Community Resources - J. Reuben Clark Law School - Brigham ...

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Camille Borg, BYU Law
Class of
2012

A clearinghouse of
community
resources for
Community Lawyers and community partners to work
with at
-
risk youth in Utah County, Utah.


Community
Resource
s





Community
Resource
s






April 10,
2012


Dear
Community Lawyers

and Community Partners:


This document is designed to
gather community resources. I will
share ideas on how
Community
Lawyers

and community partners
can use community resources

to help residents i
n Slate Canyon
Detention Center

and at
-
risk youth in the community.

Ultimately the goal will be to ignite

in the
program directors and workers

a desire to join us as community partners and
Community
Lawyers
.


This document

look
s

at resou
rces that are alternatives to Slate Canyon
, resources the residents
can use while they are locked up, and resources the residents can use when they get out. It also
explores some

places residents can volunteer
and work a job
when they get out
of detention
where they will

make new associations, gai
n skills, and have a more productive outlet
for their
time and energy. Utilizing these resources hopefully will

help the residents
and at
-
risk youth
become community partner
s

as well!


The residents and at
-
risk youth need your help.
Please

educate each juv
enile
about these
resources. H
elp the
juvenile

make a cus
to
mized plan for rehabilitating. T
hen
hopefully the
juvenile will

not only
step
both feet

onto a path to become a

p
roductive member of so
ciety


but
the juvenile

will
never return to
detention

or prison.


That is the vision of the
Community Lawyers
. We

realize it will take the choices of the res
idents
or students to choose to accept the help. Some juveniles
do not want to change.
Change is an
individual choice.

But just as there are juveniles
who do not want to change, there are others
crying for help, guidance and mentorship. Some of the residents are in detention as a
cry for
help. Others are

hitting rock bottom after all cries for help have fallen on deaf ears. I
f we
utilize

this resource cl
earinghouse
, then we can

help
guide
th
e
willing residents and

students

to find and
follow a new path.

Below I give a lot of information that I gleaned this past semester. I also offer proposals about
how to build on what we have learned. I have gathered resources so you can work with
Slate
Canyon Detention Center

Staff, P
robation
O
fficer
s, and the juvenile
s on a new road to success. I
strongly encourage you to consider the resources and my proposals as you read below.
I have
only started to build some bridges over the gaps in our knowledge. I call for a future
Community
Lawyers

to continue to find gaps and
find ways to fill them.
Please see below about how to leave
us a message about a resource you know of that we may have missed or that is newly created
.

Also if you have more information about a program that is not included that would be helpful,
please do
send it in to us so we can update the web page.


A
ny part we can have at facilitating that help
and guidance will

change a lot more than that
resident’s life. It will affect the parents, siblings, friends, associates and more importantly in my
opinion
: fut
ure victims that will never be victimized.
This is the meaning of
Community
Lawyering
. We are affecting the community


one person at a time. W
e help
a

juvenile

and
therefore th
e community as a whole
.

On the flip side of
Community
Lawyering
, we use the


community to help the
one
. As the African Proverb says, “It takes a village to raise a child.” We
must consistently
enlist more community partners to assist us

in
helping

the youth.
I put

a section
at the end that gives some helpful ideas on how to involve

the whole community in helping the
youth.

Then after you have read this
Community
Lawyering

H
andbook I hope you will consider the
following questions as a springboard to taking this project farther so we as
Community Lawyers

can extend the reach of our influence.



What is your vision for
Community
Lawyering
/
asset building in your community?



Which of these elements are already in place in your community to support that vision?
How can they be strengthened and linked?



Where do y
ou see gaps? What community resources could fill those gaps?



How will you balance or emphasize ea
ch of the overall strategies? (M
any
initiatives

focus on one area at a time
,
knowing that there are others to address over the long term.)



How will you be inte
ntional about revisiting your visio
n
, strategies, and approaches to
ensure that they still
make sense as time passes and realities shift?
1

My hope is that as future Community Lawyers jo
in h
ands to better this project the

different
community members will al
l see this project as theirs as much as mine or anyone else’s. I hope
that everyone who wants to share their
vision, ideas, and creativity
of this project will do so.
If
everyone takes responsibility for utilizing it in their

corner of the world


and adap
ting the
project to their needs

then their efforts will in turn
benefit the whole community. And that my
friends, is
how I see
Community Lawyering
.


Best luck with your
endeavors
.


Sincerely,



Camille Borg


J. Reuben Clark Law
School

BYU

Juris Doctorate

Class of 2012







1

http://www.search
-
institute.org/system/files/AACommChange.pdf






Risk Factors





Risk Factors

Prevention is a complex and multi
-
faceted process. Effective prevention strategies are based on
an understanding of the factors that place individuals at risk. The prevalence data regarding
youth with disabi
lities in the juvenile justice system suggest that the presence of a disabling
condition itself is a risk factor. Other risk factors for antisocial and delinquent behavior include
poverty, educational failure, family stress (e.g., single parent home, subst
ance or physical abuse,
coercive styles of family interaction), deviant peer networks, and lack of recreational or
vocational opportunities. Furthermore, these risk factors can have a negative effect on the
academic achievement of students, increasing the
likelihood of school failure and problem
behavior.
2

What Risk Factors Are Identified With Juvenile Crime?
3

A

relatively small number of juveniles commit crime.

O
f those juveniles who do commit crimes,
the majority of them will only commit one or two
offenses. For these individuals, the experience
of the juvenile justice system
--
being arrested by a law enforcement officer, facing their parents,
having to spend a night in juvenile hall, interacting with a probation officer or a judge
--
is enough
to keep
them from offending again.

Nevertheless, a small number of individuals who are chronic recidivists are responsible for a
large proportion of juvenile crime. Much research has shown that these juveniles commit their
fi
r
st offense at an early age (usually ag
e 11), and even at this early age, these juveniles display a
variety of serious problems indicative of an "at
-
risk" juvenile:



Failure in School.

This factor manifests itself at an early age. Failure at school includes
poor academic performance, poor
attendance, or more likely, expulsion or dropping out
of school. This is an important factor for predicting future criminal behavior. Leaving
school early reduces the chances that juveniles will develop the "social" skills that are
gained in school, such a
s learning to meet deadlines, following instructions, and being
able to deal constructively with their peers.



Family Problems.

This factor includes a history of criminal activity in the family. It also
includes juveniles who have been subject to sexual or
physical abuse, neglect, or
abandonment. It is also manifested by a lack of parental control over the child.



Substance Abuse.

This risk factor includes not just arrests for drug or alcohol possession
or sale, but also the effect of substance abuse on juven
ile behavior. For example, using
alcohol or drugs lowers a person's inhibitions, making it easier to engage in criminal
activity. Also, drug abuse can lead to a variety of property offenses to pay for drug habits.



Pattern Behaviors and "Conduct" Problems.

Pattern behaviors include chronic stealing
or running away. Juveniles with "conduct" problems can be character
-
ized as those
individuals who have not outgrown aggressiveness by early adolescence.



Gang Membership and Gun Possession.

Gang membership and gang
-
related crime is
primarily a juvenile problem. Gang membership, especially at an early age, is strongly



2

http://www.edjj.org/prevention/riskFactor
s.html

3

http://www.lao.ca.gov/1995/050195_juv_crime/kkpart3.aspx



associated with future criminal activity. Juvenile gun possession is a factor that
"magnifies" juvenile crime by making offenses more likely to result
in injury or death.

Having these risk factors does not guarantee criminal behavior, but simply increases the
likelihood of such behavior. Because young offenders who exhibit multiple risk factors are the
most likely to become chronic recidivists
--
"career
criminals"
--
early intervention that alleviates
these problems could potentially have a long
-
term beneficial impact on the level of future crime.

