The Road to Integrated Systems

slurpslapoutΔίκτυα και Επικοινωνίες

20 Νοε 2013 (πριν από 4 χρόνια και 1 μήνα)

80 εμφανίσεις











The Road to Integrated Systems
Physical and Network Security Merge to Drive
Business Processes


White Paper

www.honeywellintegrated.com


Honeywell Integrated Systems Convergence White Paper
Convergence WP, rev. 1 – September 2007 © 2007 Honeywell International, Inc. All rights reserved.
2

Table of Contents

Executive Summary......................................................................................................................3

The Complexity of System Information.........................................................................................4

The Increase in the Complexity of Vulnerabilities.........................................................................4

Honeywell’s Way Forward............................................................................................................4

Common Security Policy Management and Control..................................................................6

Common User Provisioning and Single Sign-on.......................................................................6

Single Access Credential..........................................................................................................6

Bringing it all Together..............................................................................................................6

Going Forward..............................................................................................................................7

About Honeywell...........................................................................................................................8

About the Authors.........................................................................................................................8


Honeywell Integrated Systems Convergence White Paper
Convergence WP, rev. 1 – September 2007 © 2007 Honeywell International, Inc. All rights reserved.
3

Executive Summary
Convergence – The Next Step in Integration
For years, industry and analysts have been touting the benefits of integrated systems that would
improve the decision-making process by taking information from disparate functions and
processes and organizing it efficiently. Strides continue to be made in driving efficiencies
throughout the organization through just this sort of thought: Inventory and purchasing systems,
payroll and HR systems, HVAC and fire systems, door entry and elevator systems all coming
together in solutions that drive productivity by correlating the data that these formerly disparate
systems generated. The industry calls these “converged” solutions, but in the end these efforts
are all focused on creating systems that conform to business processes. By driving efficiencies
throughout the organization, those systems improve productivity of the workforce.
Unfortunately, physical security has traditionally been left out of this efficiency discussion. In
most organizations, building access control and security are focused solely on securing physical
assets. They are typically managed by facilities operators who deploy locking and alarm
systems to minimize the risk of theft and vandalism. A more complex organization may have a
corporate security department that takes experience from the law enforcement world to
centralize these operations and deploy more advanced surveillance systems. But in the end, the
goal of security is the same as facility maintenance: to keep a company’s assets up and
running.
IT organizations have always had a parallel goal in mind: to deploy networks and systems that
keep their companies running efficiently. But in addition to this, IT has always seen security as a
priority in deploying their networks and systems. Their goal is to ensure the security of the
information data that is used by their employees.
But why should these worlds exist independently if they have parallel goals in mind? The
answer is in technology and culture.
- Physical security has always been seen as the first line of defense in managing an
organization’s security. In a world where all of an organization’s work occurred within
the confines of the four walls of a building, a good lock or physical access system
was all that was needed to maintain the integrity of physical assets and data.

- Facilities and security operators with a law enforcement mindset are accustomed to
working in a world of command and control. This is in stark contrast to working in the
IT industry, which has flourished in an environment of open communicating systems
and standards.

Getting these two worlds to work together takes investment and time. In an information-driven
economy dominated by remote networks and VPNs, a more holistic view of enterprise security
operations is needed to overcome these obstacles. We are working in a time that this
opportunity is more real than ever. But what else is driving this direction?
Honeywell Integrated Systems Convergence White Paper
Convergence WP, rev. 1 – September 2007 © 2007 Honeywell International, Inc. All rights reserved.
4

The Complexity of System Information
The typical organization produces several hundred thousand event logs stemming from various
user activities, including accessing buildings or rooms, accessing computers and applications;
communicating by e-mail and instant messaging; and printing, copying, editing, and deleting
files. All of these can be highly relevant to protecting an organization’s confidentiality, privacy,
and security.
This trend has only increased with the digitalization of physical security data. Digital video and
smart card applications have taken what historically have been stores of analog data that were
recalled and searched only following a precipitating event. These systems are now capable of
creating useful, organizable data that can be integrated into a more holistic decision-making
process.
To make matters worse, an increasing number of security solutions fall outside of the immediate
scope of today’s security infrastructure. For example, identity management and information
security clearly tie into corporate functions such as HR or strategic development, but they also
need to be linked with IT security. Ultimately, combining event and systems information with
security management results in better visibility, cost savings, and higher efficiency when
protecting and managing enterprise-wide IT systems.
1

