SUBMISSION TO AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM AND REPORTING AUTHORITY ON PROPOSED AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM SUBJECTS:

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5 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 3 χρόνια και 7 μήνες)

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SUBMISSION TO
AUSTRALIAN CURRICULU
M
AND REPORTING AUTHOR
ITY ON PROPOSED
AUSTRALIAN CURRICULU
M SUBJECTS:


-

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL
EDUCATION

-

TECHNOLOGIES










Department of
Education Employment and Workplace Relations

Office for Youth


June
2012


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Table of Contents


AYF Background

................................
................................
................................
................................
..........................

3

Methodology

................................
................................
................................
................................
..............................

4

Executive Summary

................................
................................
................................
................................
....................

5

Participants

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
.

6

Technologies Education

1.1 Technologies subject
................................
................................
................................
................................
.............

9

1.2 What young people think of the subject of Techologies today
................................
................................
..........

11

2.1 Topics within the technology curriculum

................................
................................
................................
............

12

2.2 Topics within the technology curriculum…what is useful

................................
................................
...................

13

3.1
Teaching and Learning in the Tec
hology subject

................................
................................
................................

14

4.1 Keeping the Technologies curriculum up
-
to
-
date

................................
................................
...............................

15

5.1 Cross cutting issues including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and intercultural understanding

...

16

Health and Physical Education

1.1 Health and Physical Education subject

................................
................................
................................
...............

18

1.2 What young people thought about their experience in Health and PE at school

................................
...............

19

2.1 Topics within the Health and PE curriculum

................................
................................
................................
.......

20

2.2 Topics within Health and PE which were relevant to their life

................................
................................
...........

21

2.3 Suggested topics for the new Health and PE curriculum

................................
................................
....................

22

2.4 How the Health and PE curriculum has up
-
skilled young people

................................
................................
.......

22

3.1 The inclusion of Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islanders, people with a disability and people from a culturally and
linguistically diverse background in the curriculum

................................
................................
................................
..

24

3.2 Incorporating the needs of rural and remote students

................................
................................
......................

24

4.1 The ways young people like to learn
................................
................................
................................
...................

25

4.2 Future interest in the Health and PE curriculum

................................
................................
................................

26

4.3 Other recommendations

................................
................................
................................
................................
.....

27

Appendices...................................................................
......................................
................
......................29




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Input from the Australian Youth Forum

This submission to
Australian Curriculum
Assessment
and Reporting Authority (ACARA) on
the draft shape of the Australian Curriculum
subjects of Technologies and Health and
Physical Education
,

is made on behalf of young Australians who contributed their
thoughts and opinions through the Australian Youth Forum (AYF).

It
is a summary of the
view
s
, ideas an
d
experiences

of young Australian
s. The

words
and
expressions

of young
people have been used where possible.

AYF Background

The Australian Youth Forum (AYF) was established as a formal communication channel
between the Australian Government
,

young people (aged 15

24) and the youth sector.
The AYF gives young people the opportunity to have their ideas heard, and encourages
them to get involved in ongoing public discussions so that their views can be considered
in the development of Australian
public policy, programs or projects.

The AYF engages with young people in a variety of ways, including through:



the AYF website (
www.youth.gov.au/ayf
)



the AYF Steering Committee



direct engagement activities


partnership activities, youth forums and community
events



online engagement activities


discussion topics and surveys on government policy
and specific issues that are of interest to, or that may affect, young people



socia
l media


AYF on Facebook (
www.facebook.com/AustralianYouthForum
)
,

YouTube (
www.youtube.com/user/AustralianYouthForum
)

and Twitte
r (Twitter
@AYForum)



funding
-

for example Australian Youth Affairs Coalition and Young Australian of
the Year.

Backg
round

Australia’s future relies on the young people of today and on the type of education that
they receive. The Australian Government
,

through schools and other policy and programs
,

aims to provide students with foundation skills, values, knowledge and understanding
necessary for lifelong learning, employment and full participation in society
1
.



In Australia
, formal education or school

generally starts with a kindergarten or pre
-
school
year followed by 12 years of primary and secondary school.




1

http://www.deewr.gov.au/Schooling/Pages/overview.aspx


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State and territory

governments
are largely responsible for funding state government
schools
.

