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Filing Information:
June 2013
, IDC #
CA3SSC13
, Volume: 1


Canadian Strategic Sourcing and Cloud Services
:
Competitive Analysis

COMPETI TI VE ANALYSI S


I DC Mar ket Scape: Canadi an Publ i c I aaS 2013

Vendor
Anal ysi s


Mark Schrutt

I N THI S EXCERPT

The content for this excerpt was taken directly from the IDC MarketScape:
IDC
MarketScape: Canadian Public IaaS 2013
by
Mark Schrutt

(Doc # CA
SSC13).
All or
parts of the following sections are included in this exc
erpt: IDC Opinion, In This Study,
Situation Overview, Future Outlook, Essential Guidance, and Synopsis. Also included
is
Figure
7
.

I DC OPI NI ON

The Canadian public
i
nfrastructure
-
as
-
a
-
s
ervice (IaaS) market is forecast to grow by
more than
a
50% CAGR over the next four years. It is a fast
-
moving, competitive
,

and
emerging market that by 2016 will be valued at more
than C$250 million. IDC
believes t
hat the timing is right to assess the primary vendors of public IaaS

and
provide our perspective on which providers will set the path as the market matures.
Using
the
IDC
MarketScape methodology, our premiere research tool, we evaluated a
dozen vendors on
close to 100 criteria. The IDC

MarketScape assesses
a vendor
'
s
current capabilities, a vendor
'
s strategy to drive public IaaS sales,
and

the Canadian
buyer
'
s view on market leadership. IDC approached the provider scoring from the
perspective of the average

Canadian business: midsize (500 employees) to large (up
to 5,000 employees) organizations. We invited firms with more than C$20 million in
hosting revenue or C$1 million in public IaaS sales to participate in the study. In
summary, IDC found:



The ability to fund massive datacentre facilities and scale compute and storage
resources are key to success in the public IaaS market.
Scale was a critical
criterion

in the
IDC MarketScape

and
was

balanced against more traditional
factors such as
consulti
ng,
integration and ongoing support.



Most Canadian
-
based IaaS providers are leaning toward a managed, virtual
private IaaS model. IDC believes vendors need to expand their IaaS portfolio to
include self
-
serve, on
-
demand access to infrastructure resources
t
o better match
customer demands.



W
hile 60%
of buyers preferred to have IaaS delivered

from
within
Canadian
borders
, buying in
-
Canada
solutions
ranked

unusually

low on the list of factors
that are weighed when making decisions around cloud.

IDC believes tha
t
while
the

stated

prefer
ence for in
-
Canada solutions is

important in terms of relationship
management, it is also
a convenient excuse for other factors that revolve around

knowledge and comfort with nontraditional vendors as well as inexperience in
managi
ng the reputational
risk
of outsourcing.

33 Yonge St., Suite 420, Toronto, Ontario Canada, M5E 1G4


#
CA3SSC13


©2013 IDC



IBM scored the highest in the IDC MarketScape.
Most of the vendors ranked as
Major Players.

Cloud is relatively new, and
offerings continue to evolve
,

so

market leadership is still an insecure position. We believe t
hat over the next two
to three years, there is time for vendors to make significant moves in the IDC
MarketScape rankings.


©2013 IDC

Excerpt of
#
CA3SSC13

1

I N THI S STUDY

This IDC study uses the vendor assessment model called IDC MarketScape. This
research is a quantitative and qualitative assessment of the characteristics that
explain a firm
'
s success in the marketplace and help anticipate its ascendancy.

This study asses
ses the capability and business strategy of many of the leading
p
ublic
i
nfrastructure
-
as
-
a
-
s
ervice vendors active in the Canadian market. This
evaluation is based on a comprehensive framework and set of parameters expected
to be most conducive to success i
n providing infrastructure
-
based
c
loud services
during both the short term and the long term. A significant and unique component of
this evaluation is the inclusion of the perception of
c
loud buyers of both the key
characteristics and the capabilities of t
hese IaaS providers. As one would expect of
market leaders, overall, these firms performed very well on this assessment.