The Increase in the Complexity of Vulnerabilities
With the introduction of regulations around data collection protection such as the Health
Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA); the Gramm, Leach, Bliley Act (GLBA);
Sarbanes-Oxley and Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD-12) configuration and
regulatory compliance, organizations look for a framework in which to monitor and automatically
enforce compliance with specific corporate-wide configurations as well as with government or
industry regulations and standards. Both areas demand auditing, enforcement, updating, and
documentation—and therefore stretch the capabilities and budgets of many organizations.
Add to this the sheer volume of expanding IT threats and vulnerabilities affecting more and
more applications and other system infrastructure components. Companies are now looking for
solutions that help them assess and manage their security position. They need tools that help
them manage and prioritize the sheer volume of threat and vulnerability-related information
generated by a variety of security systems.
Honeywell’s Way Forward
Technology and regulatory trends are driving organizations toward integrating their IT and
physical security systems. The idea of “convergence” represents an approach to using data
generated by both physical security and IT systems to drive business process efficiency. This
can be as simple as using digital video cameras on an existing LAN for video surveillance and
as complex as using virus threat information to proactively control physical access to a building.
The convergence of physical, network, and data security are emerging in a new way to help you
manage your business. This starts by properly structuring your data. Then you can get that


1
Forrester Quick Take: The Convergence of Systems and Security Management, Thomas Raschke.

Honeywell Integrated Systems Convergence White Paper
structured data to talk with other systems. Once the various systems are communicating, they
can start to build a knowledge base that is specific to your business. Workflows are identified,
bottlenecks are identified faster…your business is learning to be more efficient.
Honeywell wants to take this vision to your business. The vision is the culmination of our years
of experience in driving efficiencies throughout manufacturing and business organizations. We
are working to break down the cost barriers of deploying these types of solutions through
standardized platforms, common interfaces, and application of the latest technologies.
The framework can be seen not only as a technology evolution but as a migration path as your
organization grows and realizes the need to drive more systems-level integration and
productivity.
The Honeywell SmartPlus™ Convergence Solution

Convergence WP, rev. 1 – September 2007 © 2007 Honeywell International, Inc. All rights reserved.
5

Honeywell Integrated Systems Convergence White Paper


Pro-Watch
Physical Security
Systems
Common Security Policy Management and Control
Your IT infrastructure serves as the backbone for deploying your converged
solution. By deploying IP-enabled security systems you are able to take
advantage of the fixed investment and improve its ROI. While the analysis will
vary based on application, the investment will have an even higher ROI when
including the indirect benefits of creating a more actionable and integratable
form of data-enabled by technologies such as IP-enabled video surveillance.

Developing common protocols for managing access to your company’s assets
and data enables more efficient provisioning and management. Your
organization can start developing role-based policies that can manage badge
issuance, enrollment, revocation processes, and XML interfaces for integration
with identity management solutions.


SmartPlus
Identity Manager

Common User Provisioning and Single Sign-on
The various systems running on your IT infrastructure were all implemented to
improve the productivity of your workforce. These systems have become so
ubiquitous that we often forget how many of them we use in any given day.
Today, unfortunately, most of these systems run independently and require
unique user provisioning. Driving a common interface will improve productivity
and ensure that the right employees have access to the right information and
workflows.


SmartPlus
Badging

Single Access Credential
As a result of HSPD-12, the deployment of smart card credentials and
applications is experiencing widespread adoption. The technologies allow the
integration of physical access, network access, and other data onto a single
credential. These technologies enable strong authentication for access to
assets and data.