The Australian Government
is responsible for provi
ding

public funding for non
-
government schools
.

Most non
-
government schools have some religious affiliation, with approximately two
-
thirds of

non
-
government school students
enrolled in Catholic schools
.
2

Why young people
are interested in shaping the Aust
ralian Curriculum

Young peop
le are the best experts o
n themselves
.

Likewise, t
hey are in
the best

position
to provide strategic and practical advice on education
because they are
current
and
recent
users of the
system.

Young people are
well

placed to identify emerging issues in education and in
society.

T
hey
have

suggest
ed

innovative mechanisms to support local l
evel planning and
development that can

support inclusion of all

young people
,

including those who are less
likely to remain engage
d in school.


Young people are

also well

placed and

capable of consulting with
other
young people on
issues that are important to them and that impact upon their learning, growth and
development.

Methodology

The

2012
AYF
consultation process
included

an
on
-
line sur
vey and on
-
line discussion
,
a
long with a number of Facebook page ‘likes’

and

small

group

workshop
s
.
W
orkshops
were held
in Western Australia,
South Australia
, New South Wales and Queensland
.


On
-
line survey

Survey Monkey


two online surv
ey
s
,

comprising multiple choice questions

about

shaping
the
two curriculum
subjects
,

were

developed and promoted to encourage young people
to contribute their views.
In total
352 surveys were submitted to the AYF.


The

surveys

are

at
Attachm
ent
A
.


AYF
on
-
line
Discussion topic

T
he AYF website hosted
D
iscussion topic
s

on
the

National Curriculum subject
s of (1)

Health and Physical Education and
(2)
Technologies
.
Generally the D
iscussion topics asked
what should be included in the subject, what should be
left out and how it should be
taught. There were specific questions on diversity in the subject. Thirty six

responses and
11

votes were received

on

the D
iscussion

topic
s
.

The online D
iscussion topic
s

are

at
Attachment
B
.

AYF Facebook




2

http://www.deewr.gov.au/Schooling/Pages/overview.aspx


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The AYF
also heard from young people
via the AYF Facebook page
.
Fifteen

responses
were received via the AYF Facebook site.

Workshops


AYF Steering Committee
members facilitated workshops

in Perth, Adelaide, Brisbane and

Sydney. The AYF acknowledges the

Associati
on Internationale des Etudiants en Sciences
Economiques et Commerciales

(
AEISEC
)

for hosting these workshops
.

Approximately 70
young people participated in workshops on the
se

National Curriculum subjects.


In to
tal, the views and opinions of
484

respondents are included in this submission.


Executive Summary


T
he majority of young people who par
ticipated in the AYF discussions on the national Health and
PE and Technologies curriculum like and value thes
e

subjects at school. They suggested that th
e

subjects
provide
avenue
s

and opportunities

for students to get out of the classroom and away
from the more theoretical subjects.

Young people s
uggested that curriculum topics within the new curriculum should be taught in
hands
-
on and practical ways tha
t have a goal of providing

skills

and knowledge

for young people
to use today and
skills
, knowledge and understandings

that they can

use in

their
future
study and
employment.


An emphasis on self
-
esteem and confidence, managing personal relationships and assisting others
with their mental health needs are suggested topics for the Health and PE curriculum.
Where as a
focus on nutrition, communication and networking, and digital t
echnology are suggested as
important topics for the technologies curriculum.

The qu
estion of curriculum was not discussed without due

atten
tion to the practical elements
of
education including relevant ongoing
training and investment

in teachers
,

equippin
g the
classroom with up
-
to
-
date equipment

and with attention to regularly evaluating curriculum with
input of students. Young people suggest that these
elements of curriculum be built
into the new
curriculum.

Young people readily recognise
d

the oppo
rtunity

that these two curriculla

have in

providing
students and teachers
with

knowledge and understanding of minority

groups, equality and fair
play. They identified
special reasons

for

resourcing rural and remote school
s and

providing
better
access to the o
nli
ne resources
.



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Results


Note on tables and graphical information
:
Not

all of the AYF
contributors provided
information that could be represented
numerically
in this report.
However, the tables
and
graphs
should be considered

as
indicative of the
preferences and

trends acro
ss the

consultation
groups discussed within this submission paper.