This study is composed of two key sections. The first part is a definition or description
of the characteristics that IDC analysts beli
eve make a successful
p
ublic IaaS
provider. These characteristics are based on buyer and vendor surveys and key
analysts
'

observations of industry best practices.

The second part is a visual aggregation of multiple firms into a
single bubble

chart
format.
This display concisely exhibits the observed and quantified scores of the

c
loud providers.

A review of each vendor and a description of
each vendor
'
s

p
ublic
IaaS services
are

also provided.

The document concludes with IDC
'
s essential guidance to support
continued growth
and improvement of these firms
'

offerings.


Me t h o d o l o g y

IDC MarketScape criteria selection, weightings, and vendor scores represent well
-
researched IDC judgment about the market and specific firms. IDC analysts tailor the
range of standard

characteristics by which firms are measured through structured
discussions, surveys, and interviews with market leaders, participants, and end
buyers. Market weightings are based on user interviews, buyer surveys, and the input
of a review board of IDC ex
perts in each market. IDC analysts base individual firm
scores and, ultimately, firm positions on the IDC MarketScape,
on
surveys and
interviews with the firms, publicly available information, and buyer experiences in an
effort to provide an accurate and c
onsistent assessment of each firm
'
s characteristics,
behavior, and capability.


SI TUATI ON OVERVI EW


T h e Ma r k e t p l a c e f o r I a a S

The Canadian
p
ublic IaaS

market is still developing, having had its first in
-
Canada
offerings for just over four years. As such, IDC established realistic criteria for
inclusion in the study. Vendors had to have

either

C$1 million in
p
ublic IaaS compute

2

Excerpt of
#
CA3SSC13

©2013 IDC

and/or storage services or

C$20 million in hosting revenue and currently offer
infrastructure
-
based public and/or VPC cloud services to Canadian users.

Today, there are well over
1,000

vendors offering
c
loud services such as SaaS and
PaaS in the Canadian market. The selection proce
ss is far easier in the infrastructure
-
based
c
loud market. Massive investments in technologies, facilities
,

and operational
personnel
are the table

stakes in the

IaaS space. There are only a handful of vendors
with the means to offer in
-
Canada
p
ublic IaaS
services as well as a small number of
global IaaS players (
with no Canadian DC presence) that are targeting the Canadian
market with in
-
country direct sales or partners. This study

includes 12 vendors. And
while there surely will be new entrants to the mar
ket, IDC categorizes IaaS vendors
into four groups:



Large
s
ystems
i
ntegrators

(SIs).

These vendors offer a full range of
c
loud
technologies,
including

hardware and software as well as
p
ublic IaaS, with a
particular focus on
"
h
ybrid
"

c
loud environments. As they do for the majority of
their IT services, the large SIs target the midmarket and enterprise
-
sized
organizations with their IaaS offerings. Public IaaS in particular is promoted to
the commercial businesses with
revenue of C$500 m
illion or more.

Their
p
ublic
IaaS offerings are promoted as enterprise

grade,
typically
in
a virtual private,
vendor
-
managed
,

or

pay
-
as
-
you
-
go model



or
in
some combination

of these
.



Telecom
-
based
p
roviders
.

Telecoms offer the full scope of infrastructure

services,
including

hosting, networking
,

and managed application services
. T
hey
have yet to build out their portfolio to include extensive software or professional
service options. Instead
, the telcos have focused on providing infrastructure
-
based service
s to their target customer set. A key differentiator for telecom
-
based providers is their ability to offer network and Internet components
embedded in their cloud services, which results in seamless, high
-
availability
IaaS services. Telecoms also promote t
heir offerings as in
-
Canada and fully data

resident.
IDC anticipates
that
over the next 12 months
,

telecom
-
based providers
will
extend their public IaaS to include both VPC and
non
-
VPC offerings

and
,

instead of competing on price, will continue to rely on their in
-
Canada
offerings
and end
-
to
-
end value proposition.



