

Letters and Sounds should be used for the sequence of delivery. In Year 2 children
will begin to use the Searchlights for spelling resource
s.

In Key Stage 1 children will engage in phonics teaching daily. This is both formal and informal (see
timetabling section of this policy).

All formal phonics sessions will consist of 3
-
4 parts as recommended by the DFE.

Children will begin Year 1 with a revision of the phases up to phase 4 and will then commence
with teaching from the beginning of the Letters and Sounds Phase 4 sequence.


Spelling homework will be given on a weekly basis throughout Year 2 and from the Oc
tober half
term in Year 1. Spellings will be made up of the tricky words introduced in the phonics sessions
and incorporate the sounds of the week.


Key Stage 2

The teaching of spelling and phonics continues in accordance with the learning objectives in th
e
Primary Framework. Letters and Sounds continues to be used in Year 3 and above as
appropriate. Support for Spelling is used in Key Stage 2 as a long term framework and
Searchlights Spellings resources supports the delivery of spelling and phonics lessons
.


Other strategies

for teaching spelling
;



LOOK, COVER,
SAY,
WRITE and CHECK



MNEMONICS. Memory aids


e.g. NECESSARY


One collar two sleeves



HOTSPOTS. Look at the work carefully and see where you likely to go wrong e.g. bisCUIT
WedNESday lisTen



WORD FAMIL
IES. Light flight bright



CLUSTERS “ome” as in home, come, women



SPELLING TESTS/CHECKS. Check spelling weekly



ETYMOLOGY. Encourage children to learn the origins of words.




“Being a good speller is not just spelling well, but knowing what you have done wr
ong.”


Marking W
riting


see
marking policy

Teaching of reading

Our aims

Our aim is that all children at Princess Frederica CE VA Primary School will become readers;
choose books confidently and understand and use what they have read.


The reading
environment

A rich and varied reading environment is not only a matter of organising the physical space in the
classroom to ensure it is welcoming; it is also the way in which we develop a community of
readers.


A
t
Princess Frederica CE VA Primary School
, reading is organised around two collections:



the Learning to Read

collection with banded books of increasing phonetic complexity



the Reading for Pleasure

collection which houses our library stock.

Both of these are as important in the early years to d
evelop
and enthuse
young readers.


Reading Resources at Princess Frederica

Key Stage One and Foundation Stage

Key Stage Two

Learning to r
ead

Individualized books
chosen by teachers

to
support decoding skills

Ginn Readers and key word mats and games

Daily phonics activities

High frequency ‘sight’ word sets

Benchmarking assessment books

Accelerated reader

Individualis
ed reading books to support decoding
practice issued and chosen as appropriate

Assessment texts

Group reading books for use in
classroom reading
teaching chosen in relation to CLPE advice


Group reading books for use in classroom reading
teaching chosen in relation to CLPE advice / NLS


Reading for pleasure

Classroom collection of
up to 250

books per term borrowed from the school library / Picture book Library


Story tapes/MP3 stations in each Foundation and
Year 1 Classroom

Accelerated reader

Story Sacks, tapes and comics available to
borrow
from the library


Multilayered or multimodal
texts available to borrow from
the library




Picture book section as part of the main library


Weekly newspaper in Y4
-
6


Organisation and Progression in the Learning to Read Collection F/KS1

The books in this collection are pro
gressively levelled
from 1 to 30

using guidance
from the
Reading Recovery documents
. Children should move through this collection at pace
. Teachers
should
aim for the majority of
children
to be at leve
l 17 /18 by the end of Year One
. The collection
is only successful if used
alongside direct, daily
,

synthetic phonics teaching and
regular
opportunities to read a book of an appropriate complexity with an adult to
support fast word
recognition.





RR

Colour

BB

Target level by year

R Age

LS Phase

NC

Appox

F

1

2

3

4

1
-
2

Pink

1






5
-
6

2

W

3
-
5

Red

2






5
-
6

3

W

6
-
8

Yellow

3






5
-
6

3
-
4

1c

9
-
11

Blue

4






5
-
6

4
-
5

1b

12
-
14

Green

5






5
-
6

5

1b

15
-
16

Orange

6






6.5
-
7.0

5
-
6

1a

17
-
18

Turquoise

7






7.0
-
7.5

5
-
6

1a

19
-
20

Purple

8






7.5
-
8.0

6

2c

21
-
22

Gold

9






8.0
-
8.5

6

2b

23
-
24

White

10






8.5
-
9.0


2a+

25
-
26

Lime


11






9.0
-
10.0



27
-
28

Ruby

12






10.0
-
11.0



29
-
30

Sapphire

13






11.0
-
12.0




Alternative resources to promote secure decoding and good understanding



Other books should also be read

to and with the children

to enhance their interest in reading
and reinforce the genre being taught in class.


In Foundation and Key Stage One:



Children using books from the Learning to Read collection take a book home from school
and change it e
ach time
they have completed it but no less than 2 times per week in the
early stages.



Children in Nursery will join in with whole class stories on a daily basis. They will learn
about the directionality of text and the functionality of books. In term 3 the formal
teaching
of phonics will begin. Any child showing an interest in reading or an aptitude for decoding
text will be given the opportunity to take reading books home.



Children in Reception will begin taking reading books home after the first half term. These
will be sent home in conjunction with sight word sets and word mats for the children to play
games with their parents.



Children in year 1 and 2 will take reading books home from the beginning of the year. Any
children struggling to read will have addition
al support from various intervention
programmes.


In Key Stage Two
:



Children read a wide variety of reading materials.
Group sets of books from the Learning to
Read collection are used for guided reading.




Children
will chose books from our library to tak
e home and complete tests on Accelerated
Reader when they have finished.



Children who are struggling to read will be identified early in the year and given the
appropriate intervention.



Direct
and Indirect Teaching of Reading


Guided Reading:

Guided Rea
ding sessions begin in Reception

and continue up the school. These sessions are pre
planned and resourced with the aim of teaching and reinforcing a decoding or comprehension
strategy. During these sessions the teacher will listen to each child in the guid
ed group read.


The teaching of reading may have slight differences in each class but the teacher should manage
reading to ensure that all children have direct and indirect teaching which supports the following
areas:



Environment

Children are able to choo
se good quality
books from our school libraries each
week

and feel supported in choosing books


Tasks activities and experiences

Children have quiet reading time in class

Adults read to children
in class


Response and outcome

Children have positive
attitudes about reading
and are able to respond to their own
understanding about texts read.

Texts and resources

Children have access to good quality fiction,
non
-
fiction and poetry.

Grouping


Children read with a group as part of a
Guided Reading session, or individually to
their teacher or LSA at least once every
week.


Links with parents

Children and parents are positive about
reading and feel able to communicate with
their teacher and schoo
l.

Children should read at home each evening
and in the early years complete and change
books every 2 or 3 days.

Support

If Children are having difficulties they are
identified early and given frequent additional
support.


Teachers should check reading
diaries every
week

in KS1 and Reception
.


Direct teaching

Children have 4 literacy lessons a week.

Children will learn comprehension and
decoding strategies through regular Guided
Reading sessions.

Children have direct synthetic phonics
teaching every day

in Reception and Key
Stage One and are taught reliable strategies
to decode in Key Stage two.