Risk factor data
4


Juvenile delinquency at the local or county level may be more easily addressed with an
understanding of associated
risk factors

conditions or circumstances of an individual that
increase the likelihood that the youth will engage in delinquency.

This sectio
n begins with a general review of the literature examining juvenile delinquency risk
factors. Loeber and Farrington, members of the
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency

Prevention’s
(OJJDP’s) Study Group on Serious and Violent Juvenile Offenders, com
piled the
following research on risk factors.
4

Delinquency research has focused on three types of risk factors: individual, situational, and
environmental.

5


Individual risk factors




4

http://www.icjia.state.il.us/public/pdf/ResearchReports/Juvenile%20Justice%20System%20and%20Risk%20Factor
%20Data%202007%20Annual%20Report.pdf

5

4
Loeber, R., and D. P. Farrington, eds.,
Serious and Violent Juvenil
e Offenders: Risk Factors and Successful

Interventions
, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc., 1998.

5
Hawkins, J. David, Todd Herrenkohl, David P. Farrington, Devon Brewer, Richard E. Catalano, and Tracy W.

Hirachi, “A Review of Predictors of Youth V
iolence,” in Loeber, R., and D.P. Farrington (eds)
Serious and Violent

Juvenile Offenders: Risk Factors and successful interventions
, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc., 1998:

109
-
133.

6
Sampson, Robert J., and Janet L. Lauritsen, “Violent
Victimization and Offending: Individual
-
, situational
-
, and

community
-
level risk factors, in Albert J. Reiss and Jeffrey A. Roth (eds.)
Understanding and Preventing Violence:

Volume 3 Social Influences
, Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 1994: 38.

7

Lipsey, Mark W., and James H. Derzon, “Predictors of Violent or Serious Delinquency in Adolescence and Early

Adulthood,” in
Serious and Violent Juvenile Offenders: Risk Factors and Successful Interventions
, ed. Rolf Loeber

and David P. Farrington (eds.),
Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc., 1998: 140
-
141.

8
Lipsey, Mark W., and James H. Derzon, “Predictors of Violent or Serious Delinquency in Adolescence and Early

Adulthood,” in
Serious and Violent Juvenile Offenders: Risk Factors and Successful Int
erventions
, ed. Rolf Loeber

and David P. Farrington (eds.), Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc., 1998: 86
-
105.

9
Lipsey, Mark W., and James H. Derzon, “Predictors of Violent or Serious Delinquency in Adolescence and Early

Adulthood,” in
Serious and
Violent Juvenile Offenders: Risk Factors and Successful Interventions
, ed. Rolf Loeber

and David P. Farrington (eds.), Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc., 1998: 106
-
142.

10
Hawkins, J. David, Todd Herrenkohl, David P. Farrington, Devon Brewer, Rich
ard E. Catalano, and Tracy W.

Hirachi, “A Review of Predictors of Youth Violence,” in Loeber, R., and D.P. Farrington (eds)
Serious and Violent

Juvenile Offenders: Risk Factors and successful interventions
, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc., 1998:

144.




Individual risk factors include individual traits or qualities, including

various types of mental and
physical health problems that may contribute to delinquency. Studies examining the effects of
individual risk factors on juvenile delinquency have found that aggressive behavior, anti
-
social
attitudes or beliefs, hyperactivity,

impulsiveness, attention deficits, and risk
-
taking behaviors are
strongly linked to juvenile delinquency. Several studies have also found evidence of links
between medical or physical conditions impacting development, general problem behavior, and
negativ
e internalizing behaviors, such as nervousness, worrying, and anxiety, to juvenile
delinquency. IQ, low resting heart rate, depression, substance abuse, and obsessive
-
compulsive
behavior also have been identified as potential risk factors.

5


Situational r
isk factors

Situational risk factors are related to the circumstances that magnify the likelihood of a
delinquent act occurring. Examples of potential situational risk factors include the presence of a
weapon and behavior of the victim at the time of the i
ncident. Situational risk factors act as
triggers for minors who exhibit one or more of the other two types of risk factors.

6

Although a number of potential situational risk factors have been identified, researchers have not
determined which situational f
actors exacerbate the likeli
hood that a minor will commit a
delinquent act. Thus, situational factors are not addressed in this report.


Environmental risk factors

Environmental risk fa
ctors include community, social

and school risk factor subsets. While
c
ounty
-
level data on the environmental risk factors that Illinois youth are exposed to are
available, these are limited in their ability to describe the environments in which specific youth
live. While these data show the level at which certain factors are
present in a county, they are not
indicative of any individual’s exposure to risk factors.


Community risk factors

Community risk factors are related to the broader social environment in which minors reside.

Studies examining the impact of environmental
factors on juvenile delinquency have found
evidence that communities with high levels of poverty or that are socially disorganized also tend
to have high levels of juvenile delinquency. Research also has revealed that juvenile delinquency
is correlated wit
h drug availability, high levels of adult criminality, exposure to violence, and
exposure to racial prejudice in the community.
7


Social risk factors

Social risk factors are circumstances that are present in a minor’s immediate environment and
typically in
clude family relationships and peer relationships. Strong evidence suggests weak
parent
-
child relationships including poor parental discipline style and lack of parental
involvement, as well as relationships with antisocial or delinquent peers, are related

to juvenile
delinquency.


Researchers Lipsey and Derzon (1998) reported results of a statistical review of longitudinal
research examining juvenile delinquency risk factors.
8
They found that certain family
-
related risk
factors, such as antisocial parents
and parent criminality, were more predictive of serious and
violent juvenile delinquency for six to 11 year olds than for 12 to 14 year olds. Peer
-
related risk


factors including antisocial peers or peer criminality were more predictive of serious and viole
nt
juvenile delinquency among 12 to 14 year olds.

Family and/or marital conflict, separation from family, and sibling delinquency also are proven
risk factors for juvenile delinquency. In addition, abusive parents, low family bonding, high
family stress, w
eak social ties including unpopularity with peers and low levels of social activity,
and high family residential mobility may be linked to juvenile delinquency.
9
Additional research
to further explore and support these findings is needed before conclusions

regarding these
potential risk factors can be made.


School risk factors

Research on predictors of serious and violent juvenile delinquency has revealed that truancy,
dropping out of school, and poor academic performance are related to juvenile
delinquency. In a
meta
-
analysis of risk factors for delinquency, Hawkins et al (1998) found that academic failure
and low school attachment were significant predictors of juvenile delinquency.

10


Single Parenthood is a Risk F
actor

Social
-
Scientific
Resear
ch:


“Teens in both one
-
parent and remarried homes display more deviant behavior and commit more
delinquent acts than do teens whose parents stayed married.”
6


“Teens in one
-
parent families are on average less attached to their parent’s opinions and more
attached to their peer groups. Combined with lower levels of parental supervision, these attitudes
appear to set the stage for delinquent behavior. However, some research indicates that the link
between single
-
parenthood and delinquency does not hold for A
frican American children.”

7


“[S]tudies indicate that adolescents in cohabiting families are more likely teenage in delinquent
behavior, to cheat, and to be suspended from school.”
8


“Boys raised in non
-
intact families are more likely to engage in delinq
uent and criminal
behavior.”
9


“Teens in both one
-
parent and remarried homes display more deviant behavior and commit more
delinquent acts than do teens whose parents stayed married.”
10


“Teens in one
-
parent families are on average less attached to their parent’s opinions and more
attached to their peer groups. Combined with lower levels of parental supervision, these attitudes



6

W. Bradford Wilcox,
Why Marriage Matters
, Third Ed. p. 37 (see footnote 205). See
http://americanvalues.org/bookstore/pub.php?pub=81

7

W. Bradford Wilcox,
Why Marriage Matters
, Thi
rd Ed. p. 36 (see footnote 206
-
207)

8

W. Bradford Wilcox,
Why Marriage Matters
, Third Ed. p. 36 (see footnote 208)

9

W. Bradford Wilcox,
Why Marriage Matters
, Third Ed. p. 13

10

W. Bradford Wilcox,
Why Marriage Matters
, Third Ed. p. 37 (see footnote 205)



appear to set the stage for delinquent behavior. However, some

research indicates that the link
between single
-
parenthood and delinquency does not hold for African American children.”