Pro-Watch
Physical Security
Systems

Bringing it all Together
• Correlating Physical Security and IT Security Events
By creating usable data through IP-enabled technologies, physical security
events and IT security events can now be correlated that would have
remained independent from each other in the past. For instance, access to
the network should only be granted to employees who have used their
secure credential to access the building. Access to certain areas of your
building can be granted based on IT security threat levels. This “event
addition” recognizes threats by correlating seemingly disparate events. The
data can now be compared on an “apples to apples” basis to drive an
enhanced security policy.

• Unified Auditing and Response of Physical and IT Events
Once you are receiving common data, you can create a common policy for
responding to physical and IT events. This can be useful for meeting
compliance regulations, but can be even more effective in managing your
business through common response protocols across the organization.
Convergence WP, rev. 1 – September 2007 © 2007 Honeywell International, Inc. All rights reserved.
6

Honeywell Integrated Systems Convergence White Paper
Convergence WP, rev. 1 – September 2007 © 2007 Honeywell International, Inc. All rights reserved.
7


• Learning and Proactive Event Management in a Real-time
Environment
Most IT and physical security systems are reactive and take action based
on events. Proactive event threat management allows your business to
correlate real-time information with historical events. The system “learns”
how to manage the current environment and can react in a real-time
manner, increasing the value of your system and improving your ROI. The
benefits to an organization using such a system can be substantial. By
integrating several systems together to share information, an organization
is able to see vulnerabilities in real-time; a PC left logged on while an
employee is at lunch, established VPN connections while the employee is
badged into the building, and the ability to link IT security events with
physical security responses all drive real-time security policy management.
How organizations choose to implement these new toolkits is left up to
them and their individual security and compliance requirements.

Going Forward
Over the coming months, Honeywell will introduce several technologies that will allow your
organization to take advantage of the convergence between IT and physical security. Given all
of the benefits of a converged system—productivity from common protocols, increased security
of physical assets and data, and improved ROI on IT and security infrastructure investments—
Honeywell is positioned to be your partner of choice for converged solutions. For more
information, visit www.honeywellintegrated.com.
Honeywell Integrated Systems Convergence White Paper
Convergence WP, rev. 1 – September 2007 © 2007 Honeywell International, Inc. All rights reserved.
8

About Honeywell
Honeywell International is a $34 billion diversified technology and manufacturing leader, serving
customers worldwide with aerospace products and services; control technologies for buildings,
homes and industry; automotive products; turbochargers; and specialty materials. Based in
Morris Township, N.J., Honeywell’s shares are traded on the New York, London and Chicago
Stock Exchanges. It is one of the 30 stocks that make up the Dow Jones Industrial Average and
is also a component of the Standard & Poor's 500 Index. For additional information, please visit
www.honeywell.com
.
About the Authors
Peter Fehl, Marketing and Business Development Leader
Peter Fehl leads marketing and business development for Honeywell’s Integrated Security
segment. In his current role he is responsible for driving business development opportunities
and strategic direction. Before he joined Honeywell, Mr. Fehl provided engineering consulting
services as part of an engineering firm in Atlanta, Georgia and worked as an engineer for Honda
of America. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engineering and an MBA
from the Georgia Institute of Technology and is Six Sigma Black Belt certified.

Sean Leonard, Strategic Marketing Manager
In his role as strategic marketing manager for Honeywell’s Video and Access Systems, Sean
Leonard is responsible for the strategic planning process, competitive analysis, market
intelligence, and business development. His background includes three years of experience in
strategy and marketing in various industries including security, building automation, and
aerospace. He has seven years of project management experience in the aerospace industry.
Sean received his Bachelor of Science degree in engineering from the University of Illinois at
Urbana-Champaign, his MBA from Vanderbilt University, and is Six Sigma Green Belt certified.








For more information: www.honeywellintegrated.com


Honeywell Security
Honeywell Integrated Security
135 W. Forest Hill Avenue
Oak Creek, WI 53154
800-323-4576

www.honeywell.com