Participants







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Approximately

93

per cent

of the people who participated in the AYF consultations were
aged
between 15
-

24 years
of age
.

Fifty three per
cent

were
fe
male and
47
per cent
were
male.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participants

The AYF
Steering Committee and
staff used youth networks to specifically seek the
opinion of young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Approximately
8

per cent
of the people who completed the survey identified themselves as an Australian Aboriginal
or Torres Strait Islander people
s
.



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Distribution

Young people in
Tasmania

were the most
engaged in this topic

via a

high

school that was
attended by a member of the AYF Steering Committee
.




*Note:
Not all respondents

provide
d

their
locality
.


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Section
1.


1.1
Technologies subject




Overwhelmingly
(96 per cent)

of the

young people who participated in the AYF
consultation
believed

that technologies was an important subject
for

the school
curruculum. Just four

per cent of the participants did not think that learning technologies
in high school was important.


Young

peopl
e

felt that education i
n the subject of technology
was important because it
:



p
repare
d

students for employment



m
ade

the
school
learnin
g experience more enjoyable, relevant and hands
-
on



m
ade

learning complex subjects easier.


Approximately three quarters of the survey participants indicated that they would
consider studying a technologies subject in the future.


The following quotes fro
m young people
demonstrate
the importance young people place
in the technologies subjects
.







The aim of a school is to prepare and educate student
s

for what the future will hold. The future holds
copious amounts of technologies that we will need to be able to use and apply in the workforce.”



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Although young people support the inclusion of tech
n
ologies as a subject for the new
national Australian curriculum, there are a number of reservations.
These included lack of
teacher skills in using and repairing equipment and
a fear
that education would become a
on
e
-
size fits all model without
the
persona
l connection and the development of
student
and teacher relationships
.



















The thing with introducing new technologies into the classroom is that many teachers don’t know how
to use them, so we’re in class with a ‘malfunctioning’ smart board and spend half

the time trying ot
figure out how it works.”


Technology is used as a MAJOR teaching tool, instead of an additional one. All the teaching is being
shoved onto learning from online videos and explanations rather than in the classroom. You can learn

online, but the reason we’re in school is because we want a PERSON to explain it to us, someone
interactive.”


For me, actually doing things works
better than learning about doing things If we want to have skills
which look good to employers, we need to learn about new technology AT SCHOOL, not just in our own
time .”


It’s all good and dandy to learn it online, but at the end of the day, having it explained to you by a
person is more engaging than a
computer.”

“Because nowadays technology is a major part of everyone’s lives.



“Technology progresses the efficiency of the human race, which if successfully moderated, can help solve
so many of the worlds problems.”

“Technology opens doors that can improve grades and that allow people to have access to a great
wealth of knowl
edge…



“Most jobs in society use technologies so it is a very important skill to learn. Also they are quick to use
which means we can learn more in a short time.



“All jobs are becoming more and more computer based, to not give the
opportunity to students who
don’t have access to such technology at home would reduce their abilities for a career in the future.




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1.2
What

young people

think of

the subject of Tech
n
ologies

today

Young people already learn som
e of the tech
n
ology subjects and a
majority like learning
them

(83 per cent).
The r
eason
s

provided
for this level

of satisfaction

included
that the
subject is relevant, it i
s easier than trad
i
tional subjects
to learn
and that it taps into the
intrinsic motivation of young people to make learning fun.




In the main, young people
think th
at

tech
n
ologies subject
s

are

enjoyable because
they
are

different from

the traditional subjects. They like
d

the technology subject
s

because
they felt that
they

offered a

break from the usual methods of teaching and learning.


Apart from tech
n
ologies

subjects

being a ‘fun’ way
to learn, young people like that

the
subject is relevant and offers skills which they

regard

as useful to their everyday life.


Th
e following
quotes provide
examples

of the cross
-
section of ideas.
















Future employment
Enjoyable and
different to traditional
subjects
Creative and hands-on
Life skills
What young people think of the
Techologies subject today


I do like subjects that allow for creativity and design that are not offered in
‘standard’ subjects.”