11


** See Parenting Resources







11

W. Bradford Wilcox,
Why Marriage Matters
, Third Ed. p. 36 (see footnote 206
-
207)




Questions
to

Isolate Risk

and
Protective Factors




Potential
s

to ask to
isolate risk factors and
potential protective factors
:

If you help
a juvenile write a letter to the judge or find a helpful mentor but you forget to address
one risk factor the judge thinks is important, then the juvenile will face the disappointment of
staying locked up despite
diligent effort and cooperation. By asking some questions you can help
isolate the problem areas and risk factors. Then you can more adequately meet the at
-
risk youth’s
needs for safety and protective factors.


Each
Community Lawyer

can make up an intervie
w tree
. Test yourself and see how you used the
tree fa
shion. What were your questions? Were they effective? Did you miss anything?

DISCLAIMER:
Some

of these questions may be inappropriate to ask the juveniles in detention,
so it is important to know what t
he parameters are before asking the questions. These are only
meant to be

a sample of what you could ask and
as of April 2012 have not been tested yet by
Community Lawyers

yet. The probation department has a set of questions they ask the youth to
determine

their risk factors. The questionnaire had a score. Treatments are based on the score the
youth gets. Although as
Community Lawyers

we are not trying to come up with a case plan, we
do want to be available to help the resident find their protective factors

so we can educate them
so we can help them balance their risk factors and protective factors for the judge. That is the
purpose of these questions.

Disabilities

Do you have a
disabling condition
?



What is it?



What has been done to treat it?



Is it physical
or mental?



Have you ever been diagnosed with being developmentally delayed?

o

Have you ever been in special education classes?


Do you have any mental health concerns?



Have you ever been diagnosed with a mental illness?

What is it? When were you
diagnosed? H
ave you been treated?



Have you ever been checked into a mental hospital?



Have you ever been suicidal?



Do you have suicidal ideations? (want to die but won’t actually take action to make it
happen)


Academic Issues

How are you doing in school?



Have you ever flunked a class?



A grade level?



What is your attendance like?



Have you ever been expelled?



Suspended?



Have you dropped out of school?

School attendance
can
provide protective factors:





Develop “social” skills

o

Meet deadlines

o

Follow
instructions

o

Deal constructively with peers


Family Stressors

What are your family related stressors?



Poverty



Does your family move a lot? Is your living situation very mobile?



Single parent home

o

What hours of the day are you left without supervision?

o

Do y
ou have anyone else who can supervise you if your parent is not at home?



Other parent



Aunt or Uncle



Grandparents



Godparents



Coaches



Teacher at school (that maybe would let you volunteer in the
classroom before or after school to provide supervision for a
gap in
time


being at school a little longer would be better than being in DT
right?)



Ecclesiastical leader?



Other adult?

o

If you do not have another adult willing to supervise you during those times,
where can you look to make a relationship with someone
who will?



Possible places could include volunteering somewhere where the
juvenile will have a supervisor



Going to an early morning seminary or other class if the time gap is in
the morning



Boys and Girls Club, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, other mentor programs

through the school or



Substance abuse

o

Have
any
your family members gone to rehab?



Abuse

o

Physical abuse

o

Sexual abuse

o

Neglect

or abandonment.



Have you ever had counseling for
the abuse
?



Are there any cases open against your parents?

o

Do you have a GAL?

o

Do
you have a CASA?



Coercive styles of family interaction



L
ack of parental control over the child



Criminal activity from any family members in the home?

o

Who?

o

Are any family members incarcerated?




Mentors

Do you have any mentors?

Or What mentors do you have?

Who are they?

How often do you see them? For how long?


Friends/Peer Network

What is your peer network like?



Deviant?

o

What can you do to cut off friends who cause problems?



Encouraging of a promising future?

o

What can you do to foster friendships with
people who are a better influence?


How to Spend Free Time

Do you have any recreational
activities
?

Involved in sports?

Involved in clubs at school?

Involved in musical talk
?

Boy Scouts/Girl Scouts

Boys and Girls Club?

Big Brother Big Sister Program
?


Do
you have any vocational opportunities?



After school work?



Babysitting or yard work?

Do you have a lot of dead time? How do you fill it?



Do you participate in volunteer activities in the community?



Do you have community service hours to fill?


Drug Use

Have

you participated in substance abuse?



Have you been arrested for drug or alcohol possession?



Have drug abuse led to any property offenses to pay for drug habits?


Aggressive Tendencies

Have you ever stolen?



Is it a chronic problem to steal?

Have you ever r
un away?



How often have you run away?



How often do you want to run away
?

Have you ever gotten into a fight?



When? How old was the other person?



How many people were involved?


Gang Activity



Have you ever been part of a gang?

(Some gangs do not let the members talk about anything


so
getting a straight answer would be very difficult. It also may be against DT rules to ask this
branch of questions.)



When was your first exposure to the gang?



How long have you been a member?



Do
you have a gun?



Do you have access to a gun when you are not incarcerated?






Community

Resources



Alternatives to Detention




A Few Thoughts on
the Community Resources

Every
Community Lawyer

should be well versed in the different programs and opportunities.
This will save time when helping the students and residents and will build credibility with them.
How much better would it be for you to be able to open up to a tab on whatever it is they
asked a
question about rather than having to say I will get back to you on that. We want to capitalize on
their interest at that moment and have answers for them in the moment. Obviously the packet or
binder will never be complete, but that is why I sugge
st adding to it when you get a new question
you have to find an answer. Then by using the google doc system everyone can update their
binders as well so as new
Community Lawyers

join the ranks they each do not have to reinvent
the wheel.

At the schools the
y will have internet where the
Community Lawyers

can access the resources at
their fingertips. That will not be the case while the
Community Lawyers

are at Slate Canyon.

I
submit that in the future all
Community Lawyers

should have a print version of the r
esource
packet available and on hand.

Perhaps someone who builds on this resource handbook can identify bilingual or multilingual
resources. I
t would be helpful to know which of the resources cater to the Spanish speaking
population.
Additionally, when

th
e organizations and web sites do not have resources for the
Spanish speaking population,
it would be nice if

someone would translate all the resources we
have in English into Spanish.


T
here are probably a lot of other resources found within local
congregations of different faiths.
Perhaps someone can find those resources and make community partners with the congregations.

This

handbook
will be made available to anyone who asks for a copy. Please send us a message
on the BYU Law
Community
Lawyering

web site.

It is proposed that the BYU Law Community Lawyers join hands with the program the
University of Utah has begun
believed to be
called the Center for Social Justice.
U of U received
a grant to locate resources for the communities across the state.





Alternatives to Detention


Many times the probation officer (PO)

and Judge are looking for places other than Slate Canyon
Detention Center (DT)
for the youth. Studies have shown that juveniles often come out worse
from detention (prison) than they went in. For example, one DT staff member told our class that
she saw a girl come in for truancy and left addicted to
heroin
. In other words, finding le
ss
-
restrictive resources for the juveniles is one of the probation officer’s most important jobs.
Community Lawyers

can help the juveniles by educating them about the resources so they can
ask their POs about their options.


Lightening Peak

801
-
370
-
0503,
1955 Buckley Lane, Provo, which is located right above the Provo Juvenile
Court.

This program is also part of Youth Corrections.


The program gives judges another
sentencing opti
on besides secure confinement.

The youth is placed under house arrest, meaning

the youth cannot leave his or her home except to go to school and to this program.