Cloud
-
centric

p
roviders
.

Cloud
-
centric

firms are vendors
with

infrastructure
services offerings centered on IaaS. IDC included Microsoft an
d Amazon Web
Services in this
IDC MarketScape
. The field of specialty cloud providers will soon
expand to include Google (Compute Engine) and VMware. Both Microsoft and
AWS view cloud as an extension of their traditional business and leverage
massive inves
tment in
datacentre assets

to package and deliver
services
. AWS
has used a similar
mass
-
market

approach

that quickly vaulted
Amazon.com

Inc.

into the world
'
s largest online retailer. Microsoft on the other hand expanded
its
development platform by launchin
g Azure in 2010. Both providers now offer a full
range of cloud services and are building extensive VAR and channel
relationships.



Hosting
f
irms
.

Hosting firms are mostly focused on infrastructure services and
limit the availability of other associated
c
lo
ud services. The IaaS services
provided by these vendors are best suited for firms that have a range of

©2013 IDC

Excerpt of
#
CA3SSC13

3

infrastructure
requirements,
including

colocation

and
p
rivate and
p
ublic IaaS.

The
hosting firms active in Canada offer managed, virtual private cloud
(VPC)
services. The target market for hosters span
s

small and midsize

businesses
(
SMBs
)

to
the
upper end of the midmarket.

FUTURE OUTLOOK

The cloud market is the fastest
-
growing IT segment in Canada. Cloud involves all
facets of ICT, crossing lines between

telecom, datacentre, services, software
development
,

and applications. Along with big data and mobility, cloud is one of the
most important and hyped technology trends to hit Canada in over a decade. Cloud is
complex

and

confusing
,

and if buyers do not ma
ke informed decisions, cloud can
introduce additional risk and cost to running IT. Cloud will undoubtedly have a
permanent impact on the Canadian IT landscape
,

and IDC believes the timing is right
to take an unbiased view of who is setting the path to foll
ow and
who is
expected to
lead the
p
ublic IaaS market.


I D C Ma r k e t S c a p e
:

C a n a d i a n P u b l i c I a a S
Ma r k e t
V
e n d o r
A s s e s s me n t

The IDC vendor assessment for the Canadian Public IaaS market represents IDC
'
s
opinion on which providers are well positioned today throu
gh current capabilities and
which providers are best positioned to gain market share over the next few years.
Positioning in the upper right of the grid indicates that providers are well positioned to
gain market share. For the purposes of analysis, IDC di
vided potential key strategy
measures for success into two primary categories: capabilities and strategies.

Positioning on the y
-
axis reflects the provider
'
s current capabilities and menu of
services and how well aligned
the provider

is to customer
s
'

curre
nt

needs. The
capabilities category focuses on the capabilities of the company and services today,
here and now. Under this category, IDC looks at how well a provider is
building/delivering capabilities that enable it to execute its chosen strategy in the
market.

Positioning on the x
-
axis, or strategies axis, indicates how well the provider
'
s future
strategy aligns with what customers will require in three to five years. The strategies
category focuses on high
-
level strategic decisions and underlying assump
tions about
offerings, customer segments, business, and go
-
to
-
market plans for the future, in this
case defined as the next three to five years. Under this category, analysts look at
whether or not a provider
'
s strategies in various areas are aligned with

IDC
'
s
expectations of shifting

customer requirements (and spending) over a defined future
time period.

Figure
7

shows each provider
'
s position in the vendor assessment chart. A provider
'
s
market share is indicated by the size of the bubble.



4

Excerpt of
#
CA3SSC13

©2013 IDC

F I GURE 7

I DC
Mar k et Sc ape: Canadi an Publ i c I aaS

Mar k et Vendor As s es s ment


Source: IDC, 2013



V e n d o r P r o f i l e s

The section
s that follow

provide an overview of the various providers in this
s
tudy.
Cloud offerings are continuously changing
,

and as such, IDC recommends readers
refer to vendor
W
eb sites for the most recent information on the

vendors
'

public IaaS
portfolio.