I learnt relevant skills that I still continue to use out of school, and it was a nice change from doing
book work.”

“The generation now is all about keeping up with technologies and school is a great place to
learn/improve.



“Enough of this focus on making teaching techniques ‘modern’ and these fancy ‘’synthesis’ subjects.
Kids need to learn mathematics, natural sciences and reading and writing, separately. There is no need
to try to mix these together

in order to engage students. Doing so only dilutes the content..




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Section
2

2.1
To
pics within the technology curri
culum




The most common technology su
bjects currently studied were: Timber/w
oodwork,
Textiles, Food technology and D
igital technology.




Marriage refers to the public union of
two people in the eye of society and the eye of God. There
should be no prejudice in regards to sex, race, sexual orientation, gender identity or any other feature.”

“The technologies curriculum should emphasis in all syllabus the need for students as young thinkers to
be given the freedom not only to develop the foundation skills in the
subject area but to also be given
assessment on how they think the technology can be used and how it could be improved.



“There tends to be an over
-
reliance on technologies


what about other skills?



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2.2 To
pics within the technology curri
culum…what is
useful



When asked about what technology subjects are useful to everyday life, young people
selected
nutrition as

the

most

relevant. They also selected Food technology,
C
ommunication and networking and Digital technology as usefu
l. Young people explained
their

response to this question from two different perspectives, the first being in regards
to their l
ife skills


usefulness of know
l
e
dge of food and nutrition for

a

healthy lifestyle
;

and then in regards to usefulness in regards to future employment.



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Young people considered that the least useful

technology topics have been J
ewellery
design,
P
lastics,
A
viation and
R
obotics.


With this

feedback

in mind, to ensure that young people find the new curriculum rele
vant
and useful, the new technologies
curriculum sh
ould give consideration to
life skill
development
,

and to future employability skills
,

such as digital technology.

Specialist and
creative subjects are best positioned as optional subjects or as part of a vocational
component of the curriculu
m.

Section 3

3.1
Teaching and Learning in the
Tech
n
ology subject

Young

people are in the prime position to know the most effective ways
to

learn
. The
table below illustrates the
ir

preferred teaching/lear
n
ing techniques in the subject of
technology.
Respondents could choose more than one option.


Marriage refers to the public union of two people in the eye of society and the eye of God. There
should be no prejudice in regards to sex, race, sexual orientation, gender identity or any other feature.”


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Once

again, it was the preference of young people to learn in ways that were
practical
and
relevant to their life,

now and in the future for employment.

The most common forms of teaching/learning were through practical experiences such as
film clubs,
newspapers and clubs (58 per cent) with work experience (53 per cent) and
projects and challenges (57 per cent) also very popular
.

Section 4

4.1
Keeping the Technologies curriculum up
-
to
-
date


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T
echnology is chang
ing at a

faster

rate

than many other elements of
daily life
.

T
o enable
the subject of technologies to remain relev
ant and useful
,

young people suggested that
the most important

consideration

for preparing a new national technology curriculum

is

developing

a strategy to keep i
t

up
-
to
-
date.

Up
-
to
-
date equipment (hardware) was recogni
s
ed as the most important element of
renewal.
Young people suggested that the
type of
equipment
used in the classroom
should reflect the equipment that is used in day
-
to
-
day life and those that are
used by
industry/employers.

Apart from the infrastructure component of
the technology subject,

young people also
indicated that on
-
going teacher training was a key factor in the success or otherwise of a
national technology curriculum.






Section 5

5.1
Cross c
urricula

issues including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
culture and intercultural understanding



Ensuring teachers go through regular training to be kept up to date with new and emerging
technologies as soon as they come out.


“T
he same way VET stays relevant...teachers should have relevant industry experience and knowledge
or technologies and u
pdates must be made to keep up with changes...difficult, but unis do it and it is
important
.”

.



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Young
people identified the potential use of

technology to increas
e appreciation and
respect for diversity
. These included the use of communication technologies for
intercultural communication in real
-
t
ime and

to using technology to research culture.


































Perhaps by communicating

online with people from other parts of the world. Possibly even by
incorporating such learning with a second language and pairing students up with an email penpal type
thing. Or even including learning about different cultures within a project such as des
igning a website.