This option is
very common. If the resident
do not

keep the rules they have to go back to DT.



In
-
patient

Drug Rehab

T
reatment centers to overcome substance abuse addictio
ns
. See Substance Abuse section below.


Residential Treatment Centers

Utah has a large quantity of residential treatment centers. They are scattered all around Utah
County and the rest of the state. Each RTC may have a different focus: eating disorder, men
tal
health, lock
-
down with an emphasis on therapy, not
-
lock
-
down with an emphasis on education,
etc. RTCs are considered less
-
restrictive than Slate Canyon because as the RTC patients progress
with their therapeutic goals they are allowed longer visiting h
ours and off
-
campus visits to
family. The average cost for an RTC visit ranges between $20,000 per month. Some one year
programs may be $150,000 and can sometimes be covered by Medicaid.

For example Provo
Canyon School and Heritage Schools are two RTCs rig
ht here in Provo.


Observation and Assessment

801 491
-
0134, 205 West 900 North in Springville.


O&A is part of Youth Corrections.


Children
are sent there to be evaluated to determine the underlying issues and recommended treatment.

It
is structured like a

residential treatment center where the residents have their own rooms and


undergo structured activities while the staff
can
observe them to make further treatment
recommendations.


Independence High School

801 374
-
4920, 636 N. Independence Ave., in
Provo.


This is an alternative high school facility.
Many children attend high school here so they can go to an alternative environment and get
school credits without being kicked out of the whole school system. It is sort of like a second
chance for the k
ids.






Community

Resources



Community Resources/

Potential Community
Partners




Community Resources/Potential Community Partners


This list is not exhaustive, so I encourage people to build on this list as they come across
protect
ive factors that will protect the youth and are persuasive
for the judge. Identifying and
utilizing

protective factors is more than just getting the juvenile out of detention, it is supposed to
help put the juvenile on a new path headed towards success. Ke
ep that in mind while working on
finding and presenting protective factors.


The Children’s Justice Center

801 370
-
8554, 315 S. 100 E. in Provo.

They have child
-
friendly rooms where child victims of
sexual abuse are interviewed by police or social workers.


They also have a medical exam room
with exam equipment for the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE).


This resource would be good for the juveniles who have been abused and need help. A lot of
times delinquency is a problem that comes from a child havin
g unmet needs and the child is
crying out for help.


This is not a place for sex
-
offending perpetrators to go.


Latinos in Action


“Latinos In Action” (LIA) is a class/program set up at the high school & junior high to support
bi
-
lingual Latino students in

utilizing their language skills to support the school and district
community and to move these students toward a career in education. This project provides work
experience for Bilingual Hispanic High School students to serve as paraeducators and role
mode
ls for younger Hispanic students in our local Elementary and Junior high schools.


LIA students render service in their community, serve as role models, and develop their
academic skills. Each LIA program provides more than 2200 hours of instructional supp
ort to
English as a Second Language (ESL) students in the elementary and junior high schools within
their community.



Latinos in Action gained its roots during the summer of 2000 in

the state of Utah. Jose Enriqu
ez
started it with 35 Timpview
Bilingual

students in the Provo school District.


In the past eight
years Latinos In

Action has increased in numbers with 7 high schools (including one in

the state
of Washington) and two Jr. High schools implementing the

program.
12






12

https://sites.google.com/site/latinosinactionbe/Home/what
-
is
-
latinos
-
in
-
action



LDS Family Services
13

1190 N 900 E

Provo, UT 84604

801
-
422
-
7620

L
DS Family Services can make referrals for addiction recovery, employment options, therapy
and counseling, and adoption. They also have a lot of helpful information about the following
topics which are all hyperlin
ked on the soft copy of this document.


Abuse


Adoption


Adversity


Anger
Management


Anxiety and Fear


Blended (Step)
Families


Caring for the
Elderly


Communication


Conflict
Resolution


Depression


Divorce


Eating Disorders



Family


Fatherhood


Grief and Loss


Homosexuality (Same
-
Sex
Attraction)


Infertility


Marriage


Mental Health


Military Relations


Parenthood (Child Rearing,
Teaching and Training)


Parenting (Discipline and
Behavior Problems)


Peace


Pornography (sexual
addiction)




Self
-
Esteem, Self
-
Worth


Single Parenting


Single
-
Adult Issues


Special Needs
(Disabilities, Chronic
Illness)


Stress Management


Substance Abuse


Suicide


Unwed Parents


Womanhood


RadKids
14

The RadKIDS program is the largest child safety program of its kind in the
nation and is
providing children with hope, options, and practical skills to

RECOGNIZE
,

AVOID
, and, if
necessary,

ESCAPE
violence and abuse. Our advanced curriculum, based on accelerated
learning theories, provides realistic safety plans and options
enabling children to escape
dangerous situations. Unlike many programs that show videos or tell children what to do,
RadKIDS actually shares plans and strategies, while practicing realistic physical skills to escape
violence.




13

http://providentliving.org/ses/emotionalhealth/0,12283,2130
-
1,00.html

14

http://www.utahcountyonline.org/Dept/Sheriff/Administrative/radkids.asp




Through RadKIDS training, chi
ldren become

empowered
, learning to replace the fear,
confusion, and panic of dangerous situations with confidence, personal safety skills and self
-
esteem.

Through this hands
-
on educational program the lives of children are being saved.



RadKIDS and the U
tah County Sheriff’s Office, are dedicated to empowering parents, educators,
police officers, and other child safety advocates in our communities with the "gift" of the
RadKIDS program by training those interested in becoming instructors in their own
commu
nities.



RadKIDS is a non profit 501(3)(c) educational program and, thanks to the work done by the
Utah County Sheriff’s Office, this vital life skills program is endorsed by the National Sheriff’s
Association.


Utah County has one of the leading RadKIDS
programs in the nation.

We are
teaching and assisting to bring this program to the children of this county and beyond.


Please contact

Deputy Dean Larsen

at 801
-
851
-
4335 to set up a presentation and to learn h
ow
you can help empower children in your area with radKIDS. Ask him how you can help bring
radKIDS to your school, PTA, community or organization. For more information on becoming a
radKIDS instructor contact
De
puty Dean Larsen

or
visit

http://www.radkids.org/becominganinstructor.shtml







Mentoring

and
Supervision

Resources




Mentoring and
Supervision


Many of the residents come from single
-
parent homes and cannot get out of DT because of
questionable supervision. Sometimes it may be as little as a couple of hours a day that the
parent’s work schedule keeps the parent from the juvenile.
A
me
ntor or other adult may step
forward to help supervise the juvenile during the gap in time where the parent is unavailable to
supervise.
One of the most valuable assets of some of these resources is the opportunity for
juveniles to benefit from adult mento
rs and other positive role models. Mentors are one of the
best protective factors to outweigh the risk factor of a juvenile being from a single
-
parent home.

Keep that in mind when reading the list and get creative about which resources can be used in
multi
ple ways to help provide protective factors and mitigate risk factors.


Tools for Mentoring Adolescents

The following tip sheets were developed by Search Institute and the Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota, with
generous support from the

Carlson Family Foundation
.

The Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota is a trusted source of information, resources, and trainings on creating and
sustaining quality mentoring relationships and programs. Visit

MPM

at

www.mpmn.org
.

Tools for Mentoring Adolescents



#1: Mentoring Adolescents: Specific Training Needs



#2: Making the Most of Mentoring an Adolescent



#3: Aren’t Mentors for Little Kid
s?



#4: Building Trust & Attachment with Your Mentee



#5:

Let’s Get Real:

Promoting Pos
itive, Honest Communication with Your Mentee



#6: Setting Mentoring Boundaries



#7: The Influen
ce of Culture on Mentoring Relationships



#8: Developmental Characteristics of 12
-
14 Year Olds



#9: Developmental Characteristics of 15
-
18 Year Olds



#10: What’s Hot? What’s Not?
15



Big Broth
er Big Sister Program

BBBS of Utah

151 East 5600 South, Ste 200

Murray, UT 84107

ashley.spilker@bbbsu.org

http://www.bbbsu.org

(801) 313
-
0303


Note: This is a remote office of BBBS of Utah, Inc. in Murray,
UT.