BLACKIRON/Rogers

BLACKIRON was formed as an operating division of Primus Telecommunications
Group Inc
orporated
(
PTG
i)

in O
ctober 2012. BLACKIRON combined all of Primus
'

IT
and managed services businesses into one unit. Subsequently, the BLACKIRON

©2013 IDC

Excerpt of
#
CA3SSC13

5

division was sold to Rogers Communications in April 2013 and is now operating
under the Rogers Business Services arm of RCI.

BLACKI
RON goes to market with a slightly different focus and message than it had
when IT services were under the Primus umbrella. Where Primus had targeted SMEs
up to the 500
-
employee level, BLACKIRON
'
s focus is on the next layer up, namely
the upper midmarket,
businesses with 100

2,000 employees. Realizing
this market
had different buying

criteria and a potentially heightened set of IT requirements,
BLACKIRON has branded its hosting services as mission critical and enterprise
ready. BLACKIRON
'
s newest datacentre
, located in the Toronto area, is certified
t
ier
3

and LEED silver, the first facility of its kind in Canada. BLACKIRON boasts PCI
compliance

and

SAS 70 and plans to certify each of its datacentre
s

by the Uptime
Institute. BLACKIRON has built a portfolio of highly resilient, secure
,

and
geographically diversified datacentres to back up this message.
BLACKIRON
currently has eight facilities with 38,000 sq ft of raised floor. It plans on expanding its

capacity
by

over 4,000 sq ft later in 2013 and an additional 20,000

sq ft

in 2014.

BLACKIRON provides a full suite of managed hosting services including colocation,
dedicated hosting, managed storage
,

and backup. It currently delivers its IaaS
offering ou
t of the Toronto and Ottawa sites and expects to go live in Edmonton
before the end of 2013.

BLACKIRON was one of the first Canadian cloud providers, having launched its
service in 2009. BLACKIRON has made a series of changes, enhancements
,

and
upgrades to

its service, culminating with a relaunch of its IaaS offering to coincide
with its
rebranding in October
2012
. BLACKIRON
'
s

public IaaS is a VPC model and is
packaged as a
"
cloud organization
"

with integrated security, network communications,
backup
,

and c
ustomer portal.

BLACKIRON follows a consultative sales approach to cloud computing. It has a four
-
step process, beginning with
a
requirements definition

and

moving through solution
design, delivery
,

and support. BLACKIRON offers four levels of support: sel
f
-
managed
,

managed basic
,

managed proactive
,

and consultative management.
BLACKIRON
'
s value proposition is built on a value proposition
similar to that
of other
telecom
-
based providers
, that being

an extensive facilities footprint,
a
communications
network
,

and end
-
to
-
end capabilities.

BLACKIRON

differentiates
itself with value
-
added services, hybrid computing
,

and the level of detail
it
ha
s

put
into
its
cloud offering.

BLACKIRON is a Major Player in this IDC MarketScape assessment in the public
IaaS

space. B
LACKIRON also has a proven partner channel with VAR and SIs
focusing on the healthcare and financial services industries.
IDC anticipates that w
hile
not completely formalized, BLACKIRON will expand this channel and IaaS will be a
significant contr
ibutor to growth in
its
reseller segment. We also expect BLACKIRON
will extend the functionality of
its
IaaS offering, provide additional flexibility and control
of cloud resources to its clients
,

and expand its services to include SaaS, PaaS, and
true
-
met
ered public IaaS offerings.


6

Excerpt of
#
CA3SSC13

©2013 IDC

ESSENTI AL GUI DANCE


A d v i c e f o r P r o v i d e r s

For more than 25 years, outsourcing vendors have delivered to their clients IT
services with more often than not the same IT staff and facilities that
they

had before.
This asset
-
based on
shore model has withstood two recessions, the emergence of the
global players
,

a
nd the
t
ier 1s
'

own embrace of
offshoring. IDC
Canada
projects that
this traditional model of outsourcing will hit its peak by 201
5

and thereafter gradually
decline.
G
rowth ins
tead will come from alternative outsourcing models such as virtual
desktop, utility
,

and cloud computing.