.


“I
n the school there are various cultures students mixing together to perform technology subjects
would increase understanding. But the use of web technology would show students how the world is a
large
place and that people from all walks of life are using it and that the internet needs to be there for
everyone. Other technology subjects such as food tech and design promote intercultural understanding
because incorporated into those subjects are ideas fr
om many cultures.

.


.


“B
y raising awareness of different cultures. May be able to implement a "email system" with an
international brother/sister school, and enforce in classroom (this could be especially helpful for
students studying foreign
language (e.g. have a French class in Australia commute with an English class
in France).

.


.



Join together with community. Help people who need help. Join together with schools to build a
shelter for the homeless, make a documentary on an issue
that concerns Help build leaders! Teach
students to make a difference not just a school assignment. Be the voice inside their head that says
EVERYTHING is possible!



.



Join together with community. Help people who need help. Join together with

schools to build a
shelter for the homeless, make a documentary on an issue that concerns Help build leaders! Teach
students to make a difference not just a school assignment. Be the voice inside their head that says
EVERYTHING is possible!



.


“Make courses as val
uable and appropr
iate to the group/type of person.”



.


In terms of computer based technologies, use accessible software, hardware and websites.



.



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Health and Physical Education

Section

1


1
.1 Health and Physical
Education subject




Most

young people
(
95 per cent
)

who participated in the AYF consultation believed that
Health and Physical Education

(PE)

was an important subject for the school curriculum.
Generally, young people felt that Health and PE was
important because it:



t
aught young people about being healthy



k
ept young people involved in staying fit and playing sport


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t
aught you
ng people essential life skills.


The following quotes from young people illustrate these points.
















1.2

What young people thought about their experience in Health and
PE at
school


Most

young people (78 per cent)

liked the subject of Health and PE
. They liked it

because
it was fun, taught them practically about sports and fitness, got them out of the
classroom, ease
d the stress of school and taught them
new skills.





“It is essential
especially in today’s society where false advertising in regards to healthy eating and exercise
for kids to understand the true benefits of the human body. For kids who grow up in disadvantaged families,
school may also be one of their only channels to lea
rn about their own body in health education.”


“It gives an opportunity to become part of a sporting community
.



“Because it enables students to learn and experience a variety of sports.”



In our health classes we don’t just learn
about health in PE but we also learn many
,

many important other
things eg. drugs / sex/ healthy choices / driving and all sorts of things that help to influence important life
choices.



“I like the physical activity & I like the things that we are taught because they are important.”

“Gave me the chance to get outside but also learn important stuff involving health eg. sexual education.”

“Because it takes the stress out of
studies.”


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The remaining young people

(22 per cent)

did not like the subject
. They gave reasons
including
not bei
ng a ‘sporty’ kind of person and
not being accommodated due to
disability.












Section

2


2.1 Topics within the Health and PE curriculum

The topics
that young people were most likely to learn
were:



Physical Fitness (86.4 per cent
)



Sex Education (82.5 per cent
)



Fitness testing (80.8 per cent
)
.



Actually, my favourite class was Outdoor Education, we learnt more about survival than running and
swimming for the discipline of being good at an arbitrary rules system.



Physical Education mostly included games which made me feel stupid cause I never played ball games. The
learning stuff was more interesting,

somewhat
.”

“I would rather be

doing academic subje
cts and sport outside of school.”


You always have the sport heads and then the rest of the class who don’t really get to participate. I’m in
the rest of the class
.”

“I had a disability at
school and PE didn’t accommodate to that.”

Summary

Generally young people believed that the Health and PE subje
ct was important to
their life. They like taking the subject. Young people noted that the health and PE
subjects can offer opportunities fo
r
alternative
teaching/learning methods,
but could
be
improved
by the development of

a


physical education unit

which did not consist
of elevating sporting students.


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2.2 Topics

within Health and PE

which were
relevant to their life


Participants were asked what topics within the Health and PE subject were relevant to
their life.
The topics of s
ex education, first aid and healthy choices all ranked amongst th
e
most relevant
. Dance,
gymnastics, child protection and coaching and refereei
n
g all ranked
least relevant.



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Young people
referred to an inability to see some topics’ relevancy to
their life due to a
lack of personal exposure to the subject matter
,

while other respondents

remarked
they
simply

had no interest in those topics
.





2.3
Suggested topics for the new

Health and PE curriculum

Young people were invited to nominate other topics that would be

relevant to their life. A
number of participants noted the
significance and application
of essential life skills
,

such
as managing

individual lifestyle

and

personal health
.




P
articipants

frequently
regarded the topics of sex education, sexual identi
ty and mental
health as critical to young people today.










Other
suggestions included emphasis on topics such as
drugs and alcohol, sports
and
physical education,

self
-
defence and personal safety.


2.4 How the Health and PE curriculum
has up
-
skilled

young people


Whether for me or for someone else, I need to know how to handle different health situations and
conditions, how to manage my own health, maintain a set weight or lose weight, advise others when
they are living an unhealthy
lifestyle, etc.”



Health and PE too often focuses on making students run around an oval, without teaching relevant life
skills such as sexual education and social pressures. These things are also often taught by people not
train
ed specifically in these areas.”



The most important areas of learning f
or me are that of mental health, and sexual health/identity.
Unfortunately, it was not taught as comprehensively as it should have been. And very little was discussed
outsid
e the realm of heterosexuality.”


“Whilst these are relevant, PE classes focus too much on these and not enough on the other aspects of
Hea
lth and Physical Education. Practical skills such as teaching good workout regimes would be gr
eat, but
most of my PE classes
were taken up by different kinds of sports that didn’t teach me many practical life
skills.


There is a lot that is important. The most important idea is to have a comprehensive education, that
isn’t “just about

playing sport and keeping fit”

“A stronger focus of sexual health prevention, especially in Religious schools.”


More needs to be done to include learning
about things outside of heterosexuality. There were many
students in my class, myself included, who could have benefited immensely from being taught more (or at
all) about homosexuality, safe sex , gender identity (outside of the binary of “male” and “fema
le”,
homophobia, mental health and other topics
.”


More education on GLBT issues and a far more thorough peer
-
to
-
peer based sexual health education.
Furthermore, there is little guidance in the later years on practical measures such as STI testing

an
d
where to go to get it done.”


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Almost half of
the respondents expressed satisfaction that their experience in health and
PE prepared and provided th
em with skills in team work (49 per cent) and respecting
others (44 per cent
).



Young people were
invited to suggest
skills th
at would be useful to learn in the Health
and PE curriculum.
The most
commonly suggested skills included
:



self esteem and confidence



t
ime management



s
ocial skills and dealing with relationships
.


Other
suggestions

included

skills on

coping with and assisting friends with mental health
issues, life pathway planning and be
coming

self
-
sufficient
by

growing
our own
food.










Summary

The most relevant areas of the Health and PE curriculum identified by young people
included sex education
, first aid and making healthy choices. Sex education was also the
topic which required the most development and improvement; with an overwhelming
view that it should also incorporate learning about sexual identity, gay, lesbian, bisexual
and transsexual r
elationships and more practical steps on safe sexual practices.

Young people also believed the curriculum could offer more in the areas of mental
health, self esteem and time management and formal education on planning pathways
and self sufficiency.


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Section 3

3.1

The inclusion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, people with a
disability and people from a culturally and linguistically diverse background
in the curriculum


Just under a
quarter of the participants (22 per cent
) responded to this question with a
recommendation.
Many young people
responded with ‘I don’t know’ or with

non
-
specific
information
.


The following
themes emerged from the young people who did respond. These included:




Bi
-
lingual and better trained
teachers













More variety and opportunities in the
way Health and PE is taught















Educating students better about minority groups, equality and fair play





3.2

Incorporating the needs of rural and remote students


Young people were asked how the curriculum could better incorp
orate the needs of rural
and remote students. Of the participants who responded, the majority recommended
better use of technology and the online world.




Having targeted classes taught by experts who both know the topics and are wary of the specific
needs of the groups above. Separating out the physical education and health educ
ation classes would
be helpful.”



By researching and bring
ing in more specific health education for those groups. There are community
groups ot there who specialise in working with people from these groups so consult with them on best
practice to educate these people..


“Better involvement and increased cultural diverse activities in sports. For example sports and activities
which are not just common in Western Society.”

“Offering buddy systems to support kids who need help and teach
those with a better aptitude and
skills to.”

“There needs to be a greater use of online resources, such as forums, websites etc.”

“Work on sensitivity training for those
groups alongside introducing people’s stories from these groups.
Work on providing alternate sports for someone with a disability.”

“Use technology to help deliver study material, create social engagement via technology.”


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More frequent and free transport was suggested as was
holding
more interschool sports
carnivals and excursions.









In addition, using the natural environment where rural and remote schools were situated
was also a popular idea.





















Section 4


4.1

The ways young people like to learn


“Metropolitan schools could visit rural schools for interschool carnival and sports events and to learn
about the difference between country
and city life.”


Include optional sports competitions where travel to rural and remote areas are possible.”


Having different
physical recreation activities included such as those you might not always get to
experience out of the cities, and things that take advantage of the natural environment: bushwalking,
orienteering.



Improving their access to technology that may enable them to access better information than what is
available. Or fund specific health groups to go on a road trip to rural and remote areas to deliver health
information.


Summary

Young people recognized the importance of incorporating the needs of disadvantaged or
vulnerable groups of young people in Australia into the curriculum. In essence, suggestions
to address this matter include training and equipping teachers with more effec
tive skills,
educating students more comprehensively about culturally and linguistically diverse groups
and improving cultural awareness amongst students by incorporating cultural specific
sports and activities in to the curriculum.

The role technology ca
n play in bridging the gap in education of rural and remote students
was identified by respondents.


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Overall, young people preferred to learn through out of school excursions (74

per cent
),
via practical experience (62

per cent
) and group discussions and projects (53

per cent
).
The least favoured option was
through

online forums (20

per cent
) and gender specific
classes (29

per cent
).









4.2

Future interest in the Health and PE
curriculum




Respondents who were interested
(64

per cent
) i
n studying Health and PE

in the future
felt that the subject was particularly fun and interesting and helped with getting a job
later on.


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Of the young people
(
36 per cent
)
who would not study Health and PE further, many
noted that it was not in their field of interest and would not help with their chosen career
path.














4.3

Other recommendations

Young people were given the opportunity to comment further

on how the Health and PE
curriculum could be improved
. The following responses were coll
ected:









It is great and I want to become a PE teacher”

“I’m interested in this stuff but I want it to be in an environment where I’m not afraid to ask questions.”


I think it can provide life skills and important values. Health, whether it be mental or physical, or for
yourself or others, is what people base their emotions and happiness. If we can educate how to
maintain happiness, or how to deal with sadness, I b
elieve it can lead to a healthy lifestyle maintained
not just i
n school, but outside of school.”


It’s interesting but not the
path my life has chosen”


I would love to but it doesn’t help me for uni
.



I don’t need to because I experience these things outside of school”

“Because I find the current teaching methods do not suit my learning.”

“I did not enjoy t
he topic as it over simplified every youth issue as something everyone will experience.
The physical side only reduced my self confidence as it made me aware of how bad my eyesight kept
myself below other students.”

“Because I find it relevant and inte
resting to all aspects of my life.”


“I think

that students would really benefit from an extremely practical session, where they are taken on
an overnight camp, set up the campsite, cook and clean for themselves, learn independence and
teamwork. And they can play orienteering games, sports, have talk
s etc. Kids these days are so reliant
on technology that something like this would do them a world of good.”

“There needs to be more open discussion. There needs to be unbiased teaching of topics that relate to
gender, queer and non
-
heteronormative students. Perhaps a greater reliance on e
-
learning and online
resources.”


50% of school kids woul
d have had sex by the time they leave school. The authorities need to pull their
head out of the sand and acknowledge that young people are having sex, and from a younger age, so
they need the relevant support and information to protect themselves and nego
tiate safe sex
practices
.”


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Summary

According
to
the majority of young people who participated in the AYF discussion,
the Health and
PE curriculum provides a

great avenue and opportunity for students to get out of the classroom
and away from the more theoretical subjects
.


The curriculum could be improved by educating young people on more practical and realistic issues
relating to sex and sexual health, sexual

orientation and mental health.
An emphasis on self
-
esteem and confidence, managing personal relationships and assisting others with their mental
health needs was also suggested. More practical and relevant training invested in teachers,
equipping student
s with comprehensive knowledge and understanding of minority groups,
equality and fair play and resourcing rural and remote schools with better access to the online
world was also recommended.

Broadly, young people

consider the current
sports and physical
education component of the
subject could improve by incorporating more practical skills of orienteering, first aid and self
defence
.





“I wish to warn against gender specific classes


men should understand issues affecting women and
vice versa.”

“I definately recognise the importance of health and physical education classes now that I have finished
school. I wouldn't know how to play many sports for a start. Learning about issues such as sex
education, and life skills can be difficult in a classroom as it is a very theoretical approach for a
practical subject and it is awkward to discuss such topics
with a teacher and peers. Excursions and
guest speakers are a good way to approach this, as well as providing students with extra resources if
they want to do independent research, such as looking at websites at home. Even if it is not the best
approach to

teaching these subjects, it is vital that they get addressed at school, as youth may not
receive education about these topics at home.”


“I understand that people could be really good at sports if they knew the sports existed, but if PE
schooling is supposed to be any indication of living a healthy balanced life
-

it was not a good foundation
for it.”



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Appendices

Attachment A


AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM
-

TECHNOLOGIES

Why do
you think
the Technologies
subject

is important at school?


Is

learning about
agriculture, design, digital technologies, engineering and food technologies
useful

in your day
-
to
-
day life?


How can the Technologies curriculum stay up to date with the rapid changes of technology in ou
r
world?


Well, the
Technology

subjects

are

open

for discussion and this is your chance to have
a

say on
what
should

be included in the new Australian Curriculum

on Technologies
.



The Australian Curriculum, Assessment and

Reporting Authority (ACARA) is

developing the
Foundation to Y
ear 12 curriculum and has

developed a
Draft Shape of the Australian Curriculum:
Technologies

paper. You can view the paper here
:
www.acara.edu.au/technologies.html

The

AYF and ACARA
would like to hear

young people’s
views

in relation to the following questions:

1.

Why do you

think
the Technology

subjects are

important

at school
?


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2.

What do you think should/shouldn’t be included in the new
Technologies

curriculum?
Why?

3.

How should
Technologies

be taught at school?


Join the discussion and/or share your thoughts on
Technologies

curriculum
by
answering our

short
online survey
.
https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/Technol
ogies


Your feedback will be consolidated into a formal AYF response to ACARA’s consultation.


Further reading:

Shape of the Australian Curriculum v3.0 (used to guide the proposed Australian Curriculum)


http://www.acara.edu.au/verve/_resources/The_Shape_of_the_Australian_Curriculum_V3.pdf




AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM


HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Do you think
learning about
Health and Physical Education

at school

is important?


Is

learning about healthy eating habits
,
sexual health
and how to be physically active and stay fit
important in

your day to day life?


Well, the Health and Physical Education subject is up for discussion and this is your chance
to have
a

say on what will be included in the new Health and Physical Education Australian Curriculum.



The Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) are developing the
Foundation to Year 12 curriculum and have developed a
Draft Sh
ape of the Australian Curriculum:
Health and Physical Education

paper. You can view the
ACARA
paper here:
www.acara.edu.au/hpe.html

The AYF
would like to hear about young people’s experiences

and opinion

in relation to the
following:

4.

Why do you

think

the

H
ealth and
P
hysical
E
ducation subject

is important

at school
?

5.

What do you think should/shouldn’t be included in the new Health and Physical
Education curriculum?
Why?

6.

How should Health and Physical Educat
ion be taught at school?


Join the discussion and/or share your thoughts on
Health and Physical Education

curriculum

by
answering our
short
online survey
.
https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/HealthPE


Your feedback will be consolidated into a formal AYF response to ACARA’s consultation.


Further reading:

Shape of the Australian Curriculum v3.0 (used to guide the proposed Australian Curriculum)

http://www.acara.edu.au/verve/_resources/The_Shape_of_the_Australian_Curriculum_V3.pdf



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Attachment B


Technologies and Health and Physical Education surveys


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