15

http://www.search
-
institute.org/mentoring/tools
-
mentoring
-
adolescents





Use this online link to connect and learn about local Big Brothers Big Sisters volunteers near
you!


Big Brothers Big Sisters is not your typical organization. We help children realize their potential
and build their futures. We nurture children
and strengthen communities.


Our Impact

Each time Big Brothers Big Sisters pairs a child with a role model, we start something incredible: a one
-
to
-
one relationship built on trust and friendship that can blossom into a future of unlimited potential. And
thanks to the first
-
ever nationwide impact study of a mentoring organization, we have the facts to prove it.

The Study

Public/Private Ventures, an independent

Philadelphia
-
based national research organization,
looked at over 950 boys and girls from eight B
ig Brothers Big Sisters agencies across the country
selected for their large size and geographic diversity. This study, conducted in 1994 and 1995, is
widely considered to be foundational to the mentoring field in general and to Big Brothers Big
Sisters Co
mmunity
-
Based program in particular.

Approximately half of the children were randomly chosen to be matched with a Big Brother or
Big Sister. The others were assigned to a waiting list. The matched children met with their Big
Brothers or Big Sisters about t
hree times a month for an average of one year.

Researchers

surveyed both the matched and unmatched children, and their parents on two
occasions: when they first applied for a Big Brother or Big Sister, and again 18 months later.

The Results

Researchers
found that after 18 months of spending time with their Bigs, the Little Brothers and
Little Sisters, compared to those children not in our program, were:



46% less likely to begin using illegal drugs



27% less likely to begin using alcohol



52% less likely to

skip school



37% less likely to skip a class



33% less likely to hit someone

They also found that the Littles were more confident of their performance in schoolwork and
getting along better with their families.

“We have known all along that Big Brothers Big

Sisters’ mentoring has a long
-
lasting, positive
effect on children’s confidence, grades, and social skills,”

affirms Karen J. Mathis, Big Brothers
Big Sisters of America’s President and CEO, “and the results of this impact study scientifically
confirm tha
t belief.”

“These dramatic findings are very good news, particularly at a time when many people contend
that ‘nothing works’ in reaching teenagers,”

said Gary Walker, then
-
President of Public/Private
Ventures. “This program suggests a strategy the country
can build on to make a difference,
especially for youth in single
-
parent families.”


https://aim.bbbs.org/einquiry/einquiryzip.aspx?t=1




Boy Scouts

Visit
https://beascout.scouting.org/

to find local troupes and for the youth to sign up.

Boys and Girls Club

The Mission of the Boys & Girls Club of Utah County is to inspire and enable all young people,
especially
those from diverse circumstances to realize their full potential as productive,
responsible and caring citizens and leaders.

Description:


The local Boys & Girls Club has over 10 years of history in Utah County. During this time the
club has grown from a h
andful of members, to over 1,700 registered members. We believe that
our program keeps youth safe, decreases juvenile crime, provides a valuable service for single
and dual working parents, supports public education initiatives (i.e. No Child Left Behind),

provides volunteer opportunities for local community members and university students, and
provides a positive environment for great futures to start here.


Contact person:

Chelsey Clay,

Volunteer Coordinator,

(801) 371
-
6242 ext 130,

(email)

Main office number
:

(801) 371
-
6BGC (6242)

TDD number
: Dial 7
-
1
-
1 for Relay Utah

Office fax number:

(801) 371
-
6241

Languages Spoken:

English, Spanish

Address:


1060 East 150
North

Provo,

UT

84606

Web Site:

http://www.bgcutah.org

Miscellaneous Information

Services




Programs are educational but disguised by fun



Homework Help



Mini clubs



Volunteer Service Activities



Self
-
Esteem
Workshops



Cultural Enrichment



Field trips and parties



Job Ready Course



Sports Activity Competitions




Extended summer hours: 7:30 am
-
6:30 pm, Monday through Friday. Ages 5 to 18 (K
-
12) are
welcome to join. Breakfast, lunch, and snack is served daily.




Court Appointed Special Advocates

CASA workers are volunteers from the community to supplement the work of the Guardian ad
Litems (GAL = attorneys for children). The GALs have more work than they can do on their
own so the CASA worker works with the child

to get to know the child and do activities with the
child and then reports back to the GAL. In cases where the juvenile is in a dependence case (the
parents are charged with abuse or
negligence
) the juvenile will have a GAL and hopefully a
CASA.
The CASA
can offer supervision

and possibly mentoring

during the times
the CASA is
wi
th the juvenile.

Adults 21 and older interested in volunteering should visit the Juvenile Court
website at

www.utahcasa.org
.


E
lder Wisdom Circle

Members of the Elder Wisdom Circle are seniors who share their wisdom with young advice
seekers from across the world. Via the Internet, Elders answer advice requests at their own
convenience, offering young readers personalized and free

advice on a wide range of topics
-

love and relationships, family and child
-
rearing, career and self
-
improvement, and more.

Based in the San Francisco Bay Area, the Elder Wisdom Circle has more than 600 Elders (aged
60 to 105) across North America. The EW
C program and our Elders have been featured on ABC,
BBC, CBS, FOX, NPR and in such publications as Glamour, the LA Times, Ladies Home
Journal, Real Simple, Time & USA Today. We are one of the largest providers of personal
advice, with hundreds of thousands

of readers.


Family Support and Treatment

801 229
-
1181, 1255 N. 1200 W., Orem.


If you take I
-
15 north and exit at the Orem 800 North
exit, and turn left at the first light off of the exit, you should find it fairly easily.

This agency
provides treatment
for abused children and adults.


They have therapy rooms where they use
sand trays and toys to allow children to tell their story.


FS&T is also a respite nursery where
parents can drop off their minor children when they are under stress in order to preven
t further
abuse.

Parents can use this tool to help with supervision if they have no one else to turn. For
example, there was a girl from Glacier who had all her other ducks in a row to go home, but she
could not show the judge who would supervise her durin
g the two hours that her single mother’s
shift extended past the girl’s school day. The judge asked Mom who could help supervise the girl
and Mom said that she had no one she could turn to. FS&T could have been a support there. This
place is also great for

the detainees who are victims of abuse themselves. The free therapy can
help the adolescent move onto healing and help stop them in their path of crime and destruction.





Girl Scouts

Girl Scouting builds girls of courage, confidence, and character, who
make the world a better
place.

Girl Scouting gives every girl access to life
-
changing experiences that inspire her to do great
things.


History:


On March 12, 1912, Juliette Gordon Low founded Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) in
Savannah, Georgia. Today,
GSUSA is the world's pre
-
eminent organization dedicated solely to
girls. In an accepting and nurturing environment, they build character and skills for success in
the real world.


In 1920 a group of volunteers began Girl Scouts here at home in Ogden, Utah.

Girl Scouts of
Utah (GSU) serves over 8,000 girls in grades K through 12, who are supported by 3,500
dedicated adult volunteers.


Contact people:



Ashley Picard,

Membership Recruitment Coordinator,

(801) 716
-
5117,

(email)


Janelle Noall,

Volunteer Services Coordinator,

(801) 716
-
5116,

(email)

Main office number
:

(801) 265
-
8472

TDD number
: Dial 7
-
1
-
1 for Relay Utah

Office fax number:

(801) 261
-
1213

Languages Spoken:

English, Spanish

Address:



215 North Center Street

American Fork,

UT

8 4 0 9 6


We b S i t e:

h t t p://www.g s u t a h.o r g


Safety Net Mentor Program

Our mission is to recruit and train stable, adult mentors to be matched with at
-
risk youths in
helping and supportive relationships. Our vision is that through positive relationships, these
youths will overc
ome the difficulties they face to become successful and productive adults.