The good news for traditional outsourcers is that
while
these alternative models will
cannibalize some traditional business, they will more dramatical
ly expand the

way in
which services are delivered

and the market for those services
. And in many cases, it
will be the larger Canadian IT service vendors
that
will be providing services such as
cloud. As the incumbents in the Canadian outsourcing market, f
irms such as IBM

and
HP

have
some risk but also an enormous amount

to gain from cloud computing. But
this base, just like traditional outsourcing in itself, will be under constant pressures
(such as pricing and contractual flexibility).
IDC anticipates tha
t a
long with tipping the
pendulum away from traditional outsourcing, cloud will stimulate a

continued

expansion of datacentre space in Canada. Already
,

firms such as
TELUS, Savvis,
OnX
,

and Bell are making significant investments to enlarge their footprint

in support
of increased demand. IDC also expects further expansion of new players in the
Canadian marketplace,
as exhibited by Amazon
'
s
, Google
'
s
,

and
Microsoft
'
s

increasing presence in Canada.

IDC believes that cloud will have its winners and losers.
The big winner will be the
customer,
or
the IT buyer.

Cloud provides sourcing decision makers with more
options as well as holding the promise of helping companies become more productive
and enabling new streams of revenue and new ways of
doing business
:



R
ecruiting and retaining qualified staff.

The IT team is not necessarily as
virtual as the technology. It will be critical for service providers to make

investments not only in IT assets but in their consulting practice needed to drive

mindshare and develop

cloud
-
based solutions for their customers. Virtualization

skills are some of the most sought after in Canada. Service providers need to

become an employer of choice and continue to sustain and build on this effort.



Reaching the SMB market.

The Canadian sm
all and midsize businesses

segment is a deep and rich sector that historically has been difficult to market to.

Public IaaS holds promise, but vendors will be challenged to differentiate

themselves and influence decision makers. The two national telco carr
iers,

TELUS
and
Bell, hold a distinct advantage in this marketplace, yet it will

take a
tremendous marketing effort
for them
to be successful.



Not
depend
ing

on new business.

There will be some cannibalization of sales

as vendors roll out their IaaS offerin
gs.
T
his crossover may be
sizable
,

and as
such,

vendors should not discount the potential that customers will move their


©2013 IDC

Excerpt of
#
CA3SSC13

7

dedicated hosting environment to the cloud and therefore should not build their

business cases solely on net
-
new business.


A d v i c
e f o r
B u y e r s



Align your efforts
.

The shift to a more business
-
focused IT department is
already
underway.

More progressive CIOs have built closer ties and integrated IT
(resources, activities
,

and sourcing decisions) with the business. By focusing on
what solutio
ns are needed rather than how
they are

delivered, CIOs are crafting
IT departments that will look far different than traditional IT but are much more
flexible, responsive
,

and effective.



Plan.

Planning starts with the needs of the business, how IT can supp
ort
the
business
'

goals
,

and what options are available
for IT
to do
it
s job

better and
more cost effectively.
Cloud changes how IT gets done, sometimes
supplementing
,

and in other situations replacing
,

how services are delivered.
Companies need to reasses
s their IT strategy and determine if and when
traditional technologies and tasks such as test/dev and backup and recovery can
be moved to the cloud. This new IT strategy cannot sit on the shelf. Planning
needs to be a continuous process that realigns the b
usiness and IT and
addresses the rebalancing between internally and externally provided service

and

hosting, public, private
,

and hybrid IaaS.



Scale quickly
.