Description:


Safety Net Mentor Program offers an opportunity for adults of all ages to change the lives of
children. Kids throughout Utah County between the ages of 6
-
18 years of a
ge are referred to the
program by school counselors, social workers and caseworkers with service agencies, parents,
grandparents and guardians. Most are living in unstable homes. Mentors spend a minimum of an
hour weekly in their choice of activities inclu
ding recreational, cultural, educational and service.


They are encouraged to include their mentee (kid) in their interests and activities, as well as
interaction with friends and family. This gives them the opportunity to observe adults behaving
in functio
nal and positive ways. Mentoring requires commitment, but it is one of the most
rewarding ways to serve in the community, and it's fun! Mentor relationships can last a lifetime.


History:


Safety Net Mentor Program has been operating In Utah County since 1
999. It has been a part of
the State of Utah Division of Child and Family Services since 2004. It is a member of the Utah
Mentoring Partnership and the National Mentoring Partnership.


Contact person:

Karla Berrett Sedillo,

Director,

(801) 362
-
0413,

(email)


Main office number
:

(801) 224
-
7842

TDD number
: Dial 7
-
1
-
1 for Relay Utah

Office fax number:

(801) 426
-
0623

Languages Spoken:

English

Address:



442 Buckley
Avenue

Springville,

UT

84663

(
See a map
)

Web Site:

http://www.safetynetmentor.org



Utah County 4
-
H Mentoring

The Utah County 4
-
H Program hosts a program called 4
-
H: Youth and Families with Promise,
which you can learn more about by visiting http://extension.usu.edu/yfp/htm/about/. 4
-
H YFP
p
romotes child development, educational excellence and strengthening of family bonds through
one
-
on
-
one mentoring, exciting monthly activities and other menthods. Mentors are a major part
of their mentee's (or youth's) life. They provide stability and a car
ing relationship for their
mentees where they might not otherwise have a caring adult. They provide their kids with
something to be excited about and someone who is always looking out for their well being.

Utah's Youth and Families with Promise 4
-
H Mentori
ng Program (YFP) is a

mentoring program
designed for youth, ages 10
-
14, and their families.


Young adult mentors establish caring
relationships with the identified youth.


This program allows youth to develop their interpersonal
and academic skills by

par
ticipating with them in structured recreation, community service, and
community youth groups.

Youth involved in the program:



meet 4 times each month with their mentor, 1 meeting sponsored by 4
-
h



attend weekly Afterschool clubs





attend monthly Family Night O
ut programs with their family.


To enroll a child:
http://utahcounty4
-
h.org/htm/mentoring/enroll
-
your
-
child

WHEN

-

It's flexible! We'll work with your schedule.

WHERE
-
100 E. Center
St. Suite L400


Provo, UT

84606











Mediation

Resources






Mediation Ideas

The
Community
Lawyering

class has an alliance with the Youth in Mediation class taught by
Professor Tamara Fackrell

here at the BYU Law School
. In the past there have been plenty of
parent
-
teen mediators to handle the referrals we gave them from
educating

residents on the need
for parent
-
teen mediation. However, in the Winter 2012 class we had a shortage of parent
-
teen
mediators. This posed a pr
oblem that required brainstorming and looking to alternatives.


We thought to contact former students of Tamara Fackrell’s Youth in Mediation Class who are
trained in parent
-
teen mediation and victim
-
offender mediation. Names of previous class roles
are a
vailable
to Professor Dominguez
through Nancy Hamberlin BYU Law School Registrar.


UVU Mediation is a program facilitated by the Behavioral Science department at Utah Valley
State College. The mediation program assists students in learning conflict styles,

conversational
tools, and in providing the necessary training and skills to mediate conflicts. Students enrolled in
the mediation courses at UVU are required to participate in the community through offering their
time and services to help mediate, teach c
onflict styles, and develop mediation programs in Utah
County. The many mediators at UVU are happy to extend their services wherever they are
needed. Mediation provides great comfort and has the power to mend wounds and heal the hearts
of those involved. I
f you would be interested in learning more about mediation, or if you would
be interested in using
these mediation services
, please contact Dr. Grant Richards at: 801.
863.8316.
16



o

C
ommunication skills class at Dixon Middle School. The class will run from
6:00 pm to 8:00
pm. Feel free to e
-
mail Torben at torben.bernhard@gmail.com with any questions.
17


o

Alpine School District
Mediations at a
Truancy School at Lakeridge Junior High
18


** A proposal for the future would be to incorporate principles of
Community
Lawyering

into
the mediation agreements UVU does with their clients.








16

http://uvscmediation.wordpress.com/about/

17

http://uvscmediation.wordpress.com/2007/11/06/dixon
-
middle
-
school
-
thursday
-
the
-
8th
-
600
-
800
-
pm/

18

http://uvscmediation.wordpress.com/2007/10/02/alpine
-
d
istrict
-
mediations
-
nov
-
6th
-
700
-
pm/



Victim Offender Dialogue Programs

Victim offender mediation, group conferencing and talking circles offer victims of crime a forum
in which they may ask the offender questions related

to the crime, share their feelings and the
resulting impact of the harm caused by the crime and to have a voice in deciding what should
happen to help to repair the harm done. Offenders have the opportunity to take personal
responsibility for their action
s and to make amends for their behavior directly to the victim and
the community.

Victim offender dialogue helps to reinstate responsibility for crime prevention and resolution of
crime with individuals, neighborhoods and communities. It promotes participa
tion of all
stakeholders affected by crime and provides a process in which all stakeholders are directly
involved to repair harm and reach resolution.

Victim Offender Dialogue Programs are administered by local juvenile courts with assistance
and support p
rovided by the Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) Department of the Utah
Administrative Office of the Courts. All of the mediators and facilitators in the programs are
volunteers from the community or court personnel. By utilizing community volunteers, t
he
program costs are reduced and community involvement is broadened.
19


Alternative Dispute Resolution Programs

See

handout
.

http://www.utcourts.gov/mediation/docs/ADR_flowchart.pdf



Utah State Court Mediation Programs

See handout
.


http://uvscmediation.files.wordpress.com/2007/09/uccr
-
mediation
-
opportunities.pdf






19

http://www.utcourts.gov/mediation/rd/victimoffender.asp




Substance
Abuse
Resourc
es




Substance Abuse

Resources


Drug Court

What is Drug Court?

Drug Court is a privilege for those residents allowed to use the resource. There are plenty
more people who want into drug court than can actually be a part of it.

The Drug Court is a program

that targets the substance abusing population in the 4th District
Juvenile. Most juveniles referred to the court for a drug or alcohol offense who do not qualify for
intensive court intervention, but are in need of counseling services strict accountabilit
y. The
Drug Court provides earlier intervention and more intensive supervision and follow
-
through
between the court and referral agencies. The program creates liaisons between the Utah County
Substance Abuse Office, treatment providers, schools, and the co
urt. It provides an incentive for
youth to attend and complete therapy in an effort to divert these individuals from further
involvement in the Court system.

The following qualifications have been set as guidelines for the Alternative Drug Program:



Current

referral is a drug or alcohol offense



The juvenile and his/her parents volunteer to participate



The juvenile admits to the offense(s)



The juvenile completes an assessment administered by Utah County Substance Abuse,
and it is recommended that he/she
attend counseling

What to Expect of the Drug Court?

The Drug Court is a minimum nine (9) month program. During that time the individual enters a
plea in abeyance agreement with the County Attorney's office. The contract outlines the
conditions for the succ
essful completion of the program. This agreement binds the individual to
the following expectations:



Accountability for the completion of the assessment recommendations



Weekly review hearings in Court



Weekly attendance at all required sessions with treatme
nt providers to include group
and individual



Random drug screens, and a required $25.00 payment to the court for each positive test



Daily attendance at school or full
-
time employment, if board released from school by
the school district



Attendance to Speak
er's Bureau each month



Completion of a Harmfuls and a Family Characteristic Project



Completion of all work hours, No violations of the law while in the program



Parents attend group and family therapy and a Zero Tolerance drug education class

Consequences f
or Failure to Comply with Drug Court



When violations occur while the individual is participating in the Drug Court, they are strict and
sever. Non
-
compliance will result in the following:



Time spent in detention



No credit for community service hours or
additional hours can be added



House Arrest



Further intervention by the court



Possible expulsion from the program



If expelled from the program, plea is entered with statutory requirements as set forth by
Utah State Law

Why Choose The Drug Court?

In exchange

for total compliance with the Drug Court Program, the County Attorney's office will
submit a motion to dismiss the violation(s) to the Juvenile Court, the juvenile will receive credit
for all of the community service hours, and graduate from the program.


Ending Nicotine Dependence (END)
20

Need Help to Quit Smoking?

Join the Ending Nicotine Dependence, (END), Program. Helping you quit is what we do. To find
out more about the END program in your area, telephone 1
-
800
-
QUIT.NOW (toll free in Utah)
or go to th
e

Utah tobacco cessation directory
-
teen.

What is END?

END is a tobacco cessation program designed especially for teens. The program builds skills and
knowledge concerning tobacco use
to help those who want to quit succeed.

Information for Adults and Professionals

If you are an adult or professional who would like more information about the Ending Nicotine
Dependence Program please go to the

Ending Nicotine Dependence Information for Adults and
Professionals Page.

END Program Reports

END Program Evaluation January
-
December 2004

Detailed summary and

recommendations of the END Program based on surveys collected during
calendar year 2004.

Just for Teens

Visit

onegoodreason.net

for more facts, fun games, and giveaways
!




House of Hope





20

http://www.tobaccofreeutah.org/en
d.html



801

373
-
6562,
1726 S. Buckley Lane in Provo, which is just up the hill farther than the Provo
Juvenile Court.

The House of Hope provides in
-
patient drug abuse rehabilitation for women
while allowing them to keep their children with them at the facility.



Lif
e Enhancement Center
21

Weekly drug testing.



Life Enhancement Center supports adolescent sobriety through random drug testing that screens
for use of marijuana, cocaine, benzodiazepines, amphetamines, and opiates. We pride ourselves
in using

Redwood
Toxicology Lab

to analyze urine samples. This provides scientifically accurate
results that indicate precise levels of drug use and detect if an adolescent is "flushing" their
system (excessive fluid intake or use of niacin).


Telephonic monitoring and sob
er tracking.



Life Enhancement Center is the only authorized agent in Utah to use

ShadowTrack
, the newest
tool available to court involved youth.

ShadowTrack

is a highly engineered interactive voice
response system coupled with voice
-
biometric authenticat
ion technology. The system
automatically tracks juveniles with random scheduled inbound or outbound calls from any
authorized telephone. The tracking system validates the location as well as authenticates a
juvenile’s identity by comparing their voice to a

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Life Enhancement Center's addiction recovery program includes the following:

Family /Couple Therapy



Use of established

Multidimensional Family Therapy

(for

adolescents)

or

Behavioral
Couples Therapy

(for adults)

to strengthen core relationships essential for sustained
recovery



Involves parents, spouse/significant other, children, siblings, and extended family
networks as needed



Targets relationship boundarie
s, communication patterns, co
-
dependency, and problem
solving abilities

Individual Therapy



Use of established

Cognitive
-
Behavioral Therapy

to build core coping skills and relapse
prevention for sober living



Specialized male and female treatment (
gender
specific
) that targets substance use
triggers and compulsive/addictive cycles



Psychological testing to address co
-
occurring mental health needs (depression, anxiety,
trauma, ADHD)


Clinical Case Management



Personal

Human Service Worker

to assist with

comm
unity, transportation, education, and
employment resources




21

http://www.lecutah.com/DrugAlcoholAddiction.en.html





Maintenance and expansion of sober living social networks and professional
representation if court involved



Collaboration with local

physicians,

nutrition
-
health counselors, exercise
-
fitness center
s,
and detoxification facilities

Sober Tracking



Random urinalysis testing for prescription drugs, alcohol, and illegal drugs



Use of a highly engineered voice
-
biometric authentication technology to assist in
sustained recovery



Access to

Recovery Coaches

who

provide ongoing support for clients as they tackle the
difficult issues of the day

Recreation Therapy and Spiritual Resilience



Frequent multi
-
family group weekend excursions to enhance bonding, trust, and stamina



Involvement with religious services or spi
ritual activities of choice



Participation in various outdoor and wilderness
-
based activities to connect with nature
for sober healing

Call 801
-
477
-
0532 to schedule an appointment.



Other Resources with Hyperlinks

Alcohol & Drug Information

-

Information and resources from the U.S. Department of Health
and Human Services and SAMHSA's National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information.

Alcoholics Anonymous

-

Alcoholics Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share
their experience, strength, and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem
and help others

to recover from alcoholism. The only requirement for membership is a desire to
stop drinking.



National Center for Addiction and Substance Abuse (Columbia University )(CASA)

-

The
mission of CASA is

to inform Americans of the economic and social costs of substance abuse
and its impact on their lives; to assess what works in prevention; treatment, and law
enforcement; to encourage every individual and institution to take responsibility to combat
subst
ance abuse and addiction; to provide those on the front lines with the tools they need to
succeed; and to remove the stigma of abuse and replace shame and despair with hope.



Foundation for a Smokefree
America

-

Smokefree America's mission is to motivate youth to
stay tobacco free and to empower smokers to quit.



U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health
Se
rvices Administration

-

SAMHSA's mission is to build resilience and facilitate recovery for
people with or at risk for substance abuse and mental illness.

Smokefree.gov

-

Smokefree.gov allows you to cho
ose the help that best fits your needs. You
can get immediate assistance in the form of an online step
-
by
-
step cessation guide, local and
state telephone quitlines NCI's national telephone quitline NCI's instant messaging service,


publications which may be

downloaded, printed, or ordered.

Parents: The Anti
-
Drug

-

This site provides information on drug types, symptoms of use, and
resources.

National
Institute on Drug Abuse

-

The NIDA provides information for the prevention and
treatment of drug addiction and abuse.


Prime for Life
-

DUI Classes

Prime for Life is the State of Utah mandated DUI education program. This class is for adults and
youth and
focuses on both alcohol and drug prevention and intervention. These classes are
offered through Volunteers of America,

Utah at Cornerstone Counseling Center

every
Wednesday from 5:00
-

9:00

pm.



If you or someone you know would like more information on
this program, please call us
Monday through Friday from 8am to 5 pm at 801
-
355
-
2846.


Cornerstone Counseling Center is located at 660 South 200 East, # 308 in Salt Lake City.


Utah State Mental Health Hospital
22

Adolescent Units
-

Girls Youth and Boys Youth

The Adolescent Unit serves 50 youth ages 13 to 18 years. Often admittance to this program is
considered a "new beginning" for the teenager.

The individualized treatment approach meets the needs of the child/adolescent and utilizes a
broad spectrum of
therapeutic modalities. Therapies include individual, group, family, play, and
therapeutic milieu. Specialized services to deal with abuse, anger management, emotion
management, and recreational therapy are used. Participation in a wide variety of activiti
es such
as skiing, camping, river running, etc. helps to gain experience in needed social skills, self
esteem, and impulse control.

Family involvement is important in the development and progress of the child's treatment
program. The Hospital involves fami
lies by conducting the Pediatric Services Family Program
which includes family therapy, family support and advocacy. Home visitation is an integral part
of the treatment process and regular family visits are encouraged.





22

http://www.ush.utah.gov/




Tips on Finding Funding For Rehab







If the rehab place is state owned they may use
a sliding scale fee based off of income.


If it is a privately owned rehab place, then the
residents could ask how to apply for a
scholarship to help reduce the costs.


Some places will give a discount i
f you are
getting helped from a non
-
profit organization.
That means the rehab place may charge the
non
-
profit only as much as it costs to operate
the program for the addict.


http://www.drugstr
ategies.org/Treatment/Utah/

Provo
:

Intermountain

Specialized Abuse Treatment Center

1868 North 1120 West Street

Provo Canyon School

4501 North University Avenue

Utah Count
y Division of Substance

Abuse Outpatient Services

151 South University Avenue

Suite 1400

Project Reality

Utah County Program Site

151 University Avenue

Suite 1400

Utah Alcoholism Foundation

House of Hope Provo

1726 South Buckley Lane


Orem:

Addiction and Psychological Services

224 North Orem Boulevard

Gathering Place

UCCODAR

218N. Orem Blvd

NEFA

382 East 720 South

Discovery House UC I
nc

714 South State Street

Institute For Cognitive Therapy Inc

560 South State Street

Suite G
-
1








Mental Health
Resources





Alliance Clinical
Services
23

Clinical Treatment Service

Corporations hire consultants every day
--
outsiders with an objective viewpoint to help assess,
plan and implement changes that will better their company. You take your car to the mechanic
when you hear that "clunking"
sound, for he knows more about cars than you do. Elite
-
level
athletes frequently elicit specialty coaches to help them improve mental focus and discipline.

When it comes to dealing with challenges, changes or crisis in life, it's important to seek help
ear
ly. Don't wait until that clunking noise turns into a complete transmission failure. The sooner
you seek help, the shorter and easier it will be. Counseling isn't just for crazy or weak people; it's
for anyone who can benefit from an outside, expert perspe
ctive to help them along this journey
of life.

Why Treatment?

Each of us comes face to face with periods in our life when struggles seem insurmountable and
it.s as if we are unable to find a healthy perspective on life. Coming to terms with an issue can be

one of those times. We at ACS commend you for your choice in seeking resolution to those
issues and hope to be of service to you.

What Can I Expect in Treatment?

At Alliance Clinical Services, we approach individuals with issues in an open
-
minded way. We
accept them for who they are and the issues that they have in life. We treat all clients with
respect and dignity, regardless of the depths or seriousness of their situation. We work in alliance
with the client and family members, along with referring agen
cies, such as clergy, courts,
probation officers, case managers and others concerned in the life of the client. This alliance will
help the client gain the necessary skills in life to lead a joyful, value
-
based, offense
-
free lifestyle.
We encourage the cli
ent to make empathetic decisions regarding all those he/she associates with,
especially family and friends, so that relationships will cause no harm to self or others.
Therapeutic goals address personal issues and mental health issues, and will aid in help
ing the
client gain and maintain healing interpersonal connections.

Executive Directors

Administrative Services and Community Relations

Devin Jensen, MAS

devinjensen@gmail.com

Clinical Services

Jim Otteson, LPC




23

htt
p://allianceclinicalservices.com/



jamesotteson57@gmail.com


Alliance Clinical Services

American Fork

71 North 490 West

American Fork, UT 84003


Office
: 801
-
763
-
7775

Fax
:
801
-
763
-
7651

Recorded Color Code Hotline
: 801
-
494
-
0589

Provo

560 South 500 West

Provo, UT 84601


Office
: 801
-
763
-
7775


Fax
: 801
-
763
-
7651

Recorded Color Cod
e Hotline
: 801
-
494
-
0589

Spanish Fork

128 West 900 North

Spanish Fork, UT 84660


Office:
: 801
-
763
-
7651


Spanish Speaking Phone
: 801
-
615
-
5121

Fax
:
801
-
763
-
7651

Recorded Color Code Hotline
: 801
-
494
-
0589

acsutah@gmail.com


General Mental Health Issues


National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI)

-

NAMI is the nation’
猠污sge獴sgra獳牯潴猠se湴慬n
桥a汴栠潲ga湩na瑩潮⁤o摩da瑥搠瑯⁩t灲潶楮p⁴桥楶e猠潦⁰s牳潮猠汩癩vg⁷楴栠 e物潵猠浥湴r氠l汬湥獳s
a湤⁴桥楲⁦ 浩汩e献





National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

-

NIMH is th
e world's largest scientific
organization dedicated to research focused on the understanding, treatment, and prevention of
mental disorders and the promotion of mental health.



Mental Health
Channel

-

This site contains information about mental illness and disorders,
treatment, and resources.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health
Services
Administration

-

SAMHSA's mission is to build resilience and facilitate recovery for
people with or at risk for substance abuse and mental illness.


Intermountain Center For Cognitive
Therapy
24


801
-
802
-
8608

560 South State Street

Orem, UT 84058



Life Enh
ancement Center
25



"The Life Enhancement Center

program is a great asset to the delinquent youth in Utah.
The focus on evidence
-
based treatment models, gender
-
specific treatment, and
collaboration with schools and juvenile justice is commendable, and so n
eeded.”

-
Dr. Lisa Boesky
,

Author of

When to Worry: How to Tell if Your Teen Needs Help and What to Do About It

and

The Secret Cut: Understanding Self
-
Injury & Teens



Life Enhancement Center specializes in the treatment of adolescents with

emotional and
behavioral problems, particularly those who are court involved or incarceration bound.

90
-
day
treatment services include:



Weekly individual and group therapy.



This includes use of established

Cognitive
-
Behavioral Therapy

(CBT)

to reduce criminal



24

http://www.dexknows.com/business_profiles/intermountain_center_for_cognitive_therapy_icct
-
b590522

25

http://www.lecutah.com/MentalHealthServices.en.html



thinki
ng, teach problem solving skills, and resolve psychological disorders (anxi
ety, depression,
ADHD, trauma,

and substance abuse).

Life Enhancement Center provides gender specific
treatment and follows guidelines established by the Adolescent Female Advocacy
Network
(AFAN) of the State of Utah Department of Juvenile Justice Services. Female juvenile offenders
present with different treatment needs than male juvenile offenders, justifying trauma
-
focused,
emotion
-
regulation, and relational
-
based interventions. L
ife Enhancement Center mental health
counselors are certified in

Trauma
-
Focused Cognitive
-
Behavioral Therapy (TF
-
CBT)

and
use

Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT)

to effectively treat female offenders presenting with
emerging borderline personality,
suicide
-
self harm behaviors, body image/eating problems, and
history of sexual, physical, and emotional abuse.


Weekly family therapy.



Life Enhancement Center therapists use

Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT),

a reputable
and scientifically proven

fa
mily
-
based treatment developed for conduct
-
disordered problems and
for substance abuse prevention with adolescents. The treatment seeks to significantly reduce or
eliminate the adolescent's substance abuse and other criminal problem behavior, and to improv
e
overall family functioning. For the parent(s), objectives include facilitating parental commitment
and investment; improving the overall relationship and day
-
to
-
day communication between
parent(s) and adolescent; and increased knowledge about and changes

in parenting practices
(e.g., limit
-
setting, monitoring, appropriate autonomy granting, and consistent discipline). There
are two intermediate intervention goals for every family: helping the adolescent achieve an
interdependent attachment bond to parents

and family, and helping the adolescent forge durable
connections with pro
-
social influences such as schools, peer groups, and recreational and
religious institutions.



Our therapists also use

Parent Management Training (PMT)
,

an evidence
-
based behavioral

approach to the treatment of oppositional, aggressive, and defiant behavior in juveniles, in which