In today
'
s uncertain economy, leading CIOs are driving toward a
sustainable, low
-
cost framework th
at provides their companies the ability to
expand and shift strategies as their business dictates. Infrastructure
-
based cloud
technologies are enabling top Canadian companies to take advantage of the
current climate. There is too much at stake. Canadian co
mpanies need to move
quickly to take cloud off the drawing board and into production.



Manage
IT
.

IT needs

to take a lead role not only in evaluating and selecting
cloud providers but also
in
ensuring

services are implemented seamlessly and
managed
properly. Cloud providers need to be integrated into the ongoing IT
management and governance framework. The IT management framework needs
to address measuring the quality and effectiveness of the services and how
additional services are added, reduced
,

an
d removed. Furthermore, cloud needs
to be managed as part of the full IT portfolio and continuously monitored and
adjusted to ensure that it enables rather than inhibits a company
'
s success.

LEARN MORE


R e l a t e d R e s e a r c h



Canadian Infrastructure Outsourcing
2013

2017 Forecast

(IDC #CA4SSC13,
May
2013)



Worldwide Hosted Private Cloud Services 2012

2016 Forecast: New Models for
Delivering Infrastructure Services

(IDC #238689, December 2012)


8

Excerpt of
#
CA3SSC13

©2013 IDC



Who
'
s Jumping on the Cloud? Canadian Cloud Adoption Patterns and Attitud
es

(IDC #CA3CCS12, December 2012)



Canadian Cloud Buyer Budget and Cost Expectations

(IDC #CA4CCS12,
December 2012)



Canadian Cloud Software 2012

2016 Forecast and 2011 Vendor Shares

(IDC
#CA6ECA12, October 2012)



Canadian IT Services 2011 Vendor Shares: A Lo
ok at 2011 Performance,
Strategy, and Future Prospects for the Top 10 Players in Canada

(IDC
#CA19ES12, September 2012)



Worldwide and Regional Public IT Cloud Services 2012

2016 Forecast

(IDC
#236552, August 2012)



Worldwide SaaS and Cloud Software 2012

201
6 Forecast and 2011 Vendor
Shares

(IDC #236184, August 2012)



Canadian Public IT Cloud Services: 2012

2016 Forecast Summary

(IDC
#CA6ES12, July 2012)



Canadian Hosting, Data Centre and IaaS Competitive Overview

(IDC
#CA9SSC12, April 2012)


S y n o p s i s

This
IDC
study assesses the capability and business strategy of many of the leading
public infrastructure
-
as
-
a
-
service
(IaaS)
vendors active in the Canadian market.
The
Canadian public
IaaS
market is forecast to grow by more than
a
50% CAGR over the
next four
years. It is a fast
-
moving, competitive
,

and emerging market that
,

by 2016
,

will be valued at more than C$250 million.

"
IDC believes that the timing is right to assess the primary vendors of public IaaS and
provide our perspective on which providers will s
et the path as the market mature
s
,
"

says Mark Schrutt,
d
irector
,

IT Services and Enterprise Applications.
"
Using
the IDC
MarketScape methodology, our premiere research tool, we evaluated a dozen
vendors on close to 100 criteria.
The IDC MarketScape assesse
s
vendors
'

current
capabilities, vendors
'

strateg
ies

to drive public IaaS sales, a
nd
the Canadian buyer
'
s
view on market leadership.

IDC approached the provider scoring from the perspective
of the average Canadian business: midsize (500 employees) to large

(up to 5,000
employees) organizations. We invited firms with more than C$20 million in hosting
revenue or C$1 million in public IaaS sales to participate in the study. In summary,
IDC found
that the minority of

provider
s

ranked in the
L
eader

category. Clo
ud is
relatively new, offerings continue to be rolled out
,

and market leadership is still being
formed. We believe that over the next two to three years, there is time for vendors to
move up the IDC MarketScape rankings. That said, IBM scored the highest i
n the IDC
MarketScape.
Most of the vendors ranked as Major Players
.
"



©2013 IDC

Excerpt of
#
CA3SSC13

9




C o p y r i g h t
No t i